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The William Harvey Research Institute - Barts and The London

Latest news

 

First nationwide study reveals millions of cancelled operations due to COVID-19 and high risk of death
18 June 2021

HospitalThe first nationwide study of the impact of COVID-19 on surgery at NHS hospitals has revealed that more than 1.5 million operations were cancelled or postponed during the pandemic and surgical patients who became infected with COVID were five times more likely to die.

Portrait photo of Dr Zahra Raisi-Estabargh

Dr Zahra-Raisi-Estabragh wins prestigious Royal Society of Medicine Presidents Gold Medal in Cardiology
18 June 2021

Congratulations to Dr Zahra Raisi-Estabragh who was recently awarded the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM) President’s Gold Medal in Cardiology in recognition of her work developing cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) radiomics as a novel imaging biomarker.

Heart rate smart watch

Could your smart watch alert you to risk of sudden death?
8 June 2021

Scientists develop a new algorithm that could allow wearable technology to warn those at risk of dangerous heart rhythm changes.


Renal denervation system Procedure using ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure
7 June 2021 

A minimally-invasive procedure that targets the nerves near the kidney has been found to significantly reduce blood pressure in hypertension patients, according to the results of a global multicentre clinical trial led in the UK by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust.


Ramadan fasting: recommendations for people with cardiovascular disease
17 May 2021 

A new publication led by cardiologists and researchers at the Barts Heart Centre and Queen Mary University of London has developed a framework for triaging and where possible, facilitating safe fasting in patients with cardiovascular disease.

HeartHaving a healthy heart is associated with better problem solving and reaction time 
14 May 2021 

People with healthier heart structure and function appear to have better cognitive abilities, including increased capacity to solve logic problems and faster reaction times, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London and the Radcliffe Department of Medicine at University of Oxford.

New joint study applies pharmacogenetics to a novel therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis
13 May 2021 

This new study, led by Dr Trinidad Montero-Melendez will investigate how genetic variations in a gene called melanocortin 1 receptor, MC1R, affects the anti-arthritic property of a novel drug called AP1189.

Professor Munroe elected to prestigious fellowship
13 May 2021 

Congratulations to Professor Patricia Munroe who has been elected to the highly prestigious Academy of Medical Sciences Fellowship.

A brain scanScientists uncover secret of the hunger switch in the brain
15 April 2021 

A 3D structure reveals how a unique molecular switch in our brain causes us to feel full – and may help develop improved anti-obesity drugs.

How preprints accelerated science communication during the pandemic
8 April 2021 

A new study led by Queen Mary University of London researchers has found that during the early phase of the pandemic, approximately 35 per cent of the COVID-19 scientific literature was shared as preprints – freely available manuscripts that are shared prior to peer-review in a journal.

Call for cardiovascular scientists to contribute data to multinational platform
6 April 2021 

The first international platform for sharing cardiovascular data has been launched by euCanSHare, an EU-Canada funded project. Cardiovascular researchers are encouraged to use the platform to browse, deposit and analyse data.

New genetic clues point to new treatments for 'silent' stroke
26 March 2021 

£54-million-award-to-transform-health-through-data-scienceScientists from Queen Mary University of London have helped identify new genetic clues in people who’ve had small and often apparently ‘silent’ strokes that are difficult to treat and a major cause of vascular dementia.

WHRI Research funding success
19 March 2021 

In the past few months, the William Harvey Research Institute at Queen Mary University of London has seen major funding success in the areas of endocrine and inflammation research.

Why the Dutch are the tallest people in the world
16 March 2021 

Dr Eirini Marouli, Lecturer in Computational Biology at Queen Mary University of London, was interviewed by the BBC for the development of a BBC Reel on the genetics of adult height.

Schools reopening without robust COVID-19 mitigation risks accelerating the pandemic
10 March 2021 

Illustration of a group social distancing A group of academics have set out a series of recommendations for schools to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission now that they have re-opened, in a letter published in The Lancet.

Having an unhealthy heart could lead to a higher risk of being diagnosed with COVID-19
9 March 2021 

HeartPeople with unhealthy heart structures and poorer functioning hearts have a significantly higher risk of being diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, according to research by Queen Mary University of London, in collaboration with the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (The University of Southampton).

WHRI academic wins prestigious Wellcome Trust Career Re-Entry fellowship for research into Type 2 diabetes 
25 January 2021 

Dr Dunja Aksentijevic awarded £630,000 for examining immunometabolic cross-talk in the inflamed type 2 diabetic heart.

Rituximab versus tocilizumab in anti-TNF inadequate responder patients with rheumatoid arthritis (R4RA): outcomes of a stratified, biopsy-driven, multicentre, RCT
22 January 2021 

Professor Costantino PitzalisA new study published today in The Lancet is the first stratified, biopsy-driven, multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial that takes the first steps in the integration of molecular pathology into treatment decision making in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

In this Q&A Professor Costantino Pitzalis from the Centre for Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology at Queen Mary's William Harvey Research Institute explains why the R4RA trial represents the first step towards precision medicine.

Patients from Asian and black backgrounds are more likely to die from COVID-19, large study reveals
22 January 2021 

HospitalPatients of Asian and black backgrounds suffered disproportionate rates of premature death from COVID-19, according to a study of 1,737 patients by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust.

WHRI New Year PhD Symposium
21 January 2021 

Join us on Wednesday 27th January from 1.00 pm as we celebrate the new year with our annual PhD Symposium. This years programme features excellent talks from our 3rd year PhD students and a keynote lecture on 'Adaptive immunity and immune memory to COVID-19' by Prof Shane Crotty from La Jolla Institute, USA

Herd immunity is not an option
15 January 2021 

Illustration of a group social distancing In an article, published today in Science, Dr Deepti Gurdasani from Queen Mary University of London and Devi Sridhar from the University of Edinburgh explain why herd immunity by infection is not a strategy that should be considered COVID-19.

Genes could be key to new Covid-19 treatments, study finds
14 December 2020

£54-million-award-to-transform-health-through-data-sciencePotential treatments for Covid-19 have been identified after the discovery of five genes associated with the most severe form of the disease, in research involving Queen Mary academics.

No deal Brexit could have detrimental impact for four million people in UK living with a rare disease
12 December 2020

UK, EU, ParlimentExperts have warned that a ‘no deal’ Brexit will result in the exclusion of the UK from the 24 European Reference Networks (ERNs) that were established to improve the care of patients bearing the lifelong burden of a rare disease, which require highly specialised diagnosis and treatment.

Queen Mary researcher elected as President of prestigious cardiology association
11 December 2020

Professor Steffen PetersenSteffen Petersen, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Queen Mary University of London, has been elected as President of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

Pharmacology success for the WHRI at the Queen Mary Education Excellence Awards and President and Principal’s prize 2020
10 December 2020

We are pleased to announce that Dr Sadani Cooray from the William Harvey Research Institute (WHRI) was recognised for her outstanding contribution to pharmacology education at an online ceremony held on Tuesday 8th December.

Q&A: Repeatability of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Radiomics: A Multi-Centre Multi-Vendor Test-Retest Study
2 December 2020

Portrait photo of Dr Zahra Raisi-EstabarghA new collaborative study involving researchers at Queen Mary University of London investigates a new image analysis toolkit for MRI scans. In this Q&A Dr Zahra Raisi-Estabragh explains how Radiomics analysis can help us to better diagnose heart disease.

The Effect of Blood Lipids on the Left Ventricle: A Mendelian Randomization Study
18 November 2020

A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London demonstrates that bad cholesterol has a direct causal effect in inducing heart disease.

Causal Inference for Genetic Obesity, Cardiometabolic Profile and COVID-19 Susceptibility: A Mendelian Randomization Study
13 November 2020

A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London uses a novel approach to investigate the effects of cardiovascular risk factors on the risk of COVID-19 infection.

The UK needs a sustainable strategy for COVID-19
10 November 2020

Groups of people social distancing in the park.As the UK’s second lockdown gets underway, a group of 79 researchers, public health professionals, and healthcare workers are calling for a sustainable public health strategy for COVID-19.

New research predicts whether rheumatoid arthritis patients will respond to treatment
27 October 2020

Rheumatoid arthritis of knee A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London provides potential novel biomarkers for predicting patient responsiveness to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs).

Herd immunity in COVID-19 control is a ‘dangerous fallacy’, say authors of open letter
15 October 2020

Illustration of a group social distancing A group of 80 researchers say that a so-called ‘herd immunity’ approach to managing COVID-19 by allowing immunity to develop in low-risk populations is “a dangerous fallacy unsupported by the scientific evidence”.

Queen Mary researcher recognised in the Queen's Birthday honours
12 October 2020

Charles Knight, Professor of Cardiology at Queen Mary University of London and Chief Executive of St Bartholomew’s Hospital, has received an OBE for services to the NHS and people with heart disease in the Queen’s birthday honours.

Poor bone quality is linked to poor heart health
25 September 2020

New research by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Southampton’s Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (MRC LEU) has found associations between lower bone mineral density and worse cardiovascular health in both men and women.

Researcher awarded prestigious cardiology prize for MRI discovery
22 September 2020

Dr Nay Aung, an academic clinical lecturer at Queen Mary University of London, has been awarded the Royal Society of Medicine President’s prize for best cardiology PhD project.

 

New Paper Published on the use of Tetrandrine as a Potential Therapeutic Agent for COVID-19
22 September 2020

Illustration of a group social distancing Dr Robin. N. Poston from the Centre for Microvascular Research at the William Harvey Research Institute has recently published a new review paper concerning a potential treatment for COVID-19. The work he co-authored with Dr Paula Heister from University of Cambridge was included in the Journal of Pharmacological Research and Perspectives.

ROR2 blockade as a therapy for osteoarthritis
17 September 2020

In a new study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a prototype drug that can heal cartilage and simultaneously help with pain. In this research Q&A Dr Anne-Sophie Thorup from the Centre for Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology explains why the findings are significant.

Specialist centres hold key to keeping heart attack victims alive, major study shows
4 September 2020

A trial led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health researchers looking at the effect of stem cell therapy in treating heart attack patients has revealed the importance of specialist centres to extending life.

New molecule repairs cartilage and relieves symptoms of osteoarthritis
3 September 2020

A newly discovered molecule has been found to provide long-lasting regeneration of bone and cartilage defects, as well as symptom relief, and could potentially play a role in treating osteoarthritis, according to early research in animals led by Queen Mary University of London.

Architecture of the heart different between women and men and with age
1 September 2020

Differences in the shape and texture of men and women’s hearts could potentially explain why their risk of heart disease differs, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.

Intracellular sodium elevation reprograms cardiac metabolism
28 August 2020

A new BHF funded study published in Nature Communications provides new insights into the mechanisms of heart failure and identifies potential novel therapeutic targets

WHRI COVID Diaries - Q&A with Dr Vanessa Lowe
25 August 2020

In this Q&A WHRI researcher Vanessa Lowe shares her experience of helping with COVID-19 testing at the UK Biocentre in Milton Keynes. 

 

Volunteers needed: The impact of dietary inorganic nitrate on skin inflammation 
25 August 2020

The William Harvey Heart Centre is recruiting healthy male volunteers aged 18-45 for a clinical study investigating the potential role of inorganic nitrate (in the form of beetroot juice) on skin inflammation.

 

Cheap diabetes drug may reverse blood vessel damage and prevent multi-organ failure
22 July 2020

Metformine prescription pills with identification numbers on blue backgroundA BHF funded study involving researchers from Queen Mary University of London has found that metformin-a cheap drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes- could be used to stop blood vessels from leaking and reverse the damage caused during sepsis and multi-organ failure.

100% student satisfaction for BSC Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics - National Student Survey
21 July 2020

The BSc Pharmacology & Innovative Therapeutics degree programme led by Dr Sadani Cooray at the William Harvey Research Institute at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry has topped the national leader board for student satisfaction for Pharmacology in the 2020 National Student Survey (NSS).

Queen Mary BHF Accelerator Award enables Covid-19 research 
16 July 2020

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has allowed and encouraged institutions that hold Accelerator Awards (AA) to allocate currently uncommitted funds from their award to supporting Covid-19 research, at the discretion of the award director.

Success at the first-ever online WHRI Annual Review
3 July 2020

The first virtual William Harvey Annual review took place on Wednesday 24th June 2020 on Microsoft Teams. The programme included the John Vane Award Lecture, selected talks from WHRI researchers and online poster sessions.

Higher rates of severe COVID-19 in BAME populations unexplained
19 June 2020

HospitalHigher rates of severe COVID-19 infections in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) populations are not explained by socioeconomic by socioeconomic or behavioral factors, cardiovascular disease risk, or by vitamin D status, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London.

Queen Mary academics win national award recognising exceptional contribution to pharmacology education
15 June 2020

Rang Prize logoDr Sadani Cooray and Professor Nick Goulding from Queen Mary University of London have been jointly awarded the Rang Prize 2020 by the British Pharmacological Society.

Antihistamines and similar drugs could slow down Huntington's disease
9 June 2020

Controlling dopamine signalling by targeting the histamine receptor has been shown to be a promising strategy for preventing the progression of Huntingdon's disease in mice. 

Scientists discover more than 200 genetic factors causing heart arrhythmias
21 May 2020

Hundreds of new links have been found between people's DNA and the heart's electrical activity, according to a study of almost 300,000 people led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. 

Thyroid function affects the risk of stroke via atrial fibrillation: a Mendelian Randomization study
14 May 2020

Heart attackIn a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism researchers investigate whether genetically determined variation in normal-range thyroid function is causally associated with the risk of stroke and Coronary Artery Disease, and then interrogated via which pathways any confirmed relations may be mediated. 

Discovery of New Genes Modulating the Tpe Interval: an Electrocardiographic risk marker for Sudden Cardiac Death 
7 May 2020

Thirty-eight new gene regions that influence the Tpe interval, an electrocardiographic marker associated with susceptibility to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, have been discovered in the largest genetic study to date. 

Predicted Benign and Synonymous variants in VYP11A1 Cause Primary Adrenal Insufficiency Through Missplicing
1 May 2020

A joint international study led by researchers at QMUL explores how variants that might be overlooked in standard analyses can be pathogenic when combined with much rarer disruptive changes.

The uncertainties in modelling the COVID-19 pandemic
1 May 2020

Dr Deepti Gurdasani from Queen Mary’s William Harvey Research Institute and Hisham Ziauddeen from University of Cambridge are co-authors of a correspondence piece in The Lancet Global Health which suggests there were limitations in some assumptions used in the COVID-19 pandemic models forming part of the scientific evidence considered by the UK Government. In this blog post, they explain the importance of real-world evidence being used alongside modelling to develop public health responses.

Researchers use magnetism to keep drugs at disease sites
29 April 2020

New research from Queen Mary University of London suggests that a novel magnetism-based drug delivery approach could help ensure drugs are not removed from where they are needed in the body.

Inside the lab testing thousands of NHS samples for COVID-19
28 April 2020

Queen Mary University of London has been providing support to the UK Lighthouse Labs Network – the national COVID-19 diagnostic lab network. As well as donating a number of laboratory machines, a team of research staff have been seconded to help test thousands of samples from NHS workers every day.

Dr Neil Dufton, Lecturer in Inflammatory Sciences at Queen Mary’s William Harvey Research Institute, has been volunteering at one of the Lighthouse Labs in Milton Keynes and shares his experiences in this blog post.

OCD Antibodies could provide new treatment for OCD
21 April 2020

Mental health conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder could be treated in a new way using drugs that target the immune system, research suggests.

Queen Mary and Barts Health launch Covid-19 research programme
20 April 2020

Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust, as part of their Barts Life Sciences initiative, have begun a new programme of Covid-19 research across Barts Health hospitals, including NHS Nightingale Hospital London.

Queen Mary professor to lead new NHS Nightingale Hospital
8 April 2020

Charles Knight, Professor of Cardiology at Queen Mary University of London and Consultant Cardiologist at Barts Health NHS Trust, has been announced as the Chief Executive of the new NHS Nightingale Hospital London. 

QMUL hosts Precision Medicine Leadership event showcasing developments from academia and industry
8 April 2020

On 5
th March 2020, Queen Mary University of London hosted a successful Precision Medicine Leadership event at St Bartholomew’s Great Hall. The event, run in partnership with One Nucleus & Cerba Research, explored new developments in the field of Precision Medicine as well as opportunities for academic/industrial collaboration.

New paper: Sestrins induce natural killer function in senescent-like CD8+ T Cells
7 April 2020 

In a new joint study, published in Nature Immunology, researchers have found that ‘aged’ T cells are not a defective end-stage population but are reprogrammed to recognize and kill NK receptors, a process regulated by sestrins

Diabetes drug reduces complications of long-term steroid therapyMan holding steroids
26 February 2020

A drug used to treat type 2 diabetes could offer a simple and cheap solution to reduce dangerous side effects of steroid treatment, new research from Queen Mary University of London suggests. 

Heart attackWorld first in AI helps predict heart attacks and stroke
14 February 2020

Artificial intelligence has been used for the first time to instantly and accurately measure blood flow, in a new study involving researchers from Queen Mary University of London.

International team delivers research breakthrough for leading cause of blindness
7 February 2020

Researchers have identified a new protein linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that could offer new hope for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, which affects over 1.5 million people in the UK alone.

Arthritic mice were treated with either BMS or control salineQMUL study identifies a distinct way to control joint inflammation and arthritis
6 February 2020

In a new study, published in the journal Nature Communications, researchers from Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry at Queen Mary University of London observe that the promotion of synovial fibroblast senescence activates tissue protective mechanisms in the arthritic joint. 

QMUL Professor in Endocrinology elected to the Hungarian Academy of Medical Sciences
5 February 2020

Professor Márta Korbonits from the William Harvey Research Institute at Queen Mary University of London has been elected to the Hungarian Academy of Medical Sciences.  

Pinpointing rare disease mutations
31 January 2020

A new study from Queen Mary University of London and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute has uncovered the genes essential for supporting life, which could help researchers to identify mutations responsible for rare childhood diseases. 

Researchers identify possible link between cannabis use and structural changes to heart
19 December 2019

Regular cannabis use could affect the structure and function of the heart, research led by Queen Mary University of London suggests.

Success for the WHRI at the Queen Mary Education Excellence Awards and President and Principal's Prize
13 December 2019

We are pleased to announce that Dr Parjam Zolfaghari, Professor Nick Goulding and Dr Martin Carrier from Queen Mary’s William Harvey Research Institute (WHRI) were one of several winners at the Queen Mary Education Excellence Award and President and Principal's Prizes for 2019/20.

Researchers look behind the biological curtain on how fish oil might fight inflammatory disease
13 December 2019

The debate about the potential for exploiting omega-3 fatty acids to improve health has raged for years.

Cardiovascular Genomics Professor among most highly cited researchers
26 November 2019

The William Harvey Research Institute is proud to announce that Panos Deloukas, Professor of Cardiovascular Genomics, has been named in the top 0.1% of the world’s most influential researchers.

WHRI Emeritus Professor awarded Faculty of Intensive Care Gold Medal 
8 November 2019

Professor Charles Hinds recognised for his exceptional contribution to intensive care medicine.