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The William Harvey Research Institute - Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

2022

Hope for first blood test to detect deadly heart inflammation
24 November 2022

£50 blood test could improve diagnosis of myocarditis and help patients get lifesaving treatment earlier.

Nurse taking patient's blood pressure. New drug can successfully treat patients typically resistant to high blood pressure treatment
7 November 2022

A new drug called Baxdrostat has been shown to significantly reduce high blood pressure (hypertension) in patients who may not respond to current treatments for the condition, according to results from a phase II trial led jointly by a Queen Mary University of London researcher and colleagues at CinCor Pharma, USA.

Model of human heart.Model of a heart. Photo by Kenny Eliason on Unsplash. Large UK Biobank study finds COVID-19 infection is linked to subsequent poor cardiovascular health
2 November 2022

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London find that people requiring hospital admission due to COVID-19 have a high risk of subsequent cardiovascular problems.

Funding boost to help develop targeted healthcare for patients in east London
14 October 2022

Barts Health NHS Trust have received £20.9 million in funding from the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR), providing a major boost to their plans to tackle health inequalities and deliver pioneering, innovative healthcare to the people of east London and beyond.

Study of over 5 million people’s DNA reveals genetic links to height
12 October 2022

An international team of researchers, including experts from Queen Mary University of London and the GIANT consortium, have identified over 12,000 genetic variants that influence a person’s height.

Woman using lancet on finger for checking blood sugar level. Children and young adults with Down Syndrome four times more likely to have diabetes
4 October 2022

Children and young adults* with Down Syndrome are four times more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London and King’s College London.

Queen Mary researcher elected to join the committee of the British Society for Cardiovascular Research
3 October 2022

Congratulations to Dr Dunja Aksentijevic from Queen Mary University of London, who was recently elected to the committee of the British Society for Cardiovascular Research (BSCR).

Patient with doctor Healthcare workers more than three times as likely to have experienced burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic
27 September 2022

Healthcare professionals working during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic are up to 3.3-times more likely to be burned out compared to non-healthcare professionals, despite the rates of mental health issues being similar, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London.

GP taking a patient's blood pressure reading Two thirds of atrial fibrillation patients on dual-antithrombotic therapy are prescribed the medication for too long, increasing the risk of internal bleeding
15 September 2022

An observational study of people with the heart condition atrial fibrillation, published by a student of Queen Mary’s Wellcome Trust-funded PhD programme: Health Data in Practice, has found that almost 2 in 3 (65.9%) patients on dual-antithrombotic therapy (DAT) receive the treatment for more than 12 months. This is considered too long and puts the patient at increased risk of bleeding complications.

Professor Márta Korbonits Excellence in neuroendocrinology: Márta Korbonits receives the international Rolf Gaillard Prize
7 September 2022

Queen Mary University of London is pleased to announce that Professor Márta Korbonits has received the prestigious Rolf Gaillard Prize from the European Neuroendocrine Association (ENEA).

Annotation of an example ECG signal Researchers discover new genetic loci, pathways, therapeutic targets, and relationships with cardiovascular disease based on QT interval anomalies
6 September 2022

In a new study, published in Nature Communications, researchers from Queen Mary University of London have performed the largest multi-ancestry genetic analysis to date (>250,000 individuals), for markers derived from the electrocardiogram (ECG) that capture cardiac electrical activity in the heart ventricles.

T- wave morphology variations on the ECG signal could enable large-scale screening to predict SCD risk using smartwatches. Could T-wave morphology on a single-lead ECG heartbeat help to identify people at risk of sudden cardiac death?
30 August 2022

A joint collaboration involving researchers from Queen Mary University of London, University College London (UCL) and the University of Oulu has identified T-wave morphological variations (TMV), measured from a single beat single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), as a strong predictor of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in low- and high-risk populations. 

Could a short low-intensity stimulation of the ear lower blood pressure? World’s first trial begins recruitment
24 August 2022

Afferent Medical Solutions Ltd in collaboration with researchers from Queen Mary University of London are running a clinical trial to determine if its AffeX device can reduce blood pressure by delivering a low voltage current to the specific region of the ear on a periodic basis.

Prof Philipa Saunders (right) receiving the Iain MacIntyre Award for Excellence in Endocrinology from WHRI Director Prof Panos Deloukas (left). William Harvey Annual Research Review 2022
30 June 2022

After two years as an online event, the William Harvey Annual Research Review returned to Charterhouse Square on Monday 27th of July. 

New study reveals insights in the genetic architecture of right ventricular structure and function
14 June 2022

The study, published in Nature Genetics, provides the first large scale insight into the genetic basis for the function and structure of one of the most important parts of the heart, the right ventricle (RV). 

Daily beetroot juice could help people with common heart condition
9 June 2022

A regular glass of beetroot juice can reduce signs of inflammation in blood vessels that are known to be increased in people with coronary heart disease, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and presented at the British Cardiovascular Society conference in Manchester.

Obesity linked to damaging changes in failing hearts
9 June 2022

Obesity is linked to changes in the structure and pumping action of the heart before it develops heart failure, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and presented at the British Cardiovascular Society conference in Manchester.

New study links greater pericardial fat to poor cardiovascular health
6 June 2022

New research from Queen Mary University of London, published in the European Heart Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging, has shown that pericardial fat may have a role in driving structural and functional damage to the heart.

NOS2 and S-nitrosothiol signaling induces DNA hypomethylation and LINE-1 retrotransposon expression How chronic inflammation results in DNA damage and hypomethylation associated with cancer initiation
30 May 2022

A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London describes how chronic inflammation leads to altered, tumour-like epigenetic state and the re-expression of ancient, gene-editing retrotransposons that induce DNA damage.

New study shows genes can predict response to arthritis treatment and paves the way for future drug development
19 May 2022

New research from Queen Mary University of London, published in Nature Medicine, has shown that molecular profiling of the diseased joint tissue can significantly impact whether specific drug treatments will work to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients.

Image of man suffering with knee pain Queen Mary researcher awarded funding for research project which aims to develop safer drugs for autoimmune diseases
12 May 2022

Dr Trinidad Montero-Melendez from the William Harvey Research Institute has been awarded £72,633 from Versus Arthritis, The Lorna and Yuti Chernajovsky Biomedical Research Foundation and Connect Immune Research to develop new treatments to tackle the root of life-changing  autoimmune conditions.

Woman holds Covid-19 vaccine in hands. Credit: scaliger/iStock.com Unvaccinated individuals with heart problems up to 9 times more likely to die or suffer serious complications from COVID-19
4 May 2022

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have combined evidence from 110 previous Covid-19 studies and found that unvaccinated individuals who contract the virus when they already have high blood pressure, diabetes or major heart damage are up to nine times more likely to suffer serious outcomes - including death, lung failure, admission to intensive care and kidney problems.

Nurse taking patient's blood pressure. Scientists to trial world-first long-acting injection for high blood pressure
27 April 2022

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have been selected by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to create new networks aimed at transforming ageing research in the UK.

African doctors Queen Mary team awarded funding for research project to improve post-surgical outcomes in Africa
19 April 2022

A team of Queen Mary and African researchers have successfully secured almost £3 million in funding for a new research programme led by Queen Mary’s Professor Rupert Pearse and Professor Bruce Biccard from the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

laboratory glassware Queen Mary awarded funding for new healthy ageing networks
8 March 2022

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have been selected by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to create new networks aimed at transforming ageing research in the UK.

Mouse New research in mice suggests social interactions and a sense of belonging can boost our immune system
1 March 2022

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have found that socially housed mice have healthier immune systems than those who are socially isolated – who are more susceptible to longer term issues due to an altered immune system that comes from living alone.

Genomic analysis visualisation Whole genome sequencing robustly detects the most common inherited neurological diseases and is adopted by healthcare
16 February 2022

Scientists have found whole genome sequencing (WGS) can quickly and accurately detect the most common inherited neurological disorders – something previously thought to be impossible – with the results supporting the use of WGS as a standard diagnostic tool within routine clinical practice.

2022 International Day of Women and Girls in Science
11 February 2022

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science recognises and celebrates the critical role played by women but also aims to promote their full and equal access to participation in science and technology communities. 

This year we are showcasing the work of some of our inspiring female scientists and recent nominees of the SMD Women in Science Award. Here they tell about their research, what they are proud of, and any future plans for this research.

New study shows light-to-moderate coffee consumption is associated with health-benefits
10 February 2022

The study by Queen Mary University of London and the Budapest Semmelweis University has shown that having up to three cups of coffee a day has a protective effect on heart health. It also reduces the overall mortality rate and the risk of stroke. The results have recently been published in the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology.

Professor Sir Mark Caulfield appointed VP Health at Queen Mary and President-elect of the British Pharmacological Society
3 February 2022

The British Pharmacological Society has announced the appointment of Queen Mary University of London’s Professor Sir Mark Caulfield as its new President-elect.

Aspirin-helps-treat-tuberculous-meningitis Researchers investigate previously unappreciated mechanisms in the cancer protective actions of aspirin
3 February 2022

A new study involving researchers from Queen Mary University of London has identified a new role for Specialized Pro-Resolving Mediators in mediating the anti-cancer activities of aspirin. In this research Q&A, study author Professor Jesmond Dalli explains more.

Cartoon hand with magnifying glass in front of papers Comparing preprints and their finalized publications during the pandemic
2 February 2022

A new study involving Queen Mary University of London researchers has explored how preprints compare with their published versions. 

Blue pills. Credit: FotografiaBasica/iStock.com Optimising treatments for high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease could save lives, according to researchers
14 January 2022

A recent study shows that optimising medicines for high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease patients living in East London could reduce lifetime hospital costs and prevent cardiovascular events such as heart attacks and strokes.

Queen Mary alumnus thought to be the first woman of colour to complete a solo expedition across Antarctica
6 January 2022

Captain Preet Chandi, a Queen Mary University of London alumnus, travelled 700 miles in just 40 days, capping a remarkable achievement.

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