School of History

THE ANNUAL NICOLAI RUBINSTEIN LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY - "WHAT'S THE BIG IDEA? INTELLECTUAL HISTORY AND THE LONGUE DURE." DAVID ARMITAGE (HARVARD UNIVERSITY)

29 March 2012

Time: 1:00am

The School of History at Queen Mary, University of London is pleased to announce

The Annual Nicolai Rubinstein Lecture in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

David Armitage, Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History, Harvard University

will speak on

'What's the Big Idea? Intellectual History and the Longue Dure'


Newton by William Blake

The Nicolai Rubinstein Lecture in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History is an annual memorial lecture held in honour of the distinguished Renaissance scholar and former Queen Mary colleague, Nicolai Rubinstein. Having fled Nazi persecution in the 1930s, Rubinstein was appointed to a lectureship at Westfield College, University of London (later merged with Queen Mary) in 1945, and retired as Professor in 1978. He was the leading authority on the government of Florence under the Medici, and a renowned expert in the art, architecture and political thought of Renaissance Italy. This lecture series, inaugurated in 2007, celebrates his contribution to intellectual history".

Previous lecturers can be found here.

Professor David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University and an Honorary Professor of History at the University of Sydney. He is the author of numerous award-winning books, co-editor of the Cambridge University Press series Ideas in Context, a member of the Board of Syndics of Harvard University Press and a member of the Steering Committee of the Center for the History of British Political Thought at the Folger Shakespeare Library. In 2006, the National Maritime Museum in London awarded him its Caird Medal for conspicuously important work ... of a nature that involves communicating with the public and in 2008 Harvard named him a Walter Channing Cabot Fellow for achievements and scholarly eminence in the fields of literature, history or art.