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Module directory 2024-25

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2024-25. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, keywords, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the Module Development page.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescriptionSubjectAvailable to
Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY211Semester 15No

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paraskevi Argyriou

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the C1C8 programme. This module builds upon themes developed in level 4 psychology modules and considers specific cognitive functions and properties of the human mind. The material covered will include traditional cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neuropsychology (the understanding of normal cognitive processes through unique case studies of human brain damage). Cognitive functions examined will include visual, object and spatial perception, psychophysics, memory processes, complex reasoning, language, face processing and the relationship between emotion and these processes. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45% In-class test
  • Item 2: 5% Portfolio
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Psychology
Introduction to International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL106ASemester 14Yes

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Cristina Juverdeanu

Description: This module provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Specifically, we focus on four main themes that will allow you to grasp the complexities of the contemporary global order: capitalism, (post)colonialism, security, and development. You will also become acquainted with the analytical tools that are needed to think critically about international relations through these themes: a historical sensibility (i.e. how situations have elements of both continuity and change), an understanding of political-economy (i.e. why the economy is political), an understanding of the security-development nexus (i.e. how the quest for security - freedom from fear -and development - freedom from want -are contentiously linked), and the importance of resistance and "situated knowledges" (i.e. your understanding of international relations might be different depending on where and how you are situated in the world). Empirically, we will explore the Cold War and the post-Cold War global orders - their similarities and differences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Individual Review
  • Item 2: 80% Portfolio
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202ASemester 14Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4202
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have native or near-native proficiency in russian

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Russian
Social PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY726PSemester 17No

Social Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janelle Jones

Description: Have you ever wondered what influences our perceptions, emotions, thoughts, and behaviours? This module in Social Psychology will allow you to engage with the classic and contemporary scientific theories and methods used to address how other people and different contexts can shape these processes. Topics covered will include the self, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, social influence, group processes, and stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Assignment (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
Individual DifferencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY233Semester 25No

Individual Differences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY100 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a central area of psychology known variously as "individual differences" or "differential psychology". We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules that show substantial individual differences including personality, psychopathology, intelligence and cognition. We will then explore the proposed causes and effects of these individual differences drawing from research using approaches from psycho-dynamics to behavioral genetics. Finally, we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in individual differences including the continuum between personality and mental heath, the nature vs nurture debate, race differences in intelligence and genetic determinism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% E-Poster Assignment
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Psychology
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202BSemester 24Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4202
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have native or near-native proficiency in russian

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Russian
Individual DifferencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY725PSemester 27No

Individual Differences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katarzyna Kostyrka-Allchorne

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a central area of psychology known variously as 'individual differences' or 'differential psychology'. We will build on several key areas of psychology that show substantial individual differences including personality, psychopathology, intelligence, and cognition. We will then explore the proposed causes and effects of these individual differences drawing from research using approaches from psycho-dynamics to behavioral genetics. Finally, we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in individual differences including the continuum
between personality and mental heath, the nature vs nurture debate, race differences in intelligence and genetic determinism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Research Lab Report and Poster
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
US PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL254Semester 15Yes

US Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Johnson

Description: The United States remains an important actor in the world and understanding its politics is vital both in comparison to other political systems and in terms of how its own political outcomes emerge. The module provides a comprehensive overview of US politics, starting from its foundations in the Constitution, through the core institutions of US government, and the political process itself. The module covers rival perspectives on understanding US politics and government, as well as core thematic areas such as political culture, informal actors in the political system, the influence of ideas, foreign policy, and an understanding of race, class and gender in US politics and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Essay
  • Item 2: 40% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Developmental PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY724PSemester 27No

Developmental Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bosiljka Milosavljevic

Description: This module surveys developmental psychology, covering human development across the whole life span but with a more detailed focus on development in the early years (infancy/childhood). The aim of the module is to introduce the key questions, theories, concepts, methodology, studies and research findings within developmental psychology, regarding different domains of psychological functioning including social, emotional, cognitive, cultural and behavioural development. The module will also cover the prenatal period, physical, motor, and sensory development, learning theory, moral development, and development of the self (identity). Where appropriate we will focus on the roles of culture and/or geography in development as well as considering novel stressors that can affect associated processes (e.g., war, displacement).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Report (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
Nature, Nurture and Mental HealthBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY333Semester 16No

Nature, Nurture and Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Margherita Malanchini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY117 and take PSY121 and take PSY233 and take PSY253

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a new, rapidly evolving, and often controversial area, of psychology and psychiatry. We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules including social, biological and abnormal psychology to explore how genetic and environmental factors come together to cause mental illnesses such as major depression, schizophrenia and autism. Drawing on the most recent research from quantitative and molecular genetics we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in the field including the continuum between traits and disorders, the nature vs nurture debate, genetic determinism and the ethical implications of genetic research of mental illness.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Psychology
British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243ASemester 15Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Strong

Description: This module offers an intermediate-level grounding in contemporary British politics and government. Students will learn about the UK's political constitution, sovereign parliament, electoral politics, public debate, cabinet government, civil service and devolved and local administrations. They will develop a breadth and depth of knowledge, and a range of capabilities, that will prepare them to pursue careers in Westminster, Whitehall and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Portfolio (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Global SociologyPolitics and International RelationsPOL180Full year4Yes

Global Sociology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Niharika Pandit

Description: This module provides students with an introduction to central themes and concepts in Sociology, and applies them to particular cases. You will gain an understanding of what is distinctive about a sociological imagination of contemporary and historical concerns. The module helps you to see how our individual lives are connected to global developments such as climate change, migration, and the advancement of digital technology. You will also be introduced to how class, gender, race, identity, and religion organise relations in an era of globalisation. The overall aim is to introduce you to particular concepts that help you to understand how social relations are formed and change and to enhance your understanding of social change and continuity through a focus on particular issues, themes and cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Critical reflection (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Written take home exam (2 hours)
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Psychology of Individual DifferencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ233Semester 25Yes

Psychology of Individual Differences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gary Britton
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students taking this module have previously studied introductory-level psychology and research methods in psychology

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a central area of psychology known variously as 'individual differences' or 'differential psychology'. We will build on several key areas of psychology that show substantial individual differences including personality, psychopathology, intelligence and cognition. We will then explore the proposed causes and effects of these individual differences drawing from research using approaches from psycho-dynamics to behavioral genetics. Finally, we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in individual differences including the continuum between personality and mental health, the nature vs nurture debate, race differences in intelligence and genetic determinism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% E-poster
  • Item 2: 60% Final Exam (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 5
Psychology
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200BSemester 25Yes

Russian II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5200

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
The Science of ConsciousnessBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY340Semester 26No

The Science of Consciousness

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: Consciousness is one of the greatest remaining mysteries in all of biology: the ability to experience the world is one of the key considerations of what makes us human. This module will delve into the psychology and neuroscience of consciousness, reflecting the most recent progress in the field. It will explore ethical considerations in the study of consciousness, and consider the implications of diminished consciousness in psychiatric and neurological conditions, such as depression and dementia.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Psychology
Social DevelopmentBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY339Semester 26No

Social Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Echols
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY211 and take PSY215 and take PSY223

Description: This is an advanced, interactive seminar on social development from infancy to early adulthood. We will explore this topic from an interdisciplinary perspective, and discuss empirical research and theoretical perspectives on social development from neuroscience and developmental, cognitive, social, and evolutionary psychology. We will explore topics such as the emergence of personality and the self-concept, the development of empathy and moral reasoning, the importance of parental, peer, and group influences, and atypical social development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 60% Research Proposal
Level: 6
Psychology
Developmental PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY223Semester 25No

Developmental Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alena Galilee
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY107 and take PSY121 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: This module surveys developmental psychology, covering human development across the whole life span but with a more detailed focus on development in the early years (infancy/childhood). The aim of the module is to introduce the key questions, theories, concepts, methodology, studies and research findings within developmental psychology, regarding different domains of psychological functioning including social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioural development. The module will also cover the prenatal period, physical, motor, and sensory development, learning theory, moral development, and development of the self (identity).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework Practical
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Psychology
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200ASemester 15Yes

Russian II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5200

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS5201A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202Full year4Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4202A or take RUS4202B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have native or near-native proficiency in russian

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% English-Russian Translation (Equivalent to 1000 words)
  • Item 2: 8% Russian-English Translation (Equivalent to 800 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Cultural Research Project (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 5: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203BSemester 24Yes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4203
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS4203A

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed the equivalent of one semester of Russian language at their home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201BSemester 24Yes

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4201
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have a-level or knowledge of russian equivalent to cefrl level b1

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY723PSemester 17No

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rani Moran

Description: This module considers the cognitive functions and properties of the human mind. The material covered include the history of cognitive psychology, visual and multimodal perception, attentional processes, memory mechanisms, language and knowledge representation, problem-solving and expertise, and decision making and reasoning. The relationships and links between processes will be covered, as well as the implications of cognitive psychology research in the real life and other scientific fields (e.g., the dialogue between all cognitive sciences including linguistics and computer science will be embedded across the module; critical discussions about the impact of research in memory on eyewitness testimony will be prompted).
Theoretical approaches, experimental paradigms and empirical studies in cognitive psychology will be discussed throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
Project DissertationMathematical SciencesMTHM038Full year7No

Project Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Oscar Bandtlow

Description: Each MSc student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. Project selection takes place in Semester B with work on the project starting thereafter and continuing through the summer. An MSc project should help prepare students for independent practical work and PhD research. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30¿50 word-processed pages covering a specific research-level topic in pure or applied mathematics. The work usually requires the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from research articles or analyse a dataset and may also involve programming and computation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project dissertation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Qualitative Research Methods in PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY210Semester 25No

Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800) and its variants. This module introduces you to qualitative research methods in Psychology. You will understand and critically appraise the different qualitative research methods commonly used in psychology research and understand issues critical to research design and analysis such as data collection protocols, sampling, and researcher positionality. Through interactive lectures and practical sessions, you will learn how to select the best data collection protocol from a range of methods to answer a research question.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Ethics Proposal
  • Item 2: 50% Lab Report
Level: 5
Psychology
Basics of BiopsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY721PSemester 27No

Basics of Biopsychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrea Benucci

Description: To provide psychology MSc conversion students with a scientific overview of the brain and its function emphasizing concepts relevant to behaviour and its study.
This compulsory module supports psychology as a natural and experimental science and introduces you to the notion of psychology as a branch of the biological sciences (e.g., that behaviour is the end product of whole organism biology), a core aspect of accredited undergraduate degrees.
It will also introduce you to principles of neuroscience and the integrative scientific thinking skills required to study subsequent psychological topics.
You will be introduced to empirical findings and will critically evaluate the range of methods in the field.
The topics covered include basic cell biology, principles of communication, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and
human neuroanatomy. The involvement of these and other cell biological processes in the control of behaviour will be illustrated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class test
  • Item 2: 50% Written Exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
Counselling PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY329Semester 26No

Counselling Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY253 and take PSY211 and ( take PSY209 or take PSY109 )

Description: This module builds on themes developed in level 4 and 5 psychology modules. It will consider areas of psychology which are the subject of active research in the SBCS Department of Psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Group-based Assignment (1800 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Psychology
British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243Full year5Yes

British Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover

Description: This module offers an intermediate-level grounding in contemporary British politics and government. Students will learn about the UK's political constitution, sovereign parliament, electoral politics, public debate, cabinet government, civil service and devolved and local administrations. They will develop a breadth and depth of knowledge, and a range of capabilities, that will prepare them to pursue careers in Westminster, Whitehall and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Portfolio 1 (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Portfolio 2 (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Politics in ActionPolitics and International RelationsPOL113Semester 14Yes

Politics in Action

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Edkins

Description: This module embeds students in the School of Politics and International Relations¿ learning community by teaching them to: consider how research interests, questions and projects are formulated and pursued in the disciplines of Politics and International Relations, and the real-world impact that this research has; research political issues that are effecting East London communities and shaped by politics and international relations; construct cumulative evidence-based arguments orally and in writing; explore, and take the first steps towards, graduate work career paths.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group presentation (reassessment by Essay 1000 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Writing portfolio (3000 words)
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Health PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ216Semester 15Yes

Health Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwijde Maegherman
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students taking this module have previously studied introductory-level psychology and research methods in psychology

Description: This module introduces and critically discusses an area of special interest to applied psychologists, namely, psychology as applied to health behaviour. The course covers the central models and evidence bases concerning the relationship between psychological processes and health and illness. Topics covered by this module will include health promotion and public health; health behaviour models; illness maintenance and treatment adherence; chronic illness; and health through the lifespan.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Video Presentation
  • Item 2: 40% Intervention Essay
  • Item 3: 30% Exam
Level: 5
Psychology
Introduction to International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL106BSemester 24Yes

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Cristina Juverdeanu

Description: This module provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Specifically, we focus on four main themes that will allow you to grasp the complexities of the contemporary global order: capitalism, (post)colonialism, security, and development. You will also become acquainted with the analytical tools that are needed to think critically about international relations through these themes: a historical sensibility (i.e. how situations have elements of both continuity and change), an understanding of political-economy (i.e. why the economy is political), an understanding of the security-development nexus (i.e. how the quest for security - freedom from fear -and development - freedom from want -are contentiously linked), and the importance of resistance and "situated knowledges" (i.e. your understanding of international relations might be different depending on where and how you are situated in the world). Empirically, we will explore the Cold War and the post-Cold War global orders - their similarities and differences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Introduction to International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL106Full year4Yes

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Cristina Juverdeanu

Description: This module provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Specifically, we focus on four main themes that will allow you to grasp the complexities of the contemporary global order: capitalism, (post)colonialism, security, and development. You will also become acquainted with the analytical tools that are needed to think critically about international relations through these themes: a historical sensibility (i.e. how situations have elements of both continuity and change), an understanding of political-economy (i.e. why the economy is political), an understanding of the security-development nexus (i.e. how the quest for security - freedom from fear -and development - freedom from want -are contentiously linked), and the importance of resistance and "situated knowledges" (i.e. your understanding of international relations might be different depending on where and how you are situated in the world). Empirically, we will explore the Cold War and the post-Cold War global orders - their similarities and differences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Individual Review
  • Item 2: 30% Portfolio
  • Item 3: 60% Research Essay
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Child and Adolescent Mental HealthBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY338Semester 16No

Child and Adolescent Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module will provide you with a broad overview of the major childhood and adolescent neurodevelopmental and mental health conditions, including epidemiology and development, risk and protective factors and interventions. You will learn about the current research in childhood and adolescent psychopathology and how to critically appraise the evidence base for interventions. The module will also explore the role of societal changes (e.g., digitalisation, family structure), and broader context (e.g., loneliness, bullying, academic pressure) on adolescent psychological wellbeing and mental health. Finally, you will explore the role of broader psychosocial factors and culture in our understanding of childhood and adolescent psychopathology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Digital poster
  • Item 2: 50% Examination
Level: 6
Psychology
Psychology of Play and GamesBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY337Semester 16No

Psychology of Play and Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathan Emery

Description: This module will present contemporary research on play in animals, children and adults, focusing on psychological theories, especially during development. The module will also utilise an applied approach to studying how different psychological mechanisms may underlie playing different games, such as board, role-playing and video games, achieved by playing and discussing games in class. You will debate societal issues related to games, such as the role of video games in violence or game addiction, but also the positive effects of games.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Gamification Task 1
  • Item 2: 13% Gamification Task 2
  • Item 3: 13% Gamification Task 3
  • Item 4: 13% Gamification Task 4
  • Item 5: 50% Game Design
Level: 6
Psychology
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201Full year4Yes

Russian I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4201A or take RUS4201B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have a-level or knowledge of russian equivalent to cefrl level b1

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200Full year5Yes

Russian II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5200A or take RUS5200B

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201ASemester 14Yes

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4201
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have a-level or knowledge of russian equivalent to cefrl level b1

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS060N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203ASemester 14Yes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4203

Description: The module is aimed at associate students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
Psychology Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY720PFull year7No

Psychology Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: This module allows you to conceive, design and carry out a substantive, original empirical study in an area of psychology independently. You work on approved research topics set by project supervisors. Experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of the project. The work also involves critical evaluation of data previously published in the literature. A consideration of ethical issues is also required. A dissertation is prepared. This module will teach you to work on original scientific research topics and consolidate quantitative research skills, communication and critical evaluation. It will enhance your
understanding of psychology in a broader context and will provide you with experience of working in a research environment. Research project topics are varied to reflect the breadth of psychological and biologically motivated psychological research in the Department, ranging from how parental attachment styles affect students learning to how mice learn to navigate new environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
Colonialism, Capitalism and DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOL255Semester 15Yes

Colonialism, Capitalism and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karen Schouw Iversen

Description: According to Karl Marx, capital comes into the world'`dripping from head to toe, from every pore, with blood and dirt.'
Whether you agree with Marx's ideas or not, it is impossible to understand the genesis and the development of modern capitalist societies ¿ both in the Global North and the Global South ¿ without looking at the ugly face of colonialism.
This module will unpack Marx¿s and other theoretical understandings of capitalism, colonialism, and development. We will critically engage with the work of seminal authors such as Max Weber, Leon Trotsky, Karl Polanyi, Edward Said, Franz Fanon, and Silvia Federici. We will systematically inquire about the origins of capitalism and the relationship between capitalism and colonialism. We will explore alternative theoretical understandings of capitalism, colonialism and development, and the centrality of religion, culture, class struggle, race, gender, and international relations in shaping our contemporary world.
Reading the original work of canonical sociological, economic, and political writers can be quite a challenge. The lectures will unpack their most important arguments, explore their implications, and help you develop your academic reading skills. In the seminars, you will have the chance to discuss contemporary issues in light of the authors we will study, question established theories, and develop your own perspective on capitalism, colonialism, and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Book Review (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ211Semester 15Yes

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwijde Maegherman
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students taking this module have previously studied introductory-level psychology and research methods in psychology

Description: This module introduces theory and research in cognitive psychology, the study of the human mind and mental processes. Key theories and research in cognitive psychology will be discussed, including visual and multi-modal perception, attention, memory, language, reasoning, and decision-making. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided and discussed critically throughout to illustrate these concepts. This module will demonstrate the essential role of that cognitive psychology plays in everyday life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Video Presentation
  • Item 2: 40% Mid-term written exam
  • Item 3: 30% Exam
Level: 5
Psychology
Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY713PSemester 27No

Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Cioffi

Description: This module will focus on further developing the key skills required to conduct interdisciplinary research in the mental health sciences. It will provide further support for students during the data collection phase of their projects and semester B modules. It will also provide support in career development to boost students¿ employability on graduation. We will invite speakers from industry, academia and/or the public sector to give careers talks and provide workshops on career planning and job applications, including how to develop a funding application for PhD positions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% CV and application
  • Item 2: 40% science communication article
  • Item 3: 40% science communication video
Level: 7
Psychology
Working with Vulnerable GroupsBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY326Semester 16No

Working with Vulnerable Groups

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paraskevi Argyriou

Description: In this module, we will address the concept of vulnerability within three contexts: (1) Humanitarian, focusing on war affected children/youth groups and forcibly displaced families, (2) Educational, focusing on students with mental health risks and their families, (3) Workplace, focusing on minority employees. We will discuss theoretical perspectives around vulnerability, case studies outlining the factors shaping vulnerability and the needs of vulnerable groups, and the current trends in psychological practice and policies to support those groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Intervention Design and Evaluation Report
Level: 6
Psychology
Psychology of EmotionBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ127Semester 24Yes

Psychology of Emotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gary Britton

Description: The module will allow students to learn about the different conceptualisations of emotion both in terms of historical developments as well as contemporary theoretical models of emotions. The module will also consider the biological basis of emotions in the brain and the body, how emotions are expressed and perceived in faces, bodies, voice and music. The relationship between emotions and cognitions will be considered, including emotion regulation and individual differences in emotions. Finally, cultural differences and disorders of emotion will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Video presentation
  • Item 2: 5% Written review
  • Item 3: 60% Final Exam (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: An IntroductionBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY324Semester 16No

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: An Introduction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Cioffi

Description: This module introduces cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT) and their use across healthcare settings. CBT is the mostresearched form of psychotherapy, and the recommended psychological intervention for most mental health symptoms.
Students will learn how CBT is applied in understanding psychological problems, by examining the evidence-based cognitive behavioural models for different mental health conditions, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive and trauma disorders. You will be introduced to the theory and the practice of 'doing CBT', critically examining a broad range of therapeutic skills and treatment protocols for addressing specific disorders. Case studies will be used throughout to promote the
translation of theoretical knowledge into practical applications and vice versa, and to achieve in-depth understanding.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Written essay/assignment
  • Item 2: 75% Written examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Psychology
Sport and Exercise PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY336Semester 26No

Sport and Exercise Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit

Description: This module introduces students to the professional field of Sport and Exercise Psychology. It will address the psychological techniques used for improving athletic performance, team cohesion, athlete wellbeing, etc., and the psychological benefits and risks associated with exercise.
The content builds on your previous knowledge about cognitive, clinical and health psychology, and applies this knowledge to real-life problems in the form of case studies.
You will build a portfolio of case studies, covering various types of problems and intervention techniques.
You will learn how theoretical concepts of cognition, emotion, motivation, attachment and psychological interventions can be applied to real-life problems relating to individual and team sports.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Portfolio or practical skills assessment 1
  • Item 2: 13% Portfolio or practical skills assessment 2
  • Item 3: 13% Portfolio or practical skills assessment 3
  • Item 4: 13% Portfolio or practical skills assessment 4
  • Item 5: 50% Case study
Level: 6
Psychology
Social PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY215Semester 15No

Social Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janelle Jones
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY107 and take PSY121

Description: Have you ever wondered what influences our perceptions, emotions, thoughts, and behaviours? This module in Social Psychology will provide an overview of the classic and contemporary scientific theories and methods used to address how other people and different contexts can shape these processes. Topics covered will include the self, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, social influence, group processes, and stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Video Presentation
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 5
Psychology
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203Full year4Yes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4203A or take RUS4203B

Description: This module is aimed at students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test 1 (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test 2 (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Russian Language PlayLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4046Semester 24Yes

Russian Language Play

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5046
Prerequisite: In taking this module you must have basic knowledge of russian

Description: In the second semester of each academic year the Russian department prepares a play for performance in Russian. This is a unique opportunity for shared close analysis, examination, and realisation of a Russian text. The actors and directors are selected from among the students. Numbers will be limited by the size of the cast, but there is no obligation whatsoever for everyone participating to register for the module In addition to participating in the performance, students registering for the module write a supervised essay-project on a theme associated with the play performed and supported by three formal supervisions. The language of the presentation and essay is English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 4
Russian
Mental Health in ContextBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY733PSemester 17No

Mental Health in Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module explores key topics in mental health, from both historical and contemporary contexts, including in-depth analyses of current issues in the field. Key themes may include the role of mental health services, the importance of evidence-based practice and evidence-based psychological treatments. This module encourages you to view and reflect on mental health through different lenses and to consider the point the view of practitioners, scientists, and clients. It aims to advance critical reasoning skills through the analysis of empirical research, debates in the literature, and the discussion of the broader contexts of the mental health sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Written coursework (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Written coursework (1200 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243BSemester 25Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover

Description: This module offers an intermediate-level grounding in contemporary British politics and government. Students will learn about the UK's political constitution, sovereign parliament, electoral politics, public debate, cabinet government, civil service and devolved and local administrations. They will develop a breadth and depth of knowledge, and a range of capabilities, that will prepare them to pursue careers in Westminster, Whitehall and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Portfolio (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Developmental Approaches in Mental HealthBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY732PSemester 17No

Developmental Approaches in Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module takes a developmental science approach to understanding mental health conditions. It will introduce common mental health conditions which typically emerge during childhood and adolescence and discuss the underlying developmental pathways and precursors. It will consider, compare, and contrast psychological, social, and (neuro)biological perspectives on child and adolescent mental health. This module will also have an applied perspective, discussing clinical interventions and evaluating their empirical basis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Written Coursework
Level: 7
Psychology
Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY728PSemester 27No

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valdas Noreika

Description: This module builds on Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology Part I in Semester A and introduces advanced statistics necessary for independently conducting psychological research at the level for the research project. It also introduces additional methods psychologists use in research. The course will combine lectures and practical sessions covering computerised statistical analyses using a relevant statistical software package.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3% Lab assignment 1
  • Item 2: 3% Lab assignment 2
  • Item 3: 3% Lab assignment 3
  • Item 4: 3% Lab assignment 4
  • Item 5: 3% Lab assignment 5
  • Item 6: 3% Lab assignment 6
  • Item 7: 3% Lab assignment 7
  • Item 8: 3% Lab assignment 8
  • Item 9: 76% Lab report (2000 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
Background to British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL108Semester 24Yes

Background to British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Colm Murphy

Description: British Politics isn't just about institutions like cabinet, parliament, parties and pressure groups that you may already have studied and/or go on to study. Nor is it simply about voting and elections. It is also an ongoing attempt by more or less self-interested actors to cope with the issues, conflicts, opportunities and threats thrown up by time and chance, as well as by underlying economic and social developments. Employing a thematic rather than a chronological approach, this module delves back decades and brings things bang-up-to-date in order to provide you with an improved understanding of why, politically, we are as we are today.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Annotated Teaching Plan
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Global SociologyPolitics and International RelationsPOL180ASemester 14Yes

Global Sociology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Niharika Pandit

Description: This module provides students with an introduction to central themes and concepts in Sociology, and applies them to particular cases. You will gain an understanding of what is distinctive about a sociological imagination of contemporary and historical concerns. The module helps you to see how our individual lives are connected to global developments such as climate change, migration, and the advancement of digital technology. You will also be introduced to how class, gender, race, identity, and religion organise relations in an era of globalisation. The overall aim is to introduce you to particular concepts that help you to understand how social relations are formed and change and to enhance your understanding of social change and continuity through a focus on particular issues, themes and cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Critical reflection (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY727PSemester 17No

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alena Galilee

Description: This module introduces fundamental skills in experimental design, statistical analysis and other methodologies necessary for conducting research in psychology. You will learn understand and critically appraise the different research methods commonly using in psychology research, with a particular focus on qualitative methods, and understand issues critical to experimental design such as sampling, validity, and reliability. The course will combine lectures and practical sessions covering computerised statistical analysis using a relevant statistical software package.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3% Lab assignment 1
  • Item 2: 3% Lab assignment 2
  • Item 3: 3% Lab assignment 3
  • Item 4: 3% Lab assignment 4
  • Item 5: 3% Lab assignment 5
  • Item 6: 3% Lab assignment 6
  • Item 7: 3% Lab assignment 7
  • Item 8: 3% Lab assignment 8
  • Item 9: 76% Lab report
Level: 7
Psychology
Professional Skills for MathematiciansMathematical SciencesMTH5205Full year5No

Professional Skills for Mathematicians

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module aims to support students on their education and career journey by highlighting the various opportunities available, including internships, job hunting strategies, extra-curricular activities. All students will meet with their Academic Advisors and the Careers Team to discuss career plans, gathering evidence for a CV, cover letter writing, Developing and Recognising Graduate Attributes; Mathematical literacy and plagiarism.

The overall theme of this module is discovery and getting prepared for their next steps as Finalists. Students are required to engage with a wide-ranging set of compulsory and optional activities designed to actively engage students in the development of desirable transferable skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Professional Development Portfolio
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
SMS Placement TutorialMathematical SciencesMTH5200AFull year5No

SMS Placement Tutorial

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica

Description: This module is designed to prepare students to identify and apply for placement as part of their third year of study. It will also support them in being equipped to get maximum benefit from their time out on placement and how to complete the various assessments and reports required.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Dissertation in Politics / International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL318Full year6No

Dissertation in Politics / International Relations

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Rowan Lubbock

Description: The final-year Dissertation module allows students to study in depth and at length a topic of their own choosing, under the personal supervisor of an academic. Students begin to formulate their research focus before the end of their second year, and undertake formative preparatory work during the summer vacation. In-year assessment involves a Research Proposal, Presentation, and 10,000-word dissertation. Support is provided through personal supervisions and training workshops, but the emphasis is predominantly upon students' individual research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Research Proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Presentation
  • Item 3: 85% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International RelationsPOL_6_A
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154Semester 16Yes

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Civil Society - InternshipPolitics and International RelationsPOL301Semester 26No

Civil Society - Internship

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Hoover
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take POL332

Description: This module is designed to give those who take it a view of civil society and political activism from the inside out. Students will spend two days per week between January and April working for a civil society organisation in London. The module will be assessed by students completing a short coursework and reflective journal of their day-to-day experiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Job Advert (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Reflective journal (6000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Global TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL283ASemester 15Yes

Global Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Clive Gabay

Description: This module takes five key thinkers whose work emerges from experiences/histories of colonialism and racism to ask how international order(ing) has been understood by those standing outside of or in conversation with the Western canon, thinking globally. Thinking globally means thinking seemingly disparate socio-political phenomena and forces together and in connection (I.e., capitalism, racism, patriarchy, colonialism, etc.). This is a defining feature of the intellectuals and thinkers that will be explored on the module, who include Edward Said, Houria Boutjelda, Suzanne Cesaire and Cedric Robinson.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Global TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL283Full year5Yes

Global Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Clive Gabay

Description: This module takes ten key thinkers whose work emerges from experiences/histories of colonialism and racism to ask how international order(ing) has been understood by those standing outside of or in conversation with the Western canon, thinking globally. Thinking globally means thinking seemingly disparate socio-political phenomena and forces together and in connection (I.e., capitalism, racism, patriarchy, colonialism, etc.). This is a defining feature of the intellectuals and thinkers that will be explored on the module, who include Edward Said, Houria Boutjelda, Suzanne Cesaire and Cedric Robinson.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Application of Concepts (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139Semester 26Yes

Time Series

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
The International Politics of the Developing WorldPolitics and International RelationsPOL257Semester 25Yes

The International Politics of the Developing World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowan Lubbock

Description: The 'developing world' is a slippery concept. In this module, we will analyse it from an international political perspective. This means that we will uncover the international power relations that constitute the `developing world¿ as such.

We will start questioning the very concept of development and what it entails. In the first few weeks, we will read influential writers in international development, such as W.W. Rostow, Gunder Frank, Amartya Sen, and Arturo Escobar. Then we will look in closer detail at key topics in international development, such as gender, race, neoliberalism, and the return of developmental states, using the work of critical contemporary scholars and activists such as Kalpana Wilson, Naila Kabeer and Veronica Gago. Finally, we will discuss strategies of resisting imperial domination disguised under the name of 'development' and think of alternative ways to represent the global periphery.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Case Study (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors SchemeMathematical SciencesMTH6110Semester 26No

Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shabnam Beheshti
Prerequisite: There is an application and interview process for this module. The module organiser will contact you about this at the start of semester 1

Description: This module allows undergraduates to gain valuable transferable skills whilst exploring the teaching profession first hand by working with a teacher in a local school. The key skills gained include communication and presentation of mathematics, team-working, active listening, time management and prioritisation. The module will be supported by regular classes and assessed by a combination of written reports and an oral presentation. Registration for this module requires validation; places will be limited and interviews to assess suitability will be held during Semester A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 - CV
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2 - Recorded Presentation
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 3 - Essay
  • Item 4: 20% Coursework 4 - Group Project
  • Item 5: 20% Coursework 5 - Engagement
  • Item 6: 10% Coursework 6 - Teacher Feedback
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Africa and International PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL372Semester 16Yes

Africa and International Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett

Description: Africa has consistently been ignored by many of the major social science disciplines. Many of the major theoretical traditions treat Africa as either irrelevant to great power politics, or as simply an effect of great power or class domination. This module aims to introduce students to Africa's international relations, African-centric perspectives which challenge traditional academic approaches and seeks to locate Africa's fate not merely in processes of imperial domination but also in African social and class configurations themselves. This is a distinct approach which centres the teaching of Africa on the continent itself, rather than exclusively on what external actors are doing to it. This is not to dismiss the influence of external actors and processes, but to reveal the many cases of where this distinction between the external and internal in Africa has limited utility in explaining events and processes on the continent.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Country Case Study Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2,500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Imagining "America": Rebellious Political Thought in the United StatesPolitics and International RelationsPOL329Semester 26Yes

Imagining "America": Rebellious Political Thought in the United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Hoover

Description: This module examines critical traditions in American political thought , with specific authors and themes varying from year to year. Central themes will include the promise and betrayal of freedom from the founding of the nation to the present day, the tension between radical individualism and contested notions of community, and the constant struggle to maintain faith in the possibilities of democratic government and culture. The module will focus on close reading of primary texts, while also incorporating reflections on American literature, music, and film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Short Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Long Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
The International Relations of the Middle EastPolitics and International RelationsPOL327Semester 16Yes

The International Relations of the Middle East

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Phillips

Description: This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to study the Middle East from within the discipline of International Relations (IR). As such, students will take the analytical tools of IR and apply them to the region. In so doing, students will be asked to familiarise themselves with these tools but also to question their applicability beyond the global North. This understanding will be based on seeing the states of the region as vulnerable to external intervention, to sub-state movements of ethnicity and sect as well as supra-state identities. Students will then be asked to examine relations between the region itself and the wider international system, looking at how the Middle East itself was a product of the `late colonialism¿ of the inter-war period. Students will then study the causes and effects of the quasi- or neo-imperial interventions of the Cold War and post-Cold War era.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Take-home Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Socialist Political ThoughtPolitics and International RelationsPOL368Semester 16Yes

Socialist Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Madeleine Davis

Description: Socialism, described by Albert Einstein as humanity's attempt 'to overcome and advance beyond the predatory phase of human development', has historically provided the most important ideological and political alternative to capitalism and liberalism. This module examines some core ideas in the history of socialist thought through a close reading of selected primary texts. Themes to be addressed (which may vary from year to year) include: utopia; community; class, ownership and control; equality; democracy. The second part of the course examines the post-war reformulation of socialist thought in response to perceived challenges around class, culture and identity, and asks: is socialism still relevant to contemporary problems?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Portfolio of short writing tasks
  • Item 2: 60% Report on groupwork and presentation topic
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Mathematical and Actuarial Work ExperienceMathematical SciencesMTH5200Full year5No

Mathematical and Actuarial Work Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng

Description: The Work Experience (or Professional Placement) year consists of one year spent working with an employer in a mathematical, actuarial or related role. The year is undertaken between the second and fourth years of your degree programme. The module is assessed, and will contribute towards your final degree title. Assessment will be through a combination of a learning journal, a learning objectives task with employer input and feedback, a report and a short presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Learning journal
  • Item 2: 20% Learning objectives task
  • Item 3: 60% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Video Presentation
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Gender, Sexuality and CapitalismPolitics and International RelationsPOL3003Semester 16Yes

Gender, Sexuality and Capitalism

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: What do the most personal aspects of our lives - gender, sexuality, sex, intimacy, families, relationships - have to do with capitalism? How are our gender and sexual identities shaped by global hierarchies of work, race, citizenship, property, and status? Can capitalism exist without gender and sexual oppression?

In this module, we will grapple with these questions through feminist, queer, and trans thought and practice. These engagements will take us across a diverse range of topics and sites: housework and domestic services, care and emotional labor, beauty and cosmetics, the global tourist industry, sex work, and anti-capitalist struggles for gender and sexual freedom.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
China in the Global SouthPolitics and International RelationsPOL3002Semester 26Yes

China in the Global South

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: China is now arguably the most influential actor in the Global South. The methods that China has used in establishing itself as a global actor and the accompanying controversies surrounding its growing stature are critical learning points for every student of contemporary international relations. The module focuses on what China is doing in the Global South, how it is perceived and what this means. These themes will be analysed through an exciting survey of China's engagement in Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America and the South Pacific.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Task and Self-reflection
  • Item 2: 70% Regional Case study
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Boom and BustPolitics and International RelationsPOL3001Semester 16Yes

Boom and Bust

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module introduces students to different ways of understanding 'the economy': how it does and does not work for people. Through learning theories and concepts in political economy, students will broaden their understanding of economic inequality, what makes 'the economy', how politicians perceive `economic constraints¿, and different visions of a 'good' society. Students will study postwar Britain, from an expanded welfare state to `neoliberalism¿ and privatisation; from so-called 'postwar consensus' policies to the global financial crisis and austerity; and from the fallout of Brexit to the legacy of fossil fuel dependence. This module will be of particular interest to students who studied British Politics, Modernity or Comparative Politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Oral Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Social TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL280BSemester 25No

Social Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giulia Carabelli

Description: This module provides a critical overview of social theory from the late 19th/ early 20th century to contemporary developments. SEM B starts with the Frankfurt School to explore contemporary debates in Black Feminisms, Decolonial Theory and Practice, Queer Theory, Affect Theory, New Materialism and Crip Theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Social TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL280ASemester 15Yes

Social Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giulia Carabelli

Description: This module provides students with an advanced introduction to central theories and and concepts in Sociology, from nineteenth and early twentieth century theorists through to the present day. This will include consideration of the work of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Du Bois, among others.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155Semester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6112
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1. We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 5% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 26No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha
Overlap: Before your choice of MTH6138 can be approved you need to send confirmation that you have supervision agreement from a supervisor along with your project title to maths@qmul.Ac.Uk.
Prerequisite: At the start of the academic year you will need to go to the qmplus module page and choose a topic and supervisor

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report, Presentation and (possibly) Oral Examination
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 16No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha
Overlap: Before your choice of MTH6138 can be approved you need to send confirmation that you have supervision agreement from a supervisor along with your project title to maths@qmul.Ac.Uk.
Prerequisite: At the start of the academic year you will need to go to the qmplus module page and choose a topic and supervisor

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report, Presentation and (possibly) Oral Examination
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Politics of International LawPolitics and International RelationsPOL259Semester 15Yes

Politics of International Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett

Description: States spend a great deal of time and effort justifying their actions with law. Yet international relations scholars have often doubted international law's ability to shape state behaviour. This course examines this by paradox by introducing students to the major debates about the politics of international law. These perspectives will be applied to the history of international organisations and (legal) order since 1919, including the development of collective security and humanitarianism at the League of Nations and United Nations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Case Study (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Parliamentary Studies - InternshipsPolitics and International RelationsPOL392Semester 26No

Parliamentary Studies - Internships

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take POL373

Description: This module is designed to give those who take it a view of British parliamentary politics from the inside out. Students will spend two days per week between January and April working for a parliamentarian - in either the Westminster or constituency office, or both - or in a similar parliamentary setting. They will be assessed through written work directly related to the placement, including a reflective journal of their day-to-day experiences. A parliamentary placement is an intensive and demanding exercise, but should provide a formative experience and useful skills for those interested a career in politics or politics-related fields.

Contingency plans are in place should placements fall through due to factors beyond our control, such as the wider political environment. In such cases, the module will be assessed through alternative arrangements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment 1
  • Item 2: 80% Reflective Journal and Portfolio
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113Semester 26No

Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica
Prerequisite: In taking this module you must take MTH6154

Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH5131Semester 25No

Actuarial Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5120 and take MTH5129

Description: This module builds on the statistical theory of the Level 5 modules Probability and Statistics II and Statistical Modelling I. It begins with estimation of population parameters and a study of exploratory data analysis, in particular measures of correlation. It then introduces concepts from Bayesian Statistics and uses them to calculate Bayesian estimators. Finally, we study topics on generalised linear models (GLMs), including that of fitting a GLM to a dataset and interpreting its output.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 60% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Introduction to Social Sciences MethodologiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL285Semester 15Yes

Introduction to Social Sciences Methodologies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mirko Palestrino

Description: This module provides students with an introduction to social sciences methodologies. The lead questions are: How do we know and research the social and political world? What is the relation between knowledge and power? How do different research questions and methods make different aspects of social and political life legible? By taking a familiar site (e.g. a street, one¿s home, Queen Mary University), event (e.g. an election, a festival), or artefact (e.g. a pamphlet, a statue, a picture), the module explores different ways of developing sociological and political knowledge and the role of methods in doing so.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Log (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Project (2000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Global Politics of Health and DiseasePolitics and International RelationsPOL317Semester 26Yes

Global Politics of Health and Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sophie Harman

Description: Why do people die of preventable diseases? Are global health threats the biggest security concern of contemporary world politics? It is politics rather than science and medicine that limits disease eradication? Is Bill Gates more powerful than the US President? This module engages with these questions as it explores the key components of the global politics of health and disease: health security, global health governance, inequality and political economy of health. Over 11 weeks students will be encouraged to develop their own interests in global health in collaboration with the module leader. The lectures will focus on the broad themes of global health politics e.g. actors in global health, right to health, equality; and the seminars will provide a space for lively discussion around contemporary global health issues such as Ebola, Zika, and HIV/AIDS. Class learning will be supplemented by independent learning by students and voluntary attendance at a range of global health events in London (e.g. film screenings, talks, careers events). The module is for any student with a keen interest in this specialised area of International Relations and wants to develop their knowledge and learning in a new field of study. While there are no module pre-requisites, students are encouraged to be familiar with the main theories of International Relations and Global Governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Presentation
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Politics of South Asia: Independent ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL320Semester 26No

Politics of South Asia: Independent Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Layli Uddin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POL319

Description: This module gives you the chance to take a deep dive into the politics or international relations of a particular South Asian country or province. With academic guidance, you will choose a research question of significance for understanding South Asia today. Over the semester you will carry out your own self-directed but supervised study of the topic. We will hone your analysis through seminar discussions, presentations, and written assignments with detailed feedback. By the end of the module you will have developed your own substantive interpretation of a key contemporary South Asian issue and built up practical research skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Research Proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Research Presentation (10 minutes)
  • Item 3: 60% Comparative Analysis (3000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Actuarial ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6153Semester 26No

Actuarial Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha
Overlap: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer. Must not take other projects.

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take a project on a topic relevant to Actuarial Science. A list of potential projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the module organiser and the project supervisor. You will normally be expected to have a second year average of at least 60% to be accepted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation (20 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Dissertation (4000 words)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Comparative PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL284BSemester 25Yes

Comparative Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Ana Sofia Collignon Delmar

Description: Why some countries are democracies and others are dictatorships? Why are ethnic groups politicized in some countries but not in others? Why some countries have many political parties and others just a few? How governments form and what determines the type of government that take office? How can we explain patterns of representation? This module analyses some of the most relevant contemporary questions by looking at political structures, individuals and collective actors and processes through the lens of Comparative Politics. In this module we are set not just to find out about other countries, but to broaden and deepen our understanding of important and general political processes within these countries. The course first analyses the main concepts, theoretical and methodological approaches in comparative political science then applies their insights to the analysis of institutions, economic development, regime stability and change, social movements, representation, national identify, religion, ideology and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Portfolio
  • Item 2: 70% Comparative Report
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Social TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL280Full year5Yes

Social Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Giulia Carabelli

Description: This module is arranged by 'key thinkers' in social theory ¿ those who wrote books or developed concepts that captured and pushed forward the debates of their time. Yet, social theory is a form of collective labour that develops and takes new forms thanks to wider conversations (often across academic disciplines). As such, in our study of key thinkers, we highlight the intersecting legacies and shared threads among and between these intellectual pathways. While lectures provide context and definitions to familiarise with main debates in social theory, seminars present empirical case studies to understand how a specific theoretical framework might help us to unpack contemporary social dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reflexive Log
  • Item 2: 40% Essay 1
  • Item 3: 40% Essay 2
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Gender and Feminisms in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL274Full year5Yes

Gender and Feminisms in World Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: This module introduces students to debates surrounding gender and feminisms in the twenty-first century. It covers meanings of gender and feminism, exploring arguments from liberal, radical, socialist, black and global south feminisms, as well as masculinity, queer and trans studies. It examines gendered dimensions of conflict, peace, governance, inequality, labour, care, nationalism, health, sexual violence and political mobilisation in national, transnational and global contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Blog Post
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Seen Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140Semester 16Yes

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Financial EngineeringMathematical SciencesMTH6112Semester 26No

Actuarial Financial Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Fang
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6155
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced techniques in financial mathematics for actuaries, building on the foundational material in Financial Mathematics 1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuous time models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Latin American PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL369Semester 26Yes

Latin American Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilia Simison

Description: Students will survey the major theoretical approaches to understanding Latin American politics and political economy. The course will be designed to provide an introduction to the region from the end of the Second World War until the present day. The course aims to put the politics of Latin America in the broader perspective of comparative politics, international relations, and international political economy. It will help students to develop a broad understanding of how contemporary Latin America has evolved since 1945 and to identify and examine the key issues dominating politics in the region and its relationship to international politics and the global political economy. It will deal with major contemporary themes such as neoliberalism and 'post-neoliberalism', social movements, gender and ethnicity, the rise of the new Latin American Left, regional integration, and the relationship between Latin America and the US, as well as other emerging world powers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Applied Linear AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH5212Semester 15Yes

Applied Linear Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5112
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

Description: This module covers concepts in linear algebra and its applications. The ideas for two- and three-dimensional space covered by the appropriate first year module will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Number TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH5130Semester 15Yes

Number Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Subhajit Jana
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

Description: This module considers fundamental problems in number theory, related to the distribution of prime numbers and integer solutions to Diophantine equations. Students will learn the core concepts in number theory such as the existence of primitive roots modulo a prime, quadratic reciprocity and solving Pell's equation. Additionally, students will learn how to develop and implement algorithms to efficiently solve computational questions which arise in number theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Politics of South AsiaPolitics and International RelationsPOL319Semester 16Yes

Politics of South Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Layli Uddin

Description: South Asia is home to almost one in every four people alive today. It is the world's fastest-growing region and boasts the world's largest democracy. Yet it also contains one-third of the world¿s poor, and societies divided by religion, caste, class, language, gender, and region. This course will provide an in-depth survey of the politics, political economy, and international relations of the major South Asian countries: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. By the end of the course, students will be able to contribute to key debates on democratization, economic development, identity politics, and nuclear-armed conflict in the region.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Book/Film Review
  • Item 2: 60% Final Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Comparative PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL284ASemester 15Yes

Comparative Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Ana Sofia Collignon Delmar

Description: Why some countries are democracies and others are dictatorships? Why are ethnic groups politicized in some countries but not in others? Why some countries have many political parties and others just a few? How governments form and what determines the type of government that take office? How can we explain patterns of representation? This module analyses some of the most relevant contemporary questions by looking at political structures, individuals and collective actors and processes through the lens of Comparative Politics. In this module we are set not just to find out about other countries, but to broaden and deepen our understanding of important and general political processes within these countries. The course first analyses the main concepts, theoretical and methodological approaches in comparative political science then applies their insights to the analysis of institutions, economic development, regime stability and change, social movements, representation, national identify, religion, ideology and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Portfolio
  • Item 2: 70% Country Report
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Comparative PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL284Full year5Yes

Comparative Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Ana Sofia Collignon Delmar

Description: Why some countries are democracies and others are dictatorships? Why are ethnic groups politicized in some countries but not in others? Why some countries have many political parties and others just a few? How governments form and what determines the type of government that take office? How can we explain patterns of representation? This module analyses some of the most relevant contemporary questions by looking at political structures, individuals and collective actors and processes through the lens of Comparative Politics. In this module we are set not just to find out about other countries, but to broaden and deepen our understanding of important and general political processes within these countries. The course first analyses the main concepts, theoretical and methodological approaches in comparative political science then applies their insights to the analysis of institutions, economic development, regime stability and change, social movements, representation, national identify, religion, ideology and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Portfolio 1
  • Item 2: 10% Portfolio 2
  • Item 3: 30% Country report
  • Item 4: 50% Comparative report
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Populism: a Global PerspectivePolitics and International RelationsPOL312Semester 16Yes

Populism: a Global Perspective

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stijn Van Kessel

Description: Brexit, Trump, Bolsonaro, Le Pen...due to the recent prominence of supposed populist parties, politicians and events, populism has become a much-debated theme. Populism is also a problematic concept, as its use is often pejorative and imprecise. This module focuses on the concept of populism and instances of populism in the real world across time and space. What does populism mean? Is it always associated with xenophobic politics? How can support for populism be explained? What are its implications? And is populism a threat to democracy?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Analysis of populism
  • Item 2: 60% Take-home Exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Unsettling Methods - Creativity in/for Social Science ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL273Semester 25Yes

Unsettling Methods - Creativity in/for Social Science Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sharri Plonski

Description: This module is designed with two core goals in mind: On one hand, to introduce students to qualitative methods in the design and production of research in politics and international relations. On the other, to develop a critical toolbox for engaging and challenging methods as a form of colonial epistemological practice, bound up with historical and contemporary modes of domination and erasure. Through a range of relevant topics, students will reflect on dominant knowledge systems and structures, practice 'doing' qualitative research, and develop the skills to design their own research projects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Methods Portfolio (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Research Project Assignment (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Quantitative Methods for Social Science ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL272Semester 25Yes

Quantitative Methods for Social Science Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Javier Sajuria

Description: This module is designed to enhance undergraduate students' understanding and use of empirical methods, mostly quantitative, in the social sciences. Through the focus on substantive and relevant topics, the module will enable students to become more sophisticated users of quantitative readings in political studies. It will also enable them to undertake quantitative analysis in their own research, including their final-year research projects. The skills acquired in this course will enhance students' employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Research Project
  • Item 2: 50% 24-hour take-home exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Qualitative Methods for Social Science ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL271Semester 25Yes

Qualitative Methods for Social Science Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module covers a wide range of qualitative methods designed for critical social science research. It breaks down diverse methodological approaches and turns them into a set of concrete guidelines and tools that you can apply in your own research. Whether you are interested in studying how specific texts or images reproduce wider political ideologies, immersing yourself in the complex mechanisms of a particular case study, explaining how public discourses emerge, spread, and dissolve over time, or tracing transformations in the global economic system, this module provides you with the skills and tools you need to put those research goals into practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Presentation
  • Item 2: 75% Project
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Parliamentary StudiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL373Semester 16Yes

Parliamentary Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover

Description: Every democracy has a legislature which performs a number of key functions, most obviously representation, scrutiny, and of course law-making. This module focuses on how ¿ and how effectively ¿ the UK parliament performs these functions. With input from parliamentary staff, it is designed to combine rigorous academic analysis of parliament with a solid practical understanding of how the legislature works. It will look, among other things, at how laws are made, executive-legislative relations, executive scrutiny, representation and composition, constituency representation, select committees, and the House of Lords. It is intended to be a highly practical, hands-on module that may serve as a springboard for those considering a professional career in or around politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written assignment 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Written assignment 2 (2500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
The International Politics of SecurityPolitics and International RelationsPOL258Semester 15Yes

The International Politics of Security

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans

Description: This module examines the study of security in world politics, investigating the development of the study of the international politics of security and the key concerns surrounding security today. The module broadly surveys different kinds of security practice and their contemporary significance. It also introduces political questions and contestations that both shape and are resulting from developments in security practice. Overall, the module gives a wide-ranging perspective on the politics of security in contemporary international politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Review Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Take-home Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
The Political Life of Security MethodsPolitics and International RelationsPOL389Semester 26Yes

The Political Life of Security Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans

Description: This module examines contemporary security practice through the methods they use. It introduces students to (a) the security life of methods -- how methods shape contemporary security situations -- and (b) the political controversies about their use -- the political life of methods. The module will cover a range of controversial methods, for example: the deployment of anthropological knowledge and methods in counter-insurgency, the role of algorithms in surveillance, the rise of big data in security governance, the use of visual methods in security practice and their political contestation, the rise of forensic methods in criminal investigations of war, and scenario planning and foresight in anticipating catastrophes. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of security methods and their limits, and evaluate their political and social effects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Civil Society: Democracy, Activism and Social ChangePolitics and International RelationsPOL332Semester 16Yes

Civil Society: Democracy, Activism and Social Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Elliott-Cooper

Description: The module explores the nature of civil society and the political role of civil society actors - at local, national, and global levels. Civil society's traditional role as a third-sector between the state and the market will be critically examined by considering both theories of civil society and empirical case studies of democratic activism and social change. The module will cover the contested meaning of `civil society¿, attending to its historical and cultural variation. Empirical case studies will consider a variety of social movements and, where possible, include meetings with activists and other practitioners. The module will enable students to critically evaluate the changing role of contemporary civil society and develop a practical understanding of how civil society actors pursue social change, along with why they fail and why the succeed. This module is a prerequisite for POL301 Civil Society Internship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Video presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Take-home exam (24 hrs) (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Introduction to Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH6101Semester 26Yes

Introduction to Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: Machine Learning is a rapidly growing field, at the boundary between Statistics and Computer Science. This course gives an understanding of the theoretical basis for machine learning and a set of concrete algorithms including decision tree learning and classification methods. Moreover, this course will introduce some classical statistical methods for high-dimensional data. The course also includes programming and use of algorithms on concrete data set.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773PSemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips
Prerequisite: Before taking this module, you must take MTH790P if you do not already have previous experience of c++ up to the level taught in that module. Furthermore, a knowledge of financial mathematics up to the level taught in MTH771P is required.

Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Computer-based Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 50% Computer-based Assessment 2
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Probability and Statistics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5129Semester 15No

Probability and Statistics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take MTH4300 or take MTH4400 or take ECN115 ) and ( take MTH4116 or take MTH4216 or take MTH4500 or take MTH4600 )

Description: This module further develops the ideas introduced in the first year probability and statistics modules. It begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions required, such as covariance, correlation and independence of random variables. It then describes different types of statistical tests and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH5124Semester 15No

Actuarial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Baule
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take MTH4300 or take MTH4400 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 or take MTH4500 or take MTH4600 )

Description: Mathematics is used extensively to value annuities and assurances. We study compound interest, rates of discount, and interest compounded continuously. We will understand the idea of present value and how present value allows us to appraise investment projects. We cover annuities-certain. We consider life tables and use them to find the expected present value of life annuities and life assurances, premiums if life assurances are paid for by life annuities, and surrender value of life assurances.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid-term Examination
  • Item 2: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150Semester 26No

Numerical Computing with C and C++

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michail Agathos
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5001 and take MTH5123

Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

Only available to students in the School of Mathematical Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 80% Coursework 2
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141Semester 16Yes

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Johnson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
MSci ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH717UFull year7No

MSci Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha

Description: You will write a report that must present the study of some mathematical topic at fourth-year undergraduate level and must be your own work in the sense that it gives an original account of the material, but it need not contain new mathematical results. The list of potential projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted for a specific project only after agreement between the module organiser and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report, Presentation and (possibly) Oral Examination
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745PSemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Navid Nabijou

Description: This is a course in modern abstract algebra, with a focus on Galois theory. This is a beautiful subject which uses group theory to study the symmetries and solutions of polynomial equations. We begin by building up some necessary tools from the theory of rings and fields, and go on to develop the notions of field extension and Galois group. Towards the end of the module we will be able to prove several remarkable results such as the impossibility of certain ruler-and-compass constructions, and the impossibility of creating a general formula for the solution of quintic polynomials. The latter of these was famously proved by the French revolutionary Évariste Galois shortly before his death in a duel at the age of 20.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151Semester 16Yes

Partial Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shengwen Wang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 5% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Actuarial Science and Data Analytics DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH7029PSemester 37No

Actuarial Science and Data Analytics Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica

Description: Each Actuarial Science and Data Analytics MSc student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. Students may find a potential supervisor and fill out an Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The module organiser will support this process and ensure that all students are allocated supervisor and project.
The supervisor and project must be approved by the Actuarial Science and Data Analytics MSc Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, covering a specific research-level, industry applied topic in Actuarial Science and Data Analytics. The dissertation will follow the CP2 and CP3 (Core Practices) syllabuses of IFoA examinations. The project will consist of two parts: modelling and communication. The modelling part ensures that the student is able to critically analyse and model commonly used data in actuarial work, maintaining an audit trail, using analytical and statistical methods (performing computation, simulations, or analysis) and generate innovative outputs . The communication part ensures that the student is able to communicate effectively in writing to both actuarial and non-actuarial audiences. An oral presentation of results may be required. The student usually will work on case studies in order to understand and explain actuarial questions. Results from one or more journal articles need to be applied. An MSc project may also involve collaboration with a collaborator based in industry. An MSc project should help prepare students for working as qualified actuaries and even following PhD research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Mathematical Tools for Asset and Liability ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH7028PSemester 27Yes

Mathematical Tools for Asset and Liability Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica

Description: This module introduces key concepts in financial economics and risk management. We will learn economic theories used by investors to determine their optimal portfolio of investment: utility theory, stochastic dominance, mean-variance portfolio theory, CAPM, factor models and arbitrage pricing theory. We consider next efficient market theory. We learn various tests for testing efficient market theory. We also introduce stochastic models for asset prices. Finally we study topics related to ruin/risk theory and look at how insurance companies estimate their liabilities using run-off triangles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Final exam (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Midterm assessment
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134Semester 16Yes

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: The module will develop the general theory of linear models, building on theory taught in Statistical Modelling I. This module will introduce generalised linear models, which can be used for modelling data such as binary data and count data, where a normal distribution would not be appropriate. These developments dramatically extend the range of problems that can be studied. The methods will be implemented using R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127Semester 26Yes

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Farber
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105Semester 26Yes

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790PSemester 17No

Programming in C++ for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Computer-based Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 50% Computer-based Assessment 2
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Financial EngineeringMathematical SciencesMTH7027PSemester 27Yes

Financial Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module covers advanced techniques in financial engineering, which are essential if you want to pursue jobs in financial institutions. We first study the discrete-time binomial model for asset pricing, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional expectations. Then we look at continuous time models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation. We solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest rate models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Final written exam (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Assessed coursework
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH7025PSemester 17Yes

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Survival models are of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry. This module covers part of the core principles syllabus of the IFoA's Subject Actuarial Statistics (CS2). The material covered includes the mathematics of survival models, estimation of lifetime distributions, Binomial and Poisson mortality models, graduation of crude rates, goodness-of-fit of derived models, and methods of projecting mortality rates. This module provides deep knowledge of a number of parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates for survival and mortality. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm assignment
  • Item 2: 80% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Applied Statistics and Data Science DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH7022PSemester 37No

Applied Statistics and Data Science Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Silvia Liverani

Description: Each Applied Statistics and Data Science MSc student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation.

A list of supervisors and projects will be provided in Semester B from which students can choose. Students will be offered the opportunity to discuss the project with potential supervisors in order to ensure an optimal match. They will then complete the Applied Statistics and Data Science MSc Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B.

The module organiser will support this process and ensure that all students find a project and supervisor in Semester B.

A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, covering a specific research-level topic in Applied Statistics and Data Science, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles and/or performing computation, simulations, or analysis. An MSc project may also involve collaboration with a collaborator based in industry. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107Semester 16Yes

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take MTH4300 or take MTH4400 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Professional Development IIMathematical SciencesMTH5127Semester 15No

Actuarial Professional Development II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

Description: This is a compulsory module, counting towards your final degree classification, that is designed to help you build your professional and business skills and knowledge, and prepare for employment in the financial services industry. The module is a continuation of the skills development included in Actuarial Professional Development 1. The focus in this module is applying actuarial skills to business situations, developing a working knowledge of the Actuaries Code and related professional standards, and developing an awareness of key business issues that are relevant to the work of an actuary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1: Video presentation (year 2)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2: Report (year 2)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750USemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750PSemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH712PSemester 17No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Maltsev

Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Applied Statistical ModellingMathematical SciencesMTH7021PSemester 17Yes

Applied Statistical Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Silvia Liverani

Description: The module aims to provide students with a solid understanding of the theory and applications of the General Linear Models as used in modern Statistical Applications. This framework of models consists of a generalisation of linear regression that includes more general response variables such as binary, multinomial, ordinal, Poisson random variables amongst others where the underlying parameters or a function of them depend in linear fashion of the input variables.
The module will provide an introduction to the basic techniques in these advanced topics. Including a review of linear and logistic regression and will progress onto how this model can be extended to more general random variables.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm assignment
  • Item 2: 80% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Survey SamplingMathematical SciencesMTH7019PSemester 27Yes

Survey Sampling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar

Description: - The module will commence with an overview of the basic principles of sampling, types of surveys, their applications, and the importance of representative samples and sources of bias in surveys.

- The following lessons will cover Simple Random sampling, Stratified sampling, Cluster Sampling, and Systematic Sampling

- The rest of the module will focus on diagnostics for the efficacy of the techniques above, particularly covering Sampling Bias, Sampling Error, Estimation, Weighting, and Adjustment.

The delivery will be centered around realistic cases and the use of R (potentially presenting Python syntax as a complement).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm assessment
  • Item 2: 80% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Risk Analytics DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH7018PSemester 37No

Risk Analytics Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: Each Risk Analytics MSc student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. It not only trains students' ability to apply the risk analytical tools to solve real-world problems, but also provides a chance to practice collaboration and communication skills and data visualisation skills. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out a Risk Analytics MSc Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the Risk Analytics MSc Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 pages, covering a specific research-level topic in Risk Analytics, usually requiring the student to apply risk management tools to measure, predict, or manage certain types of risks. An MSc project may also involve collaboration with a collaborator based in industry. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Sustainability and Climate Risk AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH7017PSemester 27Yes

Sustainability and Climate Risk Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH7015P

Description: In this module, we discuss contemporary climate risks and sustainability issues, and measure them using various risk analytical models. We first introduce basic analytical tools for climate risk management. Then you are guided to develop appropriate strategies to manage the climate risks and evaluate responses. The module also helps you critically understand the legislation across the world relating to climate risk management and the implications for business. We use real-world data to perform climate risk analytics under different climate scenarios, which predict different climate futures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Individual project
  • Item 2: 80% Final written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Biostatistics and Medical StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH7020PSemester 27Yes

Biostatistics and Medical Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Silvia Liverani

Description: This module will start by providing an overview of the field and its contemporaneous challenges with particular emphasis on ethical considerations and data confidentiality related to biomedical research.
Students will also be provided with a review of the basic probabilistic and statistical techniques such as the basic probability distributions and hypothesis testing.
The rest of the module will combine coverage of the following:

1. Statistical notions
Including analysis of categorical data (chi-square, logistic regression) and continuous data (t-test, ANOVA)

2. Applications
Data visualization, clinical trials, experimental design, survival analysis, meta-analysis and systematic reviews.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm assignment
  • Item 2: 80% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787USemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH5123Semester 15Yes

Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take MTH4300 or take MTH4400
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: Differential equations frequently arise in application of mathematics to science, engineering , social science and economics. This module provides an introduction to the methods of analysis and solution of simple classes of ordinary differential equations. The topics covered will include first- and second-order differential equations, autonomous systems of differential equations and analysis of stability of their solutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH776PSemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods and demonstrate  that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction.  In the Module you will learn to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and apply Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771USemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Statistics for InsuranceMathematical SciencesMTH5126Semester 25No

Statistics for Insurance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Fang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module begins with a study of loss distributions, with and without reinsurance. We then study compound distributions and their applications in risk modelling. The module then introduces the concepts of copulas and extreme value theory. Finally, we study topics related to ruin theory and look at how insurance companies estimate their liabilities using run-off triangles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 60% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142Semester 26Yes

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115Semester 16Yes

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 5% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some deterministic rule: all future states are determined by the present state in conjunction with the rule which determines the system's evolution. In discrete time, a dynamical system might evolve by the repeated application of a map; in continuous time, it might evolve according to a flow or a differential equation. Dynamical systems are therefore a fundamental tool in modelling real-world phenomena in the sciences. In this module we investigate the qualitative behaviours of dynamical systems in continuous time, considering questions such as: what features does the future evolution from a given point have? How does this future trajectory of the system depend on the initial state? If the dynamical system's underlying rule is itself changed, how do the qualitative features of its trajectories change?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Regulatory Risk AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH7016PSemester 27Yes

Regulatory Risk Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Fang
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH7015P

Description: This module gives you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career not only in risk management functions, but also in regulatory institutes, e.g., central banks. It is based on Foundations of Mathematics and Statistics and goes deeper, from the lens of regulators specifically. We discuss different types of systemic risks and corresponding strategies to manage them. Then we study models on systemic risk and financial crises, e.g., extreme value theory, network analysis, and learn their recent development and application. Real data on past crises are analysed using the models. To equip you as a future regulator, we introduce the most frontier risk regulation and risk culture across different countries and areas as well. You will take the initiative to propose appropriate risk regulation in the context of risk cultures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Individual project
  • Item 2: 80% Final written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Foundations of Mathematics and StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH7015PSemester 17Yes

Foundations of Mathematics and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Fang

Description: This module introduces students to analytical tools used in risk management. After an introduction of basic probability theory and statistics used in physical and life sciences and economics, you will get an overview of statistical models used in risk modelling. You will learn applications of stochastic processes to finance and loss distribution models to liability valuation. This module includes real-world data applications using R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Final written exam (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Assessed coursework
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700USemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

Description: This module introduces you to a range of skills and knowledge which are required for research in the mathematical sciences but which are not always encountered in undergraduate study. We will consider: what mathematical research is, and how it is published and disseminated; strategies for searching the research literature; strategies for reading research papers efficiently and effectively; effective written and spoken mathematical communication; and the use of LaTeX to create mathematical documents and presentation slides. This module is assessed by a single piece of coursework (which covers the literature search, reading and writing aspects of the module) together with an oral presentation and supporting slides.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Answer questions and summarize Paper
  • Item 2: 20% Prepare slides
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Presentation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Bayesian Statistical MethodsMathematical SciencesMTH6102Semester 16Yes

Bayesian Statistical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eftychia Solea
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. You will be shown some of the drawbacks with classical statistical methods and that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction. At the end you will be able to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of situations and know how to use suitable software. Bayesian methods are being increasingly used across many applications and it is important that you know about them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Risk Management 2Mathematical SciencesMTH7014PSemester 27Yes

Actuarial Risk Management 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica

Description: This module will start by introducing students to contract design of financial products. We will consider the process of gathering and using appropriate data for recommending actuarial solutions. We will then move to modelling -we will learn how to analyse mortality and morbidity data, including factors that contribute to the variation in mortality and morbidity by region and in different social and economic environment. We will also study the cost and the pricing of providing benefits on contingent events. We will finally consider investment management (valuation of individual investments and valuation of portfolios of investments). The module also will provide understanding of the process of implementing and monitoring of actuarial solutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm assignment
  • Item 2: 80% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Risk Management 1Mathematical SciencesMTH7013PSemester 17Yes

Actuarial Risk Management 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica

Description: This module will start by providing an understanding of actuarial advice and how it can be used to meet the needs of stakeholders in both public and private institutions. The module will provide a deep understanding of the actuarial control cycles with their applications. We will also study risk governance, risk identification and classification, risk measurement and responses to risk. We consider scenario analysis, stress-testing and stochastic modeling in the evaluation of risk. The module will focus on capital management and monitoring and it will end with an overview of the general business environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm assignment
  • Item 2: 80% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787PSemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132Semester 26Yes

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106Semester 16Yes

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 5 matching mth

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157Semester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773USemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Computer-based Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 50% Computer-based Assessment 2
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745USemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Navid Nabijou
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH5101 or take MTH5100 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5125Semester 25No

Actuarial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Melania Nica
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5124

Description: This module extends the methods used in Actuarial Mathematics I. We study concepts involved with gross premium reserves, including death strain, mortality profit and Thiele's equation. We show how to calculate life table functions, annuities and assurances involving two lives, assuming independence. We describe and use methods of valuing expected cashflows that are contingent upon multiple decrement events. We investigate projected cashflow techniques for pricing unit-linked contracts. We describe the principal forms of heterogeneity within a population.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH709USemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6102
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH6134

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods and demonstrate  that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction.  In the Module you will learn to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and apply Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Comparative Competition LawLawSOLM290Semester 27No

Comparative Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: Competition law has witnessed an impressive increase in significance and geographical scope during the last two decades or so. From the situation which existed in the 1980s ¿ when there were only a few systems of competition law in the world ¿ we have moved to a new one where currently there are about 145 jurisdictions in which some form of competition law has been introduced with many others seeking to develop the process. It is anticipated that this remarkable geographical expansion of the law will increase in the future.

With this unprecedented increase in significance and remarkable geographical expansion of the law (as well as other significant developments such as the process of globalisation), it has become important to examine the role and place of competition law and policy in a globalised economy. The course will aim at such an examination.

The course is designed to include 'comparative' elements, covering, among other things, developed competition law systems (EU competition law, US antitrust law, German competition law and the Japanese competition law system), and the newer competition systems such as those of BRICS nations. The origins, structure, major provisions and the enforcement mechanisms of these systems will be discussed.

In the light of the globalisation of markets, this module will focus on the different elements of various competition law systems. Starting with an introduction to competition law and economics, we will then proceed with discussing different regimes in a comparative perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Shipping LawLawSOLM917Semester 37No

Dissertation in International Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Advocacy in Commercial DisputesLawSOLM276Semester 37No

Advocacy in Commercial Disputes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Pope

Description: This module offers the opportunity to learn about advocacy from an experienced English commercial barrister. The module begins by examining the role and nature of advocacy in commercial disputes. It then considers the theory of persuasion, a subject that is - surprisingly - rarely taught to law students. The rest of the module investigates the key skills of professional advocates, including oral and written submissions, and cross-examination. The module draws on a range of materials, from the rhetoric handbooks of classical antiquity to videos of recent hearings in the UK Supreme Court.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law and Economics of Regulation and ComplianceLawSOLM259Semester 17No

Law and Economics of Regulation and Compliance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This course covers different topics of economic analysis of regulation and compliance. The first part of the course focuses on the economic theory of regulations. The second part of the course investigates different regulated industries: environment, energy, telecom, and financial sector. Finally, the course discusses the economics of compliance and what happens when industries are deregulated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Multiple choice
  • Item 2: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Essay 2 (1000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Psychological Therapies: Applications and EffectivenessundefinedWOFM998Semester 27No

Psychological Therapies: Applications and Effectiveness

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Andrea Palinski

Description: The module maps out both classic and contemporary work in mental health and relates theory to practice, particularly in psychotherapy. Research is drawn from a number of different therapeutic treatments, such as psychoanalysis, CBT, group and family therapy and 3rd wave therapies. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the effectiveness of each method and how these are used to treat a range of mental illnesses such as Psychosis, Depression and Personality Disorders.
Students will be also submitting a reflective piece based on their clinical placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Discussion Paper
  • Item 2: 10% Attendance and Participation
  • Item 3: 50% Placement Reflective Piece (2000 words)
Level: 7
Cultural Psychology and Psychiatry: Clinical ApplicationsundefinedWOFM996Semester 27No

Cultural Psychology and Psychiatry: Clinical Applications

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Andrea Palinski

Description: The module links theory to practice, providing an overview of culturally competent approaches to the assessment, treatment and prevention of mental illness in local and global contexts. Students are introduced to research evaluating cultural competency at different levels of service delivery including culturally adapted psychological therapies, culturally appropriate assessment tools, clinical and organizational strategies to improve accessibility of mental health services, cultural competency training frameworks as well as strategic approaches to equitable global mental health care. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the importance and effectiveness of these different approaches and how they are used to enhance and improve available psychological interventions and systems of service delivery to treat a range of mental illnesses across diverse populations.
Students will be also submitting a reflective piece based on their work/clinical placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Oral Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Applied Practice Report (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Attendance and Participation
Level: 7
DissertationLawSOLM925Semester 37No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Regulation and ComplianceLawSOLM926Semester 37No

Dissertation in Regulation and Compliance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant specialisation within the academic fields of Regulations and Compliance.
The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor.
It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Case Study (5000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Independent Research Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Modern PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4402Semester 14Yes

Modern Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam

Description: This module covers the dramatic developments in physics that occurred in the early twentieth century, introducing special and general relativity and quantum theory. In relativistic mechanics we will study special relativity; the Lorentz transformation; length contraction and time dilation; the clock paradox; relativistic kinematics and dynamics; general relativity and its tests and consequences; and black holes and galactic lenses. In quantum theory, we will study descriptions of the evidence for particle-like properties of waves, and wave-like properties of particles, followed by their consequences and their formal expression in physical law: topics include Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's equation and elementary quantum mechanics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Course Work 1 Maths Portfolio
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2 Mid-Semester Test
  • Item 3: 15% Course Work 3 Group Based Assessment
  • Item 4: 60% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Common Law from Theory to PracticeLawSOLM288Semester 27No

Common Law from Theory to Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noam Gur

Description: Common law adjudication often appears like a patchwork of decisions with limited overall coherence. Are there any fundamental theoretical principles that can help us gain a deeper understanding of the common law and its workings, both as legal scholars and as practitioners? The central aim of this module is to identify such principles, use them to critically evaluate the common law, and examine how they operate in court cases. The module consists of three parts, as follows.

The first part looks at the common law from the perspective of political and legal theory concepts such as the rule of law, democracy, separation of powers, and social utility and change. It discusses questions such as: Do common law judges make policy? Is the common law undemocratic? Is the common law able to provide the certainty required for modern commercial life? The learning will include, inter alia, a case study, whereby students will have the opportunity to apply the above themes to a court case of their choice.

The second part looks at the common law¿s operation in a colonial context. Here the common law will be discussed, e.g., as an arena of struggle for emancipation from colonial power, and special attention will be given to the delicate interface between the common law and local norms (such as customary and religious laws) in colonies or former colonies.

The third part turns the spotlight onto private law as a central area of common law adjudication. It explores questions such as: Is there a unifying theory that can hold together different areas of private law, such as tort, contract, and property law, and, if so, what is that theory? Should common law judges use private law as an instrument for advancing of policy goals, such as social utility or more equitable distribution of wealth, or should they focus solely on correcting wrongs?

Graduates of this module will gain a theoretically-informed insight into the common law, which would benefit their work as practitioners and scholars alike.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The EU and International law: EU external economic relationsLawSOLM287Semester 17No

The EU and International law: EU external economic relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelos Dimopoulos

Description: This course focuses on the relations of the EU with other countries, focusing on particular on international economic relations. It discusses a vital component of the European edifice, that is the international economic agreements the EU concluded in the framework of EU external relations law.
The EU is an active player globally and participates in manifold international agreements. Trade and Investment policy has always been one of the most important areas where the EU has been active in relations with third countries. After the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, the EU has acquired the much-needed and long-awaited institutional and substantive instruments to implement a comprehensive, consistent and effective external action in this field . The module provides a thorough analysis of the relevant legal framework and offers a critical review of its efficacy. It deals with the basic constitutional foundations of EU External Relations law and engages in a detailed analysis of the EU¿s substantive policy on international economic matters.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Environmental LawLawSOLM915Semester 37No

Dissertation in Environmental Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Tax LawLawSOLM914Semester 37No

Dissertation in Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Cultural Psychology and Psychiatry: Theory and MethodundefinedWOFM995Semester 27No

Cultural Psychology and Psychiatry: Theory and Method

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Andrea Palinski

Description: This module will provide a critical understanding of the intersection between culture and mental health within a global context. Students will be introduced to social science theories from disaplines such as anthropology and sociology which have been used to inform psychological and psychiatric understandings of mental illness and its treatment. Topics discussed will include the links between culture and mental processes, variations in the manifestation and interpretation of mental illness across cultures, challenges of assessment and treatment of mental illness within multicultural contexts and the impact of intersecting inequalities on the mental health of minority populations . Students will be encouraged to reflect on the impact of culture on both mental disorder and mental healthcare treatment at both local and global levels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Critical Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Applied Research Methods 2: PracticeundefinedWOFM994Semester 27No

Applied Research Methods 2: Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Dallas

Description: This module provides students with practical application of Applied Research Methods. The general aim is to equip students with transferable skills that can be either used towards completing an empirical project or conducting a systematic review.
There is no taught component in this module, except for 4 hours of tutorial sessions delivered on alternate weeks. These 4 sessions will be complementary to 5 tutorial sessions delivered in Semester 2 for Psychological Therapies:Paradigms and Systems and Psychological Therapies: applications and Effectiveness. The aim of these 4 tutorial sessions is to provide academic support for their completion of their Pilot study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45% Poster Presentation (reassessment by poster resubmission)
  • Item 2: 55% Poster Presentation Abstract
Level: 7
Tax Administration and ProcedureLawSOLM286Semester 27No

Tax Administration and Procedure

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module is designed to enable students to understand a range of legal issues that arise in connection with the organisation and operation of tax administrations and the design and implementation of tax procedures. In particular, it will consider organisational models for and core functions of tax administrations, legal design of tax procedures, tax procedure and taxpayer rights, and tax dispute resolution and prevention mechanisms. It will also examine case studies of tax administration and tax procedure reform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000) words)
Level: 7
Law
International Natural Resources LawLawSOLM254Semester 17No

International Natural Resources Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rebecca Bates

Description: The international legal regime relating to natural resources is complex and multi-dimensional. It is found in many places, based on doctrines of public international law, regional and local laws as well specific treaty obligations. It is also a dynamic area of international law as changes in technology and environmental awareness of the impact of such developments have led to further changes in legal regime. Concepts in Natural Resources Law: Climate, Energy and Water intersects and supports the study of other disciplines including international environmental law, energy law, as well as international investment law and international economic law. Concepts in Natural Resources Law: Climate, Energy and Water examines the area of International Natural Resources Law from a multi-dimensional perspective with a particular emphasis on climate, energy and water resources. The impact of globalisation and international legal rules on activities in the natural resources sector will be explored throughout the unit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Public International LawLawSOLM913Semester 37No

Dissertation in Public International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Public Affairs AdvocacyLawSOLM274Semester 37No

Public Affairs Advocacy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: This module will examine the theory and practice of public affairs advocacy. Public affairs advocacy concerns how organizations try to influence the development of public policy and its resultant implementation through laws, regulations and related measures. Such advocacy may occur at a national, regional or international level, and is an increasingly important area of practice for lawyers. With technological disintermediation culling many functions of traditional legal services, a premium is placed on the very human skills of political advocacy - the ability of legal counsel to help their clients and organizations navigate the external world to influence and effect positive changes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Applied Research Methods 1: TheoryundefinedWOFM993Semester 17No

Applied Research Methods 1: Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Dallas

Description: This module provides students with essential knowledge and skills about Applied Research Methods. The general aim is to equip students with transferable skills that can be either used towards completing an empirical project or conducting a systematic review.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Annotated Bibliography (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Protocol (1500 words)
Level: 7
Professional Skills in Mental HealthundefinedWOFM992Semester 17No

Professional Skills in Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Dallas

Description: This module equips students with knowledge of core skills employed by Mental Health professionals in their workplace. The module maps out both classic and contemporary work in mental health settings and relates theory and research to practice, particularly in psychotherapy. Theory and research are drawn from a number of distinct areas, such as clinical and counselling psychology with a review of core mental health skills, such as assessment, diagnosis and formulation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Attendance and Participation
  • Item 2: 80% Iterative Case Study (2000 words)
Level: 7
Practical Techniques for Data SciencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5131Semester 25Yes

Practical Techniques for Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcella Bona
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4122
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA5666

Description: In this module, you will develop a broad range of skills in the practical analysis of real-world data. This will cover all of the major steps of data analysis, including the cleaning and pre-processing of datasets, initial analysis and visualisation techniques, the selection of appropriate methods to perform in-depth analyses and make statistical inferences from them, the fitting of meaningful physical models in the presence of imperfections and noise in the data, and the estimation of uncertainties and how they affect the conclusions that can be drawn. This module has an emphasis on the hands-on application of data analysis techniques using the Python and R programming languages, and is taught partly through lectures and partly through computer-based lab projects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 50% Final Project
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Mental Health in ContextundefinedWOFM991Semester 17No

Mental Health in Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Dallas

Description: This module provides students with knowledge about how mental health can be viewed in different contexts. From causal and protective factors to prevention, stigmatization, rehabilitation and social integration. It is also aimed at addressing contemporary issues, such as the impact of digital technology on mental health and the extent to which world crises can affect the onset and prognosis of mental illness. This module aims at enhancing critical thinking skills by giving the opportunity to reflect on the reciprocal relationship between the context and the individual. Issues or health inequalities, continuity of care and accessibility to mental health care are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Critical Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
DissertationundefinedWOFM990Semester 37No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Dallas

Description: This module is designed for students undertaking a research project in their chosen area of mental health.
Although this module is predominately independent study, students are expected to complete a set of formative assessments and have regular contact with their supervisor in order to monitor progress.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Art, Business and LawLawSOLM924Semester 37No

Dissertation in Art, Business and Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Classical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4401Semester 14Yes

Classical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anthony Phillips

Description: This module reviews the classical understanding of space, time and motion. We will study kinematics and dynamics; rotational motion (including the gyroscope); gravity and planetary orbits. In the second part of the module, we focus on oscillatory phenomena and wave motion. Topics will include the 1D wave equation; free, damped, forced and coupled oscillations; resonance and driven simple harmonic motion; interference, beats and standing waves; simple diffraction phenomena; and the Doppler effect in sound and light.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Course Work 1 Maths Portfolio
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2 Mid-Semester Test
  • Item 3: 15% Course Work 3 Group Based Assessment
  • Item 4: 60% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Psychological Therapies: Applications and EffectivenessundefinedWOFM988Semester 27No

Psychological Therapies: Applications and Effectiveness

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Andrea Palinski

Description: The module maps out both classic and contemporary work in mental health and relates theory to practice, particularly in psychotherapy. Research is drawn from a number of different therapeutic treatments, such as psychoanalysis, CBT, group and family therapy and 3rd wave therapies. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the effectiveness of each method and how these are used to treat a range of mental illnesses such as Psychosis, Depression and Personality Disorders.
Students will be also submitting a reflective piece based on their clinical placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Discussion Paper
  • Item 2: 10% Attendance and Participation
  • Item 3: 50% Placement Reflective Piece (2000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications LawLawSOLM923Semester 37No

Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Criminal JusticeLawSOLM922Semester 37No

Dissertation in Criminal Justice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Data Protection Law Compliance and PracticeLawSOLM285Semester 37No

Data Protection Law Compliance and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SOLM209 or take SOLM222

Description: This module offers a practical legal learning experience in data protection law compliance. It will be based on various compliance scenarios and activities that a data protection officer or in-house privacy counsel would likely face in assisting the processor or controller for whom they work to meet the requirements of the relevant legal framework in their ongoing personal data processing activities of the data . Although this module will primarily focus on the EU/UK General Data Protection Regulation, the skills and knowledge acquired from the course materials and learning exercises will be relevant to most data protection legal frameworks and data protection compliance practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group Practice Exercise Presentation Evaluation
  • Item 2: 85% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Business LawLawSOLM911Semester 37No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Intellectual Property LawLawSOLM910Semester 37No

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Legal TechLawSOLM273Semester 37No

Legal Tech

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Karen Watton

Description: A course will be taught by leading practitioners in legal engineering and design, combining both academic and hands-on practical experience using some of the latest legal tech. This module will examine the theory and application of technology to legal practice and procedures It will consider how machine learning and AI has been, and could be, deployed within the legal sector to provide substantive legal advice, procedural risk analysis, the provision of legal services and contract and practice management. The interaction of technology and legal design will be examined, as well as the practical, legal and ethical issues that legal tech raise.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Applied Research Methods 2: PracticeundefinedWOFM984Semester 27No

Applied Research Methods 2: Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Dallas

Description: This module provides students with practical application of Applied Research Methods. The general aim is to equip students with transferable skills that can be either used towards completing an empirical project or conducting a systematic review.
There is no taught component in this module, except for 4 hours of tutorial sessions delivered on alternate weeks. These 4 sessions will be complementary to 5 tutorial sessions delivered in Semester 2 for Psychological Therapies:Paradigms and Systems and Psychological Therapies: applications and Effectiveness. The aim of these 4 tutorial sessions is to provide academic support for their completion of their Pilot study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45% Poster Presentation (reassessment by poster resubmission)
  • Item 2: 55% Poster Presentation Abstract
Level: 7
Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesWHR6028Full year6No

Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Mr Rayomand Khambata

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work, resulting in a piece of original research in the area of pharmacology and therapeutics. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Dissertation (12,000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Practical work
  • Item 3: 20% Oral presentation (15 min)
Level: 6
Children, Law, and SocietyLawSOLM271Semester 27No

Children, Law, and Society

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hedi Viterbo

Description: This module engages with legal and moral debates relating to children, at both the international and national levels. It examines a wide range of child-focused issues, such as those concerning colonialism, racialisation, sexuality, state regulation of the family, and children¿s voices. Students are introduced to relevant theories and studies, among which are theories of children's rights, postcolonial and anti-racist scholarship, queer theory, criticisms of child development theories, and writing about risk and 'moral panic'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Independent research essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Class Presentation
  • Item 3: 5% Weekly written assignment 1
  • Item 4: 5% Weekly written assignment 2
  • Item 5: 5% Weekly written assignment 3
  • Item 6: 5% Weekly written assignment 4
  • Item 7: 5% Weekly written assignment 5
Level: 7
Law
Regulation and Compliance ClinicLawSOLM258Semester 27No

Regulation and Compliance Clinic

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: The Regulation and Compliance Clinic is the opportunity for students to apply the skills and knowledge they acquire about regulation and compliance to a real life setting. In this this module, students will work with partners to (1) develop and hone their oral presentation skills; (2) develop and hone their written professional skills; and (3) understand and replicate how entities deal with regulatory issue. The Clinic blends problem based approach with hands-on experience.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Group Oral Presentation (5 min)
  • Item 2: 75% Paper (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
History and Memory I: Narratives of Nation (F)undefinedULC214Semester 15No

History and Memory I: Narratives of Nation (F)

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description:

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Engagement and Participation
Level: 5
History of Sensibilities and EmotionsundefinedULC204Semester 15No

History of Sensibilities and Emotions

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: In recent years, scholars have increasingly turned their attention to historical experiences and practices of emotion. Today, the History of emotions constitutes a growing field of enquiry, particularly in anglophone universities. The field has, however, drawn considerable inspiration from French scholarship on the history of bodies and sensibilities. This module encourages students to engage with scholarship in English and in French in order to understand emotional experience, expression and practice in the modern era. Focusing on emotion in Western European societies and colonial empires, students will be invited to reflect on how modern understandings of race, gender and the body gave rise to `emotional regimes¿, and how communities of sentiment were imagined, maintained and contested by historical actors through diverse cultural practices which constituted different bodies in different ways. The module will provide students with the terminology and methodologies particular to the historical study of emotions, and encourage them to think about the experience and expression of emotions such as love, fear, loneliness and nostalgia in specific historical contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45% Source analysis
  • Item 2: 55% Essays
Level: 5
The Worldmaking of Objects : A Political Economy of International TradeundefinedULC338Semester 26No

The Worldmaking of Objects : A Political Economy of International Trade

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This course is about thinking the global from the point of view of objects and tracing the worldmaking they do through the human and non-human assemblages their trajectories create. This tight focus on objects will be our point of entry into thinking international trade, its histories and differential effects across various places, the inequalities, foreclosures and unexpected openings and entanglements it has produced. We will start by exploring what makes an object a commodity before tackling its various modes of circulation and ways of thinking about and representing the territories it traverses, the transfers, translations and transformations it operates. We will simultaneously practice different ways of narrating these worldmaking operations of objects, through ethnographic and mapping techniques.

Assessment:Level: 6

Y2K BD: The Fin de Millénaire Bande DesinéeundefinedULC315Semester 16No

Y2K BD: The Fin de Millénaire Bande Desinée

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description:

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Issues in Contemporary French PoliticsundefinedULC160Full year4No

Issues in Contemporary French Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: This module offers students an introduction to key contemporary social/poltical issues through weekly lectures and seminars, supplemented by external site visits. All teaching is in English. Assessments will be set and marked in English but students have the possibility to write in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Coursework 2
Level: 4
Exploitation of Energy Resources in Disputed AreasLawSOLM251Semester 17No

Exploitation of Energy Resources in Disputed Areas

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The module on Exploitation of Energy Resources in Disputed Areas examines the international legal issues arising in connection with exploration and exploitation of energy resources in disputed areas (both onshore and offshore, eg the South China Sea) from both a theoretical and practical perspective. It examines international rules and practices relating to disputed areas and how exploitation can proceed even when agreement on a boundary delimitation cannot be reached.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Moot Court Competition
Level: 7
Law
EU Competition LawLawSOLM248Semester 17No

EU Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: The Module EU Competition Law (along with the co-requisite Module EU Competition Law and Practice) aims at a comprehensive study of the basic provisions of European Union (EU) competition law. The Module will provide participants with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EU competition law, especially Article 101 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) is applied. The Module will aim to consider an important business phenomenon in the market namely anti-competitive agreements. It is hoped that by the end of the Module participants will gain a solid understanding of the relevant competition rules of the EU whilst developing a good business and market perspective and practical approach in order to help them identify situations in which such phenomenon may arise and how should this phenomenon be addressed.

EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Articles 101 TFEU; as well as a number of block exemption Regulations, notably those dealing with: Vertical Restraints; Technology Transfer; and Horizontal Research and Development and Specialisation Agreements. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 102 TFEU.

EU competition rules are applied by the Directorate General (DG COMPETITION (COMP)) of the European Commission, the Directorate in charge of competition matters; there is also shared competence with designated national competition authorities (NCAs) in relation to the application of Articles 101 (and 102) TFEU. Decisions of the Commission are the principal means of enforcement in competition cases. The Commission¿s decisions are subject to review by the General Court of the EU (GCEU) (formerly the Court of First Instance (CFI)) and the Court of Justice of the EU/European Court of Justice (CJEU/ECJ). This has created an extensive case-law in competition law matters and reference will be made to this case law.

In addition to considering substantive issues, the Module will also deal with relevant procedural mechanisms, such as cartel leniency and settlement mechanism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Law
The Buildings of London, from the Great Fire to the Present DayHistorySUM502GSemester 35No

The Buildings of London, from the Great Fire to the Present Day

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module, which will be taught on site in historic buildings, will introduce students to the history of London and its buildings from the late seventeenth century to the present day. This is an extremely dynamic period in London's history: nearly the entire city was destroyed and rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1666, the city then saw huge increases in its population in the eighteenth century, and massive technological and social change in the nineteenth. The twentieth century brought yet more destruction and rebuilding after the Blitz, alongside political and economic upheaval, all of which led to radical changes in the appearance of London's buildings. This century has seen huge new investment in the City, and the rise of gentrification in the suburbs.
Throughout the module, we will tell this story by visiting and considering many different types of buildings, from churches, hospitals, and palaces, to railway stations and housing estates. Along the way, we will explore questions of architectural style, the implications of social and cultural change for architecture, and urban and architectural history and theory more generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Source Analysis
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Applied Data SciencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPZ401Semester 24Yes

Applied Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module provides a wide range of introductory object-oriented programming, data analysis and data visualisation skills. The main focus is the powerful programming languages of Python, R, Matlab and visualisation tools of Tableau, Google Charts, Microsoft Power BI and JupyterR. The weekly interactive learning sessions will be supplemented by weekly computer laboratory/coding drop-in sessions allowing students to acquire the hands-on and on-screen experience they need in exploring the landscape of data science. Students will work collaboratively to draw conclusions and extract useful information from available datasets. They will gain the invaluable skills on how to interpret and report their analysis and results in ways that are informative and appropriate to varied audiences including internal and external stakeholders for informed decision making purposes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Data Analysis and Data Visualisation Assignment
  • Item 2: 10% Peer Evaluation
  • Item 3: 20% Data Analysis in groups (Report and Presentation)
  • Item 4: 60% Final Project (code + report)
Level: 4
Dissertation in Energy and Climate Change LawLawSOLM931Semester 37No

Dissertation in Energy and Climate Change Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Insurance Law (30 credits)LawSOLM930Semester 37No

Dissertation in Insurance Law (30 credits)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Professional Skills for ScientistsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4601Semester 24Yes

Professional Skills for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Hays

Description: This module develops professional and computational skills that are fundamental to the discipline, enable student engagement with employers, and expand student networks. Students develop introductory computational skills including using and writing computer programs to model physical systems, analyse quantitative data, and solve problems. These computational skills are applicable to any role that requires quantitative analysis and evidence-based decision making. Students will become proficient in preparing professional quality documents including scientific project reports, presentations and job application materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework CV preparation, mock job-application materials and related
  • Item 2: 35% Continuous Assessment in Lab
  • Item 3: 50% Coursework - Written computer code submission, data Analysis write-up
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Advanced Topics in European Trade Mark LawLawSOLM294Semester 37No

Advanced Topics in European Trade Mark Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: This module deals with advanced topics in trade mark law, theory and practice, including current developments in European jurisprudence and policy. The module will also provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the laws and procedures governing the acquisition, maintenance and enforcement of European Union Trade Marks (EUTMs), as well as substantive trade mark law and practice, policy and theory.
This module will be taught intensively over a period of 1 week in semester 3. Sem 3 is the final teaching semester taught early June to early July.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Economics of Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM293Semester 37No

Economics of Intellectual Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Noam Shemtov
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take CCLF002

Description: This module seeks to introduce an economic approach to understanding intellectual property. It will present the main branches of intellectual property as economic categories and will explain their economic characteristics, functions, impacts and conditions for efficiency. Each type of IP will be analysed as an income generating asset. The module will review the complex value chain, the opportunities that the exploitation of the asset generates and the specifics of its management. The module will examine the relevant issues from a global perspective providing perspectives from developed and developing economies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final assessment exercise
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Economic LawLawSOLM921Semester 37No

Dissertation in International Economic Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Human Rights LawLawSOLM909Semester 37No

Dissertation in Human Rights Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Law of PatentsLawSOLM291Semester 27No

International Law of Patents

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents provide, for a limited time, the right to exclude others from acts of making, using, selling, keeping or importing products containing the patented invention. Under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) WTO Members, in particular developing countries, face challenges in meeting their obligations to provide patent protection and related rights. The module will assess the extent to which these obligations derived from international law impact on access to healthcare treatments, traditional knowledge, biological diversity, farmers' rights, food security and human rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Written assessment (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in European LawLawSOLM908Semester 37No

Dissertation in European Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
European Law of PatentsLawSOLM292Semester 17No

European Law of Patents

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents are exclusive rights granted for the protection of an invention that offers a new and inventive technical solution or way of doing something. This module compares the process of obtaining and enforcing a patent under the provisions of the European Patent Convention (EPC) with special reference to the Unified Patent Court (UPC).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Written assessment (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Commercial ArbitrationLawSOLM256Semester 17No

International Commercial Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Behn

Description: This is an introductory module on the law and practice of international commercial arbitration. This one-semester module is aimed at students who do not specialise in dispute resolution and therefore does not require prior knowledge of the subject. However, the module may still be suitable for those not specialising in dispute resolution, but have some knowledge of the topic and would like to explore it in some further detail. This module will consider most of the key themes covered in the specialist arbitration modules but in less detail.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Researching Powerful OrganisationsLawSOLM281Semester 27No

Researching Powerful Organisations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Whyte

Description: The module will provide a set of skills that will enable participants, through a series of taught activities, to enhance research that focusses upon powerful institutions, namely governmental organisations and profitmaking corporations. It will introduce students to a range of innovative methodological techniques capable of generating novel data. The module will instruct students to uncover hidden aspects of the ways that powerful organisations `talk¿ and `act¿ in order to produce original case study materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Energy and Climate ChangeLawSOLM278Semester 27No

Energy and Climate Change

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module looks at the international legal regimes relating to climate change and consider how this will directly impact the energy sector. There is a fundamental shift in the energy industry away from fossil fuels (non renewable sources) to clean energy (renewable sources). This transition and how it will take place over the coming years will be discussed. This module will also consider emissions trading (ETS) and its effectiveness, the NDC (nationally determined contributions) of states to achieve climate change goals. In addition, it will consider the polluter pays principle as well as the growing number of climate change disputes and assess how these might impact future energy regulation, at an international and national level. The focus is climate change exclusively from the perspective of the energy sector. This module will consider new technologies (such as CCUS and hydrogen), renewable projects and emissions trading and its effectiveness.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Child LawLawSOLM270Semester 17No

International Child Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hedi Viterbo

Description: This module examines the broad and ever-expanding field of international child law. It looks at how international child law relates to various contexts, such as armed conflict, migration, criminal justice, education, and labour. Discussions in the module draw on a rich array of theoretical sources, including historical and anthropological studies of childhood, critical scholarship on international law and human rights, and criticisms of international children¿s rights law in particular.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Independent research essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Class Presentation
  • Item 3: 5% Weekly written assignment 1
  • Item 4: 5% Weekly written assignment 2
  • Item 5: 5% Weekly written assignment 3
  • Item 6: 5% Weekly written assignment 4
  • Item 7: 5% Weekly written assignment 5
Level: 7
Law
Reinsurance Law and International Risk TransferLawSOLM255Semester 27No

Reinsurance Law and International Risk Transfer

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: Reinsurance involves insurance (and reinsurance) companies insuring all or part of the risks they write with other (re)insurance companies. Reinsurance is required by regulators but also makes business sense since it allows insurance companies to increase their capacity to write insurance. In this module we are looking at traditional reinsurance and innovative reinsurance solutions. We consider how reinsurance contracts are formed and how they can be structured. By reference to typical reinsurance market wordings, we will consider the interaction between the underlying insurance contract and the reinsurance contract and how their relationships impacts on the reinsurance terms and claims. We will also examine the structure and regulation of insurance-linked securities which are a means of risk transfer to, and of financing insurance risk in, the capital markets. London is one of the world centres of the reinsurance industry and the London reinsurance market is amongst the leaders in developing innovative reinsurance solutions. This module will provide a thorough understanding of this important and rapidly developing area of law and practice. English law is the governing law applied to Lloyd¿s and London market insurance and reinsurance policies, and is frequently chosen as governing law for international reinsurance transactions. The LLM in Insurance Law, of which this module forms part, opens up lucrative career opportunities in the global insurance and reinsurance industry, the legal sector, management consultancies and the financial services industry generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Physics LaboratoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5201Semester 25Yes

Physics Laboratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alan Drew
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4103

Description: This course aims to illustrate some important aspects of physics through experimental measurements. The course will be marked by continuous assessment of student laboratory notebooks, which will not be allowed to be removed from the laboratory. Students will perform a number of experiments over the term and will then have to write a scientific paper on one of the experiments that they have performed. The experiments are: Alpha particle spectroscopy; Thermal equation of state and critical point of ethane, Hall effect measurement of germanium; Building a Helium Neon Laser; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Building a Michelson Interferometer and measuring the magnetostriction of metals and the refractive index of air; X-ray diffraction spectroscopy; The Zeeman effect.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Experiment/lab book 1
  • Item 2: 10% Experiment/lab book 2
  • Item 3: 10% Experiment/lab book 3
  • Item 4: 10% Experiment/lab book 4
  • Item 5: 10% Experiment/lab book 5
  • Item 6: 15% Investigative design report
  • Item 7: 35% Final experimental report
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
International Merger Control: The JurisdictionsLawSOLM249Semester 17No

International Merger Control: The Jurisdictions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: Within the field of competition law, merger control has attracted special attention. The reason for this attention can be found in the special nature of mergers as a business phenomenon, especially when compared with other business phenomena, such as abuse of dominance by firms or cartel activities. The process of relentless globalisation which has been developing since the 1990s has meant that merger operations can produce an effect on the conditions of competition in more than one jurisdiction. This means that, quite inevitably, regulatory approval in more than one jurisdiction may need to be sought. Such a consequence ¿ as is widely accepted ¿ can give rise to uncertainty for the firms concerned and cause huge expense and significant delay. Those who are involved in advising business firms in a merger situation are also not immune from the uncertainty when merger operations have to be notified to more than one competition authority. Often legal advisors have to answer extremely difficult questions in merger cases, such as whether notification of the merger to the competition authorities in one or more jurisdictions is necessary or mandatory or even desirable; which authorities need to be notified; what is required for this purpose and how to go about notifying the authorities concerned; and how will the authorities assess the merger, including any relevant time framework within which they will operate and ultimately reach a decision in a given case.

The Module will aim at a thorough examination of the highly important phenomena of international mergers and their regulation worldwide. Different merger control regimes worldwide and their operation will be an important part of the focus in the Module.

The Module will be taught in a very practical manner, to reflect the very nature of the topic. A highly interesting range of case studies and the knowledge and expertise of practitioners in the field will be a key aspect of the course. The Module should prove to be attractive for students attending other competition law courses and those with an `international¿ dimension in other areas of commercial orientation on the LLM.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Independent Research EssayLawSOLM927Semester 37No

Independent Research Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: Independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Analysing Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOL350Semester 16Yes

Analysing Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Karl Pike

Description: The aim of this module is to examine the theory and practice of policy-making in modern liberal democratic political systems. The module explores the way in which public issues and problems are triggered, defined and constructed, how policy agendas are set, how decision making takes place, and how policies are implemented. The module is comparative in scope and focuses primarily on case studies from the UK and USA.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Portfolio
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Analysing Public Policy - Independent StudyPolitics and International RelationsPOL306Semester 26No

Analysing Public Policy - Independent Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Karl Pike
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POL350

Description: The aim of the module is to give students the opportunity to engage more systematically and rigorously in major debates about the public policy process by undertaking their own independent study. The course will require students to prepare draft policy advice for a major policy-making institution, NGO or civil society organisation. This structured exercise will require students to consider not only the content of advice but how to articulate policy advice clearly and concisely to an audience that may have limited technical knowledge of a particular policy problem or issue.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group presentation (15 min) (Reassessment by 1000-word policy proposal)
  • Item 2: 80% Policy Report (2500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
MSci Financial Mathematics DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH798UFull year7No

MSci Financial Mathematics Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha

Description: Each MSci Financial Mathematics student is required to complete a 30 credit project dissertation. Projects and supervisors will be allocated by the Programme Director at the start of the academic year, taking into account each student's particular interests, as far as is possible. A typical MSci project dissertation consists of 20 to 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in financial mathematics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. Students will also be expected to give a short presentation of their work to other students on the programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Dissertation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251ASemester 15Yes

International Relations Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jean-Francois Drolet

Description: This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Critical Review (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Global EthicsPolitics and International RelationsPOL385Semester 16Yes

Global Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kimberly Hutchings

Description: This module examines debates across the field of Global Ethics. It introduces students to frameworks for thinking about global moral questions concerning for example: the global distribution of wealth, the appropriate meaning of human rights in a multi-cultural world, environmental sustainability, migration, development aid, conflict-resolution and transitional justice. Students will be expected to evaluate different approaches to ethical judgment and to apply them to real world dilemmas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Article Review
  • Item 2: 70% Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Political AnalysisPolitics and International RelationsPOL105Full year4No

Political Analysis

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Ana Sofia Collignon Delmar

Description: This module serves as an introduction to a politics degree and the ideas, skills, methods and knowledge required to succeed in your studies of politics. You will be trained in a range of study and research skills, from enhancing your ability to write analytically to learning how to interpret a wide variety of political texts. You will also have the opportunity to interact with your personal tutor and conduct a small, independent research project. The module is taught through lectures and seminars, as well as through direct contact with your personal advisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Portfolio 1
  • Item 2: 10% Portfolio 2
  • Item 3: 30% Critical analysis of research
  • Item 4: 50% Research project
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Modern Political Thought 2Politics and International RelationsPOL264Semester 25Yes

Modern Political Thought 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lasse Thomassen

Description: This module builds on the analysis of concepts and ideologies begun in POL110. It enables students to follow through key ideas and debates about equality, power, revolution, democracy, identity and politics in modern political thought. It covers a range of thinkers from exemplars of Liberalism and Marxism to their anarchist, feminist, postcolonial and postmodern critics. The module focuses on thinkers from the mid- to late-C20th, such as Fanon, Gandhi, Beauvoir, Habermas, Rawls, Foucault (the thinkers may change from year to year).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOL358Semester 26Yes

US Foreign Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Loefflmann

Description: The United States plays a powerful role in contemporary international relations. Therefore understanding its place in the international system and how its foreign policy is made are of crucial importance for every student of international relations. The module broadly focuses on the theme of American power in the world, through three areas: the historical development of US foreign policy, the institutional background, and current expressions of American power. Knowledge of these areas will give a solid overview and understanding of US foreign policy in the contemporary world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Global HistoriesPolitics and International RelationsPOL109Semester 24Yes

Global Histories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Eastwood

Description: This module provides students with an introduction to the historical background against which contemporary international political developments unfold. It examines how connections have been forged between different societies, economies, cultures, and political practices over time and how this has made it possible to think of our history as global. A particular emphasis is placed on the importance of colonialism for understanding patterns of globalisation. The module is organised around a series of key tipping or turning points in global history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (1500 words)
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
More than Human PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL343Semester 26Yes

More than Human Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giulia Carabelli

Description: The module introduces students to more than human politics at an advanced UG level. We look at different scales of politics from the personal to the global/planetary to explore human and nonhuman entanglements. Specifically, we discuss the roles of nonhuman actors in scholarly and activist debates about advanced capitalism, histories of colonialisms, gender and racialised hierarchies to reflect on the possibility of growing liveable worlds.
As part of this module, students grow plants on campus with the aim to reflect on their personal experience of human/ nonhuman entanglements and to appreciate the links between everyday practice and theory. Together we interrogate the roles of nonhuman agents in world-making and the future.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Reflection Log (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Paper (2500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Environmental PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL304Semester 16Yes

Environmental Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Yao

Description: Today humanity faces a multidimensional environmental crisis, as we breach safe 'planetary boundaries' for climate change, chemical pollution, freshwater use, biodiversity loss, and more. Yet too often effective and sustained policy solutions have failed to materialize. This module will analyse how ideas, interest groups, and institutions shape environmental politics around the world, from the global to the local level. Together we will develop theoretically informed understandings of the crucial drivers of and obstacles to environmental action.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Policy memo (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Probability and Statistics for Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH794PSemester 17No

Probability and Statistics for Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arthur Guillaumin

Description: This module establishes the probability and statistics background required for students applying techniques or doing other advanced statistics Modules. The Module begins by covering the essential theoretical notions of probability and the distributions of random variables which underpin statistical methods. It then describes different types of statistical tests of hypotheses and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, life or physical sciences, business or economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Mini-project
  • Item 6: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251Full year5Yes

International Relations Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Jaakko Heiskanen

Description: This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Critical Review (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
The UK and the EUPolitics and International RelationsPOL268Semester 25Yes

The UK and the EU

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland

Description: Traditional modules analysing the UK's relationship with the EU begin with two or three sessions devoted to its historical development. Students often find this uninspiring, even though it is essential to understand the evolution of the EU. Academically, such an approach can be misleading, as it is descriptive and not particularly analytical. In response, the first half of the module is designed differently to the more conventional approaches. We begin by studying the most contemporary issue of European Integration: Brexit. Within the module we analyse why the UK joined when it did, the role it has played in the development of the EU, the position it has taken on key Treaty reforms, and why, in the summer of 2016, it took the decision to leave. This approach provides an insight into a very topical EU issue, while enabling students to learn about the history of the EU in a stimulating and engaging approach.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and IdeologiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL110Full year4Yes

Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and Ideologies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler

Description: This module combines an introduction to modern and contemporary ideologies with the analysis of key political concepts. It begins by examining conceptions of politics and the political, with particular attention to what it might mean to approach politics normatively/critically and through a range of theoretical perspectives. Next the module introduces modern political ideologies (including liberalism, socialism, conservatism, anarchism), paying attention both to their historical development and contemporary manifestations. The focus then shifts to an analysis of key political concepts (including human nature, liberty, democracy, justice, equality, rights), examining the ways in which these concepts are deployed within and by the different ideological traditions studied earlier. The emphasis throughout is upon relating the theoretical material to contemporary political movements and questions, and the module closes by addressing a series of contemporary issues (these will vary from year to year but may include identity, multiculturalism, property, the environment) that demonstrate the uses of political theory today.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Portfolio 1
  • Item 2: 10% In-class test
  • Item 3: 30% Portfolio 2
  • Item 4: 40% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247BSemester 25Yes

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

Description: The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Political Violence and Liberal ModernityPolitics and International RelationsPOL383Semester 26Yes

Political Violence and Liberal Modernity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jean-Francois Drolet

Description: "This module will introduce students to some of the most important intellectual debates concerning political violence and late modernity as a principle of socio-historical formation. More specifically, the course will draw on literature from various fields such as political theory, philosophy, sociology and international relations to consider the relationship between political violence and the changing nature and consequences of structural phenomena associated with the process of 'liberal modernisation' since the end of the nineteenth century (e.g. secularisation, societal rationalisation, technology, the transnationalisation of production and exchange, decolonisation, the constitutionalisation of the global order, the criminalisation of war etc.). The themes covered include state violence, civil war, revolution, imperialism, genocide, ethnic cleansing, humanitarian warfare and terrorism/counter-terrorism. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Written Exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Radical Politics TodayPolitics and International RelationsPOL379Semester 26Yes

Radical Politics Today

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lasse Thomassen

Description: What does it mean to be radical today? Where do we find examples of radical politics in the contemporary world? This module combines two things: we study important contemporary radical thinkers such as Michael Hardt & Antonio Negri, Slavoj Zizek, Ernesto Laclau & Chantal Mouffe; and we study concrete examples of radical politics such as the Occupy protests, the Alter-Globalisation Movement and the Zapatistas. Doing so, we examine the dilemmas faced by students and practitioners of radical politics and the theoretical and political issues that divide them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
The Global History and Politics of the Far RightPolitics and International RelationsPOL340Semester 16Yes

The Global History and Politics of the Far Right

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Saull

Description: Far right forms of politics have emerged as a significant political current in recent years - be it the dominance of Viktor Orban's Fidesz party in Hungary to the election successes of the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party in India. Much of the popular commentary on these developments has tended to ignore the longer-term presence and historical significance of this form of politics or reduce any historical reference to inter-war fascism. However, the far right has a longer historical pedigree - beyond that of (European) historical fascism - and can be seen to reflect a significant subaltern, if reactionary, ideo-political current in popular, mass and democratic forms of politics across a range of different if connected geopolitical locales from the late nineteenth century onwards. This module examines how and why a distinct far right and 'anti-Conservative' form of politics emerged and, in particular, how and why the changing character of international relations - as revealed in the structures of geopolitics and capitalist world economy - have shaped the evolving ideo-political character of the far right. The module will do this through an examination of several historical and contemporary case studies encompassing different expressions of the far right north/south and east/west.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Short research essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Take-Home Exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Globalisation: Issues and DebatesPolitics and International RelationsPOL355Semester 16Yes

Globalisation: Issues and Debates

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

Description: The module provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes. It examines these influences through detailed analysis of contemporary manifestations of globalisation, including the study of global production and commodity chains, state-market relations, the nature and direction of capital flows, patterns of global inequality, international institutions and global governance, questions of cultural homogenisation/imperialism, the US state and globalisation and East Asia and globalisation, and anti-globalisation. The module aims to provide students with a well-rounded understanding of the globalisation debate, and how this relates to contemporary international and global political issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (1200 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Racism and Anti-Racism in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL336ASemester 16Yes

Racism and Anti-Racism in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Elliott-Cooper

Description: How has race become a method for categorising and ordering humanity? How has the politics of anti-racism sought to dismantle both racial orders and the categories they rely on?

In this course, we will grapple with these questions by exploring the diverse intellectual voices have sought to understand and theorise racism and anti-racism. These thinkers will include those who were engaged in struggles against imperialism and colonialism, in addition to contemporary forms of racial domination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Critical Review
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Advanced Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH793PSemester 27No

Advanced Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Omer Bobrowski
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description:  This module builds on the earlier module 'Machine Learning with Python', covering a number of advanced techniques in machine learning, such as different methods for clustering, dimensionality reduction, matrix completion, and autoencoders. Although the underlying theoretical ideas are clearly explained, this module is very hands-on, and you will implement various applications using Python in the weekly coursework assignments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Mid term test
  • Item 2: 60% Project
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Technology, Politics, WarPolitics and International RelationsPOL303Semester 26Yes

Technology, Politics, War

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elke Schwarz

Description: Technology is ubiquitous. And as such it takes on an ever-more significant role as a form of power in socio-political contexts. This module examines the relationship between politics, technology and war in politics and international relations. It explores the impact of new technologies in the 21st century on world politics with a specific focus on technology¿s impact on politics, society and war on a theoretical and practical level. The module aims to provide students with an introduction to the key contemporary technologies that will shape our political and military landscape in the years to come and the challenges technologies pose for society, politics and warfare in the 21st century and beyond. It will begin with an overview of the role of technological developments in politics and society and will discuss key technological innovations - digital networks, social media, robotics, Artificial Intelligence, automated and autonomous weapons systems, etc. - before engaging with the political and ethical challenges these fast-paced technological developments pose for domestic and international political governance. In this, the module introduces students to the complexity behind new technological systems, the role of political agency in shaping technology and the role of technology in shaping politics, society and warfare.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Technology Impact Report (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 65% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Modern Political Thought 1Politics and International RelationsPOL263Semester 15Yes

Modern Political Thought 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shreyaa Bhatt

Description: This module builds on the analysis of concepts and ideologies begun in POL110. It enables students to follow through key ideas and debates about equality, power, revolution, democracy, identity and politics in modern political thought. It covers a range of thinkers from exemplars of Liberalism and Marxism to their anarchist, feminist, and anti-racist critics. The module focuses on thinkers from the latter part of the C19th to the early C20th, such as Marx, Dewey, Du Bois, Goldmann, Luxemburg and Sorel (the thinkers covered may change from year to year).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Making Democracy Work: Public Opinion, Representation and InformationPolitics and International RelationsPOL309Semester 16Yes

Making Democracy Work: Public Opinion, Representation and Information

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Javier Sajuria

Description: Is it often said that democracy requires governments and representatives that are responsive to citizen's needs, and that are accountable for their actions. However, citizens are also often depicted as apathetic, uninformed, and easily influenced by demagogues and misinformation. This module will allow students find out if these theories are relevant to understand democracy, and how are people's political views formed and modified. From there, the module will equip them with a critical understanding of what can be done to improve democratic representation. We will study how people think about political issues, how do they form those opinions, and how political decisions (such as voting) are made.

We will also discuss some specific questions, such as: what drives ideological positions? Do people hold stable political opinions over their lives? How is gender related to political preferences? Can media change people's minds? Can elites? Is social class relevant to understand political behaviour? Do people really hold politicians to account during elections? What are our preferences in terms of political representation?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research design
  • Item 2: 10% Student presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Racism and Anti-Racism in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL336Full year6Yes

Racism and Anti-Racism in World Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Adam Elliott-Cooper

Description: How has race become a method for categorising and ordering humanity? How has the politics of anti-racism sought to dismantle both racial orders and the categories they rely on?

In this course, we will grapple with these questions by exploring the diverse intellectual voices have sought to understand and theorise racism and anti-racism. These thinkers will include those who were engaged in struggles against imperialism and colonialism, in addition to contemporary forms of racial domination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Theory Essay
  • Item 2: 25% Creative Writing
  • Item 3: 50% Research Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247ASemester 15Yes

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Saull

Description: The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Migration and the Politics of BelongingPolitics and International RelationsPOL334Semester 26Yes

Migration and the Politics of Belonging

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Janina Pescinski

Description: Contemporary life is hardly imaginable without mobility - of capital, things, ideas, and images and people. At the same time, some forms of mobility such as international migration, are often thought to undermine modern political forms, such as the nation-state, as well as threaten the polities associated with them. This module will investigate the relationship between mobility, modern political forms and different conceptions of belonging and membership. It will pay attention to some of the crucial tensions of the current historical moment - for example, the tension between the principle of freedom of movement and nation-state sovereignty. It will also ask whether and how practices of mobility open possibilities for imagining organization of collective life beyond the currently predominant political forms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Fieldwork reflection
  • Item 2: 60% Research essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Financial Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH792PSemester 27No

Financial Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Argyro Mainou

Description: This module will provide students with a general understanding of current applications of Data Analytics to the Finance and in particular to derivatives and investment banking.
It will revolve around problems that will be explained as part of the module delivery such as volatility surface management, yield curve evolution and FX volatility/correlation management.
It will provide students with a overview of some standard tools in the field such as Python, R, Excel/VBA and the Power BI Excel functionality.

Students are not expected to have any familiarity with coding or any of the topics above as the module will develop these from scratch.

It will provide students with the understanding of a field necessary to boost their careers in finance in roles such as trading, structuring, management, risk management and quantitative positions in investment banks and hedge funds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Mid-term Examination
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251BSemester 25Yes

International Relations Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jaakko Heiskanen

Description: This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Contemporary Russian PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL382Semester 16Yes

Contemporary Russian Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ksenia Northmore-Ball

Description: With the 2014 annexation of Crimea and the 2022 invasion of Ukraine, Russia has defied expectations of international allies and adversaries. This module focuses on understanding how Russia¿s contemporary competitive authoritarian regime works. We examine the regime¿s evolution since the Soviet collapse and its continued resilience considering the role of leaders, parties, regionalism, protest movements, popular support and national identity. This module enables students to analyse and assess the political challenges Russia faces today and how domestic politics inform Russia¿s role in current geopolitics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Short Essay
  • Item 2: 70% Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and IdeologiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL110ASemester 14Yes

Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and Ideologies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler

Description: This module combines an introduction to modern and contemporary ideologies with the analysis of key political concepts. It begins by examining conceptions of politics and the political, with particular attention to what it might mean to approach politics normatively/critically and through a range of theoretical perspectives. Next the module introduces modern political ideologies (including liberalism, socialism, conservatism, anarchism), paying attention both to their historical development and contemporary manifestations. The focus then shifts to an analysis of key political concepts (including human nature, liberty, democracy, justice, equality, rights), examining the ways in which these concepts are deployed within and by the different ideological traditions studied earlier. The emphasis throughout is upon relating the theoretical material to contemporary political movements and questions, and the module closes by addressing a series of contemporary issues (these will vary from year to year but may include identity, multiculturalism, property, the environment) that demonstrate the uses of political theory today.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Portfolio
  • Item 2: 20% In-class test
Level: 4
Politics and International Relations
Foreign Policy AnalysisPolitics and International RelationsPOL249Semester 25Yes

Foreign Policy Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Strong

Description: This module introduces students to the study of how states make foreign policy decisions. It considers the social, material, institutional and political contexts for decision-making, and how individual leaders' cognitive and psychological traits influence the choices they make. It thus forms a bridge between the study of leadership, domestic politics, and international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
War in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL256Semester 25Yes

War in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katharine Hall

Description: This module examines the study of war in world politics, investigating the practices of war in the modern international system and the key concerns surrounding them today. The module surveys three interrelated issues: the connections between war, violence and politics; war and socio-political change; and war as normative problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Fact Sheet (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Review Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247Full year5Yes

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

Description: The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Text Analysis
  • Item 2: 25% Research Essay
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Scientific MeasurementPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4103Semester 14Yes

Scientific Measurement

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eram Rizvi

Description: Practical work in the laboratory serves to illustrate basic concepts in physics, and the processes of carrying out experiments and interpreting their results. You will be taught techniques of measurement and the use of instruments and computers. There are some lectures on statistics and data analysis, which are applied to the laboratory measurements. There is no final examination. All assessment is by coursework and laboratory reports.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Laboratory
  • Item 2: 25% Report 1
  • Item 3: 50% Report 2
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Legal DesignLawSOLM308Semester 17No

Legal Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM213 or take SOLM307

Description: In this practical module, students will work in teams to solve a problem for a real client using a Legal Design approach. Legal Design is a creative problem-solving framework used by lawyers and legal innovators to help them adapt for the future of legal practice. Students will learn the theory and practice of Legal Design and apply their legal knowledge to develop and deliver a prototype solution to the client. Students will engage with the client and external lawyers in addition to the teaching team.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Client file
  • Item 2: 40% Assessed Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7001PSemester 27No

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: This module gives a broad exposition of the modern framework for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory - relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Public Legal Education for Start-UpsLawSOLM307Semester 17No

Public Legal Education for Start-Ups

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Eliza Tamsin Platts-Mills
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM213 or take SOLM308

Description: The Public Legal Education for Start-Ups module gives students hands on experience preparing commercially aware, engaging and accessible legal education videos and other resources for UK start-ups and entrepreneurs. Module students will be trained and supervised in the preparation and delivery of legal education resources covering UK commercial, corporate, intellectual property, data privacy and employment law. Students learn through inter-active class discussions and exercises during the classes and are supervised in their legal education work by qLegal staff and UK practicing solicitors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Two x 1,200 word essays
  • Item 2: 50% 3 X 5-10 minutes long oral presentation videos
Level: 7
Law
Law of International Financial InstitutionsLawSOLM306Semester 27No

Law of International Financial Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: This module will analyze the law of international financial institutions, in particular the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and regional development banks such as the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

It will also consider the law and institutions of the Economic and Monetary Union and examine the law of the European Central Bank and the law of the euro, as well as the pillars of the Banking Union: the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM); the Single Resolution Mechanism (SRM) and the proposed European Deposit Insurance Scheme (EDIS).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay questions
Level: 7
Law
Spacetime and GravityPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6308Semester 16Yes

Spacetime and Gravity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Monteiro

Description: "This course presents the essential concepts of both special and general relativity. The emphasis is on the physical understanding of the theory and the mathematical development is kept simple, although more detailed treatments are included for those who wish to follow them; space-time diagrams being are used extensively. The course includes discussion of the big bang and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Introduction to Scientific ComputingPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5666Semester 15Yes

Introduction to Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402 and take SPA4210

Description: This module provides a general introduction to numerical problem solving with the programming language Python. Scientific computing provides an inherently interdisciplinary approach to problem solving; one that combines aspects of applied mathematics, computer science, and software engineering with concepts and models from the physical sciences.

In this module basic aspects of scientific computation, including computer number representations, machine precision, discretisation of equations, error and uncertainty, will be discussed. The mathematical underpinnings of numerical methods of problem solving will be developed, including numerical integration and differentiation, searching, data fitting, interpolation, matrix computing, and solving differential equations.

These theoretical topics will be put into practice during weekly computational laboratory exercises where computer programs will be written that utilise a variety of numerical techniques to solve problems. Authentic examples from the physical sciences and industry and will be explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Laboratory 1
  • Item 2: 10% Test 1
  • Item 3: 15% Project 1
  • Item 4: 15% Laboratory 2
  • Item 5: 10% Test 2
  • Item 6: 35% Project 2
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in Competition LawLawSOLM907Semester 37No

Dissertation in Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM906Semester 37No

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Telecommunications LawLawSOLM305Semester 17No

Telecommunications Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: This module examines the law and regulation of the telecommunications sector in the European Union and at an international level. In particular, the course will concentrate on the licensing and authorisation of the provision of equipment, networks and services; the various obligations imposed upon all operators and those with market dominance, such as universal service; the building of international networks and the regimes established under the International Telecommunications Union and the agreements under the World Trade Organization; as well as regulatory issues in developing countries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
The Law of Theatre and the Performing ArtsLawSOLM304Semester 27No

The Law of Theatre and the Performing Arts

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module provides students with the opportunity to study the relevant laws pertaining to the theatre industry and aspects of the performing arts. The module covers key aspects of productions, including development and rights acquisition and management, co-productions, financial and licensing considerations, censorship, exploitation and streaming. Various creative contributions will also be examined, including set and prop design, makeup and costume design, music and musicians, choreography, and performance. Some aspects of performance art will also be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay
Level: 7
Law
EU Digital Copyright LawLawSOLM303Semester 37No

EU Digital Copyright Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SOLM075

Description: The module introduces students to fundamental problems and concepts pertaining to intellectual property rights, with an emphasis on copyright law, in digital environments. The module focuses on the divergent interests of various stakeholders, such as authors, exploiters, consumers and creators that challenge law making today, and addresses topics ranging from the protection of software and databases, exclsuive rights and limitations, technological protection measures, the relationship between IP and fundamental rights, and online enforcement amongst others. A further emphasis will be placed on the role of the European Court of Justice and the interface between international norms and market integration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Differential Geometry in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7027PSemester 17No

Differential Geometry in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The aim of this course is to complement the core Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields (RWQF) module by providing the student with some advanced tools essential for research in modern Theoretical Physics. Using the same starting point as RWQF, Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, we will focus on the Lagrangian formulation of the two most prominent theories of our time: Yang-Mills (gauge) theory and gravity. The alternative notation of differential forms will be explored and the geometric aspects of gauge theory emphasised. Building on this, and introducing elements from group theory and fibre bundles we will introduce classical solitons as localised, finite energy solutions to the classical field equations in various dimensions (kinks in 2d, vortices in 3d, monopoles in 4d, instantons in Euclidean 4d) and discuss their properties, including the existence of zero-modes, associated collective coordinates and moduli spaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Sustainability and the CorporationLawSOLM269Semester 37No

Sustainability and the Corporation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Katrien Morbee

Description: This course examines how we should design, finance, and regulate corporations in order to align their incentives with sustainability issues in general and climate change in particular. The course will focus on issues such as the concept of sustainability, the relationship between sustainability and the corporation, the design of a sustainable corporation, the role of asset managers and the financial industry in general as stewards of sustainability, and the recent policy initiatives and regulation. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of sustainable business and finance.
This module will be taught intensively over a period of 1 week in semester 3. Sem 3 is the final teaching semester taught early June to early July.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Exam (2 hours 15 minutes) (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Climate JusticeLawSOLM262Semester 17No

Climate Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by corporates and states and it explores the definition and nature of crime that causes harm to the environment in criminological, legal and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature and the scale and type of crimes committed by companies, states and their agents that damage the environment and ecosystems. There will also be an exploration of resistance tactics, from law-fare to civil society censure of environmental harm. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative (but not exhaustive) of the subjects that will be covered: corporate environmental crime, food insecurity, state and state-corporate environmental crime, CSR and 'green' business practice, the economy of environmental protection, the power of civil society to resist planet degradation, the genocide-ecocide nexus, corruption, agribusiness, toxic waste dumping and land grabbing. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Derivatives in a Legal ContextLawSOLM235Semester 37No

Derivatives in a Legal Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniele D'Alvia

Description: This module introduces complex concepts in finance at a level that is appropriate for law students to master them . The first part of the course introduces the student to basic understanding of financial models and concepts as it relates to valuation in a legal context. This knowledge forms the basis of analysis for the more complex and broader concept of derivatives. The focus eventually turns to the analysis of ¿derivative¿ instruments, their application in different economic situations, and the benefits/consequences of helping clients set up contracts employing them when investing or conducting business, both locally and globally. Derivative instruments will be analyzed from two separate points of view: speculative and hedging. Tools and basic models that help in understanding the appropriate usage of different derivatives in different situations will also be introduced and examined. Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the relationships among different derivative instruments. Legal cases are used to analyze actual situations and explore different possible solutions using financial models and derivatives, facilitating an acceptable legal determination as to the best selection for every particular exposure. The course will be taught on the assumption that the students have no prior knowledge of these financial instruments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The GalaxyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7010USemester 27Yes

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA6305

Description: "The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Financial RegulationLawSOLM246Semester 27No

International Financial Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The purpose of this module is to examine the regulation of non-bank financial institutions and markets, in particular securities firms, insurance companies, fund managers, financial derivatives, financial infrastructures, clearing and settlement. The module also considers the sources and evolution of international financial regulation and the competing demands between prudential regulation and financial services liberalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7018PSemester 17No

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
IP Protection in the Software SectorLawSOLM302Semester 27No

IP Protection in the Software Sector

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Noam Shemtov

Description: This module seeks to take a holistic approach and treat software based products and services as a distinct subject matter and consider its protectability throughout its various life-cycle phases, from inception, through development, to launch and commercialization, the relevance and application of distinct IP rights (including trade secrets) in each of these phases, highlighting key protectability milestones and the unique considerations that they may entail. The module will examine the relevant issues primarily from a European and US perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Independent Research Essay
Level: 7
Law
Advanced US Trademark LawLawSOLM301Semester 37No

Advanced US Trademark Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module will offer students the opportunity to obtain a solid knowledge of the legal principles related to the registration of signs as trade mark in the US, the infringement of US trade mark rights, the defences to trade mark infringement, the maintenance of trade mark registration etc. Among others, the module will cover issues related to the protection of non-traditional trade marks, the enforcement of famous marks, trade mark protection on the internet and parallel imports.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Online exam (4 hours)
Level: 7
Law
International Arbitration: Skills and AdvocacyLawSOLM300Semester 37No

International Arbitration: Skills and Advocacy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Maria Fanou

Description: International Arbitration is a specialized area of law requiring certain skill sets. In this module, students will learn the practical skills needed to become a successful arbitration lawyer. Oral and written advocacy is central to the arbitral process. Students need to know about the main issues dealt with by a Tribunal starting with Procedural Order 1. This module will explain how to make persuasive submissions - both written and oral - to an international Tribunal. It is also important to understand different cultural legal backgrounds as the international arbitral community is diverse. Students will take part in practical exercises, stepping in to the shoes of arbitrator, counsel or clients. Applying the theoretical concepts of international arbitration in practice, students will learn the fundamental skills that will given them an important qualification in a competitive legal market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination
  • Item 2: 20% Class Work
Level: 7
Law
Particle and Nuclear PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6307Semester 26Yes

Particle and Nuclear Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ulla Blumenschein

Description: Following an introductory rehearsal of special relativity, particle scatterings and decays, the module focuses on theoretical foundations and experimental aspects of modern elementary particle and nuclear physics. It covers modern particle accelerators and radiation detectors, conservation laws, the three fundamental forces and their unification, modern neutrino physics, various nuclear models and their implications, radioactive decays, fission and fusion. Higher-level theoretical concepts are introduced from first principles where needed. The course also includes discussions of contemporary discoveries and advances in the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Course Work 1
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2
  • Item 3: 70% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate LawLawSOLM905Semester 37No

Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Banking and Finance LawLawSOLM904Semester 37No

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Competition Law in the Digital EraLawSOLM297Semester 17No

Competition Law in the Digital Era

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: We live in a world of unprecedented technological change. The way we live our lives today, with the most essential services being only a click away, has radically transformed our existence as consumers. On the face of it, markets are performing well, as the prices for services have radically decreased - or are even provided for 'free', that is, without monetary payment ¿ through the use of online platforms. We can shop for less money, compare products in real time, search virtually any question, hail a cab on our mobile phone, order any kind of food in an instant ¿ the list is seemingly endless. As such, these technological advancements have transformed consumers¿ choice, yet they have simultaneously created new causes of concern about competition in the marketplace and the role of consumers within it. This course will critically examine how big data, algorithms and AI are transforming market dynamics, challenging the foundations of competition law enforcement and raising new challenges for competition authorities, regulators, businesses and consumers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7028USemester 27Yes

Advanced Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6311 and take SPA6308. Before or while taking this module you are advised to take SPA7019U

Description: This module covers advanced concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular will introduce the student to cosmological perturbation theory. It discusses the observed structure of the universe, how these structures formed, and how they can be used to test our theories and models of the universe. The module will also discuss recent and upcoming experiments and large scale structure surveys and their relevance for cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Euromasters Project/DissertationPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7026PFull year7No

Euromasters Project/Dissertation

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh

Description: Students will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. They will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation, placing them in a physics context, and detailing the methods used and the results obtained. The project will run through both semesters and will involve a report and an oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Dissertation (10,000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (45 min)
  • Item 3: 10% Performance
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Trade, Environment and IPRSLawSOLM267Semester 17No

Trade, Environment and IPRS

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: The tragedy of the commons doctrine argues that humans are locked into a system whereby our pursuit of self-interest erodes the commons. But according to a different view, human society is fully capable of managing the commons in ways that protect the commons and benefits us all. Continuous trade and economic growth may eventually lead to an exhaustion of environmental resources. But this is not inevitable and trade relations can be managed in sustainable and mutually beneficial ways. One means to combat this is to accept that institutional intervention and technical progress should be focused so that resources are continuously directed towards environmental improvement. Moreover, the regulation of the environment (as in food, traditional genetic resources, green technologies) affects the trading patterns of both large and small producer countries.

This module explores these concerns by studying the interrelation between : (i) the environment (as in food, agriculture, climate, bio-prospecting, and other ancillary rights such as human rights, Nagoya Protocols on climate and biodiversity rules, access and benefit sharing); (ii) trade (as in regulations within the EU, US and WTO, and other UN organisations), and (iii) IPRs (as in patents, plant variety rights, utility models, trade marks, geographical indications and technology transfer).

Our environment is of fundamental importance. Activities that derive from our environment (including agriculture, fishing, consuming natural resources) matters more than almost any other productive human activity. Our environment supplies our most basic human needs, and it employs vast numbers of people. Human activities have a transformative effect on the biosphere. Indeed, it has arguably done more than any other activity to give rise to a new era in the Earth¿s history: the Anthropocene. One example is the commercial agricultural sector where farmers are supplied with inputs such as seeds and agrochemicals and advanced new technologies produced by high-tech corporations like Monsanto and Syngenta. The processing of food and other products that are grown or reared by farmers and pastoralists is carried out by transnational corporations. These products are delivered to customers by retailers that may be small and local or are massive operations. The vital role of small-scale farmers especially in the developing countries needs to be acknowledged but all too rarely is. Along all parts of the value chain there is much pressure to innovate and intellectual property rights are an essential feature of the way businesses and markets operate, how investment choices are made and where innovative activities do (and do not) take place.

Thus, this module will analyse the legal regulation of such resources from national and international levels, with reference to technology, intellectual property, agricultural and climate policies, and human rights vis-a-vis the global industries.

The module is intended to complement substantive modules on the protection of intellectual property. Therefore, students are assumed to have a basic understanding of intellectual property rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation of Research Topic (30 minutes)
  • Item 2: 80% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
State CrimeLawSOLM261Semester 27No

State Crime

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by governments and it explores the definition and nature of state crime in criminological and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the state and the scale and type of crimes committed by governments and their agents. The definitional processes involved in labeling states acts as criminal are explored, as are the forces which explain why and how states enter into deviant or criminal practices. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative of the subjects that will be covered: Torture, State-corporate crime, counter-terrorism and human rights, Natural Disasters, Asylum Policy as state crime, War Crimes, Genocide, Resisting State Crime: the power of civil society, corruption, state crime denial, comparative genocides, and forced evictions. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The GalaxyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7010PSemester 27No

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA6305P

Description: "The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7009USemester 27Yes

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edward Gillen

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Our UniversePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4101Semester 24Yes

Our Universe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: The module is a broad survey of Astronomy aiming to acquaint you with evolution of the universe and its constituents. A particular theme is the role played by the known laws of physics in understanding astronomical observation. You will: (i) gain a familiarity with the constituents of the observed universe; (ii) appreciate, and be able to explain, the important part played by the laws of physics in designing observations, and in interpreting and understanding them; (iii) be able to explain the different types of information obtainable from observations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio waves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 60% Coursework 3
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
MSc Astrophysics Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7000PFull year7No

MSc Astrophysics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr William Sutherland

Description: The MSc project involves a critical review of a chosen topic in modern astrophysics, and may include some original research. Students write a dissertation summarising current research in that chosen field and the extent of their own investigations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Physics Review ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6913Full year6No

Physics Review Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor

Description: You will examine a specialised area of physics by directed reading and independent study. You will learn to use scientific research literature databases. You will develop the skill of writing a scientific review summarising current knowledge in a field of physics. You may enrol for this project only with the permission of the Module Organiser for MSci projects. Open only to 3rd year MSci students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Checkpoint 1
  • Item 2: 10% Checkpoint 2
  • Item 3: 50% Written Report (8000-12000 words)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Presentation
Level: 6
Physics and AstronomySPA_6_S
Mathematical Techniques 2Physical and Chemical SciencesSPA4122Semester 24Yes

Mathematical Techniques 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elham Rezasoltani

Description: By the end of this course, a student would be expected to be able to: understand and use basic complex analysis into solving complex equations; have a familiarity with double and triple integrals, polar and spherical coordinates, line and surface integrals and coordinate transformations; use and understand the meaning of scalar and vector quantities, vector differential operators, div, grad and curl and properties; comprehend matrices, their order and type, operations, inverse and transpose, symmetry, orthogonality, Hermiticity and unitarity, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, use in solving linear systems of equations; be able to solve simple, linear first and second order differential equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Course Work 1 Maths Portfolio
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2 Mid-Semester Test
  • Item 3: 15% Course Work 3 Group Based Assessment
  • Item 4: 60% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
The Physics of GalaxiesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6305PSemester 26No

The Physics of Galaxies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesco Volponi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7010P

Description: "Galaxies are the building blocks of the universe and deserve the extensive study they now enjoy. This course applies basic physical ideas to astronomical observations, exploring the properties of galaxies themselves and the evolution of structure in the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Professional Skills for Scientists IIPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5601Full year5No

Professional Skills for Scientists II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4601

Description: Career Plans and Gathering Evidence for CV; CV and Cover Letter writing; Developing and Recognising Graduate Attributes; Scientific literacy and plagiarism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Tutorial 1
  • Item 2: 25% Tutorial 2
  • Item 3: 25% Tutorial 3
  • Item 4: 25% Tutorial 4
Level: 5
Physics and AstronomySPA_6_S
Quantum Mechanics APhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5319Semester 15Yes

Quantum Mechanics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: "This course aims to introduce the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics from the beginning. By studying applications of the principles of quantum mechanics to simple systems the course will provide a foundation for understanding concepts such as energy quantisation, the uncertainty principle and quantum tunnelling, illustrating these with experimental demonstrations and other phenomena found in nature. These concepts are introduced and applied to systems of increasing (mathematical) complexity: (i)Infinite 1-D quantum wells. (ii)Finite 1-D quantum wells (introducing graphical solutions of transcendental equations). (iii)LCAO methods for modelling ions. (iv)Simple Harmonic oscillators (introducing Hermite polynomials and applying energy solutions to molecular vibrational spectra). (v)Beams of free particles, probability flux and reflection/transmission in stepwise varying potentials. (vi)Finite potential barriers and tunnelling, Tunnelling through arbitrary potential barriers (the Gamow factor), field emission and Alpha decay and tunnelling. The Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). (vii)The solution to the Hydrogen atom, including separation of variables, spherical harmonics, the radial equation and electronic energy levels and the quantum numbers n, l, ml and ms and resulting degeneracy. (viii)The treatment of angular momentum in quantum mechanics, its magnitude and projection along an axis. (ix)Introduction to first order, time independent, perturbation theory."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
DissertationLawSOLM901Semester 37No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Outer Space LawLawSOLM296Semester 37No

Outer Space Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Berna Akcali Gur

Description: The objective of the course will be to examine the sources and fundamental principles of Space Law and the role of international law and multilateral organizations in space governance. The topics covered will include the exploitation and sustainability of space resources ¿ emphasis on commercialization of space activities, space debris mitigation and space traffic management, communication satellites and space, the convergence of cybersecurity and space security, environment and space, and the liability regime for damage caused by space activities. References will be made to relevant regulations of space-faring nations to establish the relationship between international and national law in this area of law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination
Level: 7
Law
International Sports ArbitrationLawSOLM295Semester 37No

International Sports Arbitration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mairi Mitsi

Description: Sport is now big business which means there is more at stake when sporting disputes arise between athletes and sports organisations. In 2021, over 900 cases where filed with the Court of Arbitration for Sport, which conducted over 250 hearings that year.

This course examines: the organisation and politics of international sport; how sports regulations are made; the legal and binding nature of sports regulations on all participants; the various forms of sports regulation (ie. 'doping', 'integrity', 'eligibility', 'selection', 'conduct' (on and off field), 'game-rule', 'sports governance' and more recently, 'gender-sex issues in sport'); how sporting disputes are determined in an international arbitral framework; the role of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (and other sports tribunals) in the determination of sporting disputes; and the means of challenging sports arbitration awards.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7028PSemester 27No

Advanced Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik

Description: This module covers advanced concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular will introduce the student to cosmological perturbation theory. It discusses the observed structure of the universe, how these structures formed, and how they can be used to test our theories and models of the universe. The module will also discuss recent and upcoming experiments and large scale structure surveys and their relevance for cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Differential Geometry in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7027USemester 17Yes

Differential Geometry in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6308
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The aim of this course is to complement the core Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields (RWQF) module by providing the student with some advanced tools essential for research in modern Theoretical Physics. Using the same starting point as RWQF, Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, we will focus on the Lagrangian formulation of the two most prominent theories of our time: Yang-Mills (gauge) theory and gravity. The alternative notation of differential forms will be explored and the geometric aspects of gauge theory emphasised. Building on this, and introducing elements from group theory and fibre bundles we will introduce classical solitons as localised, finite energy solutions to the classical field equations in various dimensions (kinks in 2d, vortices in 3d, monopoles in 4d, instantons in Euclidean 4d) and discuss their properties, including the existence of zero-modes, associated collective coordinates and moduli spaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in LawsLawSOLM900Semester 37No

Dissertation in Laws

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Media RegulationLawSOLM265Semester 27No

Media Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: The content of the proposed module will cover the content of both current modules SOLM217 and SOLM218. This includes:
- Ownership & Control of the Media
- Press Regulation
- EU Broadcasting Law & the shift to regulation of online, streaming content
- UK Broadcasting Law & the shift to regulation of online, streaming content
- Advertising Regulation
- Article 10, Freedom of Speech and the reasonable limits thereon with a view to protecting the Article 6 right to a fair trial, in the context of media reporting the courts
- Contempt of Court and the media - filming and livestreaming the courts, contempt by publication
- Reporting restrictions and the media - including identification of victims of serious crimes, statutory restrictions on reporting proceedings involving children and vulnerable adults, discretionary judicial orders, the media's right to representation and to appeal orders.
- Protection of journalists sources & materials, including digital resources and communications, from undue state / police interference.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Corporate ViolenceLawSOLM260Semester 17No

Corporate Violence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by corporates and it explores the definition and nature of corporate crime in criminological, legal and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the corporation and the scale and type of crimes committed by companies and their agents. The definitional processes involved in labeling corporates acts as criminal are explored, as are the forces which explain why and how corporates enter into deviant or criminal practices. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative of the subjects that will be covered: corporate manslaughter, State-corporate crime, business and human rights, the power of civil society, corruption, corporate crime denial, and land grabbing. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Physics Investigative ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7015UFull year7No

Physics Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor

Description: Students will use their skills and knowledge acquired at both BSc and Masters level to carry out an advanced independent open- ended research project in the area of physics or astronomy. This involves planning, executing and reporting the results of an experiment, theory or modelling at a level substantially exceeding the BSc course and involving a considerable degree of originality and independence. Each project is open-ended and performed in collaboration with a specialist supervisor.

Regular supervisor meetings are supplemented with tutorials that develop key skills such as understanding advanced research problems; effective reading and note taking; how to search existing specialist literature using Web of Science and other resources; conceptualising research; and effective showcasing of project and student skills.

The tutorials will also equip students with core employability advice and skills to prepare them for taking confident next steps into industry/academia after the end of their studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Checkpoint 1
  • Item 2: 5% Checkpoint 2
  • Item 3: 5% Checkpoint 3
  • Item 4: 5% Checkpoint 4
  • Item 5: 50% Written Report (8000-12000 words)
  • Item 6: 30% Oral Presentation
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Esports LawLawSOLM238Semester 17No

Esports Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Esports law focuses on the legal, contractual, commercial and regulatory issues that affect competitive video gaming. The module recognises the magnitude of the phenomenon and delineates the legal and commercial parameters under which esports industries operates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Mathematical Techniques 3Physical and Chemical SciencesSPA5218Semester 15Yes

Mathematical Techniques 3

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elham Rezasoltani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4122

Description: In this module some advanced mathematical techniques are developed in the context of solving real physical problems. Computer algebra (MAPLE) is used in the practical classes to enable you to learn a professional physicists approach to real problem-solving.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Quantum Mechanics BPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6413PSemester 16No

Quantum Mechanics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber

Description: This module is both an introduction and revision, followed by an extended exposition of the basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include: Operators and the general structure of quantum mechanics, observables, orthonormality of eigenstates, expansion theorem, commuting operators, theory of measurement; The harmonic oscillator; Angular momentum theory, the rigid rotator and applications to rotation-vibration spectra of diatomic molecules; Spin in quantum mechanics illustrated with spin1/2: matrix representations, Stern-Gerlach experiments and measurement theory exemplified; Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics: Bosons and Fermions; Spherically symmetric potentials and the Hydrogen atom.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Quantum Mechanics BPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6413Semester 16Yes

Quantum Mechanics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218 and take SPA5319

Description: This module is both an introduction and revision, followed by an extended exposition of the basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include: Operators and the general structure of quantum mechanics, observables, orthonormality of eigenstates, expansion theorem, commuting operators, theory of measurement; The harmonic oscillator; Angular momentum theory, the rigid rotator and applications to rotation-vibration spectra of diatomic molecules; Spin in quantum mechanics illustrated with spin1/2: matrix representations, Stern-Gerlach experiments and measurement theory exemplified; Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics: Bosons and Fermions; Spherically symmetric potentials and the Hydrogen atom.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Law and Finance in PracticeLawSOLM237Semester 27No

Law and Finance in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This course introduces concepts in Finance and the Financial Law at a level that is appropriate for students with various backgrounds. The course walks the students through the life cycle of a firm: from a startup raising funds to winding down and selling assets. The course focuses on the legal and financial issues that arise when a company raises funds, grows, merges or winds down. The course applies Financial Theory and Financial Law to different situations. The course uses case studies for the students to simulate how lawyers and consultants combine legal and financial analyses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Group Oral Presentation (5 min)
  • Item 2: 75% Paper (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Common Law Theory and PracticeLawSOLM952Semester 37No

Dissertation in Common Law Theory and Practice

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Maksymillan Del Mar

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The Physics of GalaxiesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6305Semester 26Yes

The Physics of Galaxies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesco Volponi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7010U

Description: "Galaxies are the building blocks of the universe and deserve the extensive study they now enjoy. This course applies basic physical ideas to astronomical observations, exploring the properties of galaxies themselves and the evolution of structure in the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Mathematical Techniques IPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4121Semester 14Yes

Mathematical Techniques I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Clarkson

Description: This module develops the mathematical techniques that will be used and built upon throughout the rest of Physics and Astronomy. Topics include vectors and their operations (addition, subtraction, scalar multiplication, dot / cross products); functions of a single variable; single variable calculus (including integration and differentiation); functions of many variables and partial differentiation; Taylor series (including the binomial expansion, and for functions of two variables); Fourier series; proof by induction; properties of complex numbers; hyperbolic functions; integration techniques (e.g. substitution, by parts, partial fractions); applications of integration (e.g. averages of functions, volumes of revolution); multiple integration with applications; Fourier transforms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Course Work 1 Maths Portfolio
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2 Mid-Semester Test
  • Item 3: 15% Course Work 3 Group Based Assessment
  • Item 4: 60% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Philosophy of Human RightsLawSOLM312Semester 17No

Philosophy of Human Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze

Description: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 tells us that `the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world¿. But on what grounds? What counts as `dignity¿ and what makes it `inherent¿ to human beings? What counts as equality and what makes human rights the `foundation¿ of freedom, justice and peace? Many governments throughout history have promised various goods, but do human goods mean the same thing as human rights? If not, then what turns goods into rights? Given the historically recent concept of human rights must we conclude that societies lacking the concept necessarily lack freedom, justice and peace?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay
Level: 7
Law
Consumer law for the Digital AgeLawSOLM311Semester 17No

Consumer law for the Digital Age

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: The digital environment is developing rapidly bringing forward new opportunities for business and challenges for regulators. This is an exciting time for consumer law with many changes underway as the regulation of the digital environment has become a priority. This module examines the latest developments in the UK and in other jurisdictions, such as the EU. From dark patterns to regulation of very large online platforms to online contracts, this module aims to get students to critically engage with the latest digital business practices and the regulatory responses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Podcast presentation
  • Item 2: 60% Self-reflective report
Level: 7
Law
Spacetime and GravityPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6308PSemester 16No

Spacetime and Gravity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Monteiro

Description: This course presents the essential concepts of both special and general relativity. The emphasis is on the physical understanding of the theory and the mathematical development is kept simple, although more detailed treatments are included for those who wish to follow them; space-time diagrams being are used extensively. The course includes discussion of the big bang and black holes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7023USemester 17Yes

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: "Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Electricity Law and RegulationLawSOLM310Semester 27No

Electricity Law and Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: This module provides a highlevel overview of the regulations and legislation pertaining to the electricity sector. It will provide an overview of the electricity value chain, including transmission, distribution, generation, supply as well as wholesale trading and discuss models of electricity market design and regulations, with emphasis on electricity pool models and bilateral trading arrangements in both pre-liberalised and liberalised energy economies.
The module will analyse the impact of new technology such as battery storage (BESS) on both electricity market organisation and regulation and consider the role and impact of renewable energy (including support regimes for the same) in electricity markets and wider society.
Regulatory concequences of the changes in the energy mix due to the increase of renewable forms of electricity generation, such as capacity markets and the current market reforms considered in GB and the EU will also be analysed. The model will also give students the opportunity to engage with different forms of power purchase agreements and their regulatory context (eg, REMIT and MiFID II).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay
Level: 7
Law
Select Public International Law Issues in EnergyLawSOLM309Semester 17No

Select Public International Law Issues in Energy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM155

Description: The module on 'Select Public International Law Issues in Energy' examines the application of public international law to inter-state energy activities.

States have long taken responsibility for satisfying domestic demand for energy. Traditionally, this could largely be done at the local or, at times, regional level. Over the last fifty years, however, increasing demand for energy and, in part as a result, the progressive exhaustion of traditional energy sources has led to a more extensive interdependence between mineral resource-rich and mineral resource-scarce countries and cooperation in the energy sector. This, in turn, has led to state regulation of these activities and the emergence of a complex web of inter-state norms and practices. These norms have also evolved significantly as a result of the climate emergency and Russia's invasion of Ukraine which has led to a recent energy crisis.

Part I of the module provides the foundations of public international law concepts and principles applicable to energy activities, as well as covering the actors engaged in these activities, with a strong focus on states as the primary actors initiating and endorsing energy activities. Part II covers plurilateral and bilateral treaties governing energy activities, including treaties on the joint exploitation of common offshore oil and gas deposits, treaties on the joint exploitation of international watercourses, treaties on cross-border transportation of hydrocarbons, and energy cooperation treaties. This Part also cover the interplay between these treaties and custom. Part III examines how public international law deals with the decommissioning of energy installations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Online Examination (5 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7031PSemester 27No

Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Buican
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take INK7090P
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: This course introduces core concepts in supersymmetry that can be applied to quantitatively understand a broad variety of physical systems and is a complement to the AQFT and FMQFT modules. Starting with supersymmetric quantum mechanics as a toy model, the course covers the supersymmetry algebra, its representations, the Witten Index, and the resulting constraints on quantum dynamics. We then move on to introduce supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions consisting of scalars and fermions while giving a basic introduction to symmetry currents, the classical and quantum Wilsonian renormalization group flow, moduli spaces, spurions, and non-renormalization arguments. The course culminates in a study of simple dualities in three-dimensional supersymmetric abelian gauge theories. We conclude with a discussion of supersymmetry in four space-time dimensions and, time permitting, the embedding of our constructions in string theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Homework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Homework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Final assignment
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
MSc Physics Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7012PFull year7No

MSc Physics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh

Description: The MSc Research Project is at the heart of the MSc programme. It is an independent project undertaken by the student within a working research group in the School. The project runs over three semesters in order to allow for the student to both design their project (using available literature etc.), be trained in the relevant techniques and carry out a reasonably substantial piece of research based on an actual (real) research problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10% Performance
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Economic Law ClinicLawSOLM263Semester 27No

International Economic Law Clinic

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SOLM192 or take SOLM189

Description: This module offers the unique opportunity to work on a real legal project on international economic law of practical importance to a beneficiary. The module is conducted as a legal clinic running over semesters 2 and 3. Students will be grouped in project teams each consisting of a maximum of four students and assigned a project to work on specific questions posed by real beneficiaries who are seeking legal advice on specific problems in international economic law. Under the supervision of an academic supervisor and with the support of professional mentors, each team will prepare written legal memoranda on the assigned problem and present it to the beneficiaries at the end of semester 3. The bulk of the module consists on students' independent work on the project along with meetings with academic supervisors, mentors and beneficiaries as well as workshops on professional skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Individual Oral Assessment (10 minutes with 10 minutes for questions and answers)
  • Item 2: 65% Written Report (Group Grade, 10000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7018USemester 17Yes

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5304 and take SPA6325 and take SPA5218. Before taking this module you are advised to take SPA7027U

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Extended Independent ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6776Full year6No

Extended Independent Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor

Description: Students will use their skills and knowledge to carry out an independent research project in the area of physics or astronomy. This involves planning, executing and reporting the results of an experiment or investigation. Each project is open-ended and performed in collaboration with a specialist supervisor.

Regular supervisor meetings are supplemented with tutorials that develop key skills such as understanding research problems; effective reading and note taking; how to search existing literature; conceptualising research; and effective showcasing of project and student skills.

The tutorials will also equip students with core employability advice and skills to prepare them for taking confident next steps into industry/academia after the end of their studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Checkpoint 1
  • Item 2: 5% Checkpoint 2
  • Item 3: 5% Checkpoint 3
  • Item 4: 5% Checkpoint 4
  • Item 5: 50% Written Report (8000-12000 words)
  • Item 6: 30% Oral Presentation
Level: 6
Physics and AstronomySPA_6_S
Electric and Magnetic FieldsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4210Semester 24Yes

Electric and Magnetic Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne

Description: This course provides an introduction to the basic laws of electromagnetism and electrostatic phenomena: electric force and field; electric potential and energy; capacitance; electromotive force; magnetic force and field; the Lorentz force; electromagnetic induction; mutual and self inductance; magnetic energy; RC circuits; Maxwell's equations; introduction to electromagnetic waves; applications in science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Course Work 1 Maths Portfolio
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2 Mid-Semester Test
  • Item 3: 15% Course Work 3 Group Based Assessment
  • Item 4: 60% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Risk Management in LawLawSOLM236Semester 37No

Risk Management in Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniele D'Alvia

Description: This module introduces complex concepts in finance at a level that is appropriate for law students to master them . The focus of this course is on the analysis of valuation models, their application in different economic situations, and the benefits/consequences when investing or conducting business, both locally and globally. Tools and basic models that help in understanding the appropriate usage of different valuation models as used in different situations will be introduced and examined in order to assess risk and be able to manage it appropriately. Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the relationships between risk and return when evaluating assets. Legal cases are used to analyze actual situations and explore different possible solutions when dealing with risk and other financial concepts, facilitating an acceptable legal determination as to the best selection for various risk exposure. The module will be taught on the assumption that the students have no prior knowledge of finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Tax Law in PracticeLawSOLM120Semester 27No

International Tax Law in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SOLM119

Description: The module focus is on how multinational enterprises are structured and operate. In particular, the module will cover how groups finance their business, structure their operations and own and protect their intellectual property. There will also be some consideration of the impact of mergers, acquisitions, disposals and reorganisations. The module will also look at the challenges created by new forms of technology and new ways of doing business. The module will discuss these issues from the viewpoint of the enterprise and of the relevant revenue authorities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7023PSemester 17No

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: "Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Research Methods for AstrophysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7020PSemester 17No

Research Methods for Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: "Research in astrophysics builds on a vast body of literature and archived data. This module is an introduction to research methods which exploit existing information sources in astrophysics. The module serves as preparation for the research project which forms a major part of the MSc programme. In this module students will learn how to review and evaluate with critical insight, the current state of research of a chosen area in astrophysics. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style, and will learn how to convey research material in a presentation. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These can include specific exercises in using astronomical data archives, scientific word processing, mathematical skills, using mathematical and data analysis packages, project planning, etc."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Poster or equivalent
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Research Review (1000 words)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Global Intellectual Property LawLawSOLM084Semester 27No

Global Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: What is intellectual property? Who benefits from these laws? What types of subject matter are protected in the global perspective under patent, copyright, trade mark, etc. laws? What are the main I.P. treaties and conventions? What is the connection between trade (WTO-TRIPS) and intellectual property law? What are the main justifications and criticisms in relation to IP law? By looking at national and global IP laws, the course gives a fundamental grounding in patents, copyright, trade marks, as well as international hybrid rights such as geographical indications, plant and seed protection, utility model, design, and unfair competition protection. The module also examines the global nature of intellectual property law and policy as it is affected arising from emerging technologies, and the consequential impact on the rights and obligations of peoples and corporations. Concentrating on the jurisprudence of major countries, including the EU and US, the course also examines the conflicting positions adopted as to the propertisation of (i) drugs, biological organisms and gene technologies; and (ii) traditional knowledge and cultural heritage. The module further examines the controversial clashes which have emerged between IPRs and international norms in various fora including competition law, human rights, development and environmental agendas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Open book examination (4 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Trade SecretsLawSOLM096Semester 37No

Trade Secrets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Hull

Description: Every intellectual property right starts life as a trade secret. Trade secrets and related intellectual assets are viewed as critical to the success of many businesses. But they are also uniquely fragile rights and so their protection under different legal systems requires close assessment. This module complements other IP modules by providing an opportunity to study the economic and legal foundations of these important rights.
This module will be taught intensively over a period of 1 week in semester 3. Sem 3 is the final teaching semester taught early June to early July.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Astrophysical PlasmasPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7004PSemester 27No

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Chen

Description: "A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and LawLawSOLM080Semester 27No

Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: In this module, students will engage directly with industry and commercial fashion practice through workshops and enterprise development, gaining specific insight into design practice, fashion media, merchandising, branding, and retail curation. Seminars will cover a range of topics in commercial fashion enterprise and will consider in detail practical examples in management and innovation, allowing students to gain a comprehensive insight into building a fashion brand identity and an understanding of commercial and artistic practice in fashion and design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Statistical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6403Semester 26Yes

Statistical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Scott Melville
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5219

Description: Starting from the atomic and quantum descriptions of matter the module uses statistical principles to explain the behaviour of material in bulk. It thus relates microscopic to macroscopic quantities and provides a microscopic explanation of thermodynamics. It provides the bridge between microscopic quantum physics and the behaviour of matter as we know it daily.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
UK Tax LawLawSOLM124Semester 17No

UK Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The module will provide an introduction to the UK system of taxation, both personal and business. It will also allow students to gain an understanding of the key concepts of tax law from a UK perspective. It will cover the basic principles of the taxation of individuals in the UK on their earnings, gains and wealth. The rationale for various types of taxes will be explored, in particular the UK inheritance and capital gains taxes. Much discussed issues such as tax avoidance, sin taxes and zero hour employment contracts will also be considered. The international perspective will be included and comparisons will be made with taxes in other jurisdictions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Carriage of GoodsLawSOLM143Semester 17No

Carriage of Goods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Antigoni-Aikaterini Lykotrafiti

Description: The module will cover essential aspects of the law relating to carriage of goods by sea (mandatory international law regulating carriage of goods contracts, international standard terms, functions of documents such as bills of lading, waybills and delivery orders, as well as electronic alternatives to these documents, detailed discussion of logistics services and multimodal transport).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Introduction to Strings and BranesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7032PSemester 27No

Introduction to Strings and Branes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Congkao Wen
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The module will cover the basics of string theory, and provide an introduction to the perturbative formulation of string theories. The topics that we will cover include the classical physics of strings, and the quantisation of bosonic and superstrings, perturbative aspects of D-branes, duality symmetries, and two-dimensional conformal field theory and its application to string theory. A brief discussion on some advanced topics in string theory will be given towards the end of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Mental Health Law: Capacity to Consent and Best InterestsLawSOLM104Semester 17No

Mental Health Law: Capacity to Consent and Best Interests

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ruth Fletcher

Description: This module will analyse the Mental Capacity Act (MCA), the legislation that provides the framework in England and Wales for assessing capacity and making decisions on behalf of those who lack capacity to decide, and its application in the context of medical and social care. This module is recommended for those interested in issues of consent in health and social care. The question that will guide this module is whether the law in England and Wales strikes a good balance between respecting the autonomy of individuals and protecting their welfare. It will also discuss the compatibility between the MCA and human rights law (in particular, the European Convention on Human Rights and the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities). Therefore, even though this course will focus on England and Wales, students interested in comparative and human rights approaches to mental health and the law are strongly encouraged to apply. The cases that students will discuss in this module include, for instance, the force-feeding of anorexia patients, the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from people in a minimally conscious state, deprivation of liberty in hospitals and care homes, and the reproductive choices of people with learning disabilities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Intellectual Property Law in ChinaLawSOLM095Semester 17No

Intellectual Property Law in China

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: Reflecting the growing importance of Chinese developments in IP, and its vital role in the current and future global market economy, this module is designed to provide an insightful study of Chinese IP law and its relevance to the international community. The seminar based module looks into China's current copyright, trademark and patent, the law, policy and enforcement in the context of trade, and identifies the diverse approaches to effective management for IP in China.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Independent research essay (5000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (15 min)
Level: 7
Law
Relativity and GravitationPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7019USemester 17Yes

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6308

Description: This module starts with mathematics and principles required to formulate general relativity, before moving on to consider how the theory describes empty space, black holes, and the generation of gravitational waves. The motion of particles and the propagation and observation of rays of light is discussed. The module covers both strong gravitational fields (as found near black holes), and weak gravitational fields (as found in the solar system). The module ends with a discussion of the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7001USemester 27Yes

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: "This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
The Law of Registered Trade MarksLawSOLM083Semester 27No

The Law of Registered Trade Marks

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module covers all legal issues that might arise from the very moment someone decides to apply to register a sign as a trade mark. Covered topics include: what may constitute subject matter eligible for trade mark protection?; absolute grounds for refusal and invalidity; relative grounds for refusal and invalidity; distinctiveness acquired through use; trade mark infringement; invalidity; revocation; defenses; parallel imports; the concept of the trade mark functions; economic justifications for trade mark protection; trade mark protection against dilution; the free-riding theory of trade mark protection.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Charterparties: Law and PracticeLawSOLM142Semester 17No

Charterparties: Law and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Filip Saranovic

Description: The module will examine all aspects of charterparties, being contracts of vessel hire between the relevant parties. More specifically, the module will cover the stage of negotiating a charterparty, the basic principles underlying all such contracts, different types of charterparties (including voyage, time, hybrid and demise charters), various charterparty forms and their practical application, the effect of charterers' orders on the operation of charterparties, and the charters' discharge (including issues of breach, frustration and damages).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Machine Learning and Artificial IntelligencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6330Semester 26Yes

Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Linda Cremonesi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5666 and take SPA5131

Description: In this module, you will learn about cutting-edge developments in the fields of machine learning and artificial intelligence, and how they are being used to solve difficult or previously intractable problems. The aim is to give you an appreciation and background knowledge of what machine learning techniques are capable of, what the most powerful current techniques are, how they work, how they can go wrong, and how you can implement them to solve problems yourself. This module is taught through a combination of lectures on the theory and operation of modern machine learning and AI techniques, and computer lab projects where you will implement such methods as random forests, support vector machines, convolutional neural networks, and generative adversarial networks to solve problems in physics and related fields that would be difficult to address using more traditional analysis techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Lab book portfolio
  • Item 2: 25% Midterm project
  • Item 3: 50% Final Project
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Statistical Data AnalysisPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6328Semester 16Yes

Statistical Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ulla Blumenschein

Description: Statistical Data Analysis teaches the fundamentals of probability and statistics, data analysis, and machine learning, as applied to discovering, classifying, and measuring new phenomena. It draws on examples from a wide range of applications, within physics and far beyond. Students will learn to perform statistical calculations, to understand statistical usage in scientific research papers, and to apply practical programming techniques for more advanced analyses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Course Work 1
  • Item 2: 15% Course Work 2
  • Item 3: 70% Final Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Physical CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6311PSemester 16No

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005P

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Physical CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6311Semester 16Yes

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005U

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Wet Shipping LawLawSOLM147Semester 17No

Wet Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Filip Saranovic

Description: The module will cover all areas of the so-called 'wet' shipping law; i.e., all legal issues that might arise while a vessel and its cargo are at sea arising from various unfortunate incidents. The module will cover in detail collisions at sea, the law of salvage, the problematic area of wreck removal, the complex area of marine pollution, incidents of piracy at sea including the modern employment of armed guards; and the importance and computation of general average adjustments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
US International TaxationLawSOLM123Semester 17No

US International Taxation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module is designed to cover the structure, principles, rules and application of the US international tax system. In particular, it will cover the US tax principles and rules that apply to US and foreign entities and individuals engaged in cross-border operations and transactions. Coverage will include jurisdictional principles, the inbound and outbound regimes, income tax treaties and the treatment of corporations and shareholders. The module will also cover the taxation of trusts, estates and gifts, reporting requirements and tax administration and procedure, all with a focus on the cross-border context. The module will examine how the system operates in practice and also consider US tax policy in these areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
International Tax LawLawSOLM119Semester 17No

International Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee

Description: The module is designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of the key concepts of international tax law and of how multinational enterprises are taxed on their profits. It is also designed to equip students to participate in International Tax Law in Practice, for which it is a prerequisite. The module covers the basic principles of jurisdiction to tax, the factors used by countries in imposing taxes and the issues governing major types of income. It looks at how conflicts lead to international double taxation, the problems this creates for international trade and solutions provided for in double taxation treaties. The taxation of multinational enterprises has become a political issue, with the G20 and the OECD undertaking substantial work to address Base Erosion and Profit Shifting. This work has progressed rapidly and features prominently in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Physical DynamicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5304Semester 25Yes

Physical Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4401
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA5218

Description: Introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian mechanics. Origin of Conservation Laws and their relation to symmetry properties. Rotational motion of rigid bodies, Euler's equations, principal axes and stability of rotation, precession. Small vibration approximation, normal modes

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7031USemester 27Yes

Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Buican
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6413
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: This course introduces core concepts in supersymmetry that can be applied to quantitatively understand a broad variety of physical systems and is a complement to the AQFT and FMQFT modules. Starting with supersymmetric quantum mechanics as a toy model, the course covers the supersymmetry algebra, its representations, the Witten Index, and the resulting constraints on quantum dynamics. We then move on to introduce supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions consisting of scalars and fermions while giving a basic introduction to symmetry currents, the classical and quantum Wilsonian renormalization group flow, moduli spaces, spurions, and non-renormalization arguments. The course culminates in a study of simple dualities in three-dimensional supersymmetric abelian gauge theories. We conclude with a discussion of supersymmetry in four space-time dimensions and, time permitting, the embedding of our constructions in string theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Homework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Homework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Final Assignment
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Relativity and GravitationPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7019PSemester 17No

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: This module starts with mathematics and principles required to formulate general relativity, before moving on to consider how the theory describes empty space, black holes, and the generation of gravitational waves. The motion of particles and the propagation and observation of rays of light is discussed. The module covers both strong gravitational fields (as found near black holes), and weak gravitational fields (as found in the solar system). The module ends with a discussion of the detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and CultureLawSOLM079Semester 17No

Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This interdisciplinary module brings a range of perspectives to the analysis of intellectual property law in the fashion and design industries, including business sociology and knowledge management, art history and fashion theory, fan theory and fashion tribes, and economic and cultural aspects. Students will understand and analyse fundamental interactions between protection frameworks, the creative process, and the fashion customer, analysing critically the social, political and legal aspects of the industry and its interaction with other cultural forms. The course equips students with the skills to identify and manage intellectual property in fashion practice and to analyse critically policy aspects of the fashion industries and the interaction with the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Maritime ArbitrationLawSOLM145Semester 27No

Maritime Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: Specialist dispute resolution mechanisms catering to specific industry needs are popular in international commerce, and arbitration has emerged as the dominant industry choice for resolving shipping disputes, in particular charterparty disputes. Indeed important maritime arbitration centres have long been established in London and New York, and more recently others have started to emerge in countries such as Russia, China and Singapore. London remains a leader in this field with a large number of disputes being decided each year through arbitration in accordance with the terms of the London Maritime Arbitrators Association. The module will tackle questions such as: What is special about maritime arbitration and what distinguishes it from general commercial arbitration? What are the features of maritime arbitration that make it particularly popular? Is arbitration by its nature more suited to the resolution of disputes arising in connection with certain types of shipping contracts (e.g. charterparties) rather than others (e.g. contracts of carriage contained in bills of lading)? Why? What are the implications of widespread use of arbitration for the continued development of shipping law?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International and Comparative Law of Unfair CompetitionLawSOLM082Semester 27No

International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: "The module aims at providing the students with a thorough account of the main legal theories of unfair competition in various jurisdictions with a particular focus on US, EU, UK, French and German law in light of the binding European and international legal frameworks. Legal problems are approached from a comparative perspective. At the same time, emphasis is placed on the practical problems that arise in the context of disputes that involve claims of unfair competition."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Insurance ContractsLawSOLM140Semester 17No

Insurance Contracts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: This module looks at particular types of insurance contract. It considers the impact on specific insurance contracts of the application of general principles of insurance contract, the terms that appear in different types of contract, their function and how they are interpreted by the courts, and how the applicable legislative environment varies with different types of insurance. Insurance is fundamental to a modern economy, allowing businesses and individuals to transfer the risk of loss, thereby facilitating investment and protecting wealth, and London is a world centre of the insurance industry. Students require no prior knowledge of insurance or English law. They will learn all they need to know as the module progresses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Quantum Mechanics and SymmetryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6325Semester 26Yes

Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take INK7002U
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA6413

Description: The module will give you a grounding in the more formal and axiomatic approach to quantum mechanics and introduce you to the application of these tools in the quantum mechanical description of symmetries in particle physics. Topics include: Dirac notation; Hilbert space; linear operators; formal axioms of quantum mechanics; Schoedinger and Heisenberg pictures; harmonic oscillator; raising and lowering operators; time independent perturbation theory; transformation operators; translations and rotations of coordinates; conservation laws and good quantum numbers; rotation operators; angular momentum operators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Insurance RegulationLawSOLM139Semester 17No

Insurance Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: This module deals with the regulation of insurance. It will look at the nature of risk in insurance business, the international standards on regulation and their influence on the shape of EU law and UK law, and in detail at the UK's approach to regulation, covering the structure of the regulator and the rules that are applied to regulation of insurance business (both those companies that provide insurance and intermediaries who facilitate insurance contracts) focusing inter alia on macro and micro prudential requirements & solvency rules, conduct of business rules and the resolution of systemically important insurers (financial resolution).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Principles of TaxationLawSOLM118Semester 17No

Principles of Taxation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Vasiliki Koukoulioti

Description: The module covers the structure, principles, rules and application of a selection of taxes from a multi-jurisdictional and comparative perspective. In particular, the module looks at the taxation of individual income and wealth, the taxation of corporations and indirect taxation, as well as taxation at the sub-national level and tax administration. This is crucial not only for an understanding of specific domestic tax systems and the options available in designing domestic tax systems, but also to an understanding of the international tax system, which is determined by the interaction of national tax systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Planetary SystemsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5241Semester 25Yes

Planetary Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilisation human beings have charted the paths of the planets across the night sky and speculated about their nature. Indeed the word planet has its origin in the ancient Greek term `planete' meaning wanderer. Used in its modern scientific context the word planet refers to an object which orbits about a star, but which itself is not a star. Planets have a special philosophical significance since they are the bodies on which life itself is expected to come into existence. This course provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of the planets in our Solar System, and of the planetary systems now known to orbit around stars other than the Sun and the extrasolar planets. The properties of individual planets and their satellites will be described and contrasted, and basic physical principles will be used to explain their orbits and physical features. Our understanding of how planetary systems form will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Interactive Entertainment LawLawSOLM085Semester 17No

Interactive Entertainment Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Anthony Catton

Description: Interactive Entertainment Law analyses some of the legal, commercial, contractual and regulatory issues that the Games and Interactive Entertainment industry faces in. It delineates and analyses the legal parameters within which developers and publishers operate and in which players create and consume content, providing students with an in-depth analysis of the industry from the development to the commercialisation of interactive entertainment products.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Taxation of IndividualsLawSOLM122Semester 27No

Taxation of Individuals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module will consider the tax policy, system design and technical issues involved in the taxation of individuals. It will look at a range of issues in the design of an individual income tax system, including the construction of the tax base, tax rates and deductions and incentives. It will also look at options for the taxation of savings and wealth. The increasingly important area of cross-border taxation of both income and wealth will also be examined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Tax System Design and Policy in Emerging and Developing EconomiesLawSOLM121Semester 27No

Tax System Design and Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module considers tax system design and tax policy issues relevant to emerging and developing economies. It examines tax policy and design issues regarding the choice of taxes, expanding the tax base, expanding the tax net, encouraging taxpayer compliance and strengthening administrative capacity. In this context it considers the political economy of direct and indirect taxes, the incidence of taxation, fiscal federalism and the impact of tax treaties. It will also look at options for reform of existing systems and for improving tax administration and collection in emerging and developing economies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law and Practice of the Unified Patent CourtLawSOLM098Semester 17No

Law and Practice of the Unified Patent Court

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SOLM292

Description: The establishment of a Unified Patent Court is the most significant change to patent law and practice in Europe since the early 1970s. The module will provide advanced knowledge of EU Regulation 1257/2012 on the creation of unitary patent protection, detailed knowledge of the Agreement on the Unified Patent Court, and advanced knowledge of procedures, litigation and practice before the Unified Patent Court.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Mock trial (Moot)
Level: 7
Law
Intellectual Property and the Life SciencesLawSOLM093Semester 27No

Intellectual Property and the Life Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: The life sciences can be defined as the use of living organisms (biotechnology) and the protection or treatment of living organisms (medicine, veterinary medicine and plant protection). It comprises the science behind medicine, pharmacy and agriculture and their corresponding industries. The module will provide detailed knowledge of the role that intellectual property plays in providing investments for investment and incentives in the life sciences. It will also focus on the question of how to distribute the benefits of life sciences research fairly so that it benefits society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Public International & European Air Transport LawLawSOLM151Semester 27No

Public International & European Air Transport Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Antigoni-Aikaterini Lykotrafiti

Description: Air transport is one of the most heavily regulated sectors of the economy. For passengers and goods to be transported safely, regularly, economically and efficiently, a dense web of rules is governing aspects such as the use of airspace, safety, security, air navigation, airports and the environment. This module examines the international, supranational and national rules that make aviation pride itself on being the safest and most innovative mode of transport, as well as the industry that has globalised the world, contributing to peace and economic growth. It also examines critically the lack of uniformity in the international regulatory framework and its implications for the industry and the economy at large.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7009PSemester 27No

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edward Gillen

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Astrophysical PlasmasPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7004USemester 27Yes

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Chen

Description: "A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
UK Tax AvoidanceLawSOLM126Semester 37No

UK Tax Avoidance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The module is designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of tax avoidance from a UK perspective. The module approaches tax avoidance firstly from a historical viewpoint and distinguishes it from both evasion and mitigation. The responses of both courts and the UK Parliament to the perceived problem are examined from the viewpoint of both individuals and businesses. Apart from judicial approaches, the General Anti-Abuse Rule will be examined as will other anti-avoidance measures, including the Disclosure of Tax Avoidance Schemes rules. The international perspective will be explored, including the use of transfer pricing, controlled foreign companies and tax havens. The penalties that tax authorities wish to impose will also be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Design and Intellectual Property: EU and United StatesLawSOLM081Semester 27No

Design and Intellectual Property: EU and United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: The importance of design within competitive economies has been underestimated academically. Designs increase the visual, ergonomic, aesthetic and branding appeal of a product, and has the potential to increase the impact and competitiveness of the product within different market sectors. This option will teach students the key ways to protect the investment in graphic, environmental and product designs, with an emphasis on design patents, trade mark/trade dress and copyright laws. While the focus of the course will be on EU and US laws, the course will also cover the international design registration system, as well as specific design-related issues in major industries such as competition and consumable markets (coffee pods, spare parts, cartridges), 3D printing, and counterfeiting within furniture & fashion lifestyle industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art and Cultural ValuesLawSOLM227Semester 17No

Art and Cultural Values

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: This module will examine the cultural values and ethical considerations that guide both the public and private treatment and management of art and cultural property. This extends down from the values accepted in widely followed internationals conventions like the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, into national law, and finally into the ethical guidelines and codes of museums and other cultural institutions. The approach will also be sensitive to non-Western approaches to 'cultural property' and will consider the alternative conceptions of cultural dominion, guardianship and responsibility. Finally, the module will address the issues stemming from requests and claims for restitution and repatriation of cultural objects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Marine Insurance LawLawSOLM144Semester 27No

Marine Insurance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: Marine insurance is a fascinating and important area of international shipping law. Shipping has always been perilous - adverse sea conditions, piracy, accidents and pollution at sea, deterioration of goods during transportation - and both owners of vessels and cargo have increasingly sought, over the years, to protect themselves in the event of loss. This module deals with the law of marine insurance. This module will examine, among other issues, the definition and formation of a marine insurance contract (including the duty of disclosure and insurable interest), the parties to the contract and the various risks covered (as well as those excluded), what constitutes evidence of the contract and its terms, claims under the contract, assignment, subrogation and contribution, the rule of proximate cause, and the diverse forms of loss that a vessel or cargo owner might suffer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
StarsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5307Semester 25Yes

Stars

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Heli Johanna Hietala

Description: "Stars are a vital building block in the Universe: forming out of interstellar gas and dust, and themselves being a major component of galaxies. They are also vital for providing the nuclear reactions that create the elements from which planets and even ourselves are formed. This course describes how the fundamental properties of stars are related to observations. Temperatures and densities in the centre of stars reach values that are unattainable in the laboratory. Yet the application of basic physical principles can help us determine much about the internal structure and evolution of stars, from their formation to their ultimate end states in such exotic and spectacular objects as white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
  • Item 3: 10% Mid-semester Test
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Compliance Systems in PracticeLawSOLM224Semester 17No

Compliance Systems in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Sucheen Patel

Description: This module seeks to give students a thorough grounding in the essentials of regulatory and compliance environment. To prepare students for issues likely to arise in the application of regulatory framework in various economic and business environments . No previous knowledge of the subject is required. In addition, the module does not require prior knowledge of regulatory framework . The module takes a very practical approach with a number of case studies and always with an eye to the real world implications. Guest lecturers will provide their practical experience and the challenges they face.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Commercialisation of IPLawSOLM092Semester 27No

Commercialisation of IP

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr John Hull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM078

Description: Getting intellectual property rights is relatively easy. It's what you do with them that's difficult. And since 80% or more of a business's value is made up of IP (sometimes called "Intellectual Assets"), understanding how a business, a research charity or a university puts its IP to profitable use is fundamental to understanding how modern commercial life works.
This module, which is one of few such modules in UK universities, is focused on how IP is created, owned and commercialised (or "monetised"). It is taught by a practising lawyer with extensive experience in all aspects of IP. Guest speakers with front-line experience of IP commercialisation are a key part of this module, allowing students to understand how commercial transactions take place in real life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Tax and TechnologyLawSOLM130Semester 37No

Tax and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Vasiliki Koukoulioti

Description: The module will focus on tax and technology. It will provide an introduction to domestic and international tax provisions that are important to owners of intellectual property, with a particular focus on domestic incentives to encourage investment and to attract foreign direct investment, as well as the international perspectives around harmful tax competition by countries. The module will also consider the current debates regarding a digital services tax.
This module will be taught intensively over a period of 1 week in semester 3. Sem 3 is the final teaching semester taught early June to early July.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Entrepreneurship Law ClinicLawSOLM213Semester 27No

Entrepreneurship Law Clinic

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Karen Watton
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM308 or take SOLM307

Description: Entrepreneurship Law Clinic is a unique opportunity to learn and reflect on the legal issues that face entrepreneurs. In this module you will have the opportunity to (i) develop a number of professional skills and your professional identity; (ii) understand the practical legal issues that are faced by entrepreneurs and how to respond to those issues; (iii) interview and draft advice for a client; (iv) develop and practice public speaking and presentation skills; (v) work within a team and network closely with legal experts and entrepreneurship specialists in London's Tech City. Students must adhere to the Legal Advice Centre's practices and procedures including the signing of a confidentiality agreement and student contract.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Research Essay 1 (1250 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Client File
  • Item 3: 40% Assessed Presentation
  • Item 4: 25% Research Essay 2 (1250 words)
Level: 7
Law
Information Security and the LawLawSOLM210Semester 27No

Information Security and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: The security of important data, including personal, is of considerable concern to governments around the world as is the safety of critical infrastructure assets, systems, and networks (both public and private) that are considered so vital that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety. Concerns about former have led to growing legal obligations to ensure the security of information and the systems that transmit and store it. Whether as part of personal data protection regimes, sector-specific regulations (e.g., healthcare, banking and finance) private law or company law obligations, these present a growing source of potential corporate liability. Concerns about the latter have produced frameworks to enable oversight and cooperation needed to manage and mitigate risks to critical infrastructure. This course examines various EU and US legal frameworks

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Use of Force in International LawLawSOLM112Semester 17No

Use of Force in International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the legal framework regulating the use of force in international affairs. It examines in detail the content of the prohibition on use force in a historical context , as well as the self-defence and collective security exceptions that were explicitly provided for. The course will also examine in detail the effect of threats from terrorists and rogue states on the development of the law. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of human rights norms on the law on use of force and whether international law recognises a distinct right of humanitarian intervention. It is will also consider arguments advanced in support of a general responsibility on States to intervene militarily in support of those facing mass atrocity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay
Level: 7
Law
International Economic LawLawSOLM194Semester 17No

International Economic Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kamala Dawar

Description: The module examines the law that governs international economic relations between states and between states and non-state actors. It provides an overview of international agreements and organizations concerned with state conduct affecting trade, foreign investment, finance and monetary stability. It also considers less formal means of international economic governance such as standards, principles and guidelines. The study of the relevant law is informed by pressing development, environmental and financial stability concerns arising from the globalisation of the world economy and shifts in global economic power. The module aims to provide the foundation and context for further exploration of specific areas of international economic law covered by other modules offered by this programme. The knowledge and skills gained on this course are suitable for careers in government, international organizations, law firms and NGOs concerned with international trade, investment, finance and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Practical AstrophysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7038PSemester 27No

Practical Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: Astrophysics has been revolutionized by the advent of large accessible data sets and public domain software for accessing that data and also for modelling astrophysical systems. This module will introduce a range of data analysis and modelling methods used in astrophysics, such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting and N-body simulation. Students will develop practical skills with hands-on experience of modern software packages and data from observatories and space missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope, Kepler and the Parker Solar Probe. Minimal programming background is assumed, but students should be familiar with using computers and mathematics at a level commensurate with BSc in Physics (or equivalent).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Poster presentation
  • Item 2: 50% Final investigation report
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Foreign Investments and Public PolicyLawSOLM190Semester 27No

Foreign Investments and Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelos Dimopoulos

Description: This module examines the different public policy interests that guide regulation of international investments. It explores theories on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), how the law deals with FDI and in particular what is the role and objectives of international investment law. Moreover, this module examines how different legal instruments balance investment promotion and protection objectives with other regulatory interests, such as human rights and environmental protection. The aim is to enable students to critically reflect on the objectives of investment regulation and whether existing rules offer an appropriate balance of (conflicting) public policy interests.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Water LawLawSOLM137Semester 17No

Water Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebecca Bates

Description: Water Law is a module examining the ecology and legal management of water. The legal area forms part of the wider body of environmental, international and economic law. It consider topics including the transboundary management of water resources, the human right to water, initiatives improve water service, privatisation, the role of water in energy production and the trade of water as a good or service.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The Business of FilmLawSOLM087Semester 27No

The Business of Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module deals with intellectual property and the international film industries, including the transformative environment of digital technology and user-generated content, through a consideration of protection and commercialisation in key jurisdictions and markets. Topics include the development of a film prospectus, ancillary rights, financing and alternative funding (including crowdfunding models and fan-based theories), development and production, distribution, merchandising and co-branding, film franchises and adaptations, censorship, titles and credits, cast and performers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Cloud Computing in AIPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPC724PSemester 27No

Cloud Computing in AI

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The Cloud computing in AI module is designed to familiarise yourself with the latest Cloud computing and decentralised applications technologies in the context of data management and AI and ML applications. This module will allow you to build working knowledge of the fundamentals of data management and data processing and then to explore network concepts, types of devices and data center functions. You will learn about services provided on the top 'Big Clouds' and practice on how to combine these services to support AI analyses and modelling. You will acquire confidence in applying all the tools learned in your master programme to the widest range of computing and business environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Portfolio
  • Item 2: 20% Assessed Coding Exercise
  • Item 3: 40% Report
Level: 7
Physical and Chemical Sciences
International Arbitration and EnergyLawSOLM163Semester 27No

International Arbitration and Energy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International arbitration proceedings in the energy sector have seen an important increase in recent years, both in terms of their numbers and their economic and political importance. This module provides students with the basis for understanding the particular issues of disputes in the energy sector, both in international investment and commercial arbitration. It gives students aiming to work in the arbitration area an important qualification in a very competitive market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Fundamental Questions in the Law of TreatiesLawSOLM116Semester 17No

Fundamental Questions in the Law of Treaties

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Description: This module focuses on the most fundamental elements of the law of treaties. It is based on the analysis of the text of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the law of Treaties. It relies on the case law of international courts and tribunals and the theory of international law. Anyone who wants to study or practice international law should take this module, as giving an invariable analysis of the law of treaties, which is the pillar of international law. This module deals with such important issues as the definition of the treaty in international law; consent to be bound; interpretation of treaties; reservation s to treaties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Compliance in Global MarketsLawSOLM223Semester 27No

Compliance in Global Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Sucheen Patel

Description: The module will have four general sessions in which all the students will study together advanced cases in Compliance. The course covers advanced topics in compliance. Then the students will be split into specialist groups as specified above for another four sessions. For the final sessions the students will get together for a conclusion of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Private International & European Air Transport LawLawSOLM152Semester 27No

Private International & European Air Transport Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Antigoni-Aikaterini Lykotrafiti

Description: Who is liable if a flight is cancelled? Are air passengers compensated if their flight is delayed? Do air passengers need to take special insurance against loss or damage to their baggage? Can pilots deviate from the instructions given by air traffic controllers? How do airlines pay for their glamorous, but also costly aircraft? Is it legal to fly a drone? This module will set out to explore the regime of domestic and international liability in aviation, namely the liability of air carriers towards passengers and shippers (Warsaw and Montreal Conventions), as well as for surface damage (Rome Convention), the liability of air traffic controllers, airports, aircraft manufacturers and government bodies; the regime governing aircraft financing and aircraft nationality (Geneva and Cape Town Conventions); EU consumer protection law (Regulation (EC) No 261/2004 on compensation for denied boarding, cancellation and delay of flights and relevant jurisprudence), and last, the nascent law on unmanned aircraft systems (drones).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Intellectual Property and the Creative IndustriesLawSOLM090Semester 27No

Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Noam Shemtov

Description: This module addresses the major creative industries, the way they operate and their impact on the national global economy, with a particular focus on the interplay between intellectual property protection and the industries' business environment. This module will analyze various contentious issues in the law surrounding the creative industries with a focus on intellectual property. A number of specific creative industries will be examined as well as famous' persons rights over their name and image and the commercialization of such rights. The module is international in scope, looking at a variety of jurisdictions according to significance and relevance to particular industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay
Level: 7
Law
Transfer PricingLawSOLM129Semester 27No

Transfer Pricing

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee

Description: The module will provide students with knowledge of transfer pricing and the various principles and standards developed to deal with it. There will be a historical overview of the issues followed by an analysis of the evolution of principles leading to the BEPS Action Plan and the updated 2017 Transfer Pricing Guidelines. The module will consider major current transfer pricing issues around intangibles, business restructuring, the digital economy, services and financing. It also examines issues such as transfer pricing documentation and dispute resolution (both arbitration and litigation). The intersection of transfer pricing with EU law will also be considered and the case law on state aid and APAs will be reviewed in detail. The course is not jurisdiction specific; rather it offers a holistic approach to the topic with cameos of the different approaches of countries to it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Illegal Speech, Censorship and Digital Rights: Social Media vs 'Old' MediaLawSOLM212Semester 17No

Illegal Speech, Censorship and Digital Rights: Social Media vs 'Old' Media

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: This digital revolution has had an enormous impact on fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and privacy (and personality rights more widely), and on concepts such as identity, autonomy and agency online. The Module will analyse (1) how the law protects these rights and balances them with the rights of others; (2) whether new fundamental rights should be recognized online and (3) how the law balances potential harms online with these rights. The Module will examine the relationship between law, technology and behaviour. It has a practical dimension by looking at liability relating to online communication and the management of that risk and by examining how these existing and emerging rights can be enforced (including for example the disclosure of a pseudonymous identity). It has a theoretical, law & policy dimension by examining concepts such as identity, privacy and autonomy and how these concepts relate to the law. It will compare traditional approaches to (offline) media regulation and how they relate to new phenomena on social media. The Module therefore examines traditional approaches to content regulation on 'old' media and how these censorship regime(s) is challenged by new media, reflecting on how the law needs to adapt to 'cope' with new (and ever evolving) technologies and business practices. As in traditional media regulation, this encapsulates administrative, civil and criminal law approaches to content regulation and censorship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Practical AstrophysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7038USemester 27Yes

Practical Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: Astrophysics has been revolutionized by the advent of large accessible data sets and public domain software for accessing that data and also for modelling astrophysical systems. This module will introduce a range of data analysis and modelling methods used in astrophysics, such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting and N-body simulation. Students will develop practical skills with hands-on experience of modern software packages and data from observatories and space missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope, Kepler and the Parker Solar Probe. Minimal programming background is assumed, but students should be familiar with using computers and mathematics at a level commensurate with BSc in Physics (or equivalent).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Poster presentation
  • Item 2: 50% Final investigation report
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International and Comparative Copyright LawLawSOLM075Semester 17No

International and Comparative Copyright Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: "Copyright, the legal foundation of the creative industries, is by its modern nature international and comparative This module will offer students a solid basis for understanding the essential elements of copyright law ,its philosophical and legal basis, the international Copyright Treaties, and the different approaches adopted in major civil and common law countries, including the United Kingdom, France, Germany and the United States. We further focus on the growth of EU copyright law with its distinctive flavour, which incorporates civil law doctrines in a pragmatically common law precedent-based approach. Where relevant, reference is also made to well-known decisions on certain topics in Australia, Canada and India. This interactive course will explore copyright principles by considering and discussing crucial topics, namely, the types of protected works, copyright ownership, beneficiaries, term, nature of rights, exceptions and limitations, collective management, enforcement and user rights - from national and international perspectives. The course also looks at current international copyright policy discussions such as new Treaties and Trade Agreements. The module will enable students to embark on more specialised and in-depth courses. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Open book examination (4 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Climate Change LawLawSOLM136Semester 17No

Climate Change Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Angeliki Papantoniou

Description: Climate Change Law and Policy Application focuses on specific aspects of international, regional and national law in relation to climate change: Human Rights, international and national litigation, state responsibility, non-state actors and participation, capacity building and trade and climate change. There is also an overview of the core principles of the UNFCCC regime , including the Paris agreement and principles of international environmental law applicable to climate change, both of which are examined in depth in Climate Change Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Investment LawLawSOLM189Semester 17No

International Investment Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Angelos Dimopoulos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM048

Description: This module offers a comprehensive treatment of international law governing foreign investments. It identifies and analyses the sources of international investment law, such as Bilateral Investment Treaties and their content, examining the international law rules that determine investor-State relationships, and discussing their application in practice. It looks into the standards of investors¿ treatment and protection, such as Fair and Equitable Treatment, and assesses their application in arbitral practice. The aim is to familiarise students with the complexities of international investment law, enabling them to give advice about the application of investment law in specific cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
The Law of FilmLawSOLM086Semester 17No

The Law of Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module introduces students to skills in reading film and intellectual property critically and analytically. Students will undertake interdisciplinary evaluation of film protection and commercialisation using film theory, fan and cultural studies, and intellectual property. Studying key jurisdictions and markets, topics include history of film and its protection, film theory and intellectual property, film theory and creative practice, authorship and film practice, audience and reception, sound and intellectual property, adaptation and genre.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Nuclear Energy LawLawSOLM168Semester 37No

Nuclear Energy Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module will cover all of the legal and policy issues relating to nuclear power generation. It is one of the most heavily regulated sectors of the energy industry. The course will consider the policy aims of Governments in building nuclear power plants to comply with their obligations to transition to clean energy. Nuclear power provides a stable, secure and efficient clean base load of power. The course will also review of all of the international treaties and standards applicable to the nuclear industry from safety and liability to transportation of highly active waste material. Nuclear power is not without its challenges including time and expense of contruction, security concerns post Fukishima, wast management and decommissioning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International and Comparative Petroleum Law and ContractsLawSOLM161Semester 17No

International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Carlos Bellorin Nunez

Description: Petroleum laws and contracts are the ultimate manifestation of policy and are the result of lengthy negotiation processes and have an unusual dynamic. According to the World Bank, between 1999 and 2010 more than 30 countries revised their petroleum contracts and made major amendments or completely changed their petroleum legal and fiscal framework. Several more countries have done the same since the 2014 oil price downturn in order to adapt themselves to the changes in the industry. This module will examine the main type of contracts used in the upstream petroleum industry (Production Sharing Agreements, Concessions and Service Agreements) and their most important legal and fiscal mechanisms and the reasons why these are so frequently changed. This course will also focus on the study of these contracts dynamics within the so-called energy transition, risk mitigation strategies in order to avoid the most common forms of legal and political risks: expropriations and contract renegotiation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Enforcement of International Criminal LawLawSOLM115Semester 27No

Enforcement of International Criminal Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: This module explores the national and international institutions that are available for the enforcement of international criminal law. Beginning with the international criminal tribunal at Nuremberg, it traces the evolution of international criminal tribunals in a historical perspective. It considers in detail the Chapter VII powers of the Security Council and their use in the setting up of ad hoc tribunals. The jurisdiction, competence and contribution of the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia and the International Criminal tribunal for Rwanda are considered in detail. The continuing relevance of ad hoc mechanisms of accountability is considered in light of the jurisprudence of the Special Tribunals in Lebanon, Sierra Leone, Iraq and Cambodia. A large part of the course will be devoted to the Permanent International Criminal Court. The final part of the module explores whether accountability through criminal processes is mandatory or permissive, and the extent to which accountability can be achieved in non-judicial forums such as Truth and Amnesty Commissions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Art and GovernanceLawSOLM226Semester 17No

Art and Governance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Emily Gould

Description: The module will enable students to learn about state regulation of art, art transactions and transfers of art. In particular, it will examine four areas of state regulation of art: criminal law provisions related to art, import and export controls on art, the impact of competition law on art acquisitions and transactions and the taxation of art. Coverage of criminal law issues will include the handling of stolen art, art fraud and forgery, the treatment of obscene artworks, trade in artefacts from war zones and treasure offences. The module will also cover how states control the cross-border movement of cultural treasures, competition law as it relates to agreements prevalent in the art industry and the direct and indirect tax regimes governing art and dispositions of art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group presentation
  • Item 2: 40% Essay 1
  • Item 3: 40% Essay 2
Level: 7
Law
International and Comparative Data Protection LawLawSOLM222Semester 27No

International and Comparative Data Protection Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: "Over 100 jurisdictions have adopted frameworks protecting personal data, many in response to the EU data protection framework that precludes international transfers unless equivalent protection applies. This module examines a number of these data protection legal frameworks, particularly in key jurisdictions such as Russia, China, APEC, Canada, Australia and the US. In addition to examining their particular implementation of the fair information processing principles that have emerged as best practice, the module will explore the key policy implications and debates around trade, commercial and human rights implications and, enforcement, including the challenges of particular technological developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Research Project in Data SciencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPC720PFull year7No

Research Project in Data Science

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The students work on research topics in one of the areas of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Science set by their project supervisors. Computational work is the principal component of the projects. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Dissertation (7500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Practical work and record
  • Item 3: 30% Oral assessment and presentation
Level: 7
Physical and Chemical Sciences
Music Industry ContractsLawSOLM089Semester 37No

Music Industry Contracts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Florian Koempel

Description: The Music industry contracts module analyses the contracts between the various parts of the music industry. On the creative side it looks at the contracts between composers and music publishers; performers/ producers and record companies as well as other players such as music managers. A key aspect of the creative side of the music value chain concerns the activities of Collective Management Organisations and the module analyses the membership agreements of PRS for Music, MCPS and PPL respectively.The module we also look at the relation of music industry players with users such as broadcasting organisations and online platforms. The course will show how copyright is applied in practice on the example of the music industry. The music industry has been at the cutting edge of legal and commercial developments dealing with new business models throughout the years. The course will look at the main markets for music such as US and UK. Experiences in the field of music are transferable to all creative sectors such as audio visual and book publishing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
EU Tax LawLawSOLM127Semester 27No

EU Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christiana Hjipanayi

Description: This module provides students with an understanding of EU tax law, with an emphasis on EU corporate tax law. Sources of EU corporate tax law (legislative instruments, soft law and case law) are examined. A number of corporate topics are covered, including parent-subsidiary relationships, permanent establishments, passive income, reorganisations, anti-abuse provisions, proposed directives (CCCTB, FTT) etc. The module also examines recent developments and high-profile debates in the intersection of international tax law and European tax law. Topics such as international tax avoidance, corporate social responsibility, good tax governance, harmful tax competition, state aid and tax treaty abuse are considered from the angle of EU tax law and international tax law. The interaction of the OECD/G20's BEPS project with the European Commission's measures to fight tax fraud and tax evasion is also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
EU Data Protection LawLawSOLM209Semester 17No

EU Data Protection Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: This module examines EU data protection laws and examples of the regulatory frameworks established in the Member States. It explores the key debates surrounding and commercial and other implications under the new regime of the General Data Protection Regulation, the Policing and Criminal Justice Data and the E Privacy framework, including the challenges of particular developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Independent Research Essay
  • Item 2: 70% Final assessment exercise (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
WTO Law Domestic Regulations and Trade RemediesLawSOLM193Semester 27No

WTO Law Domestic Regulations and Trade Remedies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kamala Dawar

Description: The module covers WTO rules and principles on domestic regulations (technical standards, rules on services, intellectual property protection) and on trade remedies to protect domestic industries against both fair and unfair trade (safeguards, anti-dumping duties and countervailing duties). It examines how WTO rules, as interpreted by adjudicators, seek to balance the tensions between free trade obligations and the right to regulate in pursuance of national policy objectives and free trade and unfair trade. On completion of the module, students should be able to advice public authorities, private companies or civil society organisations on the consistency of trade defence measures and domestic regulations affecting international trade with WTO Law and on the remedies available for breaches of WTO Law. Students which are not familiar with WTO law are strongly advised to take SOLM192 WTO Law: Fundamental Principles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Art Disputes and their ResolutionsLawSOLM228Semester 27No

Art Disputes and their Resolutions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Rebecca Reynolds

Description: This module will explore the many ways in which art disputes can be resolved including litigation and alternative processes to litigation. It will examine specifically the public processes of litigation in national courts, administrative tribunals and international tribunals, and also private processes such as arbitration, mediation and other alternative processes. In so doing, it will consider the nature of the art dispute, the appropriate methods to resolve the disputes, and the remedies and solutions available. This will be led in seminar style, with lecture and interactive participation from students through exercises and dialogue.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Oral Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Renewable Energy LawLawSOLM167Semester 27No

Renewable Energy Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Malik Dahlan

Description: This module will cover all of the legal and policy issues relating to renewable power generation. There are a range of renewable energy sources available from solar to wind, biomass to geothermal. Students will learn how the energy transition will impact the renewable sector as the world moves towards low-carbon energy. This module will consider this move towards reducing Green House Gas emissions and the growing international, regional and national laws that require States to encourage green investment. China, Denmark, Germany and the Middle East will be used as case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Radiative Transfer and AstrochemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7036PSemester 17No

Radiative Transfer and Astrochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas James Haworth
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7006P

Description: Radiative transfer describes the emission and propagation of light. In this course students will learn how we use radiative transfer to infer the properties and evolution of distant objects from light alone. They will also learn how light influences the temperature and motion of matter. Light also affects the composition of astrophysical systems which naturally links the course to an introduction to astrochemistry. This module provides a key toolkit for most observational and theoretical astrophyiscs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework Problems Set
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Principles of International Criminal LawLawSOLM114Semester 17No

Principles of International Criminal Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: This module explores the evolution of International Criminal Law in a historical perspective. It examines the sources of international criminal law in both treaty and custom, as well as the main principles of interpretation. It seeks to provide students with an understanding of the concept of international crime, and the distinction maintained in international law between regimes of individual and state responsibility. It is especially concerned with the substantive crimes within the jurisdiction of international tribunals such as genocide, war crimes, aggression, torture, and crimes against humanity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art TransactionsLawSOLM225Semester 17No

Art Transactions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Geoffrey Bennett

Description: This module will examine the various rules of domestic and international private law that can impact the art trade, from the sale and purchase of artworks by private individuals, to acquisitions by other private law means, such as gift and exchange, and loans and other bailments involving museums, galleries and other cultural institutions. Beyond this, the module will also consider the impact of statute: one notable example being the statutory immunity of certain loaned cultural objects from seizure. Owing to the high value and irreplaceable nature of the art being traded, the issue of insurance is an important one. This section will consider both private cover and public insurance. Finally, the module will look at the law of auctions. Auctions are of course a favoured forum to buy and sell art, and the law that applies to the auction is different from the law of the open market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
ML for Materials DiscoveryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPC723PSemester 27No

ML for Materials Discovery

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso

Description: The ML in Materials Discovery module is designed to help you understand how artificial intelligence and machine learning can be applied to the domain of materials science for materials discovery and help you attain a deeper understanding of ML methods applied to real scientific datasets to refine your practical skills. In this module you will learn the basics of modern chemical informatics, and how AI and ML methods can be exploited to study material properties. Then you will apply these computational methods to design new materials, and to model and predict their properties. You will have the opportunity to apply these techniques to specific cutting-edge examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Assessed Computational Laboratory
  • Item 2: 20% Assessed Coding Exercise
  • Item 3: 40% Report
Level: 7
Physical and Chemical Sciences
AI, Robotics and the LawLawSOLM221Semester 37No

AI, Robotics and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM284

Description: The evolving area of AI and Robotics gives rise to many ethical and legal questions over the status of robots, the rights and responsibilities arising from their use and liability for any harm caused. The module will explore the issues of legal personhood, the protection of robots through IP, the responsibilities arising from data use and the various approaches to allocating responsibility and liability. The module covers both embodied artificial intelligent systems (robots) and non-embodied ones (intelligent agents). Distinction is also made between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as independent agents in the legal arena and its legal ramifications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law of Geographical IndicationsLawSOLM088Semester 27No

Law of Geographical Indications

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans

Description: Geographical indications (GIs) recognise the provenance and heritage of products, especially food and drink. The GI provides registered products with protection against imitation; and protects consumers from being misled about the geographical origin or quality of goods. They are important to the economy and environment of rural regions. GIs, such as Scotch Whisky, Parmigiano Reggiano or Darjeeling Tea, have become a valuable form of collective intellectual property. This module is intended for those involved in the drafting of specifications for the registration of GIs; or the formulation of regulations governing GIs; or the complementary administration of trade mark systems; or more generally, in the devising socio-economic policy for rural regions. The module will focus on EU law for the regulation of GIs; while having due regard to the comparative relationship other influential jurisdictions, including those of India and China; and by way of contrast, to the means by which GIs are protected as trade marks in the United States (US). The module will examine the substantive and procedural law relating to the EU regulation of GIs including the definition and eligibility of geographical names for registration; control or inspection obligations; enforcement and; the inter-relationship of GIs with trade marks. The module will consider the international enforcement of GIs, especially the way in which the competing models of EU and US regulation might be further harmonised within trade agreements; as well as possible approaches to future agreement between the UK and the EU concerning the recognition and protection of GIs following the withdrawal of the UK from the EU.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Machine and Deep LearningPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPC707PFull year7No

Machine and Deep Learning

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module covers fundamental concepts of machine learning with emphasis on the development of practical skills required for the selection and application of machine learning methods to defined problems. Topics include data representation and preparation, unsupervised learning methods, regression and classification methods, artificial neural networks and performance evaluation. Face-to-face teaching will be combined with extensive hands-on sessions in the computational lab.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Online test
  • Item 2: 20% Portfolio
  • Item 3: 30% Programming project
  • Item 4: 35% Presentation
Level: 7
Physical and Chemical Sciences
Licensing Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM078Semester 17No

Licensing Intellectual Property

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM092

Description: The module begins with an explanation of the principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing contracts. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution. The module will discuss current issues in the field of licensing including trade marks and selective distribution agreements; standard essential patents and FRAND (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory) licensing; as well as copyright licensing, news aggregation; and technological self-help measures including blockchain technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Refugee LawLawSOLM171Semester 17No

International Refugee Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Ellen Allde

Description: This module examines the international law dimensions of protecting refugees and other categories of forced migrants. It provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts and workings of international law, in general, and international refugee and human rights law, in particular, as they relate to the phenomenon of forced displacement. While international refugee law forms the backbone of the course, the module will also cover aspects of international criminal law, international humanitarian law, and the law of the sea as these apply to refugees and other forced migrants. The module will start by studying the historical origins and development of refugee law up to its codification in the 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol. The institutions tasked with overseeing the implementation of these instruments will also be examined, with particular focus on UNHCR and its evolving role through time. The study of substantive law, including State practice and case law of national and international courts and Treaty bodies, will follow thereafter, following ten thematic blocs: 1) the refugee definition (inclusion, exclusion, and cessation of refugee status); 2) the status of Palestinian refugees; 3) non-refoulement and complementary forms of protection; 4) status determination procedures; 5) the content of international protection and other 'durable solutions'; 6) access to asylum; 7) war and displacement; 8) 'climate refugees'; 9) poverty, destitution and 'survival migration'; 10) and the ethical roots of refugeehood, to be taught in 3-hour blocs from Week 2 to 11.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
WTO Law: Fundamental PrinciplesLawSOLM192Semester 17No

WTO Law: Fundamental Principles

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Berna Akcali Gur

Description: The module examines the fundamental principles of the law of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Topics covered include sources of WTO law, the relationship between WTO law and international and domestic law, the WTO dispute settlement system, and substantive rules on market access (tariffs and non-tariff barriers), non-discrimination (national treatment and most-favoured nation treatment) and rules aimed at balancing free trade and non-trade concerns. The module provides students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the regulatory framework underpinning the multilateral trading system. On completion of the module, students should be able to advice public authorities, private companies or civil society organisations on the consistency of market access restrictions and discriminatory measures affecting international trade with WTO Law and on the remedies available for breaches of WTO Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
General Principles of Insurance LawLawSOLM138Semester 17No

General Principles of Insurance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: This module provides students with an overview of the general principles of law involved in the formation of the insurance contract, the terms of policies and the claims process, as well as the role of brokers and the conduct of business at Lloyd's of London. Insurance is fundamental to a modern economy, allowing businesses and individuals to transfer the risk of loss, thereby facilitating investment and protecting wealth, and London is a world centre of the insurance industry. Students require no prior knowledge of insurance or English law. They will learn all they need to know as the module progresses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Conduct of Hostilities in International LawLawSOLM113Semester 27No

Conduct of Hostilities in International Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: This module is concerned with the rules of international law that govern the conduct of military operations in situations of armed conflict. Since these rules are largely intended for the protection of the civilian population, they apply irrespective of the legality or illegality of war. In the literature, the issues studied in this module are variously referred to as humanitarian law, jus in bello, or the law of war. The module will examine the core principles of humanitarian law , in particular, the centrality of the principle of distinction between civilians and combatants; rules for assessing the proportionality of military operations and their impact on targeting decisions; means and methods of warfare including the prohibition of weapons of mass destruction. The module will also consider the law applicable to situations of military occupation in light of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% Writing Submission 1
  • Item 2: 8% Writing Submission 2
  • Item 3: 8% Writing Submission 3
  • Item 4: 6% In-class assignment
  • Item 5: 70% Final essay
Level: 7
Law
Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in the Middle AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML4200Semester 14Yes

Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in the Middle Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Armstrong

Description: From boy bands to Valentines, our ways of expressing sexual love were first formulated in the Middle Ages. This module traces the early history of the language of love, through poetry and songs composed between the 12th and 15th centuries. With the help of English translations, you will explore different types of poetry in various languages: Spanish, French, Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, and the Occitan language of southern France. You will develop your ability to analyse complex poems, and to understand and respect cultural differences, through a range of activities including creative rewriting of translations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Text Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay/Creative Rewriting of Translations (2000 words)
Level: 4
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Cybercrime: Substantive OffencesLawSOLM207Semester 17No

Cybercrime: Substantive Offences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Internet technologies have enabled new ways of committing crimes and have moved 'old' crimes such as fraud online - this has created interesting challenges to substantive criminal law. These challenges concern both the interpretation of traditional criminal law (common law and statute based) and potential new crimes where there is a need to develop the law to close legal gaps. This Module examines substantive criminal law(s) of different jurisdictions (using the UK and the US as the main comparators) from a comparative and international perspective. It also looks at international harmonization efforts such as the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime and the EU framework for the harmonization of the law in the fields of cybercrime. The Module looks at definitions and categorisation of cybercrime; the relationships between cyberterrorims, cyberwarfare and cybercrime; content related cybercrime (such as child sex abuse images; pornography; IP infringement; terrorism propaganda (glorification and encouragement); hate speech); communication offences and harassment; online fraud and forgery; computer misuse (hacking; malicious code; interception) and illegal devices and malicious marketplaces. It will also examine the jurisdictional aspects of such criminality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201Full year6Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS6201A or take RUS6201B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS5201

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% English-Russian Translation (Equivalent to 1300 words)
  • Item 2: 8% Russian-English Translation (Equivalent to 1200 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Cultural Research Project (3000 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 5: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Russian
Critical JurisprudenceLawSOLM181Semester 27No

Critical Jurisprudence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze

Description: This module introduces students to a broad range of theoretical critiques of conventional (doctrinal) legal scholarship. The course begins with liberal political theory (Aristotle, Locke and Hobbes). It then considers more specific liberal critiques of law (Economic analysis, Rule of Law critique, and Mill¿s harm principle). The last section of the course looks at Foucault, Feminist legal theory, and Critical Legal Theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law of Economic Crime: CorruptionLawSOLM200Semester 27No

Law of Economic Crime: Corruption

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Peter Alldridge

Description: "The treatment of tax evasion in the UK, including the alternatives to prosecution and the developing regime for dealing with evasion. It will then turn to the national and international law of corruption, dealing with misconduct in public office. The treatment of bribery will include its history and theory, the developing international régime and the trend towards greater negotiation with persons suspected1 of bribery and placing greater duties in respect of enforcement and reporting on the private sector. There will be detailed case studies of corruption in sports and of the Trump Presidency. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Radiative Transfer and AstrochemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7036USemester 17Yes

Radiative Transfer and Astrochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas James Haworth
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7006U

Description: Radiative transfer describes the emission and propagation of light. In this course students will learn how we use radiative transfer to infer the properties and evolution of distant objects from light alone. They will also learn how light influences the temperature and motion of matter. Light also affects the composition of astrophysical systems which naturally links the course to an introduction to astrochemistry. This module provides a key toolkit for most observational and theoretical astrophyiscs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework Problems Set
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Contemporary Post- Soviet DocumentaryLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6071Semester 26No

Contemporary Post- Soviet Documentary

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks

Description: This module invites students to analyse and compare recent documentary films from countries who were part of the Soviet Union until 1991. Topics include memory and reflection on the Soviet legacy and enduring Russian influence, migration and exile, revolution and conflict. Students will place the films in the context of the possibilities of the documentary form and the historical, social and political issues the films address, drawing on theoretical perspectives from memory studies, postcolonial theory and gender.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Plan
  • Item 2: 75% Essay
Level: 6
Russian
Postcolonial Perspectives on the Russian NovelLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6069Semester 26Yes

Postcolonial Perspectives on the Russian Novel

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Chekhonadskih
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM6069

Description: This module engages with a canon of Russian novel and minor literature of the 19th century within the broader theoretical perspectives and questions of postcolonialism. Offering comparative case studies of literary and theoretical texts, it traces continuities and discontinuities between the imperialist politics of Russia and the literary themes of centre and periphery, people and power, geography and land, Westernisation and progress, Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment, tradition and nationalism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2
Level: 6
Russian
International Energy Law and EthicsLawSOLM157Semester 17No

International Energy Law and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The International Energy Law and Ethics module is concerned with legal and ethical issues arising in the energy sector. It aims to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to the analysis of these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-Class Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Essay
Level: 7
Law
Computers and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5202Semester 15Yes

Computers and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge

Description: This module is designed as an introduction to the application of technology, specifically web technology, in language education. Providing a balance of theory and practice, it equips students with the knowledge and skills to make enhanced use of computers in their studies and research activities. The module covers key concepts in the use of digital technologies for language learning, as well as providing practical experience in the creation of web-based materials using a variety of computer applications, including elementary coding in HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Reading Response (250 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Coding Practical 1 (250 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Evaluation Report (1200 words)
  • Item 4: 5% Coding Practical 2 (250 words)
  • Item 5: 5% Project Plan
  • Item 6: 50% Website Project and Rationale (1500 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Regulation of Financial MarketsLawSOLM003Semester 17No

Regulation of Financial Markets

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The module provides an overview of monetary and financial regulation drawing on a comparative study of the law in relevant financial centres in the US, UK, EU and Japan as well as on the increasing corpus of international financial `soft law¿ (such as the Basel capital rules) and considers the dynamics of financial regulation in emerging economies. The module goes beyond the description of the black letter law and explains the underlying economic and political forces which bring that law into being, analysing the interaction between law and finance. Focus is on regulatory issues, and not on contractual or transactional aspects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Culture and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML4006Full year4No

Culture and Language

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Chekhonadskih
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM4006

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts (literary and visual), concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into four 5-week blocks, devoted to topics such as, for example, Reading Literary Texts, Visual Cultures, Culture and Society, Linguistics. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Creative Response and Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Guided Film Analysis (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 25% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Short Answer Questions (1500 words)
Level: 4
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
IT TransactionsLawSOLM206Semester 17No

IT Transactions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Conor Ward

Description: The module covers information technology transactions, contracts and licences in a variety of areas, such as: system procurement contracts, commercial software licensing, outsourcing, cloud computing and free and open source software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
AI in Astrophysics and Space SciencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPC722PSemester 27No

AI in Astrophysics and Space Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Enrico Camporeale

Description: The AI in Astrophysics and Space Science module is designed to help you understand how artificial intelligence and machine learning can be applied to the astrophysics and space-science domains and help you attain a deeper understanding of ML methods applied to real scientific datasets to refine your practical skills and to help prepare for your independent study research project irrespective of the specific problem domain of that. In this module you will learn about data preparation and pathologies related to the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning, you will apply the methods you have studied in your other AI and ML and your Deep Learning modules, and you will explore knowledge-guided machine learning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Portfolio
  • Item 2: 20% Assessed Coding Exercise
  • Item 3: 40% Report
Level: 7
Physical and Chemical Sciences
E-Commerce RegulationLawSOLM220Semester 27No

E-Commerce Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Sara Jorge Nogueira Silva

Description: "This module examines the theoretical basis of the legal and regulatory framework within which online commercial transactions have to be undertaken (bearing in mind that there is much commercial activity which is, ostensibly, 'free' ¿ Facebook and Google are prime examples). It does this through the lens of legitimate authority, asking the fundamental question: 'Why should an e-commerce business accept this particular law and comply with it?' This question arises because of the regulatory and legal difficulties involved in e-commerce as a cross-border activity. The proposition that an e-commerce business must obey all the laws of the world is, simply, both unrealistic in practice and unsustainable in theory. The first part of the module examines jurisprudential theory in some depth, and the second part applies this theory to particular areas of e-commerce activity to explain how law and regulation there works (or, often, doesn¿t work). Because e-commerce is a global activity it doesn't examine the law of one country alone, but focuses on the underlying principles for regulation, how they differ between jurisdictions, the justifications for and limits on national lawmaking, and how e-commerce businesses respond to regulation. This module uses elements of lawmaking and regulatory theory to illuminate how e-commerce regulation operates in practice."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Independent Research Essay 1 (3000-4000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Independent Research Essay 2 (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art and MoneyLawSOLM230Semester 27No

Art and Money

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This module will examine the function of art and other cultural objects as financial assets. This involves seeing historic and artistic chattels from the point of view of wealth management (via investment, capital appreciation and leasing potential) and as collateral for transactions that are otherwise unrelated (art pledges, mortgages and charges). Since the investment in and taking of security over such assets necessarily involves questions of title, title warranties and title retention terms will also be examined. The module will also consider the treatment of art and cultural property in times of financial turmoil and insolvency. The main question here will be whether such cultural objects can be protected during corporate restructuring or insolvency, or indeed governmental/state financial difficulties. The module will end by considering the new area of art financing and alternative funding models for the acquisition of art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Media Law: Reputation ManagementLawSOLM216Semester 17No

Media Law: Reputation Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: Media Law: Reputation Management covers the key areas of law used by those who seek to build and protect a media 'brand' for commercial gain. The module will open with a detailed consideration of libel law and how that protects the public image of an individual (or, indeed, an entity with legal personhood). Whereas perhaps three decades ago the law in this area seemed well settled, the challenges of the internet combined with much of the Defamation Act 2013 remaining to be refined through interpretation by the courts makes this an important and ongoing focus for study by the commercial media lawyer. The second aspect of law which the module will look at is the developing area of privacy. While traditionally English law has not offered direct protection for privacy, a wide range of las have been used in effect to prevent or at least compensate individuals aggrieved by private elements of their lives being published to the masses. Sometimes this has simply been about the privacy of an individual, while in other circumstances it has been about the protection of a direct commercial relationship (such as that between the Douglases and OK Magazine in Douglas v Hello). The development of the tort of Misuse of Private Information, a result of the application of the Human Rights Act 1998, has arguably created a de facto common law privacy protection which continues to explore new nuances at the discretion of the courts. The continued existence of the tabloid press, the fallout from the phone-hacking scandal, and the apparently unending appetite on the part of the general public for 'celebrity' gossip indicates that this is an area of law which will continue to see development for some time to come. The final area of law to be covered in this module focuses on intellectual property in a media context, in particular the use of IP in personality rights and, more broadly, as a means of controlling an individual's brand. As of yet, English law does not recognise personality rights, instead protecting only those who choose to actively merchandise themselves via a form of passing off ('false endorsement'). The course will open up the debate on this issue and consider the potential for this to be expanded, as well as other ways in which IP may be used to protect personal reputation (or not - see, for instance, application of HUbbard v Vosper in this regard). Although English law will be the primary context in which this module will be taught, it is intended that this will provide more a 'case study' context in which the issues raised will be debated rather than a course solely about English law per se. Laws in other jurisdictions (such as, for example, the ongoing debate on defamation reform in Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be raised and discussed where appropriate.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Computer-based exam (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 13No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Poster presentation (600 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Individual Reflection (250 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Case Study (1200 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Individual Presentation (15 min)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200BSemester 26Yes

Russian III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS6200
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS5200 or take RUS5202

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Russian
Common Law ReasoningLawSOLM179Semester 17No

Common Law Reasoning

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Maksymillan Del Mar

Description: This course is an advanced introduction to common law reasoning. We will examine key issues and debates over the character of common law reasoning, including: is the common law a system of rules? What is the binding content of precedent? What is the place of policies in common law reasoning? What is analogy and how important is it to common law reasoning? And, how is common law reasoning affected by transnational and global forms of legal reasoning?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law of Economic Crime: Proceeds of CrimeLawSOLM199Semester 17No

Law of Economic Crime: Proceeds of Crime

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Introductory, History of Financial Crime, Corporate Liability and procedural and evidential issues in financial crme, Criminal vs Regulatory Justice, AML/CTF - the International Framework, UK regulatory framework, The substantive UK criminal offences , Art Crime, Kleptocracy, Confiscation (UK), Civil actions, Non Conviction based Seizure

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Banking Law InternationalLawSOLM007Semester 17No

Banking Law International

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the nature and content of banking law and regulation at the international, European and UK levels with reference to US law as well. Banking markets are key drivers in any national, regional or global economy with banks carrying out a number of essential services without which no economy could operate. Banking markets are nevertheless unstable and prone to significant crisis and collapse which was confirmed by the severity and damaging impact of the recent financial crises in global, European and national financial markets. Many difficult problems still arise with regard to the causes of the crises and most appropriate responses going forward. All of the relevant issues that arise in this exciting area are examined in this course.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Ethics of Migration and AsylumLawSOLM173Semester 17No

Ethics of Migration and Asylum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitri Van Den Meerssche

Description: "This module introduces the main philosophical and ethical debates concerning border control, citizenship, migration and refugee/asylum-seeker status. It sets out the arguments for and against ¿open borders¿, the political theory of citizenship and the nation state, and the relationships between citizens¿ rights and universal human rights. As well as matters of general philosophical principle, we will look at the ethics of border control practices, from identity cards and entry controls to surveillance and access to public services, detention and repatriation. We will also consider the cultural dimensions of migration control, in particular the relationship between discourses of security, citizenship, and race/ethnicity/cultural difference."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Energy Law PrinciplesLawSOLM155Semester 17No

Energy Law Principles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM309

Description: This module provides students with an overview of the energy sector. It identifies the sources of energy law from international treaties to soft law guidelines for example the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Energy is the largest sector globally and is one of the most heavily regulated. Students will learn about the evolution of the energy sector and the difficulties for the future as the sector adapts to the energy transition. There are many interested parties in the energy sector from hosts states, international oil companies, national oil companies, NGOs, IGOs as well as service providers. The different interests of the main actors can be addressed in contracts, national laws or international obligations for example the Nationally Determine Contributions of each State under the Paris Agreement 2015.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Online Exam (3 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Research MethodsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPC721PSemester 17No

Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Bevan

Description: The research methods module is designed to help you attain the relevant skills to assess, understand, and visualise data and to undertake your research project. This includes essential skills such as communication and organising information from the literature, through to being able to extract information on data science methods from a multidisciplinary environment and report writing. A strong emphasis will be placed on enabling you to engage with complex information from seminars and to discuss that information to explore how it relates to material studied on your programme. Discussion sessions will be a key part in helping you develop as a data scientist and enhance transferable skills that will benefit you in the rest of your degree and future employment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Portfolio
  • Item 2: 30% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Presentation
Level: 7
Physical and Chemical Sciences
Art and Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM229Semester 27No

Art and Intellectual Property

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: This module will examine the interplay between art and intellectual property, in particular copyright, including digital issues. The module will involve a comparative approach, looking in depth at the protection of intangible rights in the UK, before comparing this with the regimes of other countries (namely France and the United States). the module will focus on the related intellectual property rights that impact the art trade: moral rights and the artists' resale right. The module will then look specifically at museum and gallery practice to see the effect of the 2014 UK copyright changes. This will cover the two 'orphan works' schemes, extended collective licensing and the new copyright exceptions, many of which are aimed specifically at the museum and heritage sector

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Language MythsLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5201Semester 25Yes

Language Myths

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez

Description: Are some languages harder to learn than others? Are double negatives illogical? Do children lack grammar? Do dialects lack grammar? Did your parents teach you your mother tongue? In this module we explore commonly held views on human language from a contemporary, comparative perspective. The module is of interest to anyone studying for a language degree.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Assignment 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Assignment 2 (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 35% Assignment 3 (1400 words)
  • Item 4: 20% Quizzes (800 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200ASemester 16Yes

Russian III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS6200
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS5200 or take RUS5202

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Russian
English Language IScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF009Semester 13No

English Language I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner

Description: Reading and study skills, lecture comprehension and seminar skills, and an introduction to academic writing in English. This module is intended for students, primarily from overseas, whose first language is not English and who do not already have IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Portfolio: text responses
  • Item 2: 25% Individual talk (5 min)
  • Item 3: 50% Timed writing (1.5 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Comparative Criminal JusticeLawSOLM203Semester 27No

Comparative Criminal Justice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Saskia Hufnagel

Description: This module examines civil and common law jurisdictions in the area of criminal justice in different cultural contexts (i.e. Europe, Asia, Australasia, North America) and addresses possible conflicts of interests when having to work together internationally and trans-nationally. It traces the evolution of civil and common law criminal justice systems, assesses similarities of legal doctrines, theories and application of punishment, prison systems and legal aid provision. The first half of the module will provide an overview of different types of criminal justice systems around the globe, including the assessment of similarities and differences in substantive criminal law. The second half of the module will consider criminal procedure, the trial process, legal aid, penalties, prison systems and rehabilitation programs in different cultural contexts and how judicial cooperation between the systems can by hampered by differences in criminal procedure requirements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Deep LearningPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7037USemester 27Yes

Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Abigail Waldron
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECS708U or take MTH786U

Description: Machine learning influences modern life through many different avenues and is silently revolutionising the way we live and work. We can see the influence of machine learning algorithms in social media, web search engines, mobile device spell checkers and self-driving cars. This module provides an introduction to machine learning using the Python programming language and the TensorFlow (TM) programming toolkit from Google (TM). Minimal programming background is assumed, however students wishing to take this module should be familiar with using computers, and mathematics at a level commensurate with a BSc in Physics or equivalent degree (calculus and linear algebra).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Project 1
  • Item 2: 50% Final project
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Afropean IdentitiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6052Semester 16Yes

Afropean Identities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM6052

Description: 'Afropean' is a term coined by Belgian music artist Zap Mama to encompass being both African and European, not as a contradiction but as an expression of plurality and site for creativity. Beyond identity politics, though acutely aware of racism as manifested across European contexts, Afropean writers acknowledge the dark histories of slavery and colonialism while uniting around cultural memories and contemporary activist movements. Students will analyse literary texts including essays, poems, novels, and short stories. They will engage with race critical theory and Afropea as a utopian concept, as well as positioning themselves in relation to local Afropean history and culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1200 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2800 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200Full year6Yes

Russian III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS6200A or take RUS6200B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS5200 or take RUS5202

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: Essay at Home (800 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: Essay at Home (800 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Russian
International Finance Law AppliedLawSOLM006Semester 27No

International Finance Law Applied

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the principal markets and main professional documentation used in more specialist international finance and capital markets. International finance markets are key drivers in national and international economies and the new global economy. The City of London remains one of the key financial centres in the world for all of these markets and activities. The course examines the nature, function, structure, operation and importance of all of the key financial markets involved. This is essentially a private law, contract or transactional and documentation course which provides professional preparation in designing, structuring and executing all of the principal separate financial contracts involved. The course can be taken with International Finance Law or as a free standing module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Contemporary Russian FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6017Semester 26Yes

Contemporary Russian Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks

Description: "Through the analysis of films produced since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union and creation of Russia, this course aims to equip students to be able to comment on contemporary Russian films as they are released. Teaching and assessment focuses on identifying key industrial, thematic and genre trends and issues in contemporary Russian cinema, with a focus on the intersection of the national and transnational. Those without Russian will be able to participate fully in this course by taking the FLM version, although a reading knowledge can be useful for working on less well-known films. The secondary reading is in English, and all key films are subtitled."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Seminar Participation and Presentation (5 mins)
  • Item 3: 70% Essay (3500 words)
Level: 6
Russian
Securities RegulationLawSOLM001Semester 27No

Securities Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: This module examines the law and regulation of conduct of business/market conduct aspects of financial intermediation seeing from the angle of investor protection in primary and secondary capital markets. It covers a wide range of issues including the reform of the regulation of financial intermediation in the aftermath of the 2008 credit crisis, mandatory disclosure and transparency requirements for securities trading, conduct of business rules, financial mis-selling, market abuse, the regulation of credit rating agencies, hedge funds regulation, and the regulation of financial resilience. The module covers policy issues, statutory materials and case law. UK regulation is examined within the context of EU law and regulation. Where appropriate specific themes are discussed with reference to international harmonization initiatives and/or comparative analysis with parallel developments in the US. The module also places emphasis on the practical problems, which arise in capital markets and consider ways in which these may be addressed in the future.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Postsocialist intimacies: Gender and sexual politics in contemporary ChinaLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5213Semester 25No

Postsocialist intimacies: Gender and sexual politics in contemporary China

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Xumeng Xie

Description: This module provides an overview of academic debates centred around evolving gender and sexual politics in contemporary China, which manifests as a unique area for studying the expansion of neoliberal economy, digital technologies as well as its socialist legacies. Bringing together significant theoretical insights and empirical research, teaching of this module will be facilitated through case studies of emerging forms of cultural representation, production, consumption and resistance. Topics will be covered include fandom and the popularity of online literature, influencers and gender performativity, feminist and LGBTQ+ activism and the creation of queer media, in the light of the Chinese context of censorship and governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Annotated bibliography
  • Item 2: 80% Essay
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
E-Commerce TransactionsLawSOLM219Semester 17No

E-Commerce Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: This module examines the law relating to online commercial transactions (bearing in mind that there is much commercial activity which is, ostensibly, 'free' - Facebook and Google are prime examples). It focuses on the law which governs a range of online transactions, including contracting, signatures and online marketplaces. Because e-commerce is a global activity we don¿t examine the law of one country alone (though we will inevitably look at more UK and EU law than that of anywhere else). Our focus is on the underlying principles which are common to all jurisdictions, and the differences in some areas - the theory is that if you understand these, you will be able to analyse any particular national law and apply it to the particular e-commerce activity in question.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201ASemester 16Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS6201
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS5201

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 6
Russian
Cybercrime: Forensic InvestigationsLawSOLM208Semester 27No

Cybercrime: Forensic Investigations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Internet technologies have enabled new ways of committing crimes and have moved "old"" crimes such as fraud online- this has created interesting challenges to the investigation, prosecution and enforcement of the criminal law. Internet technologies are borderless and have enabled an increase in transnational crime. This Module will examine the legal procedural issues arising from transborder online crime: international co-operation, mutual assistance, extradition; the role played by private actors/industry in the enforcement of cybercrime (payment intermediaries; hosting providers (eg cloud computing); internet access providers; domain name registries and registrars etc); the relationship between public and private enforcement; the national and international powers of collecting intelligence & evidence (including surveillance); the law of evidence and admissibility; computer, device and network forensics."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Corporate Finance LawLawSOLM009Semester 17No

Corporate Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in international corporate finance. The module will focus on providing an introduction to the different corporate financing options, methods and techniques, with special emphasis on the use of debt and equity. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and international trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Deep LearningPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7037PSemester 27No

Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Abigail Waldron
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECS708P or take MTH786P

Description: Machine learning influences modern life through many different avenues and is silently revolutionising the way we live and work. We can see the influence of machine learning algorithms in social media, web search engines, mobile device spell checkers and self-driving cars. This module provides an introduction to machine learning using the Python programming language and the TensorFlow (TM) programming toolkit from Google (TM). Minimal programming background is assumed, however students wishing to take this module should be familiar with using computers, and mathematics at a level commensurate with a BSc in Physics or equivalent degree (calculus and linear algebra).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Project 1
  • Item 2: 50% Final project
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Terrorism, Migration and Human RightsLawSOLM175Semester 27No

Terrorism, Migration and Human Rights

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Elspeth Guild

Description: "This module looks at the relationship of terrorism, human rights and migration. Among the key questions will be the relationship of foreigners to threat, the treatment of suspected terrorists through immigration laws, the entitlement of foreigners to protection against return to persecution and torture (as refugees) and the transformation of the technologies around movement of people across international borders which are driven by terrorism related concerns. The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the law around terrorism and how it intersects with migration and border crossing issues. The module will include: an introduction to the course from citizens to foreigners including Human Rights, Political Violence, Terrorism and Extradition. We will examine the issues around refugees, political violence/terrorism and the principle of non-refoulement and how they interact with the prohibition on torture in the context of terrorism allegations. The question of the political issue of diplomatic assurances and legal obligations of protection will be examined as well as the convergence of terrorism, criminal law and refugee protection. The use of digital means by state authorities to counter terrorism and the use of the personal data of foreigners will also be part of the reflections of this course. Students will have an opportunity to present in class their research."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Cultures of Migration and DiasporaLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5208Semester 15No

Cultures of Migration and Diaspora

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Parvati Nair

Description: This module offers an introduction to the ways in which migration and diaspora shape cultures across a range of transnational and country contexts. Through reference to multiple 'texts,' such as selected literature, blogs, film, and photography, the module will familiarize students with key issues relating to migration and diaspora, offering both a comparative view across cultural specificities and an understanding of transnational cultural dynamics. Topics covered include migration, places and times; (im)mobilities, borders and policies; religion, rituals and diasporic communities; home and homeland; food, family and memory; digital technologies and transnational connections; inventing memory and identities across generations. A range of 'texts,' including fiction, documentary film, photography, blogs and music will be analysed to explore these topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 75% Essay 2
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Features of English: Linguistics for English Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5205Semester 25Yes

Features of English: Linguistics for English Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LIN4208

Description: Students considering a Foreign Language Assistantship, or any other English language teaching activity such as private English lessons or tuition, during their Year Abroad or after graduation, are recommended to choose this module. We would advise you to do this level 5 module in your second year, just before your year abroad. The module is especially recommended if you have little or no knowledge of English Linguistics. The module covers all main areas of English Linguistics which are relevant for the teaching of English: English phonetics; word classes and phrases (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, particles); the role of English in the world; development of English; English usage / prescription and description. Please note that this module is not available for students with prior knowledge of English Linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201ASemester 15Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5201

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 5
Russian
International Finance LawLawSOLM005Semester 17No

International Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the module is to examine the principal markets and main professional documentation used in the international finance and capital markets. International finance markets are key drivers in national and international economies and the new global economy. The City of London remains one of the key financial centres in the world for all of these markets and activities. This course examines the nature, function, structure, operation and importance of all of the key financial markets involved. This is essentially a private law, contract or transactional and documentation course which provides professional preparation in designing, structuring and executing all of the principal separate financial contracts involved.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
United States Energy Law, Regulation and PolicyLawSOLM158Semester 17No

United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This course covers US energy regulation and policy including the impact of pending climate change legislation and proposed Environmental Protection Agency climate change rules and regulations. The US has been a market leader in energy regulation and privatization since World War II. This module looks at how this was achieved in the electricity markets, oil a& gas including unconventional resources and more recently the renewables market. The work of the FERC (Federal Energy Regulaiton Commission) and the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) are also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Condensed Matter APhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5228Semester 25Yes

Condensed Matter A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher White

Description: This module provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts in modern condensed matter physics. Topics include bulk properties of matter (e.g. elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficients); crystal structures and interatomic potentials; diffraction of waves through crystals and determination of crystal structures; dynamics of crystal lattice vibrations (including phonons and the heat capacity); dynamics of electrons in solids; the origin of conductors, insulators and semiconductors; quasiparticles and holes; properties of magnetic materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Mathematics AScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF040Full year3No

Mathematics A

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anum Khalid

Description: In Semester 1 the module reviews mathematical notation, basic principles of arithmetic and algebra including ideas of accuracy and precision, coordinate geometry and trigonometry; and demonstrates how these principles may be applied to solve problems in science and mathematics. In semester 2, the knowledge on topics such as algebra and geometry and further complemented by knowledge on functions and vectors as well as seeing an introduction to the two key areas, calculus and statistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 20% Assessment 2
  • Item 3: 20% Assessment 3
  • Item 4: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected IssuesLawSOLM041Semester 37No

Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Behn

Description: This module seeks to explore specialised issues arising in dispute resolution processes that are alternative to conventional forms of adjudication. The module will examine selected issues in ADR and may include issues dealing with confidentiality and enforcement, issues of globalization and transplantation of ADR systems, ethics and morality in ADR, special areas of ADR application (for example, on-line dispute resolution), role of lawyers, the professionalisation of ADR, system design, for example. ADR is a vibrant area of scholarship; it is impossible to give 'yes' or 'no' answers to most of the issues arising in scholarship. Therefore the module will employ a critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students will be willing to share the results of their analysis, research and supported opinions, and be involved in active discussion of all issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and ContextLawSOLM040Semester 27No

Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Rahim Shamji

Description: The module will seek to provide an understanding of the various dispute resolution processes available to parties in dispute, and to understand the necessity of considering the process which best suits the dispute. The module will cover such topics as the nature of conflict, the emergence of disputes, the history of the ADR movement with its attendant debate between informalism and formalism, the adjudication process, the nature of negotiation and their strategies, the mediation process and approaches, the continuum of dispute resolution processes, the relationship between ADR and institutes such as courts, the English Courts and within the EU. ADR is a vibrant area of scholarship; it is impossible to give 'yes' or 'no' answers to most of the issues arising in scholarship. Therefore the module will employ a critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students will be willing to share the results of their analysis, research and supported opinions,and be involved in active discussion of all issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Study Abroad Year (Drama)English and DramaSED003Full year5No

Study Abroad Year (Drama)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Drama programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Company Law: Foundational and Constitutional IssuesLawSOLM020Semester 17No

Company Law: Foundational and Constitutional Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alan Dignam

Description: The module aims to inform and educate students as to the field of law that governs UK corporations. The course is a UK focused Company law course covering: Meaning of Corporate Personality and distinction between incorporated and unincorporated associations. The nature, types and functions of companies. Historical development of the modern business company. The consequences of incorporation and its practical advantages and disadvantages. The corporate entity principle and exceptions to it. The ultra vires doctrine and the Articles of Association. The company's organs and agents and the liability of the company for their acts. Formation and flotation of companies. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in the regulation of companies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hrs) (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201Full year5Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5201A or take RUS5201B

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian. Compulsory for second year students of Russian who are native speakers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% English-Russian Translation (Equivalent to 1200 words)
  • Item 2: 8% Russian-English Translation (Equivalent to 1000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Cultural Research Project (2500 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 5: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Russian
Economics of Competition LawLawSOLM058Semester 37No

Economics of Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The aim of this module is to ensure that students have an appreciation of the underlying economics employed in antitrust and merger enforcement. This module seeks to give students a thorough grounding in the essentials of economic analysis in competition law and to prepare students for issues likely to arise in the enforcement of competition legislation. Although this is an advanced module, no previous knowledge of the subject is required. In addition, the module does not require prior knowledge of economics or advanced mathematics. The module takes a very practical approach with a number of case studies and always with an eye to the real world implications of the use of economics in competition enforcement. Guest lecturers will provide their practical experience and the challenges they face in the use of economics in competition enforcement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202BSemester 25Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5202

Description: This is the second-year Russian language module for associate students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Banking and FinTech LawLawSOLM008Semester 27No

Banking and FinTech Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the nature and content of private banking law at the UK, European and international levels. Banking Law is concerned with the private law aspects of banks and banking including both Commercial Banking and Investment Banking. Banks are among the most important financial institutions within any economy, nationally and internationally, and the City of London is one of the foremost financial centres of the world. This module examines all aspects of the law governing the structure, operation and function of banks and banking markets from a UK as well as European and international perspective. The course is essentially private law based although it also examines recent areas of significant law reform especially following the recent financial crises in banking markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Investment Treaty Arbitration: Foundations, Jurisdiction and ProcedureLawSOLM047Semester 17No

Investment Treaty Arbitration: Foundations, Jurisdiction and Procedure

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international investment arbitration at the juncture of dispute resolution and public international law and policy. The course is divided into three main topics: (1) International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution; (2) ICSID - Jurisdiction and Procedure; and (3) Bilateral Investment Treaties - Jurisdiction and Procedure. The classes will explore, first by way of integration, international trade and investment disputes out of court and the evolutionary process of their institutionalisation. Then, we discuss the related regulatory and institutional framework, and the basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to investment with focus on sovereign immunity, arbitrability and applicable laws (domestic and international). The following lectures will address ICSID Jurisdiction (ratione materiae, ratione personae, temporal) and consent to jurisdiction. These classes will be followed by classes on ICSID Procedure, including annulment of awards and enforcement of awards. The next set of classes will explore jurisdiction based on Bilateral Investment Treaties (with focus on umbrella clauses, parallel proceedings and MFN clauses)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202ASemester 15Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5202

Description: This is the second-year Russian language module for associate students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Research Project in TranslationLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6204Full year6Yes

Research Project in Translation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Prerequisite: Students are not allowed to take more than one research project module

Description: In the Research Project in Translation, final-year students will acquire the background knowledge and skills to produce the translation of a previously untranslated text from one of the languages studied within their degree into English, and a commentary addressing their overall approach and strategy for rendering into appropriate English a source emanating from a different culture. A series of workshops will provide training in the relevant methodologies and theories, to enable students to implement meaningful translation choices. Students must approach a supervisor and agree on the text to be translated prior to enrolling in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Presentation (10 mins)
  • Item 2: 60% Translation (5000 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Commentary (3000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Transnational Problems of Commercial LawLawSOLM036Semester 27No

Transnational Problems of Commercial Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prosir Bernard Rix

Description: In an era of globalisation English contract law governs many international transactions between commercial parties and is essential to energy, shipping, commodities and the construction industry. This course will introduce students to the making, breaking, interpreting and disputing of contracts. It covers a range of subjects including contract interpretation, frustration, breach, termination, misrepresentation and fraud, and some of the special problems of insurance, shipping, and sale of goods law. It will also provide them with insights into the procedural aspects of commercial law; and into the different ways in which good faith may be approached in the common and civil law. In doing so, we consider typical problems concerning contract law, private and public international law, and procedure, which are encountered by commercial lawyers in negotiation, litigation, arbitration and mediation. Do you interpret contracts as a literalist goat or as a purposive sheep? When does a breach of contract destroy a contract? What are the modes and dangers of terminating a significant contract? What is the role of an ¿international commercial court¿? What is the role of private and public international law in commercial law? How does ¿good faith¿ differ in the common and civil law? Would you advise a client to arbitrate or litigate or mediate? It will give students and practitioners the ability to answer these questions and apply contract law to complex commercial disputes. It will teach them to be lawyers in business and pragmatists in law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (Two Languages)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML6203Full year6Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (Two Languages)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Laetitia Calabrese
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SML6202
Prerequisite: In taking this module you must have a mark of 60 in year 1 and 2 core language modules in two of french or german or russian or spanish

Description: This module is designed for final year BA Modern Languages students combining two L1 languages (French, German, Russian and Spanish). It is for students who have already reached a high level of linguistic competence and aim to develop listening comprehension and oral production skills ¿ including bilateral communicative skills ¿ to a very high level in both languages. Students will learn to perform different types of speech acts in everyday life situations and to perform tasks required in working and social environments, such as summarizing, reporting and presenting, as well as consecutive interpreting (interpreting between speakers of two different languages). This module is not designed for true native speakers of the languages studied. Students outside of Modern Languages can take this module at the discretion of the module organiser.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-class test Summary and Transcription with Registers L1 (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class test Summary and Transcription with Registers L2 (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 25% In-class test CIET (both ways) L1 (50 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% In-class test CIET (both ways) L2 (50 mins)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Ethics in International ArbitrationLawSOLM049Semester 37No

Ethics in International Arbitration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Parties, attorneys, and arbitrators come to international arbitral proceedings different jurisdictions and with often distinctive legal cultures and ethical assumptions. As a result, many ambiguities exist about what rules apply to their professional conduct and often parties and counsel from different jurisdictions effectively play by different ethical rules. This module, which is to be offered as an option at the Centre for Commercial Law Studies, will address these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Further MathematicsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF047Semester 23No

Further Mathematics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module introduces students to arithmetic beyond the integers and rational numbers: modulo arithmetic, and the arithmetic of polynomials, and matrices. Applications of these concepts in probabilty, logic and relational algebra will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-person test 1
  • Item 2: 25% In-person test 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Corporate Governance: Operation and PracticeLawSOLM023Semester 27No

Corporate Governance: Operation and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alan Dignam

Description: The module aims to inform and educate students as to the issues affecting both the business community and the wider societal effects of the debate on corporate governance. As such the module will focus on the systems by which companies are or should be directed and controlled, particular emphasis will be given to: self regulatory systems and their provenance, the UK Corporate Governance and associated Codes, Hostile Takeovers, and Case studies of extreme Corporate Governance failure eg. Enron and The financial crisis 2008 onwards. As such, students will have an enhanced knowledge of the issues surrounding various corporate governance industry and state regulatory perspectives on corporate governance. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Foundations of EngineeringScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF046Full year3No

Foundations of Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module provides an introduction to engineering through the application of scientific principles to solve practical engineering problems. It includes discussions on applications in the engineering field and the standardisation of units through key engineering principles, engineering calculations, mechanical applications, material behaviour and stress analysis. Key engineering topics will be covered, such as, forces and static systems; equilibrant forces and maintaining equilibrium; stress-strain behaviour of materials; structures under load and structural design; tensile, compressive and shear forces; bending stresses in beams; power transmission systems; internal combustion engines (I.C.)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Test 1
  • Item 2: 25% Test 2
  • Item 3: 25% Test 3
  • Item 4: 25% Final Examination (1 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Foundations of Biological ScienceScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF045Full year3No

Foundations of Biological Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will introduce you to the basic principles of the biological sciences. Through this module you will explore key themes that underpin many aspects of biology such as genetics, disease, cells, and whole organism biology. This will be done through interactive hands on learning as well as practical classes. This module is suitable for those going on to study; Biology, Zoology, Medical Genetics or Biomedical Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 25% Test 1
  • Item 3: 25% Test 2
  • Item 4: 25% MCQ (1 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Foundations of Physical ScienceScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF044Full year3No

Foundations of Physical Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module begins with basic physical concepts, such as Units, Physical Quantities, and Vectors;
Kinematics in one, two and three dimensions; Momentum, work, energy and Newton¿s laws, with extension to rotational motion. Equilibrium and elasticity are defined and basic concepts of matter and phases.
The concept of fields in physics is introduced and its relationship to forces and potentials on examples of gravity and electrostatics. Wave motion is then defined and corresponding maths and examples in sound and light.
Circuit theory and solutions, are introduced, including meters (examples include comparing hydraulics, battery-resistor networks, people flow through stations, etc.). Finally, Basic Quantum Mechanics is introduced using the Feynman approach as well as Relativity from Einstein's train to black holes and basic Cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Test 1
  • Item 2: 25% Test 2
  • Item 3: 25% Test 3
  • Item 4: 25% MCQ (1 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
SBCS Industrial/Professional Experience Placement ModuleBiological and Behavioural SciencesSBC5001Full year5No

SBCS Industrial/Professional Experience Placement Module

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the 'Year in Industry/Research' programmes in the field of Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Psychology offered by SBCS.

Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Semester A. Academic & industrial supervisors monitoring meeting
  • Item 2: 20% Semester B. Academic & industrial supervisors monitoring meeting
  • Item 3: 20% Student report (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 20% Industrial (500 words)
  • Item 5: 20% Presentation (10 min)
Level: 5
Human Rights of Women: Legal Framework and IssuesLawSOLM064Semester 27No

Human Rights of Women: Legal Framework and Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: The course will follow on from the material covered in Human Rights of Women - Feminist Legal Theory by covering the general international human rights legal framework before moving on to the gender specific international human rights framework. This will include assessing provisions such as CEDAW and the ECHR. The course will then move on to examine and assess international law and policy on a number of substantive areas such as violence against women, prostitution, trafficking, the veiling of women etc. In any given year the precise subjects to be studied will vary according to the provenance of the members of the class and other factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Writing Submission 1
  • Item 2: 4% Writing submission 2
  • Item 3: 4% Writing submission 3
  • Item 4: 4% Writing submission 4
  • Item 5: 4% Writing submission 5
  • Item 6: 4% Writing submission 6
  • Item 7: 3% In-class assignment 1
  • Item 8: 3% In class assignment 2
  • Item 9: 70% Final essay
Level: 7
Law
Mergers and AcquisitionsLawSOLM010Semester 27No

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This module is a corporate law and financial regulation module analyzing transactions using sophisticated methodologies. The module will focus on issues such as: due diligence, purchase sale agreements and contractual governance; the role of the board of directors in an acquisition/financing transaction; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, the US and the EU; the protection of minority shareholders in common law and civil law jurisdictions; the protection of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions; and financial assistance regulation in the UK, US and the EU. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Investment Treaty Arbitration: Agreements and Substantive ProtectionLawSOLM048Semester 27No

Investment Treaty Arbitration: Agreements and Substantive Protection

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Mairi Mitsi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM189

Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international investment arbitration at the juncture of dispute resolution and public international law and policy. The focus will be on BITs, FTAs and other International Investment Agreements, Investor Protection and State Defences. There are a number of reasons why a course on substantive protection of investors through investment arbitration is important at this time. Indeed, recent and rapid changes in investment arbitration prompted by globalisation and widespread foreign investment. There are also debates about legitimacy crisis and further debates about the negotiation and drafting of new generation treaties - so-called mega-regionals. The course is divided into three main topics: (1) Major Treaty Systems - Fragmentation and new Regionalisation, (2) Case Law of and case studies relating to Substantive Protection, (3) Specific Policy issues and State Perspectives to Investment Arbitration and ISDS. The classes will address the content and negotiations of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) and Multilateral Treaties (Energy Charter Treaty, NAFTA, CAFTA, ASEAN, CETA, TPP (CPTPP) and TTIP). The discussions will focus on substantive protection and the evolution of such protection as well as policy considerations associated with BITs and MITs. The second section of the class will focus on substantive protection as developed through jurisprudence of international tribunals. The classes will cover (1) expropriation, (2), fair and equitable treatment, (3) umbrella clauses and fork-in-the-road, (4) full protection and security and (5) MFN clauses. The third section of the course will discuss balancing interests - public interest, public policy and regulatory chill and typical state defences raised in investment disputes (including corruption and admissibility defences). Specific attention will also be paid to treaty Shopping, Transparency and Third-Party-Funding and assessment of damages by investment tribunals."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Electromagnetic Waves and OpticsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5222Semester 25Yes

Electromagnetic Waves and Optics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edward Macaulay
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4210

Description: The course covers electromagnetic wave theory, and its relationship with classical and quantum optics. Topics include Maxwell's equations and its wave solutions (including the concepts of Poynting vector and intensity); discussion of group and phase velocities for wavepackets; reflection and transmission at interfaces (including the Fresnel equations); waveguides and their modes; polarisation and birefringence; interference and diffraction; lenses and optical devices (e.g. telescopes and microscopes); simple two-level quantum systems and lasers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202Full year5Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5202A or take RUS5202B

Description: This is the second-year core language module for students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language, and by the end of the module you should be at a level comparable to those who have taken Russian II. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Russian
DissertationLanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM005Semester 37No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Fedda

Description: Dissertation

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6212Semester 26Yes

Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SML6211. In taking this module you must have dbs clearance

Description: This module introduces students to language teaching at school. It includes French, German, Spanish, and Russian. The module can count for a degree in those languages. It is the second of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the practical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other one (SML6211 which runs during the first semester) focuses on theoretical issues.
Through the completion of this module, and building up on the theoretical knowledge which you have acquired in SML6211, you develop practical knowledge of how to design and deliver materials for the purpose of teaching foreign languages. You focus on practical aspects of second/ foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and design of teaching materials. You complete a teaching placement in a local primary or secondary school, where you have an opportunity to apply the theoretical knowledge gained in SML6211 in the actual teaching and learning context. This involves planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. The module also enables you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.
Important: As you are required to complete a placement in a local school, you will have to provide clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) towards the end of semester 1 BEFORE this module in semester 2. Please contact the module organiser for further information.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% A critical reflection of workplace learning (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Science and Engineering SuccessScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF042Full year3No

Science and Engineering Success

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Study techniques and theories (including DDS), Presentation of STEM subjects.
Analysis of job market, CV building and Skills reflection.
Understanding uses and implications of AI in Higher Education.
Careers in STEM (showcase of endless possibilities).
Computer science bases and common software used in STEM with practice.
Health and Safety in the Laboratory.
Chemistry lab techniques and apparatuses.
Biology lab techniques.
Excel data analysis (students on Math A) or symbolic integration computer lab (students on Math B).
Physics lab techniques.
Engineering lab techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12% Advisor Task 1
  • Item 2: 12% Advisor Task 2
  • Item 3: 26% Computer exercise
  • Item 4: 50% MCQ Lab assessment
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Negotiation Theory and PracticeLawSOLM039Semester 27No

Negotiation Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: The course will explore negotiation through various theoretical approaches including strategic bargaining, cognitive theories, processual analysis, for example. The focus will be on the lawyer as negotiator and the intent is to blend theoretical analysis with practical application. Lectures will be delivered in combination with role-play simulations and exercises. Students will be expected to participate in exercises and simulated roleplays each class. This module is very well suited to a three hour weekly lecture due to the experiential nature of its delivery.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Oral presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Independent Research Essay (6000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Foundations of Chemical ScienceScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF043Full year3No

Foundations of Chemical Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Introduction to atomic structure: electrons, protons and neutrons, mass and atomic numbers, isotopes
The electronic structure of atoms: Bohr's model of the atom, quantum numbers and introduction to the concept of orbitals and orbital shape, electron configurations, Aufbau principle, Hund's rule and the Pauli exclusion principle, valence and core electrons.
Stoichiometry and concentrations: empirical and molecular formulae, balancing chemical equations, the concept of moles and molarity.
Chemical bonding: ionic, metallic and covalent bonding, polarisation of bonds, bond strengths and lengths.
Properties of gases, liquids and solids: Interatomic and intermolecular forces and the ideal gas law.
Introduction to organic chemistry: identification of functional groups and classes of organic compounds, organic nomenclature, the hybridisation approach to rationalising bonding and isomerism.
Acids and bases: Brønsted¿Lowry theory of acids and bases, strong and weak acids, acid-base pairs, pH and pKa, buffers solutions, Lewis acids and bases
Revision of some basic topics: units, significant figures; moles, molarities and dilutions.
Chemical equilibria: equilibria as a dynamic phenomenon, definition of Kc and Kp, calculation of equilibrium concentrations, Le Chatelier's principle, relation between free energy changes and the equilibrium constant.
Organic chemistry: specific examples of the structure and reactivity of selected organic compounds

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Mastering Chemistry 1
  • Item 2: 25% Test 1
  • Item 3: 25% Mastering Chemistry 2
  • Item 4: 25% MCQ (1 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Mathematics BScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF041Full year3No

Mathematics B

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Lubna Shaheen

Description: This module covers mathematical topics such as algebra, functions, geometry and trigonometry, and aims to provide students with a more extensive knowledge of calculus (especially in techniques of integration) and an introduction to complex numbers, numerical methods, differential equations, vector analysis and power series. It is appropriate for those students progressing onto degree programmes in mathematical sciences, and those degree programmes in physical science and engineering which require a more thorough and comprehensive grounding in mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 20% Assessment 2
  • Item 3: 20% Assessment 3
  • Item 4: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Corporate Governance: Foundational and TheoreticalLawSOLM022Semester 17No

Corporate Governance: Foundational and Theoretical

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alan Dignam

Description: The module will inform and educate students as to the issues affecting both the business community and the wider societal effects of the debate on corporate governance. As such the module will focus on the systems by which companies are or should be directed and controlled, particular emphasis will be given to the legal and extra-legal rules/systems governing internal corporate accountability and the legal and extra-legal rules/systems governing the corporations accountability to the external world. As such students will gain an enhanced knowledge of the issues surrounding various corporate governance theories that seek to explain the position of, and relationship between, the company as a metaphysical entity and its members, managers and other interested constituencies (i.e.`stakeholders¿) and the different theoretical and industry perspectives on corporate governance. The concept of shareholder primacy will be critically examined and contrasted with alternative approaches. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hrs) (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Commercial LawLawSOLM019Semester 27No

International Commercial Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Etta Ojong-Okongor

Description: The module covers the fundamental characteristics of international contracts for the sale of goods and to a lesser extent, the key ancillary contracts for the financing of trading activities, transportation of goods to their place of destination and insurance of the cargo. When traders sell or buy goods or commodities on the international markets, that transaction is composed of several contracts: the goods are sold under a contract of sale, transported under a contract of carriage, insured under a contract of insurance and frequently have payment assured through a letter of credit. The purpose of this module is to examine primarily the regulation of the sale contract under CISG, English Sales law and other international law instruments and standards. The regulation of peripheral contracts to the contract of sale will be examined too but in less detail as this is now considered in depth by more focused specific modules (e.g., on the shipping of goods, marine insurance etc). The module will also place emphasis on the practical problems, which arise in the international commercial arena and consider ways in which these may be addressed in the future.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201BSemester 26Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS6201
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take RUS5201

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 6
Russian
Cartels, Collusion and Competition LawLawSOLM057Semester 27No

Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The Directorate General for Competition of the European Commission states that a cartel is a group of similar, independent companies which join together to fix prices, to limit production or to share markets or customers between them. Instead of competing with each other, cartel members rely on each others' agreed course of action, which reduces their incentives to provide new or better products and services at competitive prices. As a consequence, their clients (consumers or other businesses) end up paying more for less quality. This is why cartels are illegal under the competition legislations of a vast number of jurisdictions and why competition authorities impose heavy fines on companies involved in a cartel. Since cartels are illegal, they are generally highly secretive and evidence of their existence is not easy to find. The 'leniency policy' encourages companies to hand over inside evidence of cartels to competition authorities. This results in the cartel being destabilised. In recent years, most cartels have been detected by competition authorities around the world after one cartel member confessed and asked for leniency, though the authorities also successfully continue to carry out its own investigations to detect cartels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201BSemester 25Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5201

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (One Language)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML6202Full year6Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (One Language)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Laetitia Calabrese
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SML6203
Prerequisite: In taking this module you must have a mark of 60 in year 1 and 2 core language module in french or in german or in russian or in spanish

Description: This module is designed for final year students taking a degree involving an L1 language (French, German, Russian or Spanish) either in the BA Modern Languages, or combined with a non-language subject. It is for students who have already reached a high level of linguistic competence and aim to develop listening comprehension and oral production skills ¿ including bilateral communicative skills ¿ to a very high level. Students will learn to perform different types of speech acts in everyday life situations and to perform tasks required in working and social environments, such as summarizing, reporting and presenting, as well as consecutive interpreting (interpreting between speakers of two different languages). This module is not designed for true native speakers of the language studied. Students outside of Modern Languages can take this module at the discretion of the module organiser.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class test Summary and Transcription with Registers (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% In-class test CIET (both ways) (50 mins)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Commercial Conflict of LawsLawSOLM046Semester 27No

Commercial Conflict of Laws

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roman Khodykin

Description: This module introduces students to the fundamental questions of applicable law that arise in a globalised society. The course gives a broad theoretical underpinning to the concepts of conflicts of laws as well as examining from a practical standpoint the challenges faced by litigators dealing with cross-border disputes. The substance of the module provides an overview of choice of law principles in the main areas of civil and commercial practice (contracts, torts, property, and company matters) and takes a closer look at developing and problematic areas as well as the challenges posed to these traditional principles by new technologies and an increasingly interconnected global marketplace. The starting point of the course is to address these issues of applicable law as they arise before the English courts. In this context, aspects of both the English common law rules as well as the European regulations, which now govern substantial aspects of English private international law in civil and commercial matters, are covered in depth. Where appropriate, the course also considers from a comparative perspective the approaches taken in other major jurisdictions (for example the USA, Switzerland and South America).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
EU Trade LawLawSOLM035Semester 17No

EU Trade Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard

Description: "This module is concerned with the legal framework for cross-border trade in the European Union. The module provides an in-depth study of the economic and commercial aspects of the 'four freedoms' (free movement of goods, services, establishment and capital) in the EU single market and discusses the various approaches to regulating the single market adopted by EU institutions. Indicative list of topics that might be covered would include: the concept of the Single Market - market integration in the EU vs other forms of international trade liberalisation; non-tariff barriers: non-discrimination and market access; locating and relocating in another EU Member State - freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services for companies ¿ regulatory competition; tariff and fiscal barriers to free movement - free movement of capital; regulating the Single Market: harmonisation policy - governance of the Single Market"

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Languages in the Classroom 1: Practical and Theoretical Approaches to TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6211Semester 16Yes

Languages in the Classroom 1: Practical and Theoretical Approaches to Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Prerequisite: Requires knowledge of a language offered in the module

Description: This module introduces you to language teaching at school. It includes French, German, Spanish, and Russian. The module can count for a degree in those languages. It also includes English but for exchange students only.
It is the first of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the theoretical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other one (SML6212 which runs during the second semester) focuses on practical matters.
Through the completion of this module, you will gain an understanding of key aspects of Applied Linguistics and Psycholinguistics. You will focus on theoretical aspects of second/ foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and the design of teaching materials. This will involve planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. This module will also enable you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.
Important: If you are planning to attend the module SML6212 (Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice) in semester 2, you will be required to complete a placement in a local school and will therefore require clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). towards the end of the first semester. Please contact the module organiser for further information.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Lesson lesson plan that links theory to practice (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Demonstration of Teaching Techniques (20 mins)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Animal Law,Welfare and TradeLawSOLM025Semester 17No

Animal Law,Welfare and Trade

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: Animal Law and Welfare is of considerable and growing importance, particularly in the areas of trade and development, access and equality, welfare and criminal liability, public liability, and health. This module brings together interdisciplinary perspectives from behaviour studies, welfare, economics, and law in order to consider a range of issues in domestic animal welfare, including companion animal law and welfare, ownership and liability, shelters and rescue, breeding industries and the commercial pet industry, farm animal welfare and trade, science and research. The course develops an evidence-based approach to legislative practice, policy and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Company Law: Corporate Finance and Management IssuesLawSOLM021Semester 27No

Company Law: Corporate Finance and Management Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shalini Perera

Description: The module aims to inform and educate students as to the field of law that governs UK corporations. The course is a UK focused Company law course covering: Minority protection. Capital, The duties of directors and of the controlling majority and the enforcement of these duties. Shareholder Remedies and Liquidation of companies. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in the regulation of companies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Modern Languages Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML005Full year6No

Modern Languages Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Petr Budrin
Prerequisite: Students are not allowed to take more than one research project module and before taking this module you must have a 60 average mark from years 1 & 2

Description: Entry to this module will not be automatic. All students wishing to take this module must meet the entry requirements, present an approved topic and have an agreed supervisor. It is designed to enable suitably qualified final-year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual or group research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. Introductory group sessions on research methods will be followed by individual supervision. You should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Project Progress Exercise (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 90% Research Project (8000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Study Abroad Year (English)English and DramaSED004Full year5No

Study Abroad Year (English)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr James Vigus

Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year English programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Multinational Enterprises: Business and Legal OrganisationLawSOLM030Semester 27No

Multinational Enterprises: Business and Legal Organisation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Yonit Percival

Description: "This module will provide a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the business and legal organisation of MNEs and of the regulation of their activities. Throughout the module we will aim to examine the regulatory environment for international business by dealing with sub-national, national, regional and multilateral policies and rules for the regulation of MNEs."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Brain and BehaviourBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY121Semester 24No

Brain and Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lars Chittka

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module builds on the theme of psychology as a biological science in parallel with the 'Exploring Psychology' module by specifying the proximate biological mechanisms involved in psychological phenomena. The module will focus on basic principles of biological psychology predominantly, and then introduce psychological processes to illustrate these.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Midterm
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Globalisation and the International Political Economy of DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOLM026Semester 27No

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

Description: The module provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world. It examines these influences through detailed analysis of contemporary manifestations of globalisation, including neo-liberalism, US hegemony and contemporary imperialism, capital flows, global commodity chains, state-market relations, patterns of global inequality, international institutions, and questions of cultural homogenisation/imperialism. The module also examines the ways in which globalisation is resisted, focusing on the rise of transnational social movements and NGOs, and the politics of anti-globalisation, and how this relates to an ostensibly post-development era. In addressing these issues, the module concludes by asking the most important question: how do we think of development in an era of globalisation, US hegemony, neo-liberalism and imperialism?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Essential Skills for PsychologistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Psychologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology. This module is structured around three main key areas:
(1) Acquiring Essential Skills for Academic Psychology. Through means of lectures and regular tutorials, the module will support you in acquiring a variety of key skills such as experimental report and essay writing, data and information handling, oral and written communication skills and appropriate use of referencing and citations in psychology. You will also be introduced to the critical evaluation skills that will be necessary for your success during further study.
(2) Considering the role of Psychology in the 'real world'. Through class activities and a series of talks from professional Psychologists, you will be encouraged to consider the role of psychology in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of your discipline.
(3) Exploring Career Pathways. You will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on your own career aspirations and to meet with professional Psychologists.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Lab Report (Introduction & Methods)
  • Item 2: 20% Careers portfolio
  • Item 3: 10% Research Participation
  • Item 4: 35% Essay
Level: 4
Psychology
Principles of RegulationLawSOLM018Semester 27No

Principles of Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Jeremmy Okonjo

Description: Regulation covers virtually all significant aspects of modern life. It is here to stay but it remains as controversial as ever. This is an advanced foundational course on regulation. The module examines problems that are common to the regulation of a wide range of industries and fields and considers how these problems are (or fail to be) treated. In particular, the module considers the nature of regulation and its relationship with law, economics and politics, the regulation of risk, standard setting, compliance and enforcement strategies, the issues of accountability and legitimacy and the rise of multi-level governance and transnational regulation. Being `problem-solving sensitive¿ but 'industry neutral', this module is an ideal complement to more narrowly-focused modules irrespective of choice of LLM Specialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Colonial Power and Desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and BrazilLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR4036Semester 24Yes

Colonial Power and Desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and Brazil

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM5036

Description: In this module you will study a range of texts problematising sexual, religious and racial domination within the context of the Portuguese Empire, starting with the epic The Lusiads (Camões, 1570). Desire in the epic will find a vocal expression in the report to the King of Portugal by the scribe of the first Portuguese expedition to Brazil (1500). Brazil¿s natives¿ oral narratives cast into film will later be seen to confront rape and religious imposition whilst the African slaves¿ agency against racial domination will surface in their testimonials embedded in biographies. A critique of the land concentration model, prominent in Raised from the Ground, a novel by the Portuguese Nobel Prize José Saramago, in turn, will find a vivid visual deployment in Brazilian Sebastião Salgado's photography. The agency of both slaves and the dispossessed will be seen to play out in the narratives of two major social movements in Brazil today: the quilombola¿s and the landless rural workers¿. All texts are available in English and Portuguese.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 4
Portuguese
International Competition LawLawSOLM054Semester 17No

International Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: Competition law has witnessed an impressive increase in significance and geographical scope during the last two decades or so. From the situation which existed in the 1980s - when there were only a few systems of competition law in the world ¿ we have moved to a new one where currently there are about 120 jurisdictions in which some form of competition law has been introduced and 30 others seeking to develop the process. It is anticipated that this remarkable geographical expansion of the law will increase in the future. With this unprecedented increase in significance and remarkable geographical expansion of the law (as well as other significant developments such as the process of globalisation), it has become important to examine the role and place of competition law and policy in a globalised economy. The course will aim at such an examination. The course is designed to include 'international' elements (comparative elements will then be addressed in the Comparative Competition Law course in semester 2), looking at, among other things, issues such as, the process of internationalisation of competition law and policy; the role of international organisations and multinational enterprises (MNEs) in this process; the extraterritorial reach of the competition rules of the EU, the USA and those of other jurisdictions; and the relationship between competition and trade policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Human Rights Law: Law, Practice and InstitutionsLawSOLM070Semester 17No

International Human Rights Law: Law, Practice and Institutions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Tzanakopoulou

Description: "This course explores the institutional and legal foundations of the post-WW2 framework for international human rights law protection, as well as a number of key rights and topics in contemporary international human rights law and practice. The first part examines the core institutions and legal regimes that together constitute the core of international human rights law. The second part of the course 'samples' a number of substantive rights, such as the right to life, the prohibition on torture and inhuman and degrading treatment, and the right to housing. It also explores the international human rights regimes from the perspective of different subjects or groups, such as women and labour, paying particular regard to the possibilities and limitations of human rights as a truly universal and emancipatory project. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2% Weekly written assignment 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 2% Weekly written assignment 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 2% Weekly written assignment 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 2% Weekly written assignment 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 2% Weekly written assignment 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 2% Weekly written assignment 6 (200 words)
  • Item 7: 2% Weekly written assignment 7 (200 words)
  • Item 8: 2% Weekly written assignment 8 (200 words)
  • Item 9: 2% Weekly written assignment 9 (200 words)
  • Item 10: 2% Weekly written assignment 10 (200 words)
  • Item 11: 80% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM087Full year7No

Dissertation in International Public Policy

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Richard Saull

Description: The Masters Dissertation: Project in International Public Policy is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of International Public Policy. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of International Public Policy which is of particular interest to them. The topic will draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue in international public policy associated with one of the modules that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme. The format of the project can differ according to the topic, ranging from traditional research dissertation to an applied public policy implementation or evaluation report. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (12,000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
International Public Policy: Concepts and PracticePolitics and International RelationsPOLM050Semester 17No

International Public Policy: Concepts and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Corina Lacatus

Description: This module will examine the key concepts, debates, actors and processes within international public policy in the contemporary period. Concepts explored include cooperation, international law, globalisation and governance, and regionalism. The module will explore the role of various agents, including states, international organisations, regiobal organisations, private authorities and NGOs in the processes of international public policy-making. The course also examines these issues through a series of case studies, including climate change negotiations, the global financial crisis, human rights regimes, European policy-making and the International Criminal Court.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Policy brief (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Research proposal (2500 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Evaluation and Delivery in Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM085Semester 27No

Evaluation and Delivery in Public Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tamara Popic

Description: This course aims to provide a critical overview of the theory and practice of two of the crucial 'end' stages of the policy process: delivery and evaluation. The module will examine how governments and public agencies around the world have sought to upgrade their delivery and evaluation capacity in recent decades. The course will explore the development of theoretical and empirical academic literature and provide opportunities for students to apply this material to selected case studies relevant to the group. Practitioners will be encouraged to reflect on their practices and experiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Policy Brief (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Case Study (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Introduction to Social Science 2: Quantitative Methods and DataPolitics and International RelationsPOLM083Semester 27No

Introduction to Social Science 2: Quantitative Methods and Data

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ksenia Northmore-Ball

Description: This module teaches you to use advanced quantitative skills appropriate for postgraduate research. Further, you will be able to analyse, interpret, critique and replicate published research using quantitative research methods and will acquire sufficient technical competence using SPSS to perform a range of quantitative techniques in your own research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% 48-hour take home exam
  • Item 2: 40% Research Project
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
International Commercial LitigationLawSOLM045Semester 17No

International Commercial Litigation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: The module examines matters relevant to the resolution of all commercial transactions before national courts. It looks into general principles of International Commercial Litigation and Private International Law, and focuses in particular on issues related to Jurisdiction of National Courts, Conflicts between Jurisdiction of National Courts and International Tribunals and Recognition and Enforcement of National Judgments. The approach taken is international and comparative, although particular emphasis is given on the European regime and legal framework. Thus, sources relevant to the course include the EC 44/2001 Regulation on Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Arbitration Law and Practice: Applicable Laws and ProceduresLawSOLM044Semester 27No

International Arbitration Law and Practice: Applicable Laws and Procedures

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented. The focus is on selected issues of applicable law(s) and procedures. In particular, in the first section the classes will explore the role of arbitral institutions as regulators of arbitration and classes will also discuss issues of legitimacy and how concerns users may have can be best addressed. In the second section of the course the focus will shift to applicable law issues. In particular, classes will discuss how applicable laws are being determined (and by whom) before looking at specific applicable substantive laws and rules as well as the role of lex mercatoria and transnational commercial rules. There will also be specific discussion of the impact of mandatory rules or law as an issue of methodology and practice. In the third section of the courses the classes will discuss they key (f)actor of arbitration: the arbitration tribunal. In particular, classes will cover the selections, status, rights and duties of arbitrators, how arbitrators are being appointed and the main duties of independence and impartiality. In this context the classes will also address liability and/or immunity of arbitrators. In the penultimate and longer section the classes will explore issues of procedure and evidence in international arbitration, ranging from the law governing the procedure (`lex arbitri¿), the classification of procedural issues, the organisation and management of procedure. Then the classes will look at provisional and interim measure as well as emergency arbitration and will also cover multi-party, multi-contract and multi-action arbitration. Issues of evidence, such as evidentiary means (witnesses, documents and document production, experts) and regulation of evidence will also receive specific attention. Finally, we will discuss efficiency as a driver of arbitration micro-regulation. Depending on the class size we may also endeavour a simulation of an arbitration process."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Chinese Business LawLawSOLM029Semester 17No

Chinese Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: The module will introduce the structure of the Chinese legal system, its cultural and political background and historical development. With these in mind, it will then cover major business and commercial law areas, including company, contract and trade law; taxation; financial regulation; and dispute resolution and litigation, with a particular focus on their application to foreign businesses, investors and individuals. The module will provide students with an understanding of the principles and rules of the Chinese business and commercial law regimes. It will also provide them with the knowledge and skills to study the Chinese business and commercial legal system in greater depth. No knowledge of Chinese is required to take the module, but students will be expected to become familiar with the relevant Chinese business and legal terms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Essay (4000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (15 min)
Level: 7
Law
Transnational Law and Governance in PracticeLawSOLM027Semester 27No

Transnational Law and Governance in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Christou

Description: The central question this module discusses is the application and implication of Transnational law, its formation, supervision, and enforcement process in the context of the transnational business community and globalised markets. This module will take a series of case studies from different areas of law to provide examples of how governance can be conducted in a globalised world. The focus will be on the role and functioning of transnational law in a globalised world. Guest lecturers will be invited to talk about the impact of globalisation on their specialism and a Transnational Law solution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM087Full year7No

Dissertation in International Public Policy

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Richard Saull

Description: The Masters Dissertation: Project in International Public Policy is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of International Public Policy. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of International Public Policy which is of particular interest to them. The topic will draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue in international public policy associated with one of the modules that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme. The format of the project can differ according to the topic, ranging from traditional research dissertation to an applied public policy implementation or evaluation report. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (12,000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Corporate Rescue and Cross-border InsolvencyLawSOLM017Semester 27No

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: The module covers the various procedures available in cases of reorganization and insolvency of corporations; the relationship between the general law of property, obligations and insolvency; and, the law of credit and security issues in the context of distress scenarios. The module will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Construction Contracts and Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM042Semester 27No

International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: International construction contracts have by their nature special features, which affect the methods of resolving disputes arising from them. The module, conducted through series of seminars, examines in detail the nature of international construction contracts, the typical clauses included in the standard form of FIDIC conditions, the parties to construction contract (and in particular the role of the Engineer and the Contractor), their structure, and the types of disputes that arise under them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Themes and Cases in US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM040Semester 27Yes

Themes and Cases in US Foreign Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Georg Loefflmann

Description: This module will consider the principal forms in which US foreign policy has been practised and interpreted since the foundation of the Republic. Amongst these are American Exceptionalism and Anti-Americanism, spheres of influence, liberal interventionism and protectionist isolationism, Cold War containment, the War on Terror following 9/11, and the strains on unipolarity in the early 21st century. Amongst the case studies linked to these themes, we shall consider the role of Native Americans and immigration, the war of 1898, gunboat diplomacy in the Caribbean, the ideas of Woodrow Wilson, the Vietnam War, the consequences of the 9/11 attacks, and the challenges posed by China.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Introduction to BiopsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY117Semester 14No

Introduction to Biopsychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Caroline Brennan

Description: This module aims to provide you as psychology students with a scientific overview of biology, emphasizing concepts relevant to behaviour and its study. This supports the distinctiveness of QMUL psychology as a natural and experimental science and introduces students to the growing notion of psychology as a branch of the biological sciences (e.g., that ¿behaviour¿ is the end product of whole organism biology).
It will also introduce you to the integrative scientific thinking skills required to study subsequent psychological topics. You will be introduced to empirical findings and will critically evaluate the range of methods in the field.
Topics covered include basic cell biology, genetics, cell signaling, development, and principles of evolution as related to behaviour.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Midterm test
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Introduction to Social Science 1: Epistemology, Research Design, and Qualitative MethodsPolitics and International RelationsPOLM082Semester 17No

Introduction to Social Science 1: Epistemology, Research Design, and Qualitative Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Cristina Juverdeanu

Description: The module provides you with advanced research skills, including the ability to select and use relevant resources effectively and to devise research questions appropriate for postgraduate research. You will develop the capacity to undertake independent guided research at postgraduate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research proposal (5000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Evaluation and Delivery in Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM025Semester 27No

Evaluation and Delivery in Public Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Karl Pike

Description: This course aims to provide a critical overview of the theory and practice of two of the crucial 'end' stages of the policy process: delivery and evaluation. The module will examine how governments and public agencies around the world have sought to upgrade their delivery and evaluation capacity in recent decades. Lectures will be given by staff and leading practitioners who have front-line experience and knowledge. The course will explore the development of theoretical and empirical academic literature and provide opportunities for students to apply this material to selected case studies relevant to the group. Practitioners will be encouraged to reflect on their practices and experiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Animal Law, Media and CultureLawSOLM026Semester 27No

Animal Law, Media and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module brings together an interdisciplinary perspective on behaviour science, welfare, economics, and law in order to introduce students to a range of legal and welfare issues arising through the use of animals in media, culture and entertainment. The module will deal with both domesticated and wild animals, considering animals in film and television, advertising, fashion, zoos and conservation, circuses, and sport. Students will also explore a range of critical questions and specific episodes on animals and creativity, including the animal as performer and the animal as author, analysing the significance for sentience and welfare, and gaining important insight into creativity and intentionality in other areas of the law (including intellectual property).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Merger Control: Special TopicsLawSOLM053Semester 27No

International Merger Control: Special Topics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: Within the field of competition law, merger control has attracted special attention. The reason for this attention can be found in the special nature of mergers as a business phenomenon, especially when compared with other business phenomena, such as abuse of dominance by firms or cartel activities. The process of relentless globalisation which has been developing since the 1990s has meant that merger operations can produce an effect on the conditions of competition in more than one jurisdiction. This means that, quite inevitably, regulatory approval in more than one jurisdiction may need to be sought. Such a consequence - as is widely accepted ¿ can give rise to uncertainty for the firms concerned and cause huge expense and significant delay. Those who are involved in advising business firms in a merger situation are also not immune from the uncertainty when merger operations have to be notified to more than one competition authority. Often legal advisors have to answer extremely difficult questions in merger cases, such as whether notification of the merger to the competition authorities in one or more jurisdictions is necessary or mandatory or even desirable; which authorities need to be notified; what is required for this purpose and how to go about notifying the authorities concerned; and how will the authorities assess the merger, including any relevant time framework within which they will operate and ultimately reach a decision in a given case. The Module will aim at a thorough examination of the highly important phenomena of international mergers and their regulation worldwide. The focus of the Module will be on special topics including: government intervention and national champions; the treatment of conglomerate effects from practical perspective, merger remedies among others. The Module will be taught in a very practical manner, to reflect the very nature of the topic. A highly interesting range of case studies and the knowledge and expertise of practitioners in the field will be a key aspect of the course. The Module should prove to be attractive for students attending other competition law courses and those with an `international¿ dimension in other areas of commercial orientation on the LLM.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Human Rights Law: History, Theory and PoliticsLawSOLM069Semester 17No

International Human Rights Law: History, Theory and Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos

Description: "This module explores the history, theory and politics of international human rights. It will explore both traditional and revisionist accounts of the philosophical and historical foundations of international human rights. It introduces the students to the main critiques of rights, from the early critiques of natural rights, including the Marxist critiques of rights, to feminist and post-colonial critiques, exploring the different strands within each of these schools of thought, all of which have generated considerable debates. Through these different lenses, it aims to engage the students with the ambivalence of international human rights, both as a concept, and as a contemporary praxis and ideology. The course closes by putting these theoretical insights and foundations into practice by looking at two contemporary phenomena that illustrate the ambivalence of the human rights project, namely the war on terror and the advent of neoliberalism. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
EU Competition Law and PracticeLawSOLM051Semester 27No

EU Competition Law and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: This module (along with the prerequisite module 'EU Competition Law') aims at a comprehensive study of the basic provisions of European Union (EU) competition law. The Module will provide participants with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EU competition law, especially Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and EU Merger Regulation 139/2004 are applied. The Module will aim to consider an important business phenomena in the market namely abusive dominance and mergers. It is hoped that by the end of the Module participants will gain a solid understanding of the relevant competition rules of the EU whilst developing a good business and market perspective and practical approach in order to help them identify situations in which such phenomena may arise and how should these phenomena be addressed.EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Article 102 TFEU and Regulation 139/2004. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 101 TFEU. EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Article 102 TFEU and Regulation 139/2004. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 101 TFEU. EU competition rules are applied by the Directorate General (DG COMPETITION (COMP)) of the European Commission, the Directorate in charge of competition matters; there is also shared competence with designated national competition authorities (NCAs) in relation to the application of Articles 102 (and 101) TFEU. Decisions of the Commission are the principal means of enforcement in competition cases. The Commission¿s decisions are subject to review by the General Court of the EU (GCEU) (formerly the Court of First Instance (CFI)) and the Court of Justice of the EU/European Court of Justice (CJEU/ECJ). This has created an extensive case-law in competition law matters and reference will be made to this case law. In addition to considering substantive issues, the Module will also deal with relevant procedural mechanisms, sanctions etc. Particular attention will be given to questions of practice under Regulation 1/2003.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Theories and Concepts in Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM086Semester 17No

Theories and Concepts in Public Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Karl Pike

Description: This module will provide a structured introduction to key issues and concepts in policy analysis. The module will give students a solid grounding in theories of the policy-making process while enabling students to apply those insights to practical case-studies of policy formulation and implementation in the real world. The module will also provide students with background on the key traditions and approaches to public administration and policy-making in countries around the world, both developing and developed countries. Issues to be covered on the module will include the nature of public policies; the policy context: institutions and actors; theoretical approaches to the policy process; policy problems and agenda-setting; decision-making; implementation/new public management; evaluation; governance; public policy beyond the nation-state; policy change and policy convergence; future challenges for policy-makers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Policy Brief (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Case Study (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Research Methods in Psychology IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY108Semester 14No

Research Methods in Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alena Galilee

Description: This module introduces you to experimental design in Psychology. You will understand and critically appraise the different research methods commonly using in psychology research and understand issues critical to experimental design such as sampling, validity, and reliability. Through interactive lectures and practical small-group sessions, you will learn how to select the best experimental design from a range of methods to answer a research question.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% News and Views
  • Item 2: 10% Research participation
  • Item 3: 75% MCQ exam (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
International Relations of the Middle EastPolitics and International RelationsPOLM081Semester 27Yes

International Relations of the Middle East

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Phillips

Description: This module gives students the opportunity to study the international relations of the Middle East through the lens of contemporary conflict. The Middle East is often characterized as the most conflict-ridden region of the world. This module seeks to explore firstly if that is an accurate assessment and secondly why so many conflicts have occurred in this region. Focusing on the contemporary Middle East, while also discussing recent history, `conflict¿ is broadly defined to mean not just wars, but also contested politics. Exploration of these conflicts will be framed by international relations theory and the theories of civil conflicts. The module will first consider the key state (and non-state) actors involved in many of these conflicts, whether regional (Turkey, Iran, Saudi, Israel, UAE/Qatar) or international (US, Russia, China). Thereafter, we will explore different conflict case studies each week in which these rivalries have play out and interacted with domestic politics: Syria, Yemen, Iraq, Lebanon, Kurdistan, Palestine and Libya.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Life, Death and Money: Welfare States in Theory and PracticePolitics and International RelationsPOLM056Semester 27Yes

Life, Death and Money: Welfare States in Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tamara Popic

Description: Welfare states are about life, death and money. They aim to cover for risks occurring during individuals' life course, such as unemployment or sickness, and by doing so they consume considerable portion of public budget of the contemporary states. The module will be based on research-led teaching and will provide students with systematic understanding of the policy and politics of welfare from a global comparative perspective. The module will also offer sustained engagements with debates surrounding the politics of welfare across five major welfare sectors - education, healthcare, unemployment, family and pension policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Policy Brief
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, ThemesPolitics and International RelationsPOLM024Semester 17No

Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, Themes

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Pierre Haroche

Description: The module is designed to give students a good command and understanding of key concepts and theoretical traditions in International Relations and their relevance for understanding contemporary themes in world politics.

The module seeks to provide students with a more nuanced understanding of the various social forces and processes shaping world politics including the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations. The module also aims at developing the students' capacity to reflect critically about the main claims, strengths and weaknesses of theories in international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Transnational Law and Governance AppliedLawSOLM028Semester 17No

Transnational Law and Governance Applied

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Christou

Description: The central question which this module will address is how Transnational law impacts on the future of law-making, supervision and enforcement of rules in a globalised world of transnational business and markets. Globalisation and polycentrality are phenomena that influence every aspect of the world society and challenge the efficiency and validity centralized law-making by the states. In a globalised world where business is mostly done at transnational level coupled with the pace that both economic and technology change, traditional national law-making is proving ineffective and as a result we have witnessed alternatives appearing, including from regional and international organisations but also from private transnational market actors too. The law has emerged from its national setting and presents itself as transnational which has important ramifications for policy making. A weekly topical issue related to Transnational Law will be discussed in depth. The discussions are based on readings and will follow a presentation of the readings. Potential issues which could be covered include: Is Transnational Law, Law?; The World Justice Forum Index; the Cape Town Convention; Climate Change as a Transnational Legal Order; private law-making in the diamond trade and financial markets; and Transnational lawyering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Independent research essay (5000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Annotated Bibliography (1000-1500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, ThemesPolitics and International RelationsPOLM090Semester 17No

Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, Themes

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Diego De Merich

Description: The module is designed to give students a good command and understanding of key concepts and theoretical traditions in International Relations and their relevance for understanding contemporary themes in world politics.

The module seeks to provide students with a more nuanced understanding of the various social forces and processes shaping world politics including the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations. The module also aims at developing the students' capacity to reflect critically about the main claims, strengths and weaknesses of theories in international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Statistics in Psychology IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY107Full year4No

Statistics in Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Echols

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology. This module introduces students to data analysis and statistics in Psychology. Students will learn basic principles of numeracy, data management, probability theory, descriptive statistics and inferential statistics using real-world examples of psychology research. The course will combine lectures and practical sessions including computerised statistical analysis using SPSS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2% Lab Practical 1
  • Item 2: 2% Lab Practical 2
  • Item 3: 2% Lab Practical 3
  • Item 4: 2% Lab Practical 4
  • Item 5: 2% Lab Practical 5
  • Item 6: 2% Lab Practical 6
  • Item 7: 2% Lab Practical 7
  • Item 8: 2% Lab Practical 8
  • Item 9: 38% Lab Report (Results & Discussion)
  • Item 10: 50% Practical Examination
Level: 4
Psychology
ThermodynamicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5219Semester 15Yes

Thermodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jan Mol
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121

Description: Thermal and Kinetic Physics is a course designed as an introduction to the notion of energy and its transformations. The thermodynamic methodology that is constructed, largely through the paradigm of the ideal gas, is widely applicable throughout the realm of physics. We begin by developing a language capable of dealing with the thermodynamic method and this requires that concepts of equilibrium and temperature are disentangled before work and heat are described in detail en route to the First Law of Thermodynamics. With the First Law many things become readily accessible to an analytic approach previously unavailable including; engines, refrigerators and heat pumps. Entropy will then make a natural appearance as a macroscopic thermodynamic variable in the build up to the Second Law of Thermodynamics with a brief look at its microscopic origins. New thermodynamic potentials including the Gibbs potential and the Helmholtz free energy, and their applications, are discussed in order to generalise further the thermodynamic method. Phase changes for simple systems are briefly covered and the Third law of Thermodynamics described. Finally an introduction to the kinetic description of gases in equilibrium and of phenomena such as diffusion and heat conduction will complete the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Sovereign Debt RestructuringLawSOLM014Semester 17No

Sovereign Debt Restructuring

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: The module covers the various procedures available in financial distress scenarios aiming at restoring viability and overcoming the excessive burden of debt. The module will address these issues from the perspective of sovereign states. The course will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
War and International SecurityPolitics and International RelationsPOLM054Semester 17No

War and International Security

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr James Eastwood

Description: Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, as well as forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states. The module offers an examination of the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force impact on international relations, how force is used by states and other actors, and how force is managed in world politics. The module surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to better examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. A major theme is looking at war in a global context, not only in terms of integrating contemporary concerns with globalisation, but also by looking at interconnections between north and south, and war and society. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict will also be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War", international law, and the role of the United Nations. Overall, the module gives a broad perspective on the place of armed force in contemporary international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Exploring Psychology IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY124Semester 14No

Exploring Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka

Description: This module introduces and develops basic concepts in the philosophy of science and its relevance to psychology as a discipline. A biological framework for psychological science is also provided. It then introduces basic cognitive science/psychology, social psychology, differential psychology and an introduction to brain and behaviour relationships.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Midterm test
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Competition and the State: EU State Aid LawLawSOLM056Semester 17No

Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: This course examines EU state aid rules, i.e. rules restraining the public conferral of selective advantages to certain companies. In recent years, EU state aid rules have attracted increased attention not only in Europe but internationally, especially as a result of the European Commission¿s actions against big multinationals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and ContextLawSOLM043Semester 17No

International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last four decades by the increasing use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. In the last ten years more than 5,000 arbitration cases have been recorded annually in London alone. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre and the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central importance in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Themes and Cases in US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM075Semester 37No

Themes and Cases in US Foreign Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Georg Loefflmann

Description: This course will consider the principal forms in which US foreign policy has been practised and interpreted since the foundation of the Republic. Amongst these are American Exceptionalism and Anti-Americanism, 'spheres of influence', liberal interventionism and protectionist isolationism, Cold War containment, the `War on Terror' following 9/11, and the strains on unipolarity in the early 21st century. Amongst the case studies linked to these themes, we shall consider the role of Native Americans and immigration, the war of 1898, gunboat diplomacy in the Caribbean, the ideas of Woodrow Wilson, the Vietnam War, the consequences of the 9/11 attacks, and the challenges posed by China.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Cognitive and Affective NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY323Semester 26No

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Laura Crucianelli
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: The aim of this module is to give students a thorough understanding of the theoretical approaches in cognitive and affective neuroscience, where we will evaluate evidence from both behavioural and neuropsychological studies. We will explore how normal cognitive functioning takes place and how this can be elucidated by looking at brain damaged patients and neuroimaging studies. The lecture series will include an introductory lecture on the overall aims and objectives of cognitive neuroscience followed by a series of lectures looking at attention, perception, memory and movement. Subsequent lectures will focus on affective neuroscience, looking at neuroscience of empathy; neural basis of emotional reactivity, including attentional processes, biases and emotion regulation; and neuroscience of different emotions such as fear, anger, or disgust.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Research Poster
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Psychology
Nationalism and International OrderPolitics and International RelationsPOLM104Semester 17Yes

Nationalism and International Order

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: The demise of the nation-state and the disappearance of nationalism have been predicted on many occasions, yet they stubbornly stick around. This module explores the past, present, and possible futures of nationalism through an interdisciplinary approach that brings together insights from sociology, history, political theory, and international relations. During the module, students will acquire an advanced understanding of the sources of nationalism, the role of nationalism in the making of the international order, and the multifaceted ways that nationalism continues to shape society and politics today.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Governing the European Union in Time of CrisisPolitics and International RelationsPOLM103Semester 27Yes

Governing the European Union in Time of Crisis

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: The European Union has developed from a narrow organisation that sought the peaceful cooperation of certain industries into a supranational political system with executive, legislative and judicial institutions. Over the last three decades the process of European integration has made rapid progress withe the deepening of the Single Market, the creation of a currency union, successive rounds of enlargement . On the other hand, recent setbacks and crises (such as Covid-19, the War in Ukraine, the Eurozone crisis, the 'migratory crisis', Brexit and the grow euroscepticism) have rekindled debates concerning the legitimacy, speed and direction of the European project. The module explores the governance of policy areas in the EU to understand the current challenges within the EU project and the drivers of these crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Critical Review
  • Item 2: 75% Policy Brief
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Globalisation and the International Political Economy of DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOLM073Semester 17No

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rowan Lubbock

Description: The course provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
DissertationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM017Semester 37No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Phillips

Description: The Masters' Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics completed over the summer months (May-August) of your degree programme. It is a compulsory element of your degree amounting to sixty credits (providing one-third of the credits for your degree). It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student's specific research interest in an area not covered by other module modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the department who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Russian Language PlayLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5046Semester 25Yes

Russian Language Play

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4046
Prerequisite: In taking this module you must have basic knowledge of russian

Description: In the second semester of each academic year the Russian department prepares a play for performance in Russian. This is a unique opportunity for shared close analysis, examination, and realisation of a Russian text. The actors and directors are selected from among the students. Numbers will be limited by the size of the cast, but there is no obligation whatsoever for everyone participating to register for the module. In addition to participating in the performance, students registering for the module write a supervised essay-project on a theme associated with the play performed and supported by three formal supervisions. The language of the presentation and essay is English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Contemporary Russian Short StoriesLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5016Semester 25Yes

Contemporary Russian Short Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM5016 or take RUS4016

Description: This module analyses the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, history, considering how the genre¿s specific features have been used to express the concerns and currents of recent Russian life since 1991. Themes analysed include post-modernism, women¿s writing, the reckoning with the Soviet past, diasporic literature and the search for a new, Russian identity. Authors studied include Liudmilla Petrushevskaia, Tatiana Tolstaia, Viktor Pelevin, Zakhar Prilepin and Anna Starobinets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Assignment 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Assignment 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Reading Contemporary RussiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4205Semester 24No

Reading Contemporary Russia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take RUS4203

Description: Reading Contemporary Russia consists of reading comprehension and content analysis of simple texts on contemporary Russia. The main focus of the class is to introduce students to current cultural, social, and political issues, using books, newspaper articles,journals, TV and radio broadcasts, and web sources from Russia. Selected readings and films will familiarize students with culture and features of everyday life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Assessment and Presentation
  • Item 3: 25% Practical Skills Assessment
Level: 4
Russian
Brazilian Cinema: The Social TraditionLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR5034Semester 25Yes

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take FLM5034

Description: Why would a Brazilian director depict not the guerrilla Che Guevara but the young doctor developing his social awareness? Walter Salles's Motorcycle Diaries will set the tone for the discussion of Brazil's emphasis on the social agenda as its major contribution to world cinema. This course will approach the evolution of this genre, beginning with Cinema Novo, the shift towards the commercial film (Pixote, Central Station), the development of a new aesthetics (City of God) and of recent radical experimentations such as prisoners and favela (shantytown) inhabitants making their own film. Discussions will include the tensions between aesthetics and ethics, the achievement of the commercial film and of the documentary as social action, and film as a tool for the empowerment of the marginalized.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 5
Portuguese
Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY711PSemester 17No

Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Caroline Brennan

Description: This module will focus on developing the key skills required to conduct interdisciplinary research in the mental health sciences. You will learn about the different genetic, social, cognitive, behavioural and neuroscientific approaches to mental health research, how to read and critically evaluate the literature and how to translate clinical findings to basic science questions. A key outcome of this module is to learn how to review the literature and identify a research question focusing on an aspect of psychiatric disorders or psychological wellbeing that can be investigated from a social, cognitive, behavioural, neuroscientific, or genetic perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Literature review
Level: 7
Psychology
Psychiatric Genetics and GenomicsBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY706PSemester 27No

Psychiatric Genetics and Genomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Pinelopi Bounia-Mastrogianni

Description: This module will focus on the genetic underpinnings of mental health and illness. Students will learn about the variety of genetic approaches that have been developed to understand the genetic risk for psychiatric and neurodevelopmental conditions, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. Drawing on the wealth of research studies in this field, we will explore novel clinical applications that integrate genetic information, discuss the way genetic predispositions interface with the environment and are manifested in cognitive and brain phenotypes, and highlight key strengths and limitations and future directions for genetic studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Oral presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Written report
Level: 7
Psychology
Psychology MSc Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY700PFull year7No

Psychology MSc Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Cioffi

Description: In this module, students will conduct an in-depth research project focusing on an aspect of psychiatric disorders or psychological wellbeing from a social, cognitive, behavioural, neuroscientific, or genetic perspective. Students will be assigned to a supervisor and start developing a project proposal as part of Semester A module `Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences I¿ and under the guidance of their supervisor. Students will complete their ethics application, begin designing their experiment and collecting data in semester B. In semester C they are expected to focus solely on the analysis, interpretation, and write-up of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Presentation
  • Item 2: 90% Research project (15000 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
Extended Essay in PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY606Full year6No

Extended Essay in Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: The extended essay is intended to give you an opportunity to study in-depth a topic of particular interest to you within the subject of Psychology. The essay will not entail you conducting empirical research.
You can choose to do the Extended Essay rather than PSY600 Psychology Research Project but will need to take another 15-credit module in your final year. The Extended Essay module is intended to provide an opportunity for you to write substantively, critically and independently about a selected and approved area of Psychology than is possible in a tutorial essay. The work also involves significant evaluation of theoretical issues relevant to the topic under investigation and you are expected to use original research articles. The assessment comprises a substantive written dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Extended Essay (5000 words)
Level: 6
PsychologyBIO_PSY_6_S
Advanced Introduction to International Political SociologyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM102Semester 27Yes

Advanced Introduction to International Political Sociology

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: This module provides students with analytical tools for engaging with a world in which it is apparent that humans, animals, plants, and geological and atmospheric processes are intimately entangled, that borders are increasingly porous, and that the local and the global are no longer easily separated. During the module, students will be prompted to critically reflect on the value and limits of International Political Sociology as a transdisciplinary field that develops new understandings of contemporary international, global, and planetary conditions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
US Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM100Semester 27Yes

US Public Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Richard Johnson

Description: US politics attracts high levels of attention around elections, but far less notice afterwards. In order to understand the politics of the United States, we must study not only who holds power but also how power is exercised. Public policy is the marshalling of public resources and legal power to shape individual and collective outcomes. This module explores the US policy-making process before examining a wide range of domestic and foreign policy competences, such as education, housing, trade, and immigration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
PsychopathologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY253Semester 25No

Psychopathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgina Hosang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take PSY124 and take PSY125 ) or take BMD161

Description: This module is designed to give you a scientific overview of psychopathology based on related theoretical frameworks and empirical findings, and to critically evaluate the range of approaches in this field. In this course, you will focus on the history of the classification and diagnosis of common mental health disorders, and on key common mental disorders including mood disorders (depression & bipolar disorder), anxiety disorders and schizophrenia. Psychological therapies will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the symptoms and diagnoses across the mental disorders as well as the risk factors and treatments used for common mental disorders.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Psychology
International OrganisationsPolitics and International RelationsPOLM099Semester 27Yes

International Organisations

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Yao

Description: This module will provide an advanced examination of International Organisations (IOs) as a transnational political workspace for both cooperation and contestation between global actors. The module will be grounded in a historical and critical examination of the development of IOs in the 19th century as a tool to manage European international order, and it will emphasize the ways in which IOs developed in conjunction with the modern state. Building upon this critical grounding, the module will examine today's IOs, with a particular focus on the UN system, and their effectiveness in confronting global challenges in the 21st century. The module will conclude with a capstone day-long Model UN simulation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Position Paper (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Reflection Paper (1500 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
DissertationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM077Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Javier Sajuria

Description: The Masters' Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student's specific research interest in an area not covered by other course modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Latin America in the Modern WorldPolitics and International RelationsPOLM060Semester 27Yes

Latin America in the Modern World

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Holly Ryan

Description: This module will examine the historical and contemporary place of Latin America in the world system through issues of political economy, cultural identity and international relations. The module will explore dependency, modernization and marxist theories, the legacy of European empires, and the independence movements of the 19th century. It will then consider the more contemporary phenomena of a contested Pan-Americanism, exceptionalist theses for Cuba and Brazil, the evolving role of indigenous American societies and that of Latinos in the USA. The module will conclude with appraisal of the regional experience of neo-liberalism and the reactions to it on continental and international planes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204BSemester 24Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4204
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have gcse or equivalent knowledge of russian

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed at least one semester of Russian language at home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
DissertationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM077Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Javier Sajuria

Description: The Masters' Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student's specific research interest in an area not covered by other course modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Contemporary Russian Short StoriesLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4016Semester 24Yes

Contemporary Russian Short Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM5016 or take RUS5016

Description: This module analyses the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, history, considering how the genre¿s specific features have been used to express the concerns and currents of recent Russian life since 1991. Themes analysed include post-modernism, women¿s writing, the reckoning with the Soviet past, diasporic literature and the search for a new, Russian identity. Authors studied include Liudmilla Petrushevskaia, Tatiana Tolstaia, Viktor Pelevin, Zakhar Prilepin and Anna Starobinets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Assignment 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Assignment 2 (2000 words)
Level: 4
Russian
Theories and Concepts in Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM092Semester 17No

Theories and Concepts in Public Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Karl Pike

Description: This module will provide a structured introduction to key issues and concepts in policy analysis. The module will give students a solid grounding in theories of the policy-making process while enabling students to apply those insights to practical case-studies of policy formulation and implementation in the real world. The module will also provide students with background on the key traditions and approaches to public administration and policy-making in countries around the world, both developing and developed countries. Issues to be covered on the module will include the nature of public policies; the policy context: institutions and actors; theoretical approaches to the policy process; policy problems and agenda-setting; decision-making; implementation/new public management; evaluation; governance; public policy beyond the nation-state; policy change and policy convergence; future challenges for policy-makers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% PowerPoint Brief
  • Item 2: 65% Assignment 2: Case-study Analysis (4000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Cognitive NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY705PSemester 27No

Cognitive Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwijde Maegherman

Description: This module will focus on developing the skills required to conduct cognitive and neuroscientific studies of mental illness. A variety of different methods will be covered in-depth, including EEG, fMRI, and psychophysiology. The lectures will cover the theoretical basis of each method and its application to mental health research, and accompanying workshops will teach students how to analyse and interpret neuroimaging data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% In-class acitivity 1
  • Item 2: 5% In-class acitivity 2
  • Item 3: 5% Data collection
  • Item 4: 5% In-class acitivity 3
  • Item 5: 5% In-class acitivity 4
  • Item 6: 5% Seminar presentation
  • Item 7: 70% Experimental plan
Level: 7
Psychology
Business PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY318Semester 26No

Business Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paraskevi Argyriou

Description: The workplace is a dynamic place, constantly changing, evolving and adapting in the face of global changes in new technologies, new ways of working and changing social, economical and political norms. In order to keep a workplace running like a fine tuned machine, it often takes the efforts of many individuals. In many ways, this is where organizational psychology comes in place, which is the branch of psychology studying the workplace environment in all its liveness by promoting effective practices to maximize the benefits for both the organizations and their employees. In this module, you will be introduced in key issues in organizational psychology and how they apply in the workplace. Topics will include employee selection and training, team-work, leadership, fairness and well-being in the workplace, and organizational change and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Psychology
Portuguese ILanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR4201Full year4Yes

Portuguese I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have a-level or equivalent knowledge of portuguese

Description: This module is offered only to students who have A-Level or equivalent in Portuguese or who are heritage speakers of Portuguese. Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary Brazilian and European Portuguese, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language. The language of instruction is predominantly Portuguese. Successful students will reach Level B1(+) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: CV, Cover Letter, Interview (600 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: Reading Comprehension and Composition (600 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Portuguese
Comparative PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY235Semester 15No

Comparative Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elisabetta Versace
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY117 and take PSY121 and ( take PSY124 or take PSY125 )

Description: As for other species, many abilities and behaviours that we take for granted - from perception to learning, communication, handedness and sexual preferences - are the result of our evolutionary history. Our history has shaped our psychology and influences our daily behaviour. Are we the only species that is deceived by visual illusions? Who is the most intelligent species? Are we the only ones that exhibit handedness? Which are the mechanisms of learning? To understand what makes as human, we have to look at ourselves from a broader perspective. In this module we will explore differences and similarities between humans beings and other species. We will learn how to access and compare the mind and behaviour of individuals that do not possess language such as human neonates, newly-hatched chicks and other models currently used in understanding of healthy and pathological behaviour.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Activity 1
  • Item 2: 5% Activity 2
  • Item 3: 5% Activity 3
  • Item 4: 35% Group presentation
  • Item 5: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Psychology
Approaches to Political EconomyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM059Semester 17No

Approaches to Political Economy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rowan Lubbock

Description: This module provides an introduction to the theoretical foundations of the contemporary analyses of advanced capitalism. How have thinkers within politics and economics theorised and analysed the relationship between the two disciplines? Is it even possible to analytically distinguish between the two? The aim of this module is to answer these two questions by reference to the major theories within the field of political economy. The module analyses both classical and contemporary theories of political economy, and explores their continued relevance to understanding the development of advanced capitalism. Towards the end of the module we will consider some heterodox approaches brought to the fore by the onset of the ongoing financial and economic crisis and consider their relevance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Critical Review (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay (3500 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Quantitative Research Methods and Statistics in PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY208Semester 15No

Quantitative Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Bor

Description: This module builds introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists, and one where the College has research strengths; health psychology or psychology as applied to health and medicine. The module covers the central models and evidence base concerning the relationship of psychological processes to health maintenance, treatment adherence, professional-patient interactions, stress and immune system function. Topics covered by this module include models and theories of health behaviour and their explanatory power; psychology & health promotion; adherence to treatment, health professional and patient interactions; research methods in health psychology; psychological issues in clinical trial design; personality, health and lifestyle; psychoneuroimmunology; cardiovascular disease; sexual health behaviours; and coping with chronic & terminal conditions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2% Lab Practical 1
  • Item 2: 2% Lab Practical 2
  • Item 3: 2% Lab Practical 3
  • Item 4: 2% Lab Practical 4
  • Item 5: 2% Lab Practical 5
  • Item 6: 2% Lab Practical 6
  • Item 7: 2% Lab Practical 7
  • Item 8: 2% Lab Practical 8
  • Item 9: 38% Lab Report
  • Item 10: 50% Practical Examination
Level: 5
Psychology
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204ASemester 14Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4204
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have gcse or equivalent knowledge of russian

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who hold the equivalent of GCSE in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
EmotionBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY127Semester 24No

Emotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Apergis-Schoute

Description: The module will allow you to learn about the different conceptualisations of emotion both in terms of historical developments as well as contemporary theoretical models of emotions. The module will also consider the biological basis of emotions in the brain and the body, how emotions are expressed and perceived in faces, bodies, voice and music. The relationship between emotions and cognitions will be considered, including emotion regulation and individual differences in emotions. Finally, cultural differences and disorders of emotion will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group video
  • Item 2: 5% Peer evaluation of videos
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Year Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS296Full year5No

Year Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Year Abroad Learning Log, which consists of three academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Cultural Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Work Placement Report (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Erasmus Work Placement (semester B)Languages Linguistics and FilmRUS295BSemester 25No

Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Erasmus Work Placement (semester B)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Semester Abroad Learning Log, which consists of two academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Work Placement Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Mobile people: Interdisciplinary Core Training Seminar (ICTS)Politics and International RelationsPOL700Full year7No

Mobile people: Interdisciplinary Core Training Seminar (ICTS)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Kimberly Hutchings

Description: This module enables students to place their research on an aspect of human mobility within a broader political, legal, geographical, and historical context and prepare them for ontological, epistemological, and methodological challenges of doing original research on human mobility. The module is convened by School of Politics and International Relations (SPIR) but is taught as an interdisciplinary module with contributions from Politics, International Relations (IR), Psychology, Law, Geography, Linguistics, History, Economics, Finance and Business Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Report (SEM1)
  • Item 2: 15% Presentation (SEM1)
  • Item 3: 35% Report (SEM2)
  • Item 4: 15% Presentation (SEM2)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Portuguese IILanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR5201Full year5No

Portuguese II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POR4201

Description: This module is offered to students pursuing a degree in Hispanic Studies and Portuguese, who have A Level in Portuguese/equivalent, and/or who are heritage speakers of Portuguese and have taken POR4201. Successful students will reach Level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL). The module develops Portuguese grammar, comprehension, oral, aural and analytical skills, with an emphasis on the appropriate use of register in both spoken and written Portuguese and preparation for the Year Abroad.

As a module, it will be available to students registered on a degree programme involving Portuguese only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: In-class News Report and Editorial (2x400 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: Lexical Field and Grammar Research Task (2x400 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Portuguese
Social-Environmental Influences on Mental Health and Well-BeingBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY704PSemester 27No

Social-Environmental Influences on Mental Health and Well-Being

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jessica Blais

Description: This module investigates the role of social and environmental factors on psychopathology and psychological wellbeing across the life span. Prenatal influences, the immediate social context (i.e., parenting, family structure), the socio-economic context, the wider social context (i.e., neighbourhood quality, green spaces), adverse life events such as exposure to war and displacement, as well as cultural factors, will be covered. This module will also have an applied perspective: reviewing social and environmental interventions that have been developed to address adverse mental health outcomes and promote positive development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Short-answer essay
  • Item 2: 80% Report
Level: 7
Psychology
Criminal and Forensic PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY314Semester 16No

Criminal and Forensic Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit

Description: This module introduces you to the fundamental concepts in the psychological study of crime. The areas
introduced include: the forensic psychologist, the study of crime, psychological explanations of crime, psychological explanations of the criminal mind, psychological explanations of specific crime types (for example, crimes of a sexual nature), the role of criminal and forensic psychologists in detection and investigation, and psychology in prison.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Individual Presentation
  • Item 2: 50% Timed report
Level: 6
Psychology
Psychology Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY600Full year6No

Psychology Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: This module allows you to conceive, design and carry out a substantive, original empirical study in an area of psychology independently. You will work on approved research topics set by project supervisors. Experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of the project. The work also involves critical evaluation of data previously published in the literature. A consideration of ethical issues is also required. A dissertation is prepared. This module will teach you to work on original scientific research topics and consolidate quantitative research skills, communication and critical evaluation. It will enhance your understanding of psychology in a broader context and will provide students with experience of working in a research environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Research Project Report (6000-8000 words)
Level: 6
PsychologyBIO_PSY_6_S
War and International SecurityPolitics and International RelationsPOLM096Semester 27No

War and International Security

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Katharine Hall

Description: Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, as well as forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states. This module will engage with these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, ThemesPolitics and International RelationsPOLM090Semester 37No

Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, Themes

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Diego De Merich

Description: The module is designed to give students a good command and understanding of key concepts and theoretical traditions in International Relations and their relevance for understanding contemporary themes in world politics.

The module seeks to provide students with a more nuanced understanding of the various social forces and processes shaping world politics including the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations. The module also aims at developing the students' capacity to reflect critically about the main claims, strengths and weaknesses of theories in international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
International Migration PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM095Semester 27Yes

International Migration Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Corina Lacatus

Description: Students will get a comprehensive understanding of how migration policy works at European and International levels and of the cutting-edge debates surrounding the so-called 'migration crisis'. Students will explore and critically analyse the causes and consequences of the migration crises from a public policy perspective. The module is divided in four parts. First, migration as a phenomenon of globalisation is introduced as well as the way states and the supranational level (EU and UN) have developed policies to `manage' and `control¿ migration. Second, the module offer a theoretical and empirical explanation of security and border policies and practices developed to control migration as well as of policies of integration. Third, the course spends some time discuss the so-called 2015 migration and refugee `crisis¿, the policies adopted by the EU, the divergent policies adopted by European member states and the role of European cities and regions. Fourth, the course studies the migration policies that are in place in North Africa, with a specific focus on the Moroccan immigration reform, and in West Africa, with a focus on ECOWAS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Policy Brief (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Politics and International Relations
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204Full year4Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS4204A or take RUS4204B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must have gcse or equivalent knowledge of russian

Description: The module is aimed at students who hold GCSE or equivalent in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test 1 (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% In-class Mixed Skills Language Test 2 (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Exploring Psychology IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY125Semester 24No

Exploring Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take PSY124

Description: This module builds upon PSY124 Exploring Psychology I by extending the introduction of basic concepts, theories, methods and research findings in psychology. The areas introduced include the core and interdisciplinary fields in psychology. Lectures for exploring psychology II will include an introductory lecture followed by lectures on specific topics in psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% MCQ midterm
  • Item 2: 75% Final Examination (1 hours 15 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement (semester A)Languages Linguistics and FilmRUS295ASemester 15No

Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement (semester A)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Semester Abroad Learning Log, which consists of two academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Work Placement Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Portuguese IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR6200Full year6Yes

Portuguese III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POR5200 or take POR5201

Description: This module is for students who have completed Portuguese II Intensive. The focus will be on fluency, expansion of vocabulary, grammatical accuracy, advanced oral and reading comprehension, and development of writing skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Semester 1: Essay (800 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Semester 2: Literary Commentary (800 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Portuguese
Race and US PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL399Semester 26Yes

Race and US Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Johnson

Description: This module studies the politics of the United States through the lens of its racial divisions. The module will help students understand why race, particularly the black-white divide, has been and continues to be central to American political life and development. In the module, students will gain a deep theoretical and historical understanding of racial formation in the United States before moving on to apply these insights to current debates about the role of race in American democracy and public policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Law and Ethics in Business and FinanceLawSOLM011Semester 17No

Law and Ethics in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: The module provides students with a broad understanding of the importance of conducting business activities (both financial and non-financial) with fairness and integrity and how this is reflected in EU and UK law and supervisory powers. By making reference to real case studies, the module investigates the legal framework pertaining to bribes, market manipulation, and other malpractices and critically analyses its effectiveness taking also into account the deterrence effect, or lack thereof, of the sanctioning and prosecution regime. It then covers corporate social responsibility and sustainable/responsible investment to analyse if and how this can nudge change. The module will also touch upon the efficacy of the organizational requirements companies are obliged to have in place to prevent unethical conduct from happening and/or spreading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Individual Student Report (1500-2500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Group video
Level: 7
Law
Introductory PortugueseLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR4200Full year4Yes

Introductory Portuguese

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham

Description: This module is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of the Portuguese language. Successful students will complete Level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Language (CEFRL). The module provides basic competence in all four main language skills (reading, listening, speaking and writing). Teaching materials are selected with a view to providing a panoramic view of the history and culture of the Portuguese-speaking countries in four continents. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. They must attend five hours of teaching per week and expect to spend a further five hours per week on private study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Semester 1: Composition and Oral Task (equivalent to 500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Semester 2: Reading Comprehension and Composition and Listening (equivalent to 500 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Portuguese
Advanced Research Methods and StatisticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY702PSemester 17No

Advanced Research Methods and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: This 15-credit module provides students with advanced-level training in research techniques appropriate for postgraduate research projects. It includes lectures on key research principles and research methodology, as well as practical workshops focused on developing skills in data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework (750 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
Portuguese II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR5200Full year5Yes

Portuguese II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POR4200

Description: This module is the second year language module for students who have started Portuguese from ab initio level and have successfully completed Introductory Portuguese, or have a knowledge of the language equivalent to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) Level A2. Emphasis is on increasing fluency in listening, reading, writing and oral communication and including materials with up-to-date information about the Portuguese-speaking countries.

It will be available to students enrolled on a degree programme involving Portuguese only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Semester 1: Composition and Oral Task (equivalent to 600 words and 3 mins Audio or Video Recording)
  • Item 2: 20% Semester 2: Translation and Composition and Oral Task and Listening (equivalent to 600 words and 3 mins Presentation)
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Portuguese
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6011Semester 16Yes

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6010 or take LAN6015 or take LAN6016 or take LAN6111 or take LAN6116

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Written Assignment (400-450 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6081Semester 16Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6080 or take LAN6085 or take LAN6086 or take LAN6181 or take LAN6186

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and growing mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B1/B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (400-450 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
French Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6017Semester 26No

French Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6010 or take LAN6015 or take LAN6012

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Languages
Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and JusticeLawLAW6173Semester 16No

Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Sherwood

Description: This course situates the study of criminology in a global and inter-disciplinary context to destabilize state- and Euro-centric conceptions of crime, punishment and justice. It starts by proposing different beginnings for criminology that reveal that in some sense the discipline has always been global. We begin with anthropological studies of so-called 'primitive' societies. How are social transgressions conceptualized and dealt with in stateless settings? Is there a concept of 'crime' to begin with? What work does the concept of crime do in organizing society? Who is being protected and who is being disciplined? We then explore two formative contexts for criminal justice: slavery and colonialism. What is the relationship between modern police forces and slave patrols? How has the `colonial encounter¿ shaped penal and policing regimes in postcolonial and metropolitan states?

After examining these `different beginnings¿, students will explore what it means to globalize crime and justice. What are we to make of 'international crimes' such as war crimes, crimes against humanity, crimes of aggression and genocide? Does it make sense to punish individuals for collective violence such as genocide in the same way as for murder? Should we reconcile, restore or transform rather than punish after mass violence?

The final part of the course looks at the global production of new forms, discourses and constituencies of criminalization and how they exclude and include people from society. Criminal justice technologies and discourses, for example, are increasingly applied to exclude refugees and migrants while some LGBTQ+ subjects are provisionally accepted into the category of 'good citizens'. How can we make sense of these new forms of criminalization and the offenders and victims they produce? How do criminal states, multinational corporations, people smugglers, child soldiers, foreign fighters, female terrorists and victims of trafficking confound our categories of victim/perpetrator in a highly racialized and gendered context of global inequality?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay
Level: 6
Law
Equity and TrustsLawLAW5003Full year5Yes

Equity and Trusts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Allen
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW6056

Description: This module will cover:

Express trusts: The three certainties in the creation of trusts; The beneficiary principle and unincorporated associations; Formalities in the creation of trusts; Dispositions of equitable interests; The duties of trustees; Breach of trust.
Resulting trusts: Trusts of homes, including proprietary estoppel.
Constructive trusts: Proprietary constructive trusts; Personal liability to account for dishonest assistance and knowing receipt
Tracing and equitable proprietary claims: Theoretical aspects of equity, property law and restitution

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Online Timed Exam (4 hours)
Level: 5
Law
Law in ContextLawLAW4008Semester 14Yes

Law in Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elizabeth Gillow

Description: In the first half of this module, you will be focusing on the skills you need to develop in order to study law effectively and efficiently, such as where to find case law and legislation, how to read a case and how to structure an essay. The second half will look at distinct but inter-related aspects of 'you': your position as a Law undergraduate; your understanding of law in the wider context and why we study law as an academic subject; your future career and employment prospects; and the skills that you need to develop to get you where you want to go.
You will learn by means of a weekly online lecture to be listened to in advance of the seminar; a weekly one hour seminar which will cover a different aspect of legal skills or career development each week; and a weekly lecture given by a law colleague who will talk about their context of studying, learning or practising law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Presentation (5 min)
Level: 4
Law
Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related RightsLawLAW6455Semester 16Yes

Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: The module focuses on the substantive law of copyright and related rights in the United Kingdom. It covers (i) the subsistence, ownership and term of copyright, (ii) exclusive economic rights and infringement (iv) exceptions and limitations to infringement and (v) moral rights. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay
Level: 6
Law
Contract Law I: Formation and VitiationLawLAW4104Semester 14Yes

Contract Law I: Formation and Vitiation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Davor Jancic

Description: This module introduces students to the principles of contract at common law and in equity and how these are applied to agreements. Students will study formative elements, including offer and acceptance, consideration, promissory estoppel, intention to create legal relations, certainty of terms and vagueness; vitiating elements, including mistake, misrepresentation and duress; and the enforcement of contractual rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Assessed coursework
Level: 4
Law
Administrative LawLawLAW6166Semester 16No

Administrative Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ian Yeats
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4001

Description: 1. The notion of administrative justice and remedies for wrongs by public bodies.
2. Judicial review procedures and remedies.
3. Who is and what kind of decisions are amenable to judicial review?
4. Who may make a claim or intervene in judicial review proceedings?
5. Advanced study of the grounds of judicial review:
a. illegality
b. irrationality
c. proportionality
d. procedural impropriety (including art 6 ECHR)
e. review of law and fact
6. Legitimate expectations and fettering of discretion
7. The status of unlawful administrative actions.
8. The role of tribunals and ombudsmen.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Introduction to French Private LawLawLAW6202Semester 26No

Introduction to French Private Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the rules that govern the relationships between individuals, being physical persons or moral persons. It provides an introduction to the sources of French private law, the court system in France, and the basic principles, procedures, and values that govern contractual and non-contractual obligations. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Online Timed Examination (4 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6087Semester 26No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6080 or take LAN6085 or take LAN6082

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (1000 words)
Level: 6
Languages
Competition LawLawLAW6048Full year6No

Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: The purpose of this module is to teach you the basic provisions of both EC and UK competition law. The module will provide you with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EC and UK competition law is applied. The module will aim to consider important business phenomena in the market such as anticompetitive agreements, abuse of market dominance and mergers between firms. It is hoped that by the end of the module you will gain a good understanding of the competition rules of the EC and the UK in order to help you identify situations in which such phenomena may arise. The module is taught on the basis of on one-and-a-halfhour lecture each week and one-and-a-half-hour tutorials held biweekly. In addition, the module includes several case studies based on real cases. You will be asked to prepare the case studies beforehand and be ready to discuss them in the class. The case studies will give you a taste of what competition law in practice is really like. They will also provide an excellent guidance on how to approach competition law problems in the examination room and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Online Timed Examination (4 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6196Full year6No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6090 or take LAN6095 or take LAN6091 or take LAN6096 or take LAN6191

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2/C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Languages
Criminal Law (Level 5)LawLAW5005Full year5Yes

Criminal Law (Level 5)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Saskia Hufnagel

Description: This module will cover:

Introduction: the scope and character of the criminal law and its objectives; Deconstructing a typical crime - Criminal Damage;
The General Principles of Criminal Responsibility: Criminal conduct - the actus reus; principles of causation; crimes of omission; Criminal fault - the mens rea; General defences; capacity and incapacity; insanity and diminished responsibility, intoxication, duress, necessity, self defence.
Particular Crimes: Offences against the person: homicide; wounding and assaults, including assaults aggravated by hatred, sexual offences; Offences against property: theft and fraud.
Preliminary or inchoate offences: Conspiracy; Attempt.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Online Timed Examination (4 hours)
Level: 5
Law
Law, Knowledge, Power: Past and PresentLawLAW6024Semester 16Yes

Law, Knowledge, Power: Past and Present

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maksymillan Del Mar

Description: This course explores the relationships between law, knowledge and power. It does so by theorising those relationships historically. The course asks two questions: First, what have been the material forms and technologies in which legal knowledge has existed? And second: what have been the political consequences of law existing in those material forms and technologies? These material forms and technologies are organised in part by references to different senses, e.g. 1) the look of law (typography, the page); and 2) the sound of law (e.g. alliteration in maxims of the law). The course also looks at the variety of ways in which knowledge of law has been stored, and the technologies devised for finding it: e.g. archives, filing systems, databases, and devices such as indexes, footnotes and search algorithms. Also examined are genres of legal knowledge (e.g. casebooks, treatises) and the material histories of commonly taken-for-granted concepts in legal knowledge (e.g. the material history of rules). Throughout, the course pays attention to the politics of these material forms and technologies, including the way many of them have tended to make law illegible (often literally illegible, e.g. through black-letter script) to the general population.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 6
Law
Jurisprudence and Legal TheoryLawLAW6021Full year6Yes

Jurisprudence and Legal Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noam Gur

Description: Main currents of modern Western legal thought: natural law theory (classical and modern forms); legal positivism (Austin, Bentham and the legal theory of sovereignty; Hart's concept of law; Kelsen's pure theory of law); classical social theory and law; aspects of legal realism an critical legal studies; Dworkin's interpretative theory and law as integrity; punishment; corrective justice, civil disobedience; rights; feminist legal theory; economic analysis of law; legal autopoiesis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Online Timed Examination (4 hours)
Level: 6
LawLAW_456_S
Climate JusticeLawLAW6179Semester 16Yes

Climate Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Whyte

Description: This module explores the concept of 'climate justice' from a range of legal, social and political perspectives, tracing in detail how the concept has been underpinned by a wide range of traditions in human thinking. The module will introduce students to the growing significance of a concept of climate justice in contemporary political and policy debates, and show how our understanding of the concept varies widely across different historical and cultural contexts. Topics covered will include:
Climate justice in policy and politics (exploring historical development and the uses of the concept in UN, NGO and national government contexts).
Climate justice and racial justice (exploring the concept of climate justice in anti-colonial, post-colonial and anti-racist ideas).
Climate justice and economic production (exploring the concept of climate justice in the critique of industrial capitalism and eco-socialism).
Climate justice and social reproduction (exploring the concept of climate justice in feminist theory and in the critique of androcentric accounts of climate change).
Climate justice and indigenous epistemologies (exploring the contemporary significance of pre-colonial and pre-industrial concepts of climate justice).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay
Level: 6
Law
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5187Full year5No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN5080 or take LAN5085 or take LAN5182 or take LAN5082 or take LAN5087

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Assignment (200-250 characters)
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
The Art of LawLawLAW6171Semester 16No

The Art of Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isobel Roele

Description: The Art of Law provides an introduction to a range of ways in which law and the visual arts come together now and in the past. The module will explore how law appears in artworks including painting, sculpture, photography, and film. It will also consider when, how and why works of art appear in state institutions like courthouses, Inns of Court, government buildings, and international organisations, and how state and international organisations make use of art work in their public outreach activities.
Students will develop an understanding of basic art historical approaches and methods including psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxian, post- and anti-colonial, and queer, approaches. They will use these to navigate cutting-edge interdisciplinary research in the field of Law and the Arts. They will make their own art work, engage in class discussions, visit art galleries, watch films, and undertake an independent research project.
For the creative project, students may choose between making a 5-minute film; an A2 poster; or 5-frame photo-essay.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Creative Project (choice of formats) and Self-reflection
  • Item 2: 75% Essay
Level: 6
Law
Public LawLawLAW4001Full year4Yes

Public Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tanzil Chowdhury

Description: This module will cover:

General characteristics of the UK constitution; Institutions of the European Union and Council of Europe; Rule of law; Parliamentary sovereignty; European Union law and the challenge to parliamentary sovereignty; Separation of powers; Accountability; Sources of power: primary and secondary legislation, prerogative powers; Constitutional conventions; European Union law-making process; Constitutional functions of judges; United Kingdom Supreme Court; Appointing, scrutinising and dismissing judges; International courts and tribunals; European Convention on Human Rights; Human Rights Act 1998 and proposals for a British Bill of Rights; Reform of the European Union; Treaty ratification; Proposals for constitutional reform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Law
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6111Full year6Yes

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6010 or take LAN6015 or take LAN6116 or take LAN6011 or take LAN6016

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Written Assignment (400-450 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6086Semester 16No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6080 or take LAN6085 or take LAN6081 or take LAN6181 or take LAN6186

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and growing mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B1/B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (400-450 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Languages
Equity and Trusts (Level 6)LawLAW6056Full year6No

Equity and Trusts (Level 6)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Allen

Description: This module will cover:

Express trusts: The three certainties in the creation of trusts; The beneficiary principle and unincorporated associations; Formalities in the creation of trusts; Dispositions of equitable interests; The duties of trustees; Breach of trust; Resulting trusts; Trusts of homes, including proprietary estoppel; Constructive trusts: Proprietary constructive trusts; Personal liability to account for dishonest assistance and knowing receipt;
Tracing and equitable proprietary claims; Restitution of unjust enrichment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Online Timed Examination (4 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Equality and the LawLawLAW6061Semester 16Yes

Equality and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Elizabeth Barmes

Description: Students will learn about the law in the UK on equality and anti-discrimination. They will be introduced to the legal rules through case studies in particular topical areas such as the legal profession, the judiciary, the legislature, education and gender segregation in society. Through these case studies the operation of the law in practice will be scrutinised and evaluated. The module will be assessed through research proposals, presentations of their chosen topic and a research essay of 4,000 words.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Video presentation (10 min)
  • Item 2: 60% Research proposal
Level: 6
Law
Spanish Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6022Semester 26Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6020 or take LAN6025 or take LAN6027

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6020Full year6Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6025 or take LAN6021 or take LAN6026 or take LAN6022 or take LAN6027 or take LAN6121 or take LAN6126

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5186Full year5No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN5080 or take LAN5085 or take LAN5081 or take LAN5086 or take LAN5181

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A1/A2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2/B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Assignment (175-225 characters)
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Land LawLawLAW4006Full year4Yes

Land Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Rupert Seal

Description: This module will cover:

Fundamental concepts; Contracts relating to land; Adverse Possession; Leases/Licences; Mortgages; Co-ownership and the family home; Freehold covenants; Easements; Protection of interests in land: registered land and unregistered land.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75% Final coursework
Level: 4
Law
Law and PharmacologyLawLAW6170Full year6No

Law and Pharmacology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Amber Marks

Description: In the medico-legal field, medicines regulation has, until recently (E.Jackson, Law and the Regulation of Medicines (Hart, 2012)) received relatively little scholarly attention, and drug offences have been largely neglected in undergraduate courses on criminal law. These two areas of law (medicines regulation and recreational drug use ) are rarely considered together despite both being concerned with pharmacology and its impact on consumers, and despite raising similar ethical questions (autonomy, paternalism, the role of the state in public and private health) and facing similar threats from those seeking to maximise profit.
The purpose of the module will be to identify and critically evaluate normative frameworks in this area, in search of theoretical coherence. The course will identify relevant legal and theoretical frameworks and regulatory agencies. The focus will be on UK law but will also include international treaties and European law. The module will combine domestic and comparative jurisprudence, and will also adopt a law-reform flavour given the evolving nature of science and law in this area . The module may particularly interest those students who are studying medical law, those propose to enter into a practising law career, a law, regulatory or policy-reform role, or who may enter into associated fields such as consumer lobbying and activism, or governmental legal offices.

Questions to be considered will include: What are the normative implications of a shift in regulatory perspective in relation to recreational drugs from the criminal to the public health model? How tenable is the distinction drawn in law between medicinal drugs and recreational drugs? What are the regulatory implications of a product¿s classification as medicinal? What is the role and nature of the harm/benefit nexus in the design of regulatory measures?

In the second semester students will explore several case-studies, including novel psychoactive substances, cannabis law reform and nicotine replacement therapy before proceeding to research and make oral presentations on their own chosen topics for the coursework element, for which they will receive supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% EEssay 1 (4000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (6000 words)
Level: 6
Law
Health LawLawLAW6163Full year6No

Health Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ruth Fletcher

Description: This module teaches students how to research, work with and develop health law. Health law is concerned with the promotion of health and well-being through access to treatment and medicines, the governance of health as a public good, the regulation of relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, and the righting of wrongs that may occur in health systems. Health law presents an excellent opportunity for students to work across the sub-disciplines of crime, tort and public law, to draw on ethics, human rights and socio-legal perspectives in building legal arguments, and to assess the impact of professional standards, patients and carers' experiences, government policy and corporate provision on law in practic

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2
Level: 6
Law
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6085Full year6No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Jung-Chiao Lee
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6080 or take LAN6081 or take LAN6086 or take LAN6082 or take LAN6087 or take LAN6181 or take LAN6186

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1/B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (1000 words)
Level: 6
Languages
CriminologyLawLAW6045Full year6Yes

Criminology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison

Description: Sociological and psychological approaches to the aetiology of criminal behaviour; questions of criminal justice policy-making. Topics include: the aims and values of the criminal justice system; the definition of crime both in a theoretical and a practical sense; studies of particular types of crime (eg 'white collar' crime and crimes of the powerful, juvenile crime); penal policy with regard to particular types of crime; crime and public opinion; crime and the mass media; police organisation; prisons and the penal crisis; the role of victims of crime. The module focuses on the contemporary British context but adopts historical and comparative perspectives where relevant.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Forum posting
  • Item 2: 40% Essay
  • Item 3: 50% Online Timed Exam (3 hours)
Level: 6
Law
French Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6010Full year6Yes

French Language and Culture III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6015 or take LAN6011 or take LAN6016 or take LAN6012 or take LAN6017 or take LAN6111 or take LAN6116

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6116Full year6No

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6010 or take LAN6015 or take LAN6111 or take LAN6011 or take LAN6016

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Assignment (400-450 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6096Full year6No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson

Description: The non-credit bearing module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2/C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (1000 words)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6082Semester 26Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6080 or take LAN6085 or take LAN6087

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (1000 words)
Level: 6
Languages
Competition Law ALawLAW6048ASemester 16No

Competition Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: 1. Market definition
2. Article 81 EC
3. Vertical restraints
4. Article 82 EC
5. Competition Act 1998 and Enterprise Act 2002
6. Market investigation references
7. Cartels
8. EC mergers
9. UK mergers
10. Practice, enforcement and procedure
11. Collective dominance

Assessment:Level: 6

Law
Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6025Full year6No

Spanish Language and Culture III

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6020 or take LAN6021 or take LAN6026 or take LAN6022 or take LAN6027 or take LAN6121 or take LAN6126

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6021Semester 16Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN6020 or take LAN6025 or take LAN6026 or take LAN6121 or take LAN6126

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Written Assignment (400-450 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Medicines and Pharmaceutical MarketsFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6109Semester 26Yes

Medicines and Pharmaceutical Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module considers drug discovery and the forms and stages of clinical trials. Examples will be given of the influence of networks of public-private partnership on drug approvals. A further focus will be on the regulation of medicines and how patterns of national and regional pharmaceutical production and supply are affected by international regulation such as TRIPS, TTIP and international institutions such as the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The module will also give a comparative overview of national regulatory standards for the production, quality control, distribution, prescribing of medicines, and systems of pharmacovigilance. It will also cover issues related to access to medicine and identify areas in which the market has failed to meet global health needs. For example no new drugs have been developed since the 1950s for `neglected diseases¿ such as chagas in Latin America and leishmaniasis in Africa, and current drugs for these diseases are prohibitively expensive; at the same time infectious disease in poorer societies remains untreated, and the global market for anti-depressants has grown.

The module will be assessed by an essay that will be linked to a 15 minute formative presentation that will take place during the seminar time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
The History of the UK from 1956 to 2016Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP3025Semester 23No

The History of the UK from 1956 to 2016

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr William Hutton

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK from the Suez Crisis to the 'Brexit' referendum. It examines key political, economic, and diplomatic events and developments during the period. It also addresses cultural and social changes during the second half of the twentieth century and considers their impact upon the contemporary United Kingdom.
In addition, and continuing the process begun in Semester A, the module will help students develop further their skills in interpreting and assessing evidence and presenting their informed conclusions orally and in writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Seminar Skills
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Test (80 mins)
Level: 3
Anthropology and Global HealthFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6006Semester 26Yes

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall

Description: This module will introduce the students to the ways in which anthropological theory and methods have been used in global health contexts. It will involve the students in the anthropological analyses of health, illness experience and health care. It will demonstrate the ways in which anthropology can contribute to an understanding of global health issues and inform global health programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation
Level: 6
Public Health
Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political EconomyFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6010Semester 26Yes

Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we examine trends towards the reform of health systems in the context of globalisation. Particular attention is given to the impact of neoliberal policy and commercialisation; the move towards universal health coverage; policy on integration; and decentralisation. The role of actors in shaping policy will also be covered, as well as the impact of trade and investment related agreements on health systems. The impact of other aspects of globalisation on health systems - such as migration - will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Essay
Level: 6
Public Health
Computer Systems and NetworksElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT430USemester 24No

Computer Systems and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Adam Eppendahl

Description: This module provides you with a basic understanding of how a computer works and how programs are executed by the CPU at the machine level. As an introduction to computer architecture and systems software, this module presents the concepts needed to understand typical computers at the level of their ';machine-code'; instruction set. It covers Boolean algebra rules and terminology as well as logic gates. The module also examines the use of bits, bytes and data formats to represent integers, text and programs as well as looking at the conventional von Neumann computer architecture (CPU, registers, memory). Assembly language programming and system software are introduced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Lab assessments
  • Item 3: 20% In-class Test
  • Item 4: 15% Written Coursework
Level: 4
Professional and Research PracticeElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT427WSemester 14No

Professional and Research Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aisha Abou El-Maaty

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. It covers the following topics: discipline topic tasters; finding, retrieving and evaluating information; ethics, science & technology; scientific and technical writing; skills for workplace context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid-point assessment
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Assignment
Level: 4
Risk and Decision-Making for Data Science and AIElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT7005PSemester 27No

Risk and Decision-Making for Data Science and AI

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bruno Ordozgoiti Rubio

Description: This module provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges of risk assessment, prediction and decision-making covering public health and medicine, the law, government strategy, transport safety and consumer protection. Students will learn how to see through much of the confusion spoken about risk in public discourse, and will be provided with methods and tools for improved risk assessment that can be directly applied for personal, group, and strategic decision-making. The module also directly addresses the limitations of big data and machine learning for solving decision and risk problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Written assignment 1
  • Item 3: 25% Written assignment 2
Level: 7
Big Data ProcessingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT640USemester 16No

Big Data Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ahmed Mohamed Abdelmoniem Sayed

Description: Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming. The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures. Queen Mary has been actively involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, you will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain first hand experience in relevant techniques. Laboratory work will be based on the MPI (Message Passing Interfaces) standard, running on a network of PCs in the teaching laboratory. The module should be of interest to Computer Scientists and those following joint programmes (eg CS/Maths, CS/Stats). It is also suitable for Chemistry and Engineering students and all those who are concerned with the application of high performance parallel computing for their particular field of study (eg Simulation of chemical Behaviour). The 12-week module involves two hours of timetabled lectures per week. Laboratory sessions are timetabled at two hours per week, normally spanning half the semester only. The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance. In addition, it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise you with messagepassing systems (MPI) as adopted by the industry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Data Analysis Project
  • Item 3: 20% Quiz
Level: 6
Data MiningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT607USemester 16No

Data Mining

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitrios Kollias

Description: Data that has relevance for decision-making is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the Internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and electronic patient records. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist decision-makers to make intelligent use of these repositories. The field of data mining has evolved from the disciplines of statistics and artificial intelligence.

This course will combine practical exploration of data mining techniques with a exploration of algorithms, including their limitations. Students taking this module should have an elementary understanding of probability concepts and some experience of programming.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Assignment 1
  • Item 2: 20% Assignment 2
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Introduction to EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6005Semester 16No

Introduction to Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar

Description: Introduction to Econometrics will introduce the student to regression analysis used in studies that test hypotheses and empirically fit models in economics. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid Module Test
  • Item 2: 70% End of Module Test
Level: 6
Finance and Economics Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6014Semester 26No

Finance and Economics Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dylan Williams

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6013 by choosing their conceptual framework, building and testing their model and their writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Report (5000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Presentation (10 mins)
Level: 6
The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP3023Semester 13No

The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr William Hutton

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK from the beginning of the twentieth century to 1955. It examines key political, economic, ideological, diplomatic and military events and developments during the period.

In addition, the module will help students develop skills in interpreting and assessing evidence, and in effective writing and oral presentation. To this end, two weeks of the module address issues of research and methodology specific to the academic discipline of History. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the module assessments, while also preparing students for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3024 The History of the UK since 1956.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Seminar Skills
  • Item 2: 50% Portfolio (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 30% In class test
Level: 3
Controversies of Science and Technology in the Making of the Modern WorldHistoryHSZ4434Semester 24Yes

Controversies of Science and Technology in the Making of the Modern World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Mendelsohn

Description: We live in a world profoundly shaped by science and technology. Yet few are equipped to analyse these aspects of the modern world, understand how they arose historically, and construct and assess arguments concerning the problems they raise. This module gives you the intellectual tools to do so ¿ to live in and contribute to such a world as a historian and citizen. Accessible to students with no science background, each topic begins from a familiar controversy, newsworthy problem, or `challenge¿ in today¿s world. Topics are drawn from controversy over the environment, animal rights, science and religion, race in science, modern sexuality, climate change, `sustainability¿, IQ testing, technological disaster, eugenics, automation and robotics (in the workplace, medicine, and war), human experimentation, clinical trials in Africa and Asia, scientific experts in democratic societies, population and famine, intellectual property and biopiracy, what counts as a disease. The module introduces students to history of science, technology and medicine (STM) and their reciprocal relations with society, politics, government, economy, culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Blog Post
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Screening History: Representing the Past in the Contemporary Historical FilmHistoryHSZ4433Semester 24Yes

Screening History: Representing the Past in the Contemporary Historical Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Glancy

Description: Historical films are one of the principal means through which the public engages with history, yet they are also a continuous source of controversy. This module offers an introduction to the historical film genre by examining American, British, European and Japanese films made during the past 20 years. It considers the debates surrounding the representation of history on film, and the influence and impact that historical films have on the public imagination and understanding of history. Throughout, we will explore the aesthetic pleasures that historical films offer to audiences, as well as the wider public discussion and debate that historical films provoke among scholars, critics and journalists in print and online. Films studied may include 12 Years a Slave (2013), Dunkirk (2017), The Social Network (2010) and Suffragette (2015).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Source Analysis
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6009Semester 16No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alex Pietrus

Description: The module provides students an appreciation of the operations of organisations and functions of management. It introduces students to principles and models of and developments in management. The module explores the behaviour of organisations and their interactions with the industry, national and global environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Group Report (2500 words)
Level: 6
The Russian RevolutionHistoryHST6777Full year6No

The Russian Revolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andrew David Willimott
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The Russian Revolution altered the course of history. It led to the formation of the world's first avowedly communist regime, irrecoverably changed life across the Russian empire, and shaped geopolitics for the remainder of the twentieth century. This module will examine the origins, development, and outcomes of this tumultuous turning point. Along the way, we will assess the role of key figures such as Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin. But we will also look at how revolution was experienced on the ground, among ordinary people, young hopefuls, and the different peoples of the former Russian Empire. A range of primary materials will be utilized to shed light on topics such as the revolutionary influences on the Bolsheviks dating back to the 1860s, the popular experience of revolution in 1917, and the tentative attempts to forge a socialist society in the immediate wake of revolution. Knowledge of Russian is not required. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 2: 25% Source Analysis
  • Item 3: 15% Dissertation Progress Report
  • Item 4: 50% Essay
Level: 6
HistoryHST_6_A
From Pinny to Hot Pants? Women in Britain, 1945-1970HistoryHST6776Full year6No

From Pinny to Hot Pants? Women in Britain, 1945-1970

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Amanda Vickery
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Between 1945 and 1970, the life chances of British women were transformed, while what it meant to be a `British woman¿ was itself revolutionised, through decolonization and immigration. These decades saw rising living conditions, educational opportunities in the wake of the Butler Education Act (1944), the acceptance that married women might work (part-time), and key legislative victories from the legalisation of abortion (1967) to the Equal Pay Act (1970). Yet not all were winners post-war and stubborn inequalities remained. This era is also credited with a 'love revolution', the rise of 'companionate marriage' , the emergence of modern fatherhood, and sexual permissiveness. Together we will analyse these claims. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 2: 20% Dissertation Progress Report
  • Item 3: 20% Presentation
  • Item 4: 50% Essay
Level: 6
History
Anticolonial Political ThoughtHistoryHST6775Full year6No

Anticolonial Political Thought

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Waseem Yaqoob
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: How does colonialism operate? And how, more fittingly, might we imagine a future outside of colonial rule? In this module we will think with those who tried to answer these questions. From those like B.R. Ambedkar, Frantz Fanon and Kwame Nkrumah who imagined federal and nationalist projects for sovereignty, critiqued neo-colonialism, and analysed how the racialisation of colonised peoples underpins enduring global inequalities. To Walter Rodney and the Black Power movement in the Caribbean. To Alfred Taiaiake¿s thoughts on indigenous sovereignties and the environment. We will read people writing from the imperial core but primarily thinkers from the Caribbean, the African continent, South Asia, and the Middle East. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Seminar Leadership
  • Item 2: 15% Source Analysis
  • Item 3: 20% Literature Review
  • Item 4: 50% Essay
Level: 6
History
American Film History: Hollywood from Vietnam to ReaganHistoryHST6774Full year6No

American Film History: Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Mark Glancy
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: On this Special Subject, we will analyze the representation of ethnicity, gender, politics, race, and sexuality in American films made in the era of 'new Hollywood cinema'. In historical terms, this is a period that begins with the protests against the Vietnam War in the late 1960s and ends with the election of President Ronald Reagan in the early 1980s. In cinematic terms, this is a period characterized by a new generation of creative filmmakers, the decline of censorship, and the rise of politically charged films. We will explore the era and its landmark films, considering the scope of progressive perspectives in Hollywood films and, ultimately, the conservative backlash that brought the era to an end. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Source Analysis 1
  • Item 2: 20% Essay 1
  • Item 3: 15% Source Analysis 2
  • Item 4: 50% Essay 2
Level: 6
HistoryHST_6_A
French Language and Culture I (a) for IFPLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP4011Semester 13No

French Language and Culture I (a) for IFP

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French .

Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.

In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Written Assignment (125-175 words)
Level: 3
Epidemiology and StatisticsFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6000Semester 16Yes

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dominik Zenner

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In Class Test
  • Item 2: 70% Critical Appraisal (2000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
Global Health, Governance and LawFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6009Semester 26Yes

Global Health, Governance and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jonathan Kennedy

Description: The protection of public health at the national and subnational level often depends significantly on various decisions made at the international or global level by regimes, including those related to trade, finance, law, diplomacy and inter-governmental relations. Such regimes can have a profound impact on the determinants of health as experienced within countries, at the national and local levels, and have become increasingly important as a result of ever-deepening forms of 'globalisation' and the threat of global hazards to health such as large-scale global environmental change. This module provides an introduction to the disciplines of international relations, international politics, international jurisprudence, globalization and global governance as they relate to global health. It will examine the content and operation of various supra-national policy instruments, structures, institutions and processes, and place these within the context of the right to health and contemporary controversies and topical issues being confronted by the global health community.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Review Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
Information System AnalysisElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT419USemester 14No

Information System Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Claria Guo

Description: The course locates the design methods and the development of computer systems in the wider context of the use of information technology and its impact upon organisations. The topics covered are:
What are Information Systems and requirements. Why is analysis needed. Systems theory and types of information systems; their relationship with organisational processes and structures. Stakeholders.
Requirements analysis and project failures Elicitation of Requirements. Techniques for eliciting requirements; user participation. Impact on project success. Object-Oriented Analysis Techniques. UML notation, including use cases and class diagrams. Overview of the software development processes. Soft Systems Methodology. Introduction to SSM and the limitation of conventional systems analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2
Level: 4
Object-Oriented ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT414USemester 24No

Object-Oriented Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Huntbach

Description: Major topics include the concepts of class, object, method, subclass, inheritance and their use in programming. The relevance of the object oriented style with respect to concrete software problems will be stressed both in lectures and labs. There will be two hours of lectures per week, and each student will have a weekly timetabled lab session. In addition, you will be expected to spend further time outside scheduled lab periods in the lab (or at home machines if they are available), and to read textbooks and review notes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Mini-project
  • Item 2: 40% Coding assessment
Level: 4
Procedural ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT401USemester 14No

Procedural Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Raymond Hu

Description: This is an introductory module in computer programming using Java. You will learn the basic concepts of programming and learn to write and reason about simple programs. The main topics covered are: storing and manipulating data, control structures, methods and recursion, and algorithms for searching and sorting data. Classes include weekly lectures and lab sessions. You will be assessed by coursework throughout the term and by an end-of-term exam. Both will require you to demonstrate that you can write programs and understand theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% In-Class Tests
Level: 4
"Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal Systems"Faculty of Medicine and DentistryICM6011Semester 26No

"Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal Systems"

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adina Michael-Titus

Description: History of neurology, challenges in drug discovery for neurological & psychiatric conditions, neuropathology of basal ganglia disorders, epilepsy, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, stroke and head injury; Imaging and biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, genomics, proteomics and metabonomics; neurobiology of endocannabinoids; neurotransmitter release.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Poster Presenation
  • Item 2: 25% Critique of 2 Scientific Posters (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Algorithms and Data StructuresElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT529USemester 25No

Algorithms and Data Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikos Tzevelekos

Description: The module is an introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures. It covers topics such as running time of algorithms, asymptotic complexity, simple and advanced sorting algorithms, divide and conquer algorithms, recursion, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, basic data structures (strings, arrays, lists), linked lists, trees, hash tables.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 5% Mini Project part 1
  • Item 3: 20% In-class Test (2 hours)
  • Item 4: 20% Weekly Labs
  • Item 5: 5% Mini Project part 2
Level: 5
Internet Protocols and ApplicationsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT524USemester 15No

Internet Protocols and Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Uhlig

Description: This module builds upon the Programming Fundamentals and Telecoms and Internet Fundamentals modules, introducing you to the major Internet applications. It focuses on the TCP/IP protocol suite from OSI layers 5 through to 7, though some appreciation is given to transport layer protocols as part of the socket-programming topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 6% Coursework 1 - Wireshark
  • Item 3: 6% Coursework 2 - Sockets
  • Item 4: 6% Coursework 3 - TCP
  • Item 5: 6% Coursework 4 - Dijkstra
Level: 5
Graphical User InterfacesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT522WSemester 25No

Graphical User Interfaces

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. It covers the following topics: cognitive psychology principles relevant to the design of GUIs; building GUIs using Java, and use of basic vision and audio libraries for input/ output; framework of GUI design guidelines to inform and evaluate GUI design; techniques for analysing artefacts and situations to inform the design of suitable GUIs; iterative design processes; evaluation techniques with users, heuristics and models; interaction beyond the visual modality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid point Assessment
  • Item 2: 70% Individual assignment
Level: 5
Film Studies AlternativeLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6004Semester 26No

Film Studies Alternative

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Pate

Description: The module builds on IFP6003 / IFJ6003 Film Studies: an Introduction to Hollywood Cinema by examining a number of movements and styles from British, European and Asian cinema, as well as New Hollywood Cinema. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Seminar Skills
  • Item 2: 15% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 3: 65% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
The Foundations of Modern Thought: Introduction to Intellectual HistoryHistoryHSZ4432Semester 24Yes

The Foundations of Modern Thought: Introduction to Intellectual History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Waseem Yaqoob

Description: This is a module in the history of ideas that introduces students to important shifts in the ways in which history, society and politics have been thought about from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. The module will cover key figures in the history of political thought and philosophy, including Niccolo Machiavelli, Mary Wollstonecraft, Karl Marx, Mohandas Gandhi and Hannah Arendt, and will address influential debates about such issues as the relationship between politics and morality, the justification for violence, the nature and causes of inequality, the rise of capitalism, imperialism and the rights of women. Attention throughout will be focused on a careful scrutiny of primary sources. By the end of the module, students will have deepened their understanding of some of the critical issues that have dominated modern history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Source Analysis
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Global Encounters: Conquest and Culture in World HistoryHistoryHSZ4431Semester 14Yes

Global Encounters: Conquest and Culture in World History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Layton

Description: This module offers an introduction to encounters between civilizations, cultures and societies in world history, based on examples drawn from the medieval, early modern and modern periods. It seeks to develop understanding of patterns in world history and an introduction to approaches within the field of global history. It will introduce specific case-studies, from the Arab conquest of the Muslim Spain and Chinese exploration of the Indian Ocean, through colonial encounters in Africa, America and India, to the Balfour Declaration in 1917. Students discuss the meeting of civilizations, cultures, and societies in world history, covering examples from the medieval period up to the modern day. They develop a global perspective, form professional and informed attitudes, and consider the methodology of global history. Students complete a learning log, in which they discuss the process of absorbing new ideas, approaches, and perspectives, and articulate the ways in which the lectures, seminars, and readings have changed their view of world history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Learning Log
  • Item 2: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Database SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT519USemester 15No

Database Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Roelleke

Description: This module is an introduction to databases and their language systems in theory and practice. The main topics covered by the module are: the principles and components of database management systems; the main modelling techniques used in the construction of database systems; implementation of databases using an object-relational database management system; the main relational database language; Object-Oriented database systems; future trends, in particular information retrieval, data warehouses and data mining.There are two timetabled lectures a week, and one-hour tutorial per week (though not every week). There will be timetabled laboratory sessions (two hours a week) for approximately five weeks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% SQL Quiz
  • Item 3: 15% ER Design
  • Item 4: 15% SQL Queries
Level: 5
History in PracticeHistoryHSZ4430Semester 14Yes

History in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Peart

Description: History in Practice (HiP) explores the history of the East End, the fascinating and ever-changing location of Queen Mary University of London. The module progresses chronologically, beginning with the medieval origins of the East End, through its waves of immigration, financial growth and political resistance, and ending with its representations in film. In this module, you will develop your analytical skills by examining written documents, objects, photographs and oral testimonies, and your practical skills in how to research essays and articulate ideas in presentations at university level. HiP is your introduction to studying history and the skills you need as a historian: you will reflect on what historians do, and how you can shape your own journey at QMUL.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Personal Development Plan
  • Item 2: 15% Annotated Bibliography
  • Item 3: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 4: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 5: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Building the American Nation: 1776-1896HistoryHSZ4332Semester 24Yes

Building the American Nation: 1776-1896

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Cohen

Description: This module explores the turbulent development of the United States from its inception in 1776 with the Declaration of Independence through to its ascendance as an industrial and imperial world power in 1896. We will explore the history of this young nation from the writing of the Constitution, through contests over democracy, slavery and the Civil War, to an era of mass immigration and industrial capitalism. Throughout the module our studies will be guided by four themes which were central to the building of an American nation and which continue to divide opinion today: expansion, race, capitalism, and democracy. Students will gain an understanding of different approaches to studying American history and will demonstrate an ability to marshal historical knowledge to make a convincing case in favour of their own critical interpretation of the past.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Learning Log (re-assessed by reflective log)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Europe in a Global Context since 1800HistoryHSZ4331Semester 24Yes

Europe in a Global Context since 1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Cronin

Description: In the period covered by this module, Europe rose to global dominance and then entered a gradual process of relative decline, which is still underway. Any history of Europe in the period must also therefore take account of Europe's interactions ¿ military, economic and intellectual ¿ with the wider world. During the period of expansion, Europeans envisaged themselves as embodying a superior civilisation, which exemplified ideals of modernity and progress. But these ideals also had darker side which resulted in Europeans perpetrating acts of the most extraordinary violence, upon each other and on others. In the nineteenth century, nationalist ideas were associated with progress, emancipation and liberalism but in the twentieth century they became vectors of exclusion, authoritarianism and even genocide. If there has been no general war in Europe since 1945, as ideas of a united Europe have taken root, Cold War, local wars and inter-ethnic conflicts have mutated and endured. These are some of the themes and contradictions that this module will seek to explore. Students consider key trends and discontinuities in the international and global history of Europe since 1800. They discuss and evaluate the interpretations which have been put forward to explain this historical period, and construct their own interpretations which draw upon them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
FinanceLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6008Semester 26No

Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar

Description: This module will introduce students to the basic principles of finance and investment. Finance is essentially about pricing, but the essentials of corporate and international finance will also be covered. There will be an introduction to the theory of financial markets and their regulation, and a brief look at the concept of market efficiency. However, most of the focus will be concentrated on the relationship between risk and return, the principles behind portfolio evaluation, the behaviour of asset prices and the role of institutions and trading systems in modern financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Online Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid Term Test
  • Item 3: 20% End of Term Test
Level: 6
Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary CareFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6003Full year6No

Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary Care

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This core module on the BSc Global Public Health and Primary Care offers students the opportunity to pursue a topic of interest in depth and produce a critical and scholarly review of the literature. Students will select a project from a range on offer, mostly from supervisors in the Centre for Public Health and Primary Care, though some from other Institutes with QMUL may be available. Students may be allowed to devise their own project, and/or include analysis of raw data, through discussion with a supervisor. Projects will be supported by a series of seminars covering critical evaluation, literature searching, presentation and writing skills. Students will acquire skills in developing, planning, organising and focusing a project as they work on a one to one basis with their supervisor. They will also acquire skills in searching, critically appraising, summarising and synthesising the literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (8000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
Our Bodies, Our Selves: Sex, Reproduction and Identity in Modern BritainHistoryHST6773Full year6No

Our Bodies, Our Selves: Sex, Reproduction and Identity in Modern Britain

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Geiringer
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Sex, selfhood and reproduction are intensely intimate and deeply personal; they have also been profoundly transformed during the long twentieth century. Fierce debates over birth control, LBGTQI rights, abortion, adoption, religious morality, racialised eugenic policies, reproductive technologies, and Queer identities have reconfigured the relationship between sexuality and selfhood. This module explores the history of these politically, emotionally and medically charged contests. How have attitudes, beliefs and desires changed? What power relations have underpinned experiences and understanding of family, procreation, intimacy, and the body? How have we got to where we are today, and how can historical analysis intervene in these highly charged issues? Together, we will draw on public history skills and techniques to offer a vital historical perspective on contemporary controversies surrounding sex, reproduction and identity. This module must be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 2: 25% Blog Post
  • Item 3: 50% Essay
  • Item 4: 15% Reflective Report
Level: 6
HistoryHST_6_A
Parting the Iron Curtain: Everyday Life in Cold War Europe, 1945-1991HistoryHST6772Full year6No

Parting the Iron Curtain: Everyday Life in Cold War Europe, 1945-1991

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Natalya Chernyshova
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This module approaches European and Cold War history from below. What did it mean to live in divided Europe? Despite many differences, post-war socialist and capitalist societies shared surprising commonalities. Students are invited to take a fresh and intimate look at Europe in the second half of the twentieth century. With the help of a broad range of primary sources, from memoirs and oral history to advertisements and cinema, we will explore consumerism and the home, fashions and leisure, family and relationships, gender and sex, popular culture and generational conflicts on both sides of the Iron Curtain. We will pay attention to the margins of communist and capitalist societies, from ethnic minorities and refugees to youth subcultures. The stories of daily life will lead us to ask bigger questions about Cold War politics and ideology, the meaning of race, class and modernity, and economic and social change in post-war Europe. Knowledge of another European language is not required. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 2: 20% Source Analysis
  • Item 3: 20% Dissertation Progress Report
  • Item 4: 50% Essay
Level: 6
HistoryHST_6_A
Surviving an Apocalypse: Societal Resilience in the Age of the Black DeathHistoryHST6771Full year6No

Surviving an Apocalypse: Societal Resilience in the Age of the Black Death

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Asbridge
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The Black Death was an unparalleled catastrophe ¿ a plague pandemic that caused untold human suffering between 1347 and 1353, killing 50% of the population in the many regions it affected, with most communities abruptly devastated in the space of just six to nine months. What happens to societies when they suffer such unimaginable trauma? Do they shatter, abandoning the established norms of law, custom and religious devotion, or do they cling ever tighter to convention, hoping thereby to endure the raging tempest? With these questions in mind, this module assesses the Black Death¿s immediate effects across a diverse range of settings and cultures, gauging the extent of societal resilience by interrogating an array of written source material ¿ including personal letters and intimate chronicles, wills, judicial accounts and governmental records ¿ as well as material culture and archaeological remains, all while seeking to understand how and why the medieval world survived this epochal cataclysm. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 2: 15% Source Analysis
  • Item 3: 50% Essay
  • Item 4: 25% Learning Log
Level: 6
HistoryHST_6_A
Globalisation and Contemporary Medical EthicsFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6002Semester 26Yes

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amos Miran Epstein

Description: The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics: (i)consent and consensus, (ii) medical confidentiality, (iii) the discourse on distributive justice, (iv) human and animal research ethics, (v) end-of-life ethics, (vi)transplant ethics, (vii)reproductive ethics. The introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Written Assessment (3000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 2: Application and AnalysisLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6018Semester 26No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 2: Application and Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Dixon

Description: This module introduces students to the study of international politics. The main objective of this course is to offer a comprehensive and critical overview of politics on a global scale. Having taken International Politics 1: ideas and concepts, students will build upon and apply their knowledge to case studies. The course will survey a range of topics including war, conflict, peace and intervention; the global economy; security studies and the environment. This module will also pay close attention to understanding how historical legacies continue to shape current global issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Presentation (20 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class Test (2 hours)
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical PracticeFaculty of Medicine and DentistryICM7042Semester 17No

Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module will provide the trainee with detailed knowledge and understanding of the structure, function, mode of action and resistance mechanisms of antimicrobial agents. They will gain knowledge and experience of the use and monitoring of antimicrobial therapy and the impact on patient management in a variety of clinical settings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Scientific Poster on an Antimicrobial Topic (Poster size A0)
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Presentation on an Antimicrobial Topic (10 mins)
  • Item 3: 60% End of Module Assessment (3 hours)
Level: 7
Gender, Sexuality and HealthFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6008Semester 26Yes

Gender, Sexuality and Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: Recent media coverage and debate over female genital mutilation, trafficking, circumcision, gender reassignment, trans issues, and LGBTQI healthcare provision, have moved gender and sexuality to be central issues in health and human rights. Often in public health and medicine, through the adopting of a biomedical model, 'gender' is coupled with 'woman' and heterosexuality assumed. Public and academic debate, though, regularly unpacks, even attacks, these assumptions. This module responds to such shifts and debates, encouraging students to explore contemporary issues around gender, sexuality and health in society through seminars and self-directed research. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate the broad array of potential developments around gender and sexuality in public and global health policy and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation (20 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
Operating SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT518USemester 25No

Operating Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tassos Tombros

Description: What is an Operating System for and how does it work? How can a computer run, or appear to run, many programs at once? This module introduces Operating Systems, with a combination of study of the principles and practical skills in scripting and monitoring an Operating System kernel. Concepts of processes and concurrency are introduced in the context of Operating Systems and then pursued further as a tool for an application programmer wishing to exploit the full potential of a multicore processor. The module prepares students for further studies in distributed systems and high performance computing at the next level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 8% Lab1
  • Item 3: 8% Lab 2
  • Item 4: 8% Lab 3
  • Item 5: 8% MCQ 1
  • Item 6: 8% MCQ 2
Level: 5
Software Engineering ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT506WSemester 25No

Software Engineering Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lev Mukhanov

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. Students will identify a significant software problem to solve from their workplace context, in conjunction with the module lecturer and their employer. To meet the problem requirements and build a satisfactory system within the time constraints, the students will have to apply the principles learnt in ECS505W Software Engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Group Project Report
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation
  • Item 3: 10% Interim presentation
Level: 5
Film Studies HollywoodLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6003Semester 16No

Film Studies Hollywood

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Pate

Description: The module examines several theoretical aspects of studying film that students will encounter in a core module of an MA Film Studies, including such concepts as how to 'read' a film, cinematic codes, narrative and genre analysis, and various theoretical approaches (narrative, genre, etc). The module will also explore the history of Hollywood cinema from the 1930s to the present day. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 55% Portfolio (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Seminar Skills
  • Item 3: 30% Sequence Analysis (90 mins)
Level: 6
Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801HistoryHSZ4330Semester 14Yes

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Robert Waters

Description: Over the last two centuries, Britain has changed beyond recognition. From the industrial revolution to the sexual revolution, new forces have transformed the lives of ordinary men and women. The rise and fall of the British Empire, a series of global wars and migration to and from Britain challenged what it meant to be British, while political institutions became increasingly democratic. In the sciences, the theory of evolution, the invention of television and the coming of the atom bomb offered exciting and sometimes terrifying possibilities, with far-reaching effects on British society. New forms of leisure emerged, while attitudes towards homosexuality, race, religion and the rights of women have been redrawn. This module provides a rich introduction to modern British history, from 1801 to the present day. If you have not previously studied the period, it will give you the foundation for specialist modules in subsequent years. If you have some prior knowledge, it will challenge you with new interpretations from the cutting edge of historical research. The module introduces you to new critical approaches to the subject and draws extensively on primary sources such as film, pop music and visual imagery. It has a strong global dimension, showing how crises in India, Asia and Africa shaped the 'British World'. By the end of the module, you will have developed new skills in source analysis while challenging your preconceptions about modern Britain. Above all, we hope to enthuse you with the richness and diversity of British history, and the possibilities it offers for further study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Source Analysis
  • Item 2: 10% Seminar Participation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Reformation to Revolution: Europe and the World 1500-1800HistoryHSZ4230Semester 24Yes

Reformation to Revolution: Europe and the World 1500-1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Liesbeth Corens

Description: Understanding the early modern period (c.1500-1800) is crucial to understanding the formation of the modern world. In the course of three centuries, Protestant and Catholic Reformations reshaped the religious landscape in Europe, Asia and the Americas; new scientific theories led to the foundation of modern disciplines; rulers centralised their power through bureaucracy and warfare; overseas exploration forged global trade empires; and revolutions rocked the world order. This module examines changes and continuities in European cultural, social, religious, political and economic life. It accesses the histories of famous and ordinary people, and introduces students to the approaches and conceptual frameworks needed to understand early modern history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Source Analysis
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
Europe 1000-1500: The Middle Ages and their LegacyHistoryHSZ4130Semester 24Yes

Europe 1000-1500: The Middle Ages and their Legacy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eyal Poleg

Description: Medieval institutions, ideas and practices still greatly influence the shape of modern Europe. Europe's languages, rituals, religious beliefs, political institutions, urban infrastructure and universities are deeply marked by their medieval origins. This module offers an introduction to Europe's medieval past in its full diversity and complexity. It will introduce men and women, laypeople and priests, warriors, traders and farmers, offering learners information and insights into the continent¿s formative past. Students will gain an insight into poorly-documented historical pasts, and will explore the techniques and approaches employed by medieval historians.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Source Analysis
  • Item 2: 50% Essay
Level: 4
History InternshipHistoryHST7903Semester 27No

History Internship

Credits: 20.0
Contact: Dr David Geiringer

Description: This module gives you the opportunity to complete an internship placement with one of our local partners in the museum, public history, archival, or education sectors. Working alongside practitioners in the field, you will be introduced to the skills employed by public historians, such as curating exhibitions, creating digital resources, cataloguing archival materials, or participating in outreach. The placement allows you to put into practice in a professional environment the knowledge and skills gained through the MA degree. Prior to embarking upon your placement, you will receive training in the practices and responsibilities of professionals working in history-related fields, and assistance in preparing an application for your placement from the options available. The placement will be sixteen hours per week over a period of six weeks, and you will be supported throughout by the School of History. A range of placements with partner-organisations will be available, though students are not guaranteed their first choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Placement Application (750 words plus CV)
  • Item 2: 50% Placement portfolio (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 35% Blog post (1500 words)
Level: 7
History
Software EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT505WSemester 15No

Software Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nida Aziz

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. It covers the following topics: engineering principles, management principles, theoretical foundations, tools and notation for development and testing of large-scale software systems; practical skills in using a range of relevant tools including a Java programming IDE, unit testing tool, configuration management tool, UML design tool, and project planning tool; exposure to industry-standard techniques and tools.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Group Project Report
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation and Viva
  • Item 3: 10% Presentation Slides
Level: 5
EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6007Semester 16No

Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar

Description: This module will equip students with the standard methods and analytical tools of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, with emphasis on the relationship between the decisions of individual agents, the operation of markets and the general state of the economy. The microeconomics component will analyse the nature of competition a firm faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, while the macroeconomics one will focus on growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Test 1 (45 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Test 2 (45 mins)
  • Item 3: 25% Test 3 (45 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Test 4 (45 mins)
Level: 6
Epidemiology and StatisticsFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH7000Semester 17No

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dominik Zenner

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In Class Test
  • Item 2: 70% Critical Appraisal (2000 words)
Level: 7
Public Health
A History in ObjectsHistoryHST6770Full year6No

A History in Objects

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eyal Poleg

Description: Did the introduction of beer usher-in the modern era? What does Charlemagne's moustache tell us about royal power? And what can X-raying a book tell us about Henry VIII's court? Objects are becoming common in historical analysis. This module will explore the material culture of the Middle Ages and early modernity to shed new light on life, belief and power. Introducing students to material culture and its historical analysis, students will handle medieval shoes and arrowheads, consult medieval manuscripts and some of the world's rarest books, to question the cult of power in the Middle Ages, transformations of technology and society, and the transition between the Middle Ages and modernity. The module would be taught in collaboration with leading museums and laboratories, where you will learn about the work of curators, heritage science and public engagement. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 13% Presentation (10 mins)
  • Item 3: 13% Blog Post (1000 words)
  • Item 4: 13% Draft Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 5: 50% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 6
History
Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthFaculty of Medicine and DentistryIPH6001Semester 16Yes

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypotheses about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider the distribution of wealth, income , resources, and power at global, national, and local levels. Redistributive mechanisms work through either government or market control, and the economic implications for inequalities will be compared and analysed. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Written Assessment (2000 words)
Level: 6
Public Health
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4001Semester 14No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy. The overall desired outcome is for learners to acquire a basic level of the language to cope effectively with a range of commonly occurring circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is built around written and audio texts and tasks, designed to develop and enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German and they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Reading and Listening Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Written Assignment (125-175 words)
Level: 4
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and ConceptsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6017Semester 16No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Dixon

Description: This module introduces students, who may not have English as their first language, to modern political ideas and to international relations. It examines general issues such as: What is politics about? Why and how do we study Politics? What kinds of ideas and institutions is politics concerned with? It examines key concepts which inform political debate and the historical development of such key concepts. Political ideas and concepts to be studied include the state, the nation, race, ideologies, citizenship and democracy. Students will also examine key political ideologies in detail. Ideologies to be studied will include Marxism, feminism, liberalism, conservatism and socialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Presentation (20 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class Test (2 hours)
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Formative StudiesFaculty of Medicine and DentistryICM7040Full year7No

Formative Studies

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module aims to support the full time student to enable them to participate fully during the in class discussions with the part time students who can reflect on their work place experiences. Whilst not being a work-placement the full time students are supported in developing an understanding of principles and practices of microbiology and infection control within the NHS, UK and the global perspective by the use of tutorials, practical classes and additional assignments. All full time students must attend the teaching on this module. The majority of the module teaching is provided during semester 1 (October-December). The usual pattern of study for this module is 2 x 90 minute practical tutorials and 1 x 90 minute theory tutorial per week.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Attendance
Level: 7
Project Management for Big Data AnalysisElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceIOT7015WSemester 27No

Project Management for Big Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman

Description: This module will provide degree apprentices with the methodological skills to manage a big data project, both