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School of Law

Alumni profile - Rida Hussain

What I love about MYH is that it gives the Muslim youth the opportunity to receive judgment-free advice on issues they may face.  The fact that the helpline is confidential helps to empower younger Muslims in getting the help that they would perhaps otherwise not be comfortable seeking. For this reason I see MYH as providing an essential service to our community and am honoured to be part of such an amazing organisation. 

(Law LLB, 2018)

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Why did you study Law at Queen Mary? What sparked your interest in this field? 

I decided to study Law because it is part of the fundamental framework of the society that we currently live in. Although its primary purpose is to maintain the rules of society, the law influences all aspects of our lives - be they social, political or economic. Pursuing a degree in Law would allow me to develop a multitude of skills such as problem-solving; research; critical thinking, whilst also equipping me with a solid understanding of the environment we currently live in. I chose Queen Mary because of the great reputation of the School of Law; the positive interaction I had with students and professors during the open day and offer-holders day; and the fact that it offered a campus experience in London.

For me, Islamophobia Awareness Month is the chance to acknowledge the effect of an increasingly polarised world on the Muslim community. Raising awareness should, hopefully, force us all to confront and challenge the unconscious bias we adopt due to the way in which the media and certain groups portray Muslims.

Could you give an overview of your career to date, and what your role at Credit Agricole?

I joined CACIB as an intern soon after I finished my degree in July 2018. My internship was within the Compliance & Financial Security Department, and was a great opportunity to understand the importance of both law and regulation within the financial services industry. I specifically sat within the Central Compliance team, and was then offered a permanent position as an Associate. During my time as an Associate, I was responsible for supporting the Branch throughout Brexit across various workstreams; responding to regulatory requests for information; implementation of the UK regulatory conduct regime; and the London Compliance department's control framework. Following a successful two and a half years as an Associate, I became Head of Central Compliance in July 2021. 

Could you tell me about your work with the Muslim Youth Helpline? What motivated you to do this?

I joined the Muslim Youth Helpline as a Trustee in April 2021. My current role is focussed on ensuring that there is the correct level of governance and control within the organisation to ensure that we are meeting our legal responsibilities and obligations. As a Muslim I believe that it is extremely important to use your skills and resources to feed back into your community and help those that you can. Whilst donating money to charity is an important way of doing this, donating your time and attention is personally much more rewarding. Having focussed on my career for nearly 3 years, I felt I was ready to get involved in a progressive Muslim organisation with values that aligned with my own, so when I saw the role for Trustee at MYH advertised I applied straight away. What I love about MYH is that it gives the Muslim youth the opportunity to receive judgment-free advice on issues they may face.  The fact that the helpline is confidential helps to empower younger Muslims in getting the help that they would perhaps otherwise not be comfortable seeking. For this reason I see MYH as providing an essential service to our community and am honoured to be part of such an amazing organisation. 

What does Islamophobia Awareness Month mean to you? 

For me, Islamophobia Awareness Month is the chance to acknowledge the effect of an increasingly polarised world on the Muslim community. Raising awareness should, hopefully, force us all to confront and challenge the unconscious bias we adopt due to the way in which the media and certain groups portray Muslims.

What was special about your time at Queen Mary? Can you give one or two examples of your most memorable moments?

My time at QM was special because of the friends I made there - from late nights studying to understand complex legal concepts and making essay plans, to attempting to try every Halal restaurant on Mile End Road. I made friends for life and I wouldn't change it for the world!

This profile was conducted by Alumni Engagement Coordinator, Hannah Dormor. If you would like to get in touch with Rida or engage her in your work, please contact Hannah at h.dormor@qmul.ac.uk. 

 

 

 

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