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School of Law

Alumni profile - Kamran Khan

No one day as a pupil barrister is ever the same. Each case has its own nuances, and the job requires you to absorb a large volume of information in a short space of time and be able to apply it in your client’s best interests.

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What does working as a Pupil Barrister look like on a day-to-day basis? What made you choose your current role?

No one day as a pupil barrister is ever the same. Each case has its own nuances, and the job requires you to absorb a large volume of information in a short space of time and be able to apply it in your client’s best interests. My current practice includes a variety of civil trials and applications.

I am very fortunate to be undergoing my training at Farrar’s Building as I have been able to gain a wide range of experience in a number of subject areas, including personal injury, insurance and credit hire law.

I chose a career at the Bar because it constitutes an ideal blend of intellectual rigour, advocacy and client care.

Can you tell me about a key turning point in your career?

A key turning point in my career was reaching the final of Middle Temple’s Rosamund Smith Mooting Competition. I consider this a significant achievement because of the competition’s history and the calibre of the competitors. It was a real honour to stand before an all-Supreme Court panel of Lord Carnwath, Lord Hodge and Lord Lloyd-Jones and showcase my advocacy skills.

How did your time studying Law at Queen Mary equip you for life after university?

Studying Law at Queen Mary was transformative. The quality of teaching meant that I was able to constantly challenge myself and ensure that I finished my degree confident in my ability to grapple with all types of legal concepts. Even today, I deal with some of the foundational concepts I learned from my contract law, employment law and tort law modules.

Why did you choose your degree subject? Why did you choose Queen Mary?

Choosing to study Law at Queen Mary was a no brainer for me. Combined with the School of Law’s excellent reputation and the engagement of the student body, my time at Queen Mary allowed me to learn from and network with the best simultaneously.

What’s a piece of advice that changed your perspective?

“The worst they can say to you is ‘no’”.

What advice would you give a current student or recent graduate considering their career options?

Think very carefully about the career path you want to embark upon. The job market for young professionals is often quite saturated – there will be plenty of rejections along the way, but it is important to remain resilient in pursuit of your goals.

What was the most memorable thing about your time at Queen Mary?

This is where I met my wonderful wife, a fellow Queen Mary Law graduate!

Do you have any role models that you look up to, in or out of your field?

As a British Asian individual, I am conscious of issues surrounding diversity at the Bar. Over the years I have taken inspiration from Her Honour Judge Sapnara, the first British-Bangladeshi person appointed to the judiciary in England and Wales. Her story is inspiring, highlighting the adversity she faced along the way. Ultimately, it shows that anything can be achieved if you put your mind to it.