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School of Biological and Behavioural Sciences

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bumblebee by pink flower First-ever study shows bumble bees ‘play’
27 October 2022

Bumble bees play, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London published in Animal Behaviour. It is the first time that object play behaviour has been shown in an insect, adding to mounting evidence that bees may experience positive ‘feelings’. 

Children in a refugee camp Only 1 in 5 Syrian children in refugee camps show resilience to mental health problems
12 August 2022

Many more Syrian children living in refugee camps appear to be living with mental health problems than previously thought, according to new in-the-field research led by Queen Mary.  

A bumblebee visiting a pink flower Queen Mary research is changing the way we think about bees
5 August 2022

Hot on the heels of his new book ‘The Mind of a Bee’, Professor Lars Chittka’s lab shows that bumblebees appear to feel pain 

Macro Photography of Bee on a Plant The Mind of a Bee review: Can a bee have a form of consciousness?
14 July 2022

A radical new book from Professor Lars Chittka argues that a bee may have a mind of its own, awareness of the world, basic emotions and intelligence. It is a bold and brave claim – but is it true?

Colourful envelopes with crafts inside Entelechy Arts and Queen Mary University of London share new report on the impact of remote creative programmes on older adults.
14 July 2022

Identifying the art of well-being’ is the second and final report in this research partnership providing insights into the effects of remote creative programmes on older adults during the Covid-19 pandemic. Remote creative programmes were shown to have long-term benefits for older adults' social connection and well-being.

Chick Domestic chicks can master the abstract concept of “absence”
7 June 2022

New experimental findings, published in eLife by an international research group involving Szabó from Central European University, Dr Elisabetta Versace from Queen Mary and researchers at the University of Trieste and the University of Trento shows that young domestic chicks are able to master the idea of the absence of an object. In a nutshell, chicks care about “nothing”.

Group of staff and students chatting around posters Psychology department hosts successful workshop on Current Trends and Future Directions in Social Interaction
23 May 2022

The EPS-Funded Workshop on Current Trends and Future Directions in Social Interaction was held successfully on 4 May 2022 at the Graduate Centre at Queen Mary University of London. The event saw an excellent line-up of 8 speakers, 25 poster presentations and 60 attendees.

Couple speaking to therapist Relationship help programmes may be more successful for people who have ‘sensitivity’ genes
22 March 2022

Professor Michael Pluess from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Behavioural Sciences has co-written for The Conversation on how genetics impacts therapy and similar relationship courses.

Peston Lecture Theatre 25 strategic Lectureships/Senior Lectureships available in the Faculty of Science and Engineering
22 February 2022

The School of Biological and Behavioural Sciences (SBBS) is seeking candidates for several new academic positions to enhance its research in three strategic areas: Digital Environment, Biosciences, and Green Energy and Sustainability. The Faculty of Science and Engineering has 25 lectureships and senior lectureships (Teaching and Research) to offer, and it is expected that 7 of these will be placed in SBBS.

Couple speaking to therapist Genetic study suggests more sensitive people respond better to couple’s therapy
2 February 2022

How well someone responds to couple’s therapy could be determined by their genes, according to a new study led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Denver.

Shazia Jaufarally Student Spotlight - Shazia, BSc Psychology
17 December 2021

We spoke to Shazia to find out what she enjoys about studying BSc Psychology at Queen Mary and how she has found mixed-mode education 

Bee on yellow artificial flower Scientists discover gut bacteria that improve memory in bees
25 November 2021

An international research team have discovered a specific type of gut bacteria in bees that can improve memory.

Lars Chittka Queen Mary Professor elected to Germany’s National Academy of Sciences
8 November 2021

Professor Lars Chittka from Queen Mary University of London has been elected to the prestigious German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

man scratching his head in front of large white question mark To what extent are we ruled by unconscious forces?
28 May 2021

Dr Magda Osman, Reader in Experimental Psychology at Queen Mary University of London, provides her perspective on this question in an article for the Conversation's new series, Life’s Big Questions, co-published with BBC Future. 

Mental Health Awareness Week 2021, nature #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek: Improving our understanding of mental health, resilience and well-being
13 May 2021

For Mental Health Awareness Week, we’re taking a closer look at how researchers at Queen Mary University of London are undertaking to better understand mental health and potentially find new ways to treat mental health conditions.

Pile of fruit and vegetables Subsidies most effective way to encourage sustainable food choices, study shows
17 March 2021

Subsidising low carbon emission meals could encourage more people to choose them, according to new research. 

three female scientists Celebrating the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences' Women in Science
11 February 2021

Today is UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science, which aims to recognise women’s contributions in science, smash stereotypes and defeat discrimination against women and girls in science.

pink wristband on woman's arm with rather stylish matching nail polish Could a wristband or certificate allow you out of lockdown after a negative coronavirus test?
6 January 2021

Dr Magda Osman, Reader in Experimental Psychology at Queen Mary University of London has written an opinion piece for The Conversation exploring whether freedom passes based on negative test results could offer a way to avoid placing restrictions on everyone.

female ballerina stretching New project will explore use of digital technologies to support remote learning in performing arts
8 December 2020

A new research collaboration, led by Queen Mary University of London, will investigate how digital technologies could be used to support learning in performing arts during the Covid-19 pandemic.

lightbulb Nudges fail more often than is reported, experts warn
28 October 2020

Research led by Queen Mary University of London has shown that despite the widespread use of behavioural interventions across society, failed interventions are surprisingly common.

Tortoise hatchling looking at face like shape Tortoise hatchlings are attracted to faces from birth
14 September 2020

Tortoises are born with a natural preference for faces, according to new research from scientists at Queen Mary University of London, the University of Trento and the Fondazione Museo Civico Rovereto. 

Dr Robert Keers A tribute to Dr Robert Keers
19 August 2020

Here are a few memories of a very special scientist, colleague and friend, Dr Robert Keers. 

Nurse holds swab for coronavirus test. Coronavirus: Queen Mary study suggests more people have had it than previously estimated
26 June 2020

Queen Mary researchers Professor Norman Fenton, Professor Martin Neil and Dr Scott Mclachlan from the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, and Dr Magda Osman, from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, co-wrote an opinion piece for The Conversation on over-confidence in the reporting of Covid-19 statistics. 

Person typing Researchers launch new website for people to test their sensitivity
25 June 2020

Studies have shown that some people seem more sensitive than others. Now researchers have developed a free online questionnaire that allows you to test exactly how sensitive you are.

DNA Study in twins finds our sensitivity is partly in our genes
3 June 2020

Some people are more sensitive than others – and around half of these differences can be attributed to our genes, new research has found.

thumbs up People more likely to accept nudges if they know how they work and how effective they are
1 June 2020

The more people know about when and why behavioural interventions are being used and their effectiveness, the more likely they are to accept their use to change their behaviour, according to recent research from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Oxford.

boy using phone Psychologists from Queen Mary University of London have created a free online resource for mental health services now looking to deliver psychological therapy to children remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic.
21 April 2020

Psychologists from Queen Mary University of London have created a free online resource for mental health services now looking to deliver psychological therapy to children remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic.

fruit fly Genes and social environment affect individual but not population preferences for right or left sided behaviour: lessons/insights from fruit flies
3 April 2020

Being alone or with a partner strongly affects the behaviour of fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. The presence of a partner changes the front-back position in a pair and induces more extreme biases towards the right or the left side. However, the presence of a partner does not increase the alignment of the whole population on a specific side, a new study has found.

Heat-map of coronavirus in the UK Coronavirus: country comparisons are pointless unless we account for these biases in testing
2 April 2020

Dr Magda Osman, Reader in Experimental Psychology, with the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, and Professor Norman Fenton, Professor of Computer Science, Professor Martin Neil, Professor of Computer Science and Statistics, and Mr Scott Mclachlan, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, with the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, co-wrote an opinion piece for The Conversation, about the flaws in comparing countries on coronavirus.

A lit cigarette Screening of zebrafish identifies gene involved in human nicotine addiction
30 March 2020

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have shown that zebrafish can provide genetic clues to smoking, a complex human behaviour 

Students sitting exams Don’t worry about cancelled exams – research shows we should switch to teacher assessment permanently
27 March 2020

Dr Margherita Malanchini, Lecturer in Psychology, with the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, co-wrote an opinion piece for The Conversation, about the positive evidence supporting a switch from exams to teacher assessments permanently.

bee, bumblebee, psychology, research, university, study, experiment Bumblebees can experience an object using one sense and later recognise it using another
2 March 2020

How are we able to find things in the dark? And how can we imagine how something feels just by looking at it?

Post-it notes of goals Psychologists discover secret to achieving goals
24 February 2020

Research led by scientists at Queen Mary University of London has provided new insights into why people often make unrealistic plans that are doomed to fail

Solitary female bee selecting their nest Smart single mother bees learn from their neighbours
31 January 2020

Solitary female bees inspect other nests for signs of danger before making decisions on where to build their own, a new London-based study suggests.

Gwyneth Paltrow's alternative 'health treatments' exposed in new music video by Queen Mary Biologist
23 January 2020

SBCS's Rock n roll biologist Professor Lars Chittka has released a new music video which takes aim at the alternative ‘health treatments’ of Gwyneth Paltrow. 

Attendees at NCFR 2019 Student Blog - Rebecca Oldroyd
19 December 2019

Rebecca Oldroyd recently presented at the National Council on Family Relations in Fortworth, Texas, after winning their competitive international travel section award. The 2nd year Psychology PhD student discussed some of her research findings on how transitions in family structure effect the health of children, her future research plans and the positive impact of her supportive supervisor.

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