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Module directory 2021-22

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2021-22. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescriptionThemeAvailable to
Counselling PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY329Semester 26No

Counselling Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY253 and take PSY211 and ( take PSY209 or take PSY109 )

Description: This module builds on themes developed in level 4 and 5 psychology modules. It will consider areas of psychology which are the subject of active research in the SBCS Department of Psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201Full year4Closed

Russian I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4202, RUS4203, RUS4204"
Prerequisite: A level or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1
Corequisite: None

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Cognitive and Affective NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY323Semester 26No

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Frederike Beyer

Description: The aim of this module is to give students a thorough understanding of the theoretical approaches in cognitive and affective neuroscience, where we will evaluate evidence from both behavioural and neuropsychological studies. We will explore how normal cognitive functioning takes place and how this can be elucidated by looking at brain damaged patients and neuroimaging studies. The lecture series will include an introductory lecture on the overall aims and objectives of cognitive neuroscience followed by a series of lectures looking at attention, perception, memory and movement. Subsequent lectures will focus on affective neuroscience, looking at neuroscience of empathy; neural basis of emotional reactivity, including attentional processes, biases and emotion regulation; and neuroscience of different emotions such as fear, anger, or disgust.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: .50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Comparative PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY235Semester 15Yes

Comparative Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elisabetta Versace
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY117 and take PSY121 and ( take PSY124 or take PSY125 )

Description: As for other species, many abilities and behaviours that we take for granted - from perception to learning, communication, handedness and sexual preferences - are the result of our evolutionary history. Our history has shaped our psychology and influences our daily behaviour. Are we the only species that is deceived by visual illusions? Who is the most intelligent species? Are we the only ones that exhibit handedness? Which are the mechanisms of learning? To understand what makes as human, we have to look at ourselves from a broader perspective. In this module we will explore differences and similarities between humans beings and other species. We will learn how to access and compare the mind and behaviour of individuals that do not possess language such as human neonates, newly-hatched chicks and other models currently used in understanding of healthy and pathological behaviour.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
EmotionBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY127Semester 24Yes

Emotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Di Bernardi Luft

Description: The module will allow students to learn about the different conceptualisations of emotion both in terms of historical developments as well as contemporary theoretical models of emotions. The module will also consider the biological basis of emotions in the brain and the body, how emotions are expressed and perceived in faces, bodies, voice and music. The relationship between emotions and cognitions will be considered, including emotion regulation and individual differences in emotions. Finally, cultural differences and disorders of emotion will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Exploring Psychology IIBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY125Semester 24Yes

Exploring Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY124

Description: This module builds upon PSY124 Exploring Psychology I by extending the introduction of basic concepts, theories, methods and research findings in psychology. The areas introduced include the core and interdisciplinary fields in psychology. Lectures for exploring psychology II will include an introductory lecture followed by lectures on specific topics in psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Exploring Psychology IBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY124Semester 14Yes

Exploring Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka

Description: This module introduces and develops basic concepts in the philosophy of science and its relevance to psychology as a discipline. A biological framework for psychological science is also provided. It then introduces basic cognitive science/psychology, social psychology, differential psychology and an introduction to brain and behaviour relationships.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Unfamiliar LanguagesLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6016Semester 26No

Unfamiliar Languages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Coppe Van Urk
Overlap: LIN7016
Prerequisite: LIN4203/LIN4210 or LIN037/LIN5213
Corequisite: None

Description: Students will work in elicitation sessions with a native speaker of an unfamiliar language, i.e., one not commonly studied in linguistic theory. The language is decided on a year-by-year basis and can come from any part of the world. Previous years have studied Biak, Georgian and Hawaiian. The purpose of the module is to apply knowledge of the parameters of linguistic variation acquired in previous linguistics modules to form and test hypotheses about the grammatical structure of an unknown language. Assessment will emphasize the method of discovery (including elicitation, data organization, and hypothesis formation and testing) as well as the discoveries themselves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Research Methods in SociolinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7023Semester 27Yes

Research Methods in Sociolinguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides students with an advanced overview of both qualitative and quantitative research methods in sociolinguistics. Covering all aspects of data collection and analysis, students will learn how to devise appropriate research hypotheses; collect data for subsequent quantitative and qualitative scrutiny; and perform a variety of analytical techniques most commonly used in the humanities and social sciences (including narrative analysis, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, analyses of variance, multiple regression and various non-parametric tests). Methods covered include observation, interview, surveys, questionnaires and corpus-based techniques. Students will also learn how to effectively summarize and present findings to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5217Semester 15Closed

Introduction to Semantics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: LIN5209
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: When you say a sentence, that sentence evokes a new thought in the mind of the person you are talking to. This is because words of human languages have meanings, and the ways that those words combine also has an effect on meaning. This module looks at the different aspects of meaning that contribute to the process of understanding sentences that underlies all communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Typology II: Language Universals and Grammatical TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5216Semester 25Yes

Typology II: Language Universals and Grammatical Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: LIN5207
Prerequisite: LIN4206/LIN4213 or LIN402/LIN4209
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a module about language universals and linguistic typology. In it you will extend the descriptive knowledge you gained in LIN403 (Languages of the World) and learn how the descriptive categories connect to theoretical models of language variation. We will cover a subset of word order, grammatical functions, case marking, relative clauses, causative constructions, lexicalization parameters, the organization of the noun phrase, prepositional syntax, morphophonological variation. The assessment is mainly by a research project where you will work with native speakers of languages to investigate some typological property of interest.

As a module it will be available to students registered on undergraduate degree programmes involving English Language or Linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Colonial Power and Desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and BrazilLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR4036Semester 24Yes

Colonial Power and Desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and Brazil

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: COM5036
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will study a range of texts problematising sexual, religious and racial domination within the context of the Portuguese Empire, starting with the epic The Lusiads (Camões, 1570). Desire in the epic will find a vocal expression in the report to the King of Portugal by the scribe of the first Portuguese expedition to Brazil (1500). Brazil¿s natives¿ oral narratives cast into film will later be seen to confront rape and religious imposition whilst the African slaves¿ agency against racial domination will surface in their testimonials embedded in biographies. A critique of the land concentration model, prominent in Raised from the Ground, a novel by the Portuguese Nobel Prize José Saramago, in turn, will find a vivid visual deployment in Brazilian Sebastião Salgado's photography. The agency of both slaves and the dispossessed will be seen to play out in the narratives of two major social movements in Brazil today: the quilombola¿s and the landless rural workers¿. All texts are available in English and Portuguese.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Afropean IdentitiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6052Semester 26Closed

Afropean Identities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: COM6052
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: 'Afropean' is a term coined by Belgian music artist Zap Mama to encompass being both African and European, not as a contradiction but as an expression of plurality and site for creativity. Beyond identity politics, though acutely aware of racism as manifested across European contexts, Afropean writers acknowledge the dark histories of slavery and colonialism while uniting around cultural memories and contemporary activist movements. Students will analyse literary texts including essays, poems, novels, and short stories. They will engage with race critical theory and Afropea as a utopian concept, as well as positioning themselves in relation to local Afropean history and culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Features of English: Linguistics for English Language TeachersLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5204Semester 25Yes

Features of English: Linguistics for English Language Teachers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: LIN4208
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Students considering a Foreign Language Assistantship, or any other English language teaching activity such as private English lessons or tuition, during their Year Abroad or after graduation, are recommended to choose this module. We would advise you to do this level 5 module in your second year, just before your year abroad. The module is especially recommended if you have little or no knowledge of English Linguistics. The module covers all main areas of English Linguistics which are relevant for the teaching of English: English phonetics; word classes and phrases (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, particles); the role of English in the world; development of English; English usage / prescription and description. Please note that this module is not available for students with prior knowledge of English Linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Mathematics BScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF041Full year3No

Mathematics B

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anum Khalid

Description: This module covers mathematical topics such as algebra, functions, geometry and trigonometry, and aims to provide students with a more extensive knowledge of calculus (especially in techniques of integration) and an introduction to complex numbers, numerical methods, differential equations, vector analysis and power series. It is appropriate for those students progressing onto degree programmes in mathematical sciences, and those degree programmes in physical science and engineering which require a more thorough and comprehensive grounding in mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Computers and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5202Semester 15Closed

Computers and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge
Overlap: SML209
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed as an introduction to the application of technology, specifically web technology, in language education. Providing a balance of theory and practice, it equips students with the knowledge and skills to make enhanced use of computers in their studies and research activities. The module covers key concepts in the use of digital technologies for language learning, as well as providing practical experience in the creation of web-based materials using a variety of computer applications, including elementary coding in HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Phonetics II: Acoustic Analysis of SpeechLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5215Semester 15Yes

Phonetics II: Acoustic Analysis of Speech

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
Overlap: LIN5200
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4204/LIN4212
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, students will be introduced to some of the key acoustic techniques used to examine segmental elements of speech. As such, this module focuses on the smallest physical properties of speech which ultimately give rise to meaning. Much of the module will involve lab work and students will be given the opportunity to work both with guidance and independently on assignments. For example, students will undertake a durational analysis of voice onset time in the waveform and a frequency analysis of formants in the spectrogram. Such analyses will build on knowledge of the Source-Filter Theory and on articulatory correlates of the acoustic signal. Students will become confident in identifying how biological, linguistic, social, and psychological factors underlie variation in the acoustic signal. By the end of the module students will be equipped to perform independent acoustic analyses into segmental elements of speech. This module is a prerequisite for Describing and Measuring Prosody.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Cultural Diversity and LawLawLAW6458Semester 26Yes

Cultural Diversity and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module explores how different legal systems manage cultural diversity, which includes religious, ethnic and linguistic diversity. The module is based on the English legal system as the core case study and compares it to the experience of other legal systems in the management of cultural diversity. The comparative study of legal approaches to cultural diversity includes an exploration of legal pluralism, the significance of long-standing and newer diversities introduced through immigration, the problems of assimilation and integration, and paradigms of citizenship, multiculturalism and secularism, and also a study of individual topics ranging from family law to anti-discrimination law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Securing Human Rights Compliance: A Case Study on the United KingdomLawLAW6457Full year6No

Securing Human Rights Compliance: A Case Study on the United Kingdom

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Sanchita Hosali

Description: This clinical practice module will provide a unique opportunity to gain detailed insight into human rights law and legal procedures in the United Kingdom; examining parliamentary committees and processes; national human rights institutions; ombudsmen and regulators; and an introduction into non-ligation advocacy. The module will also provide the opportunity to experience the practice based environment of a leading human rights NGO through a unique work experience placement with the British Institute of Human Rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_456_S
Russian Film: Gender and SocietyLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6032Semester 16Yes

Russian Film: Gender and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: "FLM5032, FLM6032, RUS5032"
Prerequisite: A-Level or equivalent knowledge of Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: "Starting from the Russian revolution's proclaimed liberation of women, this course analyses Russian cinema as both a reflection of and means of challenging the dominant constructions of masculine and feminine in Russian society. Informed by Feminist and other perspectives, students examine the shifting representations of gender, the changing role of women in the cinema industry, the specific nature of Russian women's cinema, and the ways in which masculinity has been problematized and questioned in recent film. The films are all available with English subtitles and readings are in English."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian Novel: Crimes and PunishmentLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6018Semester 26Yes

Russian Novel: Crimes and Punishment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: "COM5018, COM6018, RUS5018"
Prerequisite: A-Level or equivalent knowledge of Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1880. We will focus on Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, two novels about individuals, a man and a woman, who attempted to place themselves outside society and who are "punished" accordingly. In both cases, this emancipation from social and moral constraints becomes the occasion for a unique, profoundly influential piece of narrative art and for a sustained exploration of the spiritual, moral, and social ingredients of the modern condition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Materials Selection in DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT602Semester 16No

Materials Selection in Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Busfield

Description: Introducing material selection concepts including processing constraints in design. An appreciation of the interaction of processing and material related cost considerations and the need to adopt a simultaneous engineering approach. The use of design guides such as Ashby diagrams is a key skill developed in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201Full year5Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS5200, RUS5202"
Prerequisite: RUS4202 or near-native competence in Russian equivalent to CEFRL level C2
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian. Compulsory for second year students of Russian who are native speakers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Manufacturing ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT601Semester 26Yes

Manufacturing Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Haixue Yan
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT7713
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100 and take MAT206

Description: Review of the processes of casting and shaping metal components, introducing and relating the necessary casting and plasticity theory. Fundamentals of welding processes and defects in welds. Discussion of the defects introduced into the materials by the various processes and the non-destructive tests used to evaluate and monitor such defects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204Full year4Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4201, RUS4202, RUS4203"
Prerequisite: GCSE or equivalent in Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at students who hold GCSE or equivalent in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Russian Language PlayLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4046Semester 24Yes

Russian Language Play

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS5046
Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: In the second semester of each academic year the Russian department prepares a play for performance in Russian. This is a unique opportunity for shared close analysis, examination, and realisation of a Russian text. The actors and directors are selected from among the students. Numbers will be limited by the size of the cast, but there is no obligation whatsoever for everyone participating to register for the module In addition to participating in the performance, students registering for the module write a supervised essay-project on a theme associated with the play performed and supported by three formal supervisions. The language of the presentation and essay is English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
History of RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4024Semester 24Yes

History of Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Makarova
Overlap: RUS5024
Prerequisite: A-level Russian or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers an overall historic, linguistic, and social view of the Russian language. Learning about the processes that shaped Russian will deepen and enrich your understanding of the modern language. Seemingly peculiar language features will no longer be random facts you have to memorise, but rather the outcome of regular and well-understood historical developments in grammar and vocabulary. The module will explain how Russian came to be the way it is now.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and FieldworkLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7020Semester 27No

Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and Fieldwork

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colleen Cotter
Overlap: LIN6020
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an overview of Ethnography of Communication, a theoretical and methodological approach to analyzing and understanding communicative patterns and language use in social and cultural contexts. The focus on primary literature includes the seminal figures who established the approach (e.g., Hymes, Gumperz), developed the framework (Baumann, Briggs, Ervin-Tripp, Philipps), and who continue to advance it today (Duranti, Goodwin, Hill, Rampton). Applying ethnographic insights and methodologies to fieldwork activities and projects in the local community will instill understanding of the broad range of practices that constitute doing ethnography as well as illustrate the points raised in the literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
The Psychology of Real World Decision-MakingBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY320Semester 16No

The Psychology of Real World Decision-Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Magda Osman

Description: Decision-making is embedded in every action we take, from the most basic (e.g. whether or not to his Snooze on our alarm) to some of the most important (e.g. what partner we end up being with, what house we buy, what career we pursue). This lecture and seminar based module is designed to expose students to core theoretical and empirical work on decision-making and how it has been applied to address current public policy issues (e.g., sustainable consumption, healthy eating, weight reduction, debt reduction). Each week the module will present theoretical and empirical work on decision-making to understand how we make personal, social and moral decisions and through a seminar based approach will facilitate debate on how this work has been applied, through case examples of actual public policy, to support behavioural change. This combination of basic and applied psychology is framed around understanding core psychological processes that underpin decision-making (e.g. agency, control, causal inference) in order to critically evaluate where psychology can best contribute to addressing real world policy issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Individual DifferencesBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY233Semester 25Yes

Individual Differences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY100 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a central area of psychology known variously as "individual differences" or "differential psychology". We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules that show substantial individual differences including personality, psychopathology, intelligence and cognition. We will then explore the proposed causes and effects of these individual differences drawing from research using approaches from psycho-dynamics to behavioral genetics. Finally, we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in individual differences including the continuum between personality and mental heath, the nature vs nurture debate, race differences in intelligence and genetic determinism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Developmental PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY223Semester 25Yes

Developmental Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Pluess
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY109 and take PSY121 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: This module surveys developmental psychology, covering human development across the whole life span but with a more detailed focus on development in the early years (infancy/childhood). The aim of the module is to introduce the key questions, theories, concepts, methodology, studies and research findings within developmental psychology, regarding different domains of psychological functioning including social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioural development. The module will also cover the prenatal period, physical, motor, and sensory development, learning theory, moral development, and development of the self (identity).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 2.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 2.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 2.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 6: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Brain and BehaviourBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY121Semester 24Yes

Brain and Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lars Chittka

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module builds on the theme of psychology as a biological science in parallel with the 'Exploring Psychology' module by specifying the proximate biological mechanisms involved in psychological phenomena. The module will focus on basic principles of biological psychology predominantly, and then introduce psychological processes to illustrate these.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Positive PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY119Semester 14Yes

Positive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Pluess
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take PSY100

Description: This module introduces themes at Level 4 in psychology and considers a unique area of psychological research: Positive Psychology which focuses on psychological well-being and optimal functioning as well as the individual and social determinants thereof. The aim is to introduce this field of psychology and explore its relationship to other areas of psychology. Key studies, and their ethical dimensions, from both classic and modern biological, experimental and intervention perspectives are provided throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Phonology II: Explaining Phonological StructuresLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5214Semester 15Yes

Phonology II: Explaining Phonological Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Chong
Overlap: LIN5208
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4203/LIN4210
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will build on the skills of phonological analysis, focusing on the learning of constraint-based models of phonology (i.e. Optimality Theory). Students will continue to "learn-by-doing", working on extracting patterns from linguistic data. This will be a further study in phonological theory and analysis, introducing students to autosegmental theory, syllable structure, metrical theory, the interface of phonology and other components of the grammar, as well as experimental approaches to theoretical phonology. A focus of this module will be on theory comparison, comparing rule-based vs. constraint approaches.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Sex, Gender and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7019Semester 17No

Sex, Gender and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Salina Cuddy
Overlap: LIN6019
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, we explore the development of feminist and queer theoretic conceptualizations of identity and how these conceptualizations relate to language. Drawing on foundational texts in philosophy, literary theory, sociology and cultural studies in addition to linguistics, we interrogate the position of women and men in society through the prism of linguistic practice, and work to develop a holistic account of the ways in which individual speakers negotiate social and ideological pressures in their construction and presentations of gendered and sexual selves. Students will gain hands-on experience in conducting original research on a sex- and/or gender-related topic, and special emphasis will be placed on linking academic research in this area to finding solutions for the real-world problems that women and men may face.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
In a WordLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5212Semester 25Yes

In a Word

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hagit Borer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4209
Corequisite: None

Description: Words are the most natural, accessible units of our language, but when we attempt to make more explicit our knowledge and use of words, we are faced with many important questions. For instance, the average adult knows approximately 50,000 words but how is it possible for to learn so many words in a relatively short period of time? How do we extract words, with their specific meaning, from the acoustic jumble of speech? How do we know when 'strike' is a noun and when it is a verb? How do we know that 'transformationalize' is probably a word in English, even if we don't know what it means, but that 'transformize' is not? And how do young children learn all this? Based primarily on English, we will learn to assign structure to words; we will look at how their meaning interacts with context; and finally, at how children acquire words.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Syntax II: Explaining Grammatical StructuresLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5213Semester 15Yes

Syntax II: Explaining Grammatical Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: LIN037
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN402/LIN4209
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a course on contemporary syntactic theory and its application to the analysis of English and other languages. We will build on the knowledge of syntax that you have gained in LIN402 Intro to English Syntax/LIN4209 Syntax I, and apply the same system to a more complex set of linguistic phenomena. You will also develop your ability to generate and test hypotheses using the theory of syntax developed in Carnie's Syntax: A Generative Introduction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 33.33% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 33.33% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 33.33% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Race and Racism in European CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5045Semester 25Closed

Race and Racism in European Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maha El Hissy
Overlap: COM5045
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module encourages students to analyse representations of race and racism within European culture from the Middle Ages to the present. It engages with a variety of sources (literary, historical, material, and visual) and draws on evidence from a range of European traditions (such as French, German or Spanish) to explore these representations. It mobilises key critical theories that relate to these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Language MythsLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5201Semester 15Closed

Language Myths

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Are some languages harder to learn than others? Are double negatives illogical? Do children lack grammar? Do dialects lack grammar? Did your parents teach you your mother tongue? In this module we explore commonly held views on human language from a contemporary, comparative perspective. The module is of interest to anyone studying for a language degree.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Chinese Short FictionLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML4047Semester 24No

Chinese Short Fiction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module analyses Chinese practices of and experiments with short fiction forms, considering how the specific features of short fiction have been used to express the concerns and currents of society, history and culture in the greater China region. The module explores a range of literatures including canonical fiction as well as those texts often considered marginal, such as queer literature, ethnic literature, women¿s writing, Sinophone texts, internet literature and others.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Mathematics AScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF040Full year3No

Mathematics A

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anum Khalid

Description: This module reviews mathematical notation, basic principles of arithmetic and algebra, logarithms and powers, functions and graphs, coordinate geometry and trigonometry, an introduction to the techniques of calculus; and demonstrates how these principles may be applied to solve problems in science and mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Intellectual Property - Industrial PropertyLawLAW6456Semester 26Yes

Intellectual Property - Industrial Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: The module focuses on the law of the United Kingdom (and the European Union) relating to those forms of intellectual property that are sometimes described as industrial property. It covers (i) patent law, (ii) the law of trade secrets, (iii) the law of registered trade marks and (iv) the tort of passing off. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Business Information SystemsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF036Semester 23No

Introduction to Business Information Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jorge Del Bosque Trevino
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take SEF034

Description: The module balances business and technical aspects but adopts a high-level view, aiming for example to explain the purpose and use of databases rather than develop specific skills in database query or design. Alongside learning the basic ideas of programming, this module provides an introduction to the context of much IT.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related RightsLawLAW6455Semester 16No

Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: The module focuses on the substantive law of copyright and related rights in the United Kingdom. It covers (i) the subsistence, ownership and term of copyright, (ii) exclusive economic rights and infringement (iv) exceptions and limitations to infringement and (v) moral rights. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
SBCS Industrial/Professional Experience Placement ModuleBiological and Chemical SciencesSBC5001Full year5No

SBCS Industrial/Professional Experience Placement Module

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the 'Year in Industry/Research' programmes in the field of Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Psychology offered by SBCS.

Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Professional Capability
  • Item 2: 20.00% Professional Capability
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Professional Capability
  • Item 5: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201BSemester 26Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS6201, RUS6200B"
Prerequisite: RUS5201 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201ASemester 16Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS6201, RUS6200A"
Prerequisite: RUS5201 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the MonolithLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6015Semester 26Yes

Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the Monolith

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "COM5015, COM6015, RUS5015"
Prerequisite: RUS4012/SML4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines developments in Russian prose fiction, especially the genre of the povest¿, in the period from 1953 to the present. Students analyse works including those by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Valentin Rasputin, Liudmila Petrushevskaia and Viktor Pelevin in relation to the historical events and social phenomena they refract, their technique and their place in debates about Russian literature and cultural identity. You will explore the relation of cultural politics to developments in Russian society and develop an understanding of the role of literature in the political and historical process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Digital Electronics and Computer SystemsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF035Semester 23No

Digital Electronics and Computer Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nida Aziz

Description: This module will introduce SEFP students to basic electronics, with a focus on digital and programmable systems. This module follows on from SEF034 Computing, which introduces basic programming skills and seeks to look below the abstract level at which most computers are programmed and ask 'how are computers created?'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200ASemester 15Yes

Russian II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS5200
Prerequisite: RUS4201 or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1+
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS5201A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200BSemester 25Yes

Russian II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS5200
Prerequisite: RUS4201 or knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL level B1+
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Environmental Properties of MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT507Semester 16Yes

Environmental Properties of Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT7040

Description: Recycling - possibilities of recycling schemes for different types of materials like glasses, plastics and metals will be discussed.
Environmental politics - such as the EU end of life vehicle directive will be discussed as well as other political drivers for creating a sustainable society.
Ecodesign - the benefits of designing for recycling using a cradle to grave design methodology. Examining in detail designs for single material or reduced number of materials systems that can be easily disassembled.
Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) - Detail of how the life cycle analysis is undertaken, including instruction in the use of appropriate life cycle analysis software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
CeramicsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT522Semester 16Yes

Ceramics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Reece

Description: Review to physical and structural origin of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of ceramics. Relate this knowledge to their applications and commercial importance. Review the processing and characterisation of ceramics. (Particular reference will be made to the following structural ceramics: alumina; silicon nitride; zirconia; and silicon carbide.) Review of functional ceramics: varistors; ferroelectrics; piezoelectrics; pyroelectrics; optoelectronics; and ferrites. Throughout the module the students will develop their knowledge so that they can relate structure, properties and applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203BSemester 24Closed

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4203, RUS4204B"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed the equivalent of one semester of Russian language at their home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203ASemester 14Closed

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4203, RUS4204A"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at associate students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 4
Russian Short Stories: The Twentieth CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4021Semester 14Yes

Russian Short Stories: The Twentieth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: "COM5021, RUS5021"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: While the novel has enjoyed a privileged status for much of the twentieth century, for important periods the short story dominated Russian culture. After defining and analyzing the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, long critical neglect and the prejudice against it as a fragmentary form, this course focuses on periods where short stories came to the fore in Russia: the beginning and end of the century and the period of World War Two.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Year Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS296Full year5No

Year Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Year Abroad Learning Log, which consists of three academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Physical CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA6311Semester 16Yes

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005U

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Erasmus Work Placement (semester B)Languages Linguistics and FilmRUS295BSemester 25No

Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Erasmus Work Placement (semester B)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Semester Abroad Learning Log, which consists of two academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Understudied Languages and Linguistic TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7016Semester 27Yes

Understudied Languages and Linguistic Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Harbour
Overlap: LIN6016
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The diversity of the world's languages is of crucial importance to linguistic theory. Linguistic theory developed primarily with reference to data from major world languages (English, Japanese, French, etc.) nonetheless frequently yields rapid and deep insight into understudied languages from diverse families. In this course, we will work with a speaker of such a language, eliciting data, forming generalisations, and testing and explaining these in light of current linguistic theory. The course is, therefore, a practicum-style approach to formal linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Business PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY318Semester 26No

Business Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paraskevi Argyriou

Description: The workplace is a dynamic place, constantly changing, evolving and adapting in the face of global changes in new technologies, new ways of working and changing social, economical and political norms. In order to keep a workplace running like a fine tuned machine, it often takes the efforts of many individuals. In many ways, this is where organizational psychology comes in place, which is the branch of psychology studying the workplace environment in all its liveness by promoting effective practices to maximize the benefits for both the organizations and their employees. In this module, you will be introduced in key issues in organizational psychology and how they apply in the workplace. Topics will include employee selection and training, team-work, leadership, fairness and well-being in the workplace, and organizational change and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Current Topics in Mental HealthBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY316Semester 16No

Current Topics in Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Echols

Description: This module explores current topics in mental health from both historical and contemporary perspectives. It includes in-depth analyses of contemporary issues in the field, such as the social/biological/cultural influences to mental health, the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders, and/or the role of public policy in mental health diagnosis and treatment. Key themes may include studying mental health across multiple levels of analysis (from cellular to cultural), and how our understanding of mental health has evolved over time. This module aims to advance critical reasoning skills through the analysis of empirical research, debates in the literature, and the discussion of the broader socio-cultural context of the mental health sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Health PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY216Semester 15Yes

Health Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit

Description: This module introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists ¿ namely, psychology as applied to health behaviour. The course covers the central models and evidence bases concerning the relationship between psychological processes and health and illness. Topics covered by this module will include health promotion and public health; health behaviour models; illness maintenance and treatment adherence; chronic illness; and health through the lifespan.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Social PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY215Semester 15Yes

Social Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janelle Jones
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY109 and take PSY121 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: Have you ever wondered what influences our perceptions, emotions, thoughts, and behaviours? This module in Social Psychology will provide an overview of the classic and contemporary scientific theories and methods used to address how other people and different contexts can shape these processes. Topics covered will include the self, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, social influence, group processes, and stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY211Semester 15No

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paraskevi Argyriou

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the C1C8 programme. This module builds upon themes developed in level 4 psychology modules and considers specific cognitive functions and properties of the human mind. The material covered will include traditional cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neuropsychology (the understanding of normal cognitive processes through unique case studies of human brain damage). Cognitive functions examined will include visual, object and spatial perception, psychophysics, memory processes, complex reasoning, language, face processing and the relationship between emotion and these processes. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 45.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Spacetime and GravityPhysics and AstronomySPA6308Semester 16Yes

Spacetime and Gravity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Monteiro

Description: "This course presents the essential concepts of both special and general relativity. The emphasis is on the physical understanding of the theory and the mathematical development is kept simple, although more detailed treatments are included for those who wish to follow them; space-time diagrams being are used extensively. The course includes discussion of the big bang and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to BiopsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY117Semester 14Yes

Introduction to Biopsychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Brennan

Description: The topics covered include basic cell biology, principles of communication, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and human neuroanatomy. The involvement of these and other cell biological processes in control of behaviour will be illustrated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY109Full year4No

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Echols

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module introduces fundamental skills in experimental design, statistical analysis and other methodologies necessary for conducting research in psychology. The module will combine lectures and practical sessions including hand calculation and computerised statistical analysis using SPSS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Essential Skills for PsychologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Psychologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: This module is structured around three key areas, the first of which is acquiring essential skills for academic Psychology. The module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as experimental report and essay writing, data and information handling, oral and written communication skills and appropriate use of referencing and citations in psychology. During regular tutorials throughout the module, students will also be introduced to the critical evaluation skills that will be necessary for their success during further study.

The second key area is considering the role of Psychology in the ¿real world¿. Through personal investigations and a series of talks from professional Psychologists, students will be encouraged to consider the role of psychology in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

The third key areas is exploring career pathways. Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional Psychologists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 7: 5.00% Practical
Level: 4
Social DevelopmentBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY339Semester 26No

Social Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Echols

Description: This is an advanced, interactive seminar. In it, you will examine how social influences shape development across the lifespan, and how social behaviour is in turn linked to brain development. We will discuss the theories and latest research on how interactions between individuals and their environment shape social, emotional, and cognitive development. Topics will span the neural and developmental basis of normal social functioning, problematic social behaviours such as aggression, interventions to decrease these behaviours, as well as how societal-level structures impact social development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Psychology Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY600Full year6No

Psychology Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elisabetta Versace

Description: Pre-requisites: 30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. This module allows the students to conceive, design and carry out a substantive, original empirical study in an area of psychology independently The students work on approved research topics set by project supervisors. Experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of the project. The work also involves critical evaluation of data previously published in the literature. A consideration of ethical issues is also required. A dissertation is prepared. This module will teach students to work on original scientific research topics and consolidate quantitative research skills, communication and critical evaluation. It will enhance students understanding of psychology in a broader context and will provide students with experience of working in a research environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Doing International Relations Research: Theories Methods, DataPolitics and International RelationsPOLM979Semester 27No

Doing International Relations Research: Theories Methods, Data

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Musab Younis

Description: This module introduces students to main theories from which international relations research is conducted and methods and analytics with which to conduct such research. Taught in SEM2 the module serves as a preparation for undertaking dissertation research that students are expected to accomplish in SEM3. The module enables students to learn (1) various theories of knowledge (e.g., positive versus normative, explanation versus understanding, objectivist versus subjectivist, postcolonial and decolonial, and rational versus relativist ways of doing international relations research; (2) major methods used in international relations research (e.g., interviews, documents, repositories, archives, recordings, and digital sources); and (3) analytical relations between various theories of knowledge in international research and methods appropriate to them. The module introduces students all these three issues with judicious examples drawn from major debates in contemporary international relations research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Culture and Language (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML4006BSemester 24Closed

Culture and Language (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: COM4006B
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The course will introduce students to a wide range of texts, concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into two 5-week blocks. The precise content of these may change from year to year, but they will be broadly concerned with culture, language, and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Culture and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML4006Full year4Closed

Culture and Language

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: COM4006
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts (literary and visual), concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into four 5-week blocks, devoted to topics such as, for example, Reading Literary Texts, Visual Cultures, Culture and Society, Linguistics. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 9: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Culture and Language (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML4006ASemester 14Closed

Culture and Language (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: COM4006A
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into two 5-week blocks, roughly divided between Literature Visual Cultures. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
ComputingScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF034Semester 13No

Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Dharini Krishnamoorthy

Description: The Computing module will provide SEFP students with an understanding and practical experience of core areas of computer science: programming and algorithms; underlying theory; software development; computer systems; and networks. It will include hands-on programming experience during supervised lab sessions. The module is designed principally to prepare students for pursuing study in the areas of computer science or electronics; however, it will also provide a basic introduction for students not intending to pursue study in these areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Diversity and EcologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF033Semester 23No

Diversity and Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sally Faulkner
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF031

Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles of evolution and to develop an appreciation of the dynamic nature of ecological systems. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Ecology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology, Genetics, and Biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Molecules to CellsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF032Semester 23No

Molecules to Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Viji Draviam Sastry

Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the study of Biology at the molecular level. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Biological Information Technology. It is also suitable for students wishing to study microbiology or more general biology degree programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Brazilian Cinema: The Social TraditionLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR5034Semester 15Yes

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: FLM5034
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Why would a Brazilian director depict not the guerrilla Che Guevara but the young doctor developing his social awareness? Walter Salles's Motorcycle Diaries will set the tone for the discussion of Brazil's emphasis on the social agenda as its major contribution to world cinema. This course will approach the evolution of this genre, beginning with Cinema Novo, the shift towards the commercial film (Pixote, Central Station), the development of a new aesthetics (City of God) and of recent radical experimentations such as prisoners and favela (shantytown) inhabitants making their own film. Discussions will include the tensions between aesthetics and ethics, the achievement of the commercial film and of the documentary as social action, and film as a tool for the empowerment of the marginalized.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Portuguese ILanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR4201Full year4Yes

Portuguese I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Overlap: POR4200
Prerequisite: "A-level or equivalent knowledge of Portuguese, including heritage speakers"
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is offered only to students who have A-Level or equivalent in Portuguese or who are heritage speakers of Portuguese. Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary Brazilian and European Portuguese, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language. The language of instruction is predominantly Portuguese. Successful students will reach Level B1(+) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201Full year6Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS6200
Prerequisite: RUS5201 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200BSemester 26Yes

Russian III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS6200, RUS6201B"
Prerequisite: RUS5200/RUS5202 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202BSemester 25Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS5202
Prerequisite: RUS4203/RUS4204 or knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL level A2
Corequisite: None

Description: This is the second-year Russian language module for associate students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202ASemester 15Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS5202
Prerequisite: RUS4203/RUS4204 or knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL level A2
Corequisite: None

Description: This is the second-year Russian language module for associate students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 5
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202Full year5Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS5200, RUS5201"
Prerequisite: RUS4203/RUS4204 or knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL level A2
Corequisite: None

Description: This is the second-year core language module for students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language, and by the end of the module you should be at a level comparable to those who have taken Russian II. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Physical CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA6311PSemester 16Yes

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005P

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200Full year5Yes

Russian II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS5201, RUS5202"
Prerequisite: RUS4201 or knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL level B1+
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Physics (Fields and Waves)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF006Semester 23No

Physics (Fields and Waves)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrei Sapelkin

Description: The role and characteristics of fields, in particular gravitational and electromagnetic fields. The description of natural phenomena and the widespread occurrence of oscillations and wave motion, with examples taken from the physics of sound and light. Prerequisite - SEF005

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Physics (Mechanics and Materials)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF005Semester 13No

Physics (Mechanics and Materials)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Elise Stacey Agra

Description: This is one of three modules providing a detailed introduction to concepts of physics. This module covers the following topics: Newtonian mechanics, including statics, linear and rotational dynamics; forces and energy, and their role in the molecular structure of matter, properties of liquids and gases; basic concepts of thermodynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introductory ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF003Semester 13No

Introductory Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stoichko Dimitrov

Description: This module introduces essential principles and concepts in chemistry, including atomic structure, electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, stoichiometry of reactions, measures of concentration, oxidation states and redox chemistry, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
A Closer Look at ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF004Semester 23No

A Closer Look at Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yao Lu

Description: This module expands upon topics covered in SEF003 and provides a further introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry; including topics such as thermochemistry, reaction kinetics and equilibria, molecular structure, aspects of organic chemistry, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: SEF003 Introductory Chemistry

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203Full year4Closed

Introductory Russian

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4201, RUS4202, RUS4204"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is aimed at students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202BSemester 24Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4202
Prerequisite: Native or near native proficiency in Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement (semester A)Languages Linguistics and FilmRUS295ASemester 15No

Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement (semester A)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Semester Abroad Learning Log, which consists of two academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Russian Short Stories: The Twentieth CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5021Semester 15Yes

Russian Short Stories: The Twentieth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: "COM5021, RUS4021"
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: While the novel has enjoyed a privileged status for much of the twentieth century, for important periods the short story dominated Russian culture. After defining and analyzing the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, long critical neglect and the prejudice against it as a fragmentary form, this course focuses on periods where short stories came to the fore in Russia: the beginning and end of the century and the period of World War Two.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian Novel: Crimes and PunishmentLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5018Semester 25Yes

Russian Novel: Crimes and Punishment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: "COM5018, COM6018, RUS6018"
Prerequisite: A-Level or equivalent knowledge of Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1880. We will focus on Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, two novels about individuals, a man and a woman, who attempted to place themselves outside society and who are "punished" accordingly. In both cases, this emancipation from social and moral constraints becomes the occasion for a unique, profoundly influential piece of narrative art and for a sustained exploration of the spiritual, moral, and social ingredients of the modern condition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the MonolithLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5015Semester 25Yes

Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the Monolith

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "COM5015, COM6015, RUS6015"
Prerequisite: RUS4012/SML4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines developments in Russian prose fiction, especially the genre of the povest¿, in the period from 1953 to the present. Students analyse works, including those by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Valentin Rasputin, Liudmila Petrushevskaia and Viktor Pelevin in relation to the historical events and social phenomena they refract, their technique and their place in debates about Russian literature and cultural identity. You will explore the relation of cultural politics to developments in Russian society and develop an understanding of the role of literature in the political and historical process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Psychology of CreativityBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY313Semester 16No

Psychology of Creativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Di Bernardi Luft
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY215 and take PSY209 and take PSY211

Description: Taking a multi-disciplinary approach, this module will provide students with an in-depth understanding of different theoretical conceptualizations of creativity, how it can be measured empirically and the extent to which this research can inform practices in areas such as education, business and mental health. It will draw on research from various different disciplines within psychology, covering areas such as neuroscience, social, developmental and cognitive psychology and creative arts. By exploring evolutionary foundations and creativity research in non-humans, cognitive processes underlying creativity and creativity as a strategy for fostering resiliency it will also highlight links to key focal areas and research strengths within the School of Psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Criminal and Forensic PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY314Semester 16No

Criminal and Forensic Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit

Description: This module introduces students to the fundamental concepts in the psychological study of crime. The areas introduced include: the forensic psychologist, the study of crime, psychological explanations of crime, psychological explanations of the criminal mind, psychological explanations of specific crime types (for example, crimes of a sexual nature), the role of criminal and forensic psychologists in detection and investigation, and psychology in prison.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IIBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY209Full year5No

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valdas Noreika
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY109 and take PSY100

Description: This module builds introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists, and one where the College has research strengths; health psychology or psychology as applied to health and medicine. The module covers the central models and evidence base concerning the relationship of psychological processes to health maintenance, treatment adherence, professional-patient interactions, stress and immune system function. Topics covered by this module include models and theories of health behaviour and their explanatory power; psychology & health promotion; adherence to treatment, health professional and patient interactions; research methods in health psychology; psychological issues in clinical trial design; personality, health and lifestyle; psychoneuroimmunology; cardiovascular disease; sexual health behaviours; and coping with chronic & terminal conditions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
PsychopathologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY253Semester 25Yes

Psychopathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgina Hosang
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module is designed to give students a scientific overview of psychopathology based on related theoretical frameworks and empirical findings and to critically evaluate the range of approaches in this field. The course will focus on the history of the classification and diagnosis of common mental disorders and will then focus on key common mental disorders including mood disorders (depression & bipolar disorder), anxiety disorders and schizophrenia. Psychological therapies will also be discussed. Students will develop an understanding of the symptoms and diagnoses across the mental disorders as well as the the risk factors and treatments used for common mental disorders.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Portuguese IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR6200Full year6Yes

Portuguese III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POR5200/POR5201 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is for students who have completed Portuguese II Intensive. The focus will be on fluency, expansion of vocabulary, grammatical accuracy, advanced oral and reading comprehension, and development of writing skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Psychology of Play and GamesBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY337Semester 26No

Psychology of Play and Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathan Emery

Description: This module will present contemporary research on play in animals, children and adults, focusing on psychological theories, especially during development. The module will also utilise an applied approach to studying how different psychological mechanisms may underlie playing different games, such as board, role-playing and video games, achieved by playing and discussing games in class. Students will debate societal issues related to games, such as the role of video games in violence or game addiction, but also the positive effects of games.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Nature, Nurture and Mental HealthBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY333PSemester 16No

Nature, Nurture and Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Margherita Malanchini

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a new, rapidly evolving, and often controversial area, of psychology and psychiatry. We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules including social, biological and abnormal psychology to explore how genetic and environmental factors come together to cause mental illnesses such as major depression, schizophrenia and autism. Drawing on the most recent research from quantitative and molecular genetics we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in the field including the continuum between traits and disorders, the nature vs nurture debate, genetic determinism and the ethical implications of genetic research of mental illness.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Nature, Nurture and Mental HealthBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY333Semester 16No

Nature, Nurture and Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Margherita Malanchini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY117 and take PSY121 and take PSY233 and take PSY253

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a new, rapidly evolving, and often controversial area, of psychology and psychiatry. We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules including social, biological and abnormal psychology to explore how genetic and environmental factors come together to cause mental illnesses such as major depression, schizophrenia and autism. Drawing on the most recent research from quantitative and molecular genetics we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in the field including the continuum between traits and disorders, the nature vs nurture debate, genetic determinism and the ethical implications of genetic research of mental illness.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Languages in the Classroom 1: Practical and Theoretical Approaches to TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6211Semester 16Yes

Languages in the Classroom 1: Practical and Theoretical Approaches to Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Knowledge of relevant language
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces you to language teaching at school. It includes French, German, Spanish, and Russian. The module can count for a degree in those languages. It also includes English but for exchange students only.
It is the first of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the theoretical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other one (SML6212 which runs during the second semester) focuses on practical matters.
Through the completion of this module, you will gain an understanding of key aspects of Applied Linguistics and Psycholinguistics. You will focus on theoretical aspects of second/ foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and the design of teaching materials. This will involve planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. This module will also enable you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.
Important: If you are planning to attend the module SML6212 (Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice) in semester 2, you will be required to complete a placement in a local school and will therefore require clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). towards the end of the first semester. Please contact the module organiser for further information.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (Two Languages)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML6203Full year6Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (Two Languages)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Consuelo Sanmateu-Martinez
Overlap: "FRE6207, HSP6207, SML6203"
Prerequisite: Two of FRE5202/HSP5201/HSP5202/RUS5200/RUS5202 and at least 60 in the core language modules at level
Corequisite: None

Description: This course is designed for final year students doing doing Joint Honours Modern Languages BA (French, or Spanish, or Russian combined accordingly with French, or Spanish, or Russian). The course is for the students who have already reached a high level of linguistic competence and aim at developing listening comprehension and oral production skills ¿ including bilateral communicative skills ¿ to a very high level. Students will learn to perform different types of speech acts in everyday life situations and to perform tasks required in working and social environments, such as summarizing, reporting and presenting, as well as consecutive interpreting (interpreting between speakers of two different languages). This module is not designed for true native speakers of French, Spanish or Russian. QMUL HSS students can take this module at the discretion of the module organiser.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 2.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 12: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (One Language)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML6202Full year6Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (One Language)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Laetitia Calabrese
Overlap: "FRE6207, HSP6207, SML6203"
Prerequisite: FRE5202/HSP5201/HSP5202/RUS5200/RUS5202 and at least 60 in the core language modules at levels 4 and
Corequisite: None

Description: This course is designed for final year students doing Single Honours Modern Languages BA (French, or Spanish, or Russian) or doing Joint Honours Modern Languages BA (French, or Spanish, or Russian) with a non-language subject. The course is for the students who have already reached a high level of linguistic competence and aim at developing listening comprehension and oral production skills ¿ including bilateral communicative skills ¿ to a very high level. Students will learn to perform different types of speech acts in everyday life situations and to perform tasks required in working and social environments, such as summarizing, reporting and presenting, as well as consecutive interpreting (interpreting between speakers of two different languages). This module is not designed for true native speakers of French, Spanish or Russian. QMUL HSS students can take this module at the discretion of the module organiser.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
On the Subject of Sex I: Sappho to StonewallLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML206Semester 15Yes

On the Subject of Sex I: Sappho to Stonewall

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In the early 21st Century the Western subject - who I think I am - is inextricably linked to the categories of sex - both as gender (male and female) and as sexuality (homosexual, heterosexual, bisexual, transsexual). In this module we shall examine how these connections were made at certain key moments in history, from the ancient Greeks to the liberation movement of the 1960s. The aim is to contextualize and to relativize certain common assumptions about the nature of sexual identity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Languages Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML005Full year6No

Modern Languages Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Hannah Scott Deuchar
Overlap: Students are not permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: At least a 2:1 average level of attainment up to final year
Corequisite: None

Description: Entry to this module will not be automatic. All students wishing to take this module must meet the entry requirements, present an approved topic and have an agreed supervisor. It is designed to enable suitably qualified final-year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual or group research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. Introductory group sessions on research methods will be followed by individual supervision. You should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Form and Function in BiologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF031Semester 13No

Form and Function in Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gail Schofield

Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the basic biology of microbes, plants and animals. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology and Ecology. It is also suitable for students who wish to study the more microbial and molecular aspects of biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 23No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
Level: 3
Introductory PortugueseLanguages Linguistics and FilmPOR4200Full year4Yes

Introductory Portuguese

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Overlap: POR4201
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of the Portuguese language. Successful students will complete Level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Language (CEFRL). The module provides basic competence in all four main language skills (reading, listening, speaking and writing). Teaching materials are selected with a view to providing a panoramic view of the history and culture of the Portuguese-speaking countries in four continents. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. They must attend five hours of teaching per week and expect to spend a further five hours per week on private study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 13No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
Level: 3
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200ASemester 16Yes

Russian III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS6200, RUS6201A"
Prerequisite: RUS5200/RUS5202 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200Full year6Yes

Russian III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS6201
Prerequisite: RUS5200/RUS5202 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central AsiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6057Semester 16Yes

Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: "COM6057, RUS5057"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Once part of the ancient Silk Road, the countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia have a roller-coaster history which includes subjection to Russian imperial and Soviet rule. Through the prism of award-winning literature and film by a new post-Soviet generation of women (e.g. Mariam Petrosyan¿s The Gray House, 2009; Nana Ekvtimishvili¿s In Bloom, 2013), this module explores the cultural and socio-political developments in the now independent Georgia, Armenia, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Themes to discuss will include childhood, youth, migration, post-Soviet identity, the effects of colonialism, and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201BSemester 25Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS212
Prerequisite: RUS4202 or near-native competence in Russian equivalent to CEFRL level C2
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201ASemester 15Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS5201
Prerequisite: RUS4202 or near-native competence in Russian equivalent to CEFRL level C2
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Materials Industrial ExperienceEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT616Full year6No

Materials Industrial Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof James Busfield

Description: Students will be helped to secure a work placement through a range of new initiatives in a company appropriate to the programme. The work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful students with a placement will each be allocated a tutor, a SEMS academic in a relevant field, who will wherever practical visit the student twice in the year. Where a visit is not possible the tutor will ensure that there is email and telephone contact with the student. SEMS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer. This person is likely to be their line manager and will be expected to support as well as line-manage the student. Students completing the module will be required to work on a project that will allow them to follow a pathway toward CEng registration approximately three years after graduation; maintain a training diary to be reviewed by their tutor during and after the placement is completed; attend at least one Industrial Liaison Forum to share their experience with other SEMS students; deliver one seminar at QMUL to promote future opportunities at their sponsor; complete a final report on the placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Study Abroad Year (Drama)English and DramaSED003Full year5No

Study Abroad Year (Drama)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Drama programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 5
Study Abroad Year (English)English and DramaSED004Full year5No

Study Abroad Year (English)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr James Vigus

Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year English programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 5
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202ASemester 14Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4202
Prerequisite: Native or near native proficiency in Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201BSemester 24Closed

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4201
Prerequisite: A level or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1
Corequisite: None

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202Full year4Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4201, RUS4203, RUS4204"
Prerequisite: Native or near native proficiency in Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Trends in Linguistic ResearchLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7027Semester 17Yes

Trends in Linguistic Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Chong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Each week, students in this module will read one paper by a member of staff (along with, optionally, a related text in that subfield) and prepare questions about the research described in those papers. The member of staff will attend that week's class meeting, and engage in discussion of their research goals, results and methods with students. Students will be expected to participate in developing further research questions and novel methodological solutions pertinent to the sub-discipline being focused on in a given week. Students will gain an appreciation for the full range of research topics and methods that staff are expert in, and have a unique opportunity to engage in high level, in-depth discussions of world renowned, cutting edge research with the researchers who have done this research. Students will write several short 500 word response papers and will develop one of these into a longer piece of work.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201ASemester 14Closed

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4201
Prerequisite: A level or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1
Corequisite: None

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS060N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Reading Contemporary RussiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4205Semester 24Yes

Reading Contemporary Russia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: RUS4203 / RUS4204

Description: Reading Contemporary Russia consists of reading comprehension and content analysis of simple texts on contemporary Russia. The main focus of the class is to introduce students to current cultural, social, and political issues, using books, newspaper articles,journals, TV and radio broadcasts, and web sources from Russia. Selected readings and films will familiarize students with culture and features of everyday life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Practical
Level: 4
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204ASemester 14Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4203A, RUS4204"
Prerequisite: GCSE or equivalent in Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who hold the equivalent of GCSE in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 4
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204BSemester 24Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: "RUS4203B, RUS4204"
Prerequisite: GCSE or equivalent in Russian
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed at least one semester of Russian language at home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127PSemester 26No

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mahdi Godazgar

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Meaning in the Real WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6046Semester 16Yes

Meaning in the Real World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: LIN7046
Prerequisite: LIN5209/LIN5217
Corequisite: None

Description: The study of linguistic meaning has many real-world applications. In the areas of law, healthcare, politics and other domains of public life, one must grapple with issues such as ambiguity, vagueness, and context-sensitivity. This module will investigate how analytical tools from formal semantics can be applied in order to highlight and address a diverse range of problems in these areas. We will apply the tools from the Level 5 module Aspects of Meaning to a set of real-world cases. Examples might include legal cases involving an ambiguity in the wording of a contract, the expression of pain in healthcare settings, and recent controversies over the use of racial slurs by politicians. By conducting your own investigation of a real-world case study that raises issues about the nature of linguistic meaning, you will learn about the ways in which linguistics can shed light on contemporary societal and political issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127Semester 26Yes

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mahdi Godazgar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Differential GeometryMathematical SciencesMTH5113Semester 25No

Introduction to Differential Geometry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arick Shao
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4122
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: This module provides an introduction to the differential of curves and surfaces. The core of the module deals with developing the language and tools for studying, describing and quantifying the geometry of curved objects. Particular emphasis is placed on connecting geometric questions with ideas from Calculus and Linear Algebra, as well as on extending Calculus to curved settings. The module concludes by studying some landmark results in vector Calculus e.g. Lagrange multipliers, Green's theorem and Stokes' theorem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Constructing a LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6203PSemester 27No

Constructing a Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: LIN6203
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: From Esperanto to Klingon, from Volapuk to Elvish, from Leibniz's Universal Characteristic to Peterson's Dothraki, humans have made up artificial languages to support political, philosophical, and creative ends. This course examines examples of such artificial languages and their relation to natural language systems, and allows you to create a constructed language of your own, with a strong focus on systematic linguistic structure: phonological, morphological and syntactic systems as well as systems of lexical semantics and historical change. It will require you to bring together all your knowledge of linguistic structures as you make up your own language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Law and PharmacologyLawLAW6170Full year6No

Law and Pharmacology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nikola Georgiou

Description: In the medico-legal field, medicines regulation has, until recently (E.Jackson, Law and the Regulation of Medicines (Hart, 2012)) received relatively little scholarly attention, and drug offences have been largely neglected in undergraduate courses on criminal law. These two areas of law (medicines regulation and recreational drug use ) are rarely considered together despite both being concerned with pharmacology and its impact on consumers, and despite raising similar ethical questions (autonomy, paternalism, the role of the state in public and private health) and facing similar threats from those seeking to maximise profit.
The purpose of the module will be to identify and critically evaluate normative frameworks in this area, in search of theoretical coherence. The course will identify relevant legal and theoretical frameworks and regulatory agencies. The focus will be on UK law but will also include international treaties and European law. The module will combine domestic and comparative jurisprudence, and will also adopt a law-reform flavour given the evolving nature of science and law in this area . The module may particularly interest those students who are studying medical law, those propose to enter into a practising law career, a law, regulatory or policy-reform role, or who may enter into associated fields such as consumer lobbying and activism, or governmental legal offices.

Questions to be considered will include: What are the normative implications of a shift in regulatory perspective in relation to recreational drugs from the criminal to the public health model? How tenable is the distinction drawn in law between medicinal drugs and recreational drugs? What are the regulatory implications of a product¿s classification as medicinal? What is the role and nature of the harm/benefit nexus in the design of regulatory measures?

In the second semester students will explore several case-studies, including novel psychoactive substances, cannabis law reform and nicotine replacement therapy before proceeding to research and make oral presentations on their own chosen topics for the coursework element, for which they will receive supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Foundations of LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4208Semester 14Closed

Foundations of Language

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to the core concepts, terminology, and technical apparatus of the structural parts of linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics), as well as the conceptual underpinnings of the discipline. You will learn about fundamental concepts such as: contrast and distribution; structure; rules and representations; the cognitive basis of language and how that is distinct from its social basis; language universals and variation. You will also learn how to solve problems of linguistic analysis using these concepts and the terminology and techniques of the discipline as well as how to use hypothesis testing to devise solutions to these problems. These are all fundamental pieces of knowledge and skills that will provide the foundation for any further study in linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Language AcquisitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN101Semester 24Yes

Language Acquisition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will delve into the process of language acquisition. The module will look at different models and theories that have arisen from the different schools of thought. It explores the different processes of first language acquisition and stages of development (phonological, lexical, syntactical), before moving onto the cognitive framework of language processing (parsing). The next area of focus will be bilingualism and second language acquisition. Students will be introduced to different forms of bilingualism and the issues raised in second language acquisition. They will also be introduced to language in the brain, speech pathologies and other communication systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Linear Algebra IMathematical SciencesMTH5112Semester 15No

Linear Algebra I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5212
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

Description: This is a rigorous first module in linear algebra. The ideas introduced in Geometry I for two- and three-dimensional space will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of mathematics. The module contains a fair number of proofs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
English/Linguistics Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN042Full year6No

English/Linguistics Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: Students are not permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: LIN5202
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is compulsory for single honours English Language and Linguistics students as well as joint honours English Literature and Linguistics students who are not taking the research project module in the English Department. All other students wishing to take this module must see the module organiser before registration and must have reached a good standard on the prerequisite module LIN306 Research Methods in Linguistics. The module is designed to enable final year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. You will give presentations of your research as it progresses, and should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Thinking Linguistics: Approaches to Writing and AnalysisLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4207Semester 14No

Thinking Linguistics: Approaches to Writing and Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: LIN4208

Description: The module will prepare students for university-level academic work during their degree, including standard practices in research and different genres of writing typical for the fields of Linguistics and English Language studies. The module will cover basic study skills at the university (finding your way around the campus, the role of the advisor and others, using the library effectively), basic research skills (writing essays and reports, how to choose what to read, using an index, internet use, plagiarism, referencing), and research skills specific to Linguistics (e.g. how to write an essay, an analytic problem set, a report on qualitative data, and a report on quantitative data). The module will help students recognise the inter-disciplinary nature of the field, and will provide hands-on experience with writing, editing, and critical thinking to prepare them for a range of types of assessment and genres of writing.

s a module it will be available to students registered on degree programmes involving English Language or Linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Computing and Data Analysis with ExcelMathematical SciencesMTH4114Semester 14No

Computing and Data Analysis with Excel

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This module introduces students to many of the key features of the Excel spreadsheet environment, with a focus on using it to solve real-world problems using numerical techniques. Most of the module will be 'hands on' in the computer laboratories, with a series of worksheets, assignments and problems to solve.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700PSemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris

Description: This course is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, and network research in particular. The module will serve as preparation for the research project that students will undertake as a major part of the MSc programme in Mathematics and Mathematics of Networks. The students will learn how to critically review and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork.The students will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Numbers, Sets and FunctionsMathematical SciencesMTH4113Semester 14No

Numbers, Sets and Functions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Johnson
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4213
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: The modules cover the fundamental building blocks of mathematics (sets, sequences, functions, relations and numbers). It introduces the main number systems (natural numbers, integers, rational, real and complex numbers), outlining their construction and main properties. They also introduce the concepts of definition, theorem, proof and counterexample.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Surfaces and Interfaces in MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT210Semester 15Yes

Surfaces and Interfaces in Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gleb Sukhorukov
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT211 or take MAT212

Description: This module gives fundamentals in surface and interface science. It covers definition of surface and interfaces, surface free energy, different types of interfaces, adsorption, capiliarity, molecular basics of surface activity and its application to adhesion, wetting, emulsion and colloids. Main surface characterisation techniques are to be taught in the course. The module includes lab work where the students get some experience in preparation and characterisation of materials surfaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Sociolinguistic TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7002Semester 17No

Sociolinguistic Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patricia D'Allemand
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The field of sociolinguistics has seen the parallel development of a number of theories of how language relates to, and is embedded in, society. Some of these developments have been mutually reinforcing or complementary, while others have raised questions and debates over the nature of social variation in language. This course reviews the major 'lineages' of thinking in sociolinguistics, covering theories that have formed the foundation of both quantitative and qualitative approaches sociolinguistics. With a focus on the former, the course will require students to read classic texts from early sociolinguistic theory (developed in William Labov's early work and parallel strands of thought from the same period) and then trace the development of distinct 'waves' of thinking and analysis in subsequent decades. On the qualitative side, the course will cover selected classic works from social theory, and literary and cultural theory that have been influential in sociolinguists' thinking about social structure and variation (e.g. Bourdieu, Bakhtin). Overall, the course will provide students with an advanced foundational knowledge of major developments in sociolinguistic thought over the past half century.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7207Semester 27No

Introduction to Syntax

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Tsahi Campbell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. How is it that the grammar of any given language can produce an infinite array of sentences? Syntax is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of grammatical structure. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of syntactic analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises, working with data from a variety of well-known and unfamiliar languages The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Nanotechnology and NanomedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7803Semester 17Yes

Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gleb Sukhorukov

Description: This module will define and describe nanostructures and nanomaterials. it will include how they are manufactured, appropriate characterisation technologies and a description of their application in a range of fields. In particular the application and challenges in the use of nanotechnology in medicine will be considered, including the regulatory issues to be considered, the use of nanomaterials for drug delivery and the development of lab in a chip technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7207Semester 17No

Introduction to Syntax

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. How is it that the grammar of any given language can produce an infinite array of sentences? Syntax is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of grammatical structure. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of syntactic analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises, working with data from a variety of well-known and unfamiliar languages The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115PSemester 16No

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Constructing a LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6203Semester 26Yes

Constructing a Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4203/LIN4210 or LIN037/LIN5213
Corequisite: None

Description: From Esperanto to Klingon, from Volapuk to Elvish, from Leibniz's Universal Characteristic to Peterson's Dothraki, humans have made up artificial languages to support political, philosophical, and creative ends. This course examines examples of such artificial languages and their relation to natural language systems, and allows you to create a constructed language of your own, with a strong focus on systematic linguistic structure: phonological, morphological and syntactic systems as well as systems of lexical semantics and historical change. It will require you to bring together all your knowledge of linguistic structures as you make up your own language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Coding for LinguistsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6209PSemester 17No

Coding for Linguists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: LIN6209
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides students with an introduction to computer programming and computational modelling for applied linguistics. Students will learn how to write code in a widely used programming language (Python), and gain experience in using tools that are suited to solving a range of computational problems in linguistics using machine learning approaches. There will be a focus on developing practical skills. The module is suitable for final year BA students and MA students without any prior experience in computer programming or machine learning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7206Semester 17No

Introduction to Semantics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. How is it that we can understand sentences that we have never heard before? Semantics is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of meaning. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of semantic analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Multilingualism and BilingualismLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6034Semester 16Closed

Multilingualism and Bilingualism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
Overlap: LIN7034
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the field of bilingualism and multilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspective. Topics to be covered include the definition of bilingualism and multilingualism and types of language contact, code-switching, bilingual and multilingual education and policy, as well as language development in individuals who are proficient in more than one language, and the cognitive effects of speaking more than one language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Differential and Integral AnalysisMathematical SciencesMTH5105Semester 25No

Differential and Integral Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Huy Nguyen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

Description: This module provides a rigorous basis for differential and integral calculus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115Semester 16Yes

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Convergence and ContinuityMathematical SciencesMTH5104Semester 15No

Convergence and Continuity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Jerrum
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4113 or take MTH4213 )

Description: This module introduces some of the mathematical theory behind Calculus. It answers questions such as: What properties of the real numbers do we rely on in Calculus? What does it mean to say that a series converges to a limit? Are there kinds of function that are guaranteed to have a maximum value? The module is a first introduction, with many examples, to the beautiful and important branch of pure mathematics known as Analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Criminal SentencingLawLAW6169Semester 26No

Criminal Sentencing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jeffrey Kennedy

Description: This module will provide students with a critical introduction to the legal and philosophical issues involved in decisions of how we respond to crimes following conviction. In doing so, students will come to understand and evaluate the rules, principles, and processes of criminal sentencing. While focusing on the law of England and Wales, the module will take a broader perspective by engaging the central questions that arise across different jurisdictions relating to the aims, nature, and significance of sentencing, who should be able to participate in the decision, how judicial discretion should be guided or constrained. Students will therefore come to understand the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Language and EthnicityLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN504Semester 25Yes

Language and Ethnicity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4211/LIN4201
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers students an introduction to the study of language and ethnicity. Drawing on examples from Britain and around the world, we examine the structural, social and ideological factors that influence language use in minority communities. We also investigate representations of minority speakers in popular broadcast media, and discuss the legal and political ramifications of ethnicity-linked language variation. By the end of this module, students will have a firm grasp of the existing literature on language and ethnicity, and a strong foundation in the frameworks used for understanding language use in society more broadly.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Jurisprudence and Legal Theory (Paris)LawLAW6621Full year6No

Jurisprudence and Legal Theory (Paris)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: 1. Introduction to Jurisprudence, Legal Philosophy and Legal Theory
2. Classical natural law
3. Modern developments in natural law
4. Early positivism: Bentham and Austin
5. Modern positivism: HLA Hart and Analytical Jurisprudence; Kelsen's Pure Theory of Law
6. Legal Realism
7. Social theory I: Marx
8. Social theory II: Durkheim
9. Critical legal theory and the 'Jurisprudence of Difference'
10. Dworkin
11. Raz
12. Postmodernism: Law without Foundations?
13. Selected topics:
a. Law and Morality
b. Civil Disobedience
c. Punishment
d. Economic Analysis of Law
e. Femenist Legal Theory
f. Autonomy of Law

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Administrative LawLawLAW6166Semester 16No

Administrative Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ian Yeats
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4001

Description: 1. The notion of administrative justice and remedies for wrongs by public bodies.
2. Judicial review procedures and remedies.
3. Who is and what kind of decisions are amenable to judicial review?
4. Who may make a claim or intervene in judicial review proceedings?
5. Advanced study of the grounds of judicial review:
a. illegality
b. irrationality
c. proportionality
d. procedural impropriety (including art 6 ECHR)
e. review of law and fact
6. Legitimate expectations and fettering of discretion
7. The status of unlawful administrative actions.
8. The role of tribunals and ombudsmen.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 4)LawLAW6601Full year6No

Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 4)

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Double Degree in English and French Law with Paris 1. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the assessments set by the collaborative institution in order to be granted a LLB Degree in English and French Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 6
Complex VariablesMathematical SciencesMTH5103Semester 25No

Complex Variables

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201

Description: The integral and differential properties of functions of a complex variable. Complex differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions. Sequences and series, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities and residues. Complex integration, Cauchy's theorem and consequences, Cauchy's integral formula and related theorems. The residue theorem and applications to evaluation of integrals and summation of series. Conformal transformations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 3)LawLAW6600Full year6No

Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 3)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Double Degree in English and French Law with Paris 1. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the assessments set by the collaborative institution in order to be granted a LLB Degree in English and French Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 6
Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771USemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771PSemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Structural CharacterisationEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT400Semester 25No

Structural Characterisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100

Description: The theory of X-ray diffraction and analytical electron microscopy. Applications of X-ray techniques, scanning and transmission electron microscopy in materials science and engineering. Other techniques that cans be used to identify materials are introduced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Comparative LawLawLAW6164Semester 26No

Comparative Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marc Van Hoecke

Description: This module offers a general introduction to comparative law. It offers information on other Western legal systems, predominantly as to private law, most notably French and German law, which have strongly influenced many legal systems within Europe and beyond. It will show how legal systems have to be understood in their (historical, social and economic) context and how law in action may sometimes be rather different from law in the books, so that in practice there may be more similarities or differences than the written law would suggest. In order to understand a legal system one has to understand its underlying legal (and general) culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
MetalsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT321Semester 25Yes

Metals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Haixue Yan
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100

Description: The plastic deformation of metals and other classes of materials. The characterisation and properties of dislocations and their relationships to plastic deformation. The influence of micro-structural defects on the behaviour of dislocations and on the mechanical properties. A study of strengthening mechanisms in specific metal alloys.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Language in the UKLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4205Semester 24Closed

Language in the UK

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Devyani Sharma
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to diverse language situations in the UK, including English dialects, Celtic and French varieties, and immigrant languages. The emphasis will be on careful description of structural and social aspects of language variation in the UK. Students will be encouraged to explore language use in their own environment. The importance of basic concepts in linguistic description will be emphasised, as well as issues concerning language ideologies, the media, and education.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Introduction to ProbabilityMathematical SciencesMTH4107Semester 14No

Introduction to Probability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosemary Harris
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4207
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This is the first module in probability, covering events and random variables. It introduces the basic notions of probability theory and develops them to the stage where one can begin to use probabilistic ideas in statistical inference and modelling, and the study of stochastic processes. The first section deals with events, the axioms of probability, conditional probability and independence. The second introduces random variables both discrete and continuous, including distributions, expectation and variance. Joint distributions are covered briefly.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Actuarial Professional Development IMathematical SciencesMTH4112Full year4No

Actuarial Professional Development I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This is a compulsory module that is designed to help you identify and develop the professional and business skills and knowledge that are expected of an actuary. The module will help you prepare for working in finance and for sitting the CT9 (Business Awareness) and CA3 (Communication) exams of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. The module will also help you prepare for and apply for jobs in the financial services sector. The module is expected to include a number of guest lectures from actuaries and other professionals working in financial services.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Advanced Polymer SynthesisEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7797Semester 27Yes

Advanced Polymer Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Julien Gautrot

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding and knowledge of polymer synthesis techniques and their main applications. It will focus on key areas for industrial applications: synthesis of high performance polymers, polymeric biomaterials, polymers used for energy production and in the micro-electronics area. At the beginning of the module, basic polymerisation methods and concepts will be reviewed, to enable students with different backgrounds to come to the same level in the field of polymer chemistry. Following lectures will focus on more advanced polymerisation methods and their use to synthesis functional materials with industrial applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH6991Semester 26No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 6
Manufacturing ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7713Semester 27No

Manufacturing Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Haixue Yan
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT507

Description: This module provides a development of both fundamental and technological studies of shaping, fabrication, and product-evaluation processes. It applies phase transformation, microstructure, stress analysis, diffusion, plastic deformation and/or rheology to the manufacture of different products. Examples of current practices in the automobile, aerospace and bio-medical industries are illustrated, where appropriate, to enhance students' technological awareness.
In more detail, the syllabus will cover the following topics:
Casting: nucleation, crystal growth, solidification, segregation, ingot microstructure, casting defects, casting processes, temperature and recrystallization, strain rate.
Forming: element of plasticity and deformation mechanics, selected methods of analysis of simple forming processes, element of transport properties and viscous flow, extrusion, injection moulding.
Joining and Welding: fusion welding, solid-state welding, effect of welding on materials microstructure, brazing and soldering.
Additive manufacturing methods: Rapid Prototyping.
Inspection and testing, non-destructive methods: ultrasonic inspection, magnetic inspection, acoustic emission monitoring.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6934Semester 16No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Iziumtseva
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

Description: This module aims to present some advanced probabilistic concepts and demonstrate their application to stochastic modelling of real-world situations. The topics covered vary from year to year but may include, for example, limit theorems, renewal theory, and continuous-time Markov processes. In addition to exposure to proofs and theoretical material, students develop practical skills through a large number of problems and worked examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
English Dialect SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6208PSemester 27No

English Dialect Syntax

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: LIN6208
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: English dialects display many non-standard syntactic features which challenge many of the analyses that have been proposed for standard English. In this module you'll encounter these features, have a chance to build analyses for them, and to evaluate alternative analyses from the primary literature. You must have taken at least Explaining Grammatical Structures or have an equivalent level of expertise in syntax.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Coding for LinguistsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6209Semester 16No

Coding for Linguists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides students with an introduction to computer programming and computational modelling for applied linguistics. Students will learn how to write code in a widely used programming language (Python), and gain experience in using tools that are suited to solving a range of computational problems in linguistics using machine learning approaches. There will be a focus on developing practical skills. The module is suitable for final year BA students and MA students without any prior experience in computer programming or machine learning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
English Dialect SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6208Semester 16Yes

English Dialect Syntax

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN037/LIN5213
Corequisite: None

Description: English dialects display many non-standard syntactic features which challenge many of the analyses that have been proposed for standard English. In this module you'll encounter these features, have a chance to build analyses for them, and to evaluate alternative analyses from the primary literature. You must have taken at least Explaining Grammatical Structures or have an equivalent level of expertise in syntax.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
English Dialect SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6208PSemester 17No

English Dialect Syntax

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: LIN6208
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: English dialects display many non-standard syntactic features which challenge many of the analyses that have been proposed for standard English. In this module you'll encounter these features, have a chance to build analyses for them, and to evaluate alternative analyses from the primary literature. You must have taken at least Explaining Grammatical Structures or have an equivalent level of expertise in syntax.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to PhoneticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7205Semester 17No

Introduction to Phonetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide a introduction to phonetics, one of the core sub-fields of Linguistics. This is the study of how speech sounds are produced and perceived, as well as what the acoustic properties of these sounds are. This module will focus on the main processes of phonetic articulation, practice with transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet as well as on the acoustic analysis of speech. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to PhonologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7204Semester 27No

Introduction to Phonology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Chong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. A central part of speakers' knowledge about the language that they speak is that words are not always pronounced in the same way. The variation that we observe is systematic. Phonology is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of the sound patterns, i.e. the ways in which words are pronounced differently across contexts. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of phonological analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Sociolinguistic Variation and ChangeLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5211Semester 15Yes

Sociolinguistic Variation and Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Salina Cuddy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4201/LIN4211
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an in-depth investigation of linguistic variation as a social phenomenon. Building on the knowledge acquired in LIN404 Introduction to Sociolinguistic Variation, we identify the major theoretical principles that govern language variation and change, and develop a variety of both quantitative and qualitative methodologies for their investigation. In addition to being exposed to classic pieces of research in the field, students also gain first-hand experience in conducting original sociolinguistic research projects of their own.

As a module it will be available to students registered on degree programmes involving English Language or Linguistics only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Research PracticumLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7014Semester 27No

Research Practicum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Students taking this module will work closely with a member of staff on a research project that is connected to the staff member's own research objectives and is related to the intended specialization of the student. Students will receive individualized training in the skills necessary to engage in this research, and regular supervision as they complete their project. Possible research projects include organizing and analyzing an existing data set with a view to publication of the results, designing materials for a future experiment, conducting critical literature reviews preparatory to the launch of a new line of research, collecting data from research participants, formulating new research protocols and research methods, synthesizing existing research results for presentation to non-academic audiences, etc. The skills and experience gained through this practicum will substantially enhance the preparedness of the student to pursue their own research goals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Language and the MediaLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5210Semester 15Closed

Language and the Media

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, we will investigate the social and structural factors of language standardisation and the position of media in relation to it, as well as look at journalism's collective role in influencing language style and language policy. Both print and broadcast media will be examined, and you are encouraged to consider language production practices in web-based domains. You will analyse style standardisation efforts, processes, and data from a variety of micro and macro linguistic perspectives.

It will be available to students registered on single or joint honours English Language or Linguistics degree programmes only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Developmental Disorders of Language and CognitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6205PSemester 27No

Developmental Disorders of Language and Cognition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
Overlap: LIN6205
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore current theoretical approaches and research in the area of developmental disorders of language and cognition. The following topics will be included: Theoretical and methodological issues in the study of developmental disorders; Specific Language Impairment; Dyslexia; Reading Comprehension Impairment; Autism Spectrum Disorders; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Hearing Impairment; Assessment and Intervention for Developmental Disorders.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Typology I: Languages of the WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4213Semester 24Yes

Typology I: Languages of the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hagit Borer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is an introduction to the great diversity in language structure and use around the world. Using indigenous languages from diverse regions, such as Africa, Australia, Asia and North America, we will explore the question of whether universal constraints limit the range of what is possible in human language, and if so, why such universals might exist. We will consider diversity in how social and pragmatic functions are signalled by language use in different speech communities around the world, and the problems associated with language endangerment and death. We will also examine how different language families differ from one another in sounds, word formation, sentence formation, and usage.

As a module it will be available to students registered on a degree programme involving English Language or Linguistics only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Experimental LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5039Semester 25Yes

Experimental Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides students with introductory training in theoretical and practical elements of experimental linguistics. The module will include hands-on training in statistics and hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection (including training in ethical human subjects research protocols), and data analysis. The module will also engage students in considering strengths and limitations of various kinds of linguistics data, and how multiple sources of data and methods of data collection can be combined to enhance understanding. Students will develop their critical reading skills and gain practice in presenting primary source literature to their peers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and FieldworkLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6020Semester 26Yes

Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and Fieldwork

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colleen Cotter
Overlap: LIN7020
Prerequisite: LIN4208 or permission of convenor
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an overview of ethnography of communication, a theoretical and methodological approach to analyzing and understanding a wide range of communicative patterns and language uses as they occur within social and cultural contexts. Students will also apply ethnographic insights and methodologies to fieldwork activities and projects in the local community, investigating the range of practices that constitute ethnographic research, aiming for an integrative and holistic understanding through discussion of class members' fieldwork activities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Chinese Law and InstitutionsLawLAW6453Semester 26No

Chinese Law and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module focuses on the origins, evolutions, and practices of the Chinese legal system. The first part addresses the historical and institutional foundations of the Chinese legal system. The second part provides critical insights into a number of selected aspects of Chinese private and public law with the overall purpose to critically assess the main legal challenges China is facing today. Taking stock of China's central role in the globalisation process, the third part considers the interactions and interdependence between the Chinese legal system and the international legal order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to French Public LawLawLAW6201Semester 16No

Introduction to French Public Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the students to the rules that govern the organisation, the functioning and the attributions of the French political and administrative entities, as well as the relationship between citizens and state institutions. Based primarily on an analysis of French constitutional law and administrative law, this module should provide the students with an in depth introduction to the institutions and sources of law that are at the heart of French public law. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to French Private LawLawLAW6202Semester 26Yes

Introduction to French Private Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the rules that govern the relationships between individuals, being physical persons or moral persons. It provides an introduction to the sources of French private law, the court system in France, and the basic principles, procedures, and values that govern contractual and non-contractual obligations. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Health LawLawLAW6163Full year6Yes

Health Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ruth Fletcher

Description: This module teaches students how to research, work with and develop health law. Health law is concerned with the promotion of health and well-being through access to treatment and medicines, the governance of health as a public good, the regulation of relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, and the righting of wrongs that may occur in health systems. Health law presents an excellent opportunity for students to work across the sub-disciplines of crime, tort and public law, to draw on ethics, human rights and socio-legal perspectives in building legal arguments, and to assess the impact of professional standards, patients and carers' experiences, government policy and corporate provision on law in practic

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Phonetics I: The Sounds of EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4212Semester 14Yes

Phonetics I: The Sounds of English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to give students knowledge of the main processes of phonetic articulation (mode, manner and place of articulation, airstream mechanisms, voicing, secondary articulations [velarization, palatalization, lip-rounding etc], vowel articulation including backness, height and roundness, plus a basic understanding of tone and pitch). It also aims to provide students with an understanding of how those processes are used in producing speech sounds, and with an ability to represent different sounds using an international standard (the IPA). In addition students will also be able to discriminate sounds aurally, and produce them from IPA script. The module will first focus on the sounds of English before examining sounds that are used in the world's languages. This module is a pre-requisite for the Introduction to Phonology module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Street LawLawLAW6462Semester 26No

Street Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Frances Ridout
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW6156

Description: StreetLaw is a vehicle by which the public can be made more aware of their rights and responsibilities. This module educates students about public engagement, pro bono work, StreetLaw and clinical legal education. Students learn specific areas of law and run three StreetLaw projects designed to educate different groups in the community on that area of law. Strategy, reflection, feedback, and principles of teaching / engaging audiences will be key features which are encountered during each StreetLaw project.

Students need to work with LAC staff to complete a DBS check before starting the module (university assistance will be provided).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Practical
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_56_A
Law and GlobalisationLawLAW6463Semester 26No

Law and Globalisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: Debate on globalisation remains very polarised with different perspectives regarding the extent to which law serves as a shield against or a driver of globalisation. This module looks at the impact of globalisation on legal systems as well as the role played by the law to regulate globalisation. This module will focus on law at various levels (i.e. national, regional, international and transnational), the activities of international organisations (such as WTO, World Bank and IMF), and the role played by multinational enterprises in a globalised legal landscape.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Composites for Aerospace ApplicationsSchool of Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT5030Semester 25No

Composites for Aerospace Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti

Description: The role of composites in modern engineering, in particular aerospace applications will be described which will enable the effective selection of a fibre-resin system for a range of applications . The module will include the manufacture of glass, carbon, aramid and polyethylene fibres, extending to the manufacturing of polymer composites using processes including for example resin transfer moulding, compression moulding and pultrusion. The module will also consider particulate filled composite materials and high temperature metal matrix composite materials. The module will cover the theory that is used to predict the stiffness and strength of composite components, with emphasis on exploring the roles of the three different components encountered in a composite materials of fibre (filler), matrix and the interface. A framework for understanding the cost of manufacture to enable the selection of an appropriate manufacturing technology for a part. Comparisons will be made compare to more traditional materials such as metals, in particular in aircraft applications. Failure modes in composites will be described, non-destructive testing methods such as ultrasonics and strategies towards repair of composite structures will be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Failure of SolidsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT501Semester 26No

Failure of Solids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wei Tan

Description: The physics of fracture and fracture mechanics. Application of fracture mechanics to engineering applications. Influence of temperature on the mechanical properties of materials. High temperature deformation by dislocation movement and by diffusion. Practical aspects of creep deformation. Failure of materials under cyclic loading. Theories of fatigue. Practical aspects of fatigue in engineering materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
PolymersEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT313Semester 15Yes

Polymers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti

Description: A comparative study of polymers as engineering materials. Mechanical properties of polymers and polymers reinforced with fibres and particles. Micro-mechanics and property prediction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Law ReviewLawLAW6162Full year6No

Law Review

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Morris

Description: In this module, you will take on the role of legal editor, publisher, and potential legal author while working to support the Queen Mary Yearbook of Interdisciplinary Legal Studies and the Queen Mary Human Rights Law Review. You will consider the role of law journals in the dissemination and impact of scholarship; be exposed to, critique and evaluate a diverse range of legal scholarship; and develop skills in copy-editing (including writing style, conformity with citation guides and accuracy of quotations and footnotes), law review production (including arranging for peer review and author liaison), and writing for publication. You will work both individually and in small teams. This module will require your active participation and full commitment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative MedicineSchool of Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT311Semester 16Yes

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury

Description: This specialised module covers a range of topics in Tissue Engineering. It will develop the knowledge base of the student with emphasis on the current research directions of this rapidly emerging topic supported by skills developed in the laboratory. The students will understand the multidisciplinary principles underpinning tissue engineering, They will appreciate principles that underlie behind a series of strategies to repair both tissues and organs. They will be able to apply their engineering background to biological systems. They will develop skills to enable them to be fully conversant with current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH4104Semester 24No

Introduction to Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Fink
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

Description: This module is an introduction to the basic notions of algebra, such as sets, numbers, matrices, polynomials and permutations. It not only introduces the topics, but shows how they form examples of abstract mathematical structures such as groups, rings and fields, and how algebra can be developed on an axiomatic foundation. Thus, the notions of definition, theorem and proof, example and counterexample are described. The module is an introduction to later modules in algebra.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Research and Design Team ProjectSchool of Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT7400Full year7No

Research and Design Team Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah

Description: The aim of this module is to provide a group project in accordance with the accreditation requirements as set out by engineering institutions such as the I.Mech.E and the R.Ae.S The project tackles specified engineering problems and tasks of relevance to internal research groups and/or external industry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 18.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Calculus IIMathematical SciencesMTH4101Semester 24No

Calculus II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rainer Klages
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take SPA4122 or take MTH4201
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4100 or take MTH4200

Description: This module is the second of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module introduces complex numbers, infinite series including power series, and develops techniques of differential and integral calculus in the multivariate setting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
SociophoneticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7010Semester 27No

Sociophonetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students will discover phonetic methodology which can be used to investigate sociolinguistic variation and change. Through training in the phonetic and phonemic transcription of various languages and their varieties, as well as in the acoustic analysis of speech phenomena, students will learn to objectively measure and quantify phonetic variation and change. Both segmental and prosodic analyses of speech will be examined. For example, students will conduct acoustic analyses into the acquisition of phonetic norms in a second language and how these impact a person's native language pronunciation. We will also reflect on socially significant pronunciation norms, as shared by groups of speakers, and discuss how and why such norms affect our understanding of what it means to speak "correctly" in English and other languages. The ultimate goal of this module is to equip students with an integrated understanding and set of methodological tools for phonetic studies into sociolinguistic variation and change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
From Morpheme to MeaningLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7007Semester 27Yes

From Morpheme to Meaning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Harbour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Current generative theory has developed a model of the interaction between structure, morphological form, and meaning which takes the syntax to provide the central system with which morphophonology and semantics interface. This idea has been mainly developed in primary technical literature by Chomsky, Marantz, Borer, Kayne, Cinque, Ramchand, Adger and others. The module systematically develops an understanding of what this architecture for language implies for analyses of crucial phenomena: clause and nominal structure, predication, syntactic dependencies, language variation, through a critical exploration of the relevant literature. It also develops students' skills of syntactic argumentation, and the presentation of these arguments to professional audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Calculus IMathematical SciencesMTH4100Semester 14No

Calculus I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Oscar Bandtlow
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take MTH4200
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This is the first of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques and background from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module develops the concepts and techniques of differentiating and integrating with supporting work on algebra, coordinate transformations and curve sketching.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Developmental Disorders of Language and CognitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6205Semester 26Closed

Developmental Disorders of Language and Cognition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore current theoretical approaches and research in the area of developmental disorders of language and cognition. The following topics will be included: Theoretical and methodological issues in the study of developmental disorders; Specific Language Impairment; Dyslexia; Reading Comprehension Impairment; Autism Spectrum Disorders; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Hearing Impairment; Assessment and Intervention for Developmental Disorders.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Student Centred Learning 2Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT308Full year5No

Student Centred Learning 2

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Oliver Fenwick

Description: SCL aims to develop in the students an awareness of all aspects of the subject and professional life throughout the first two years of the degree programmes offered in materials science. Cognitive and transferable skills are developed in an integrated series of seminars, practical exercises, industrial visits and problem based learning case studies. All of the exercises draw on subject matter being taught within core module units in the relevant semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Directed Study in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7211Semester 17No

Directed Study in Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an opportunity for students to undertake a course of independent study in a sub-field of Linguistics, tailored to their own interests and needs. You will work closely with a member of staff to design a programme of inquiry into an area of interest, enabling you to delve deeper into your chosen topic. The module is intended to serve as a springboard into higher-level research, by providing specialist training in your chosen area, with close supervision from a member of staff with substantial relevant expertise.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Directed Study in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7212Semester 27No

Directed Study in Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an opportunity for students to undertake a course of independent study in a sub-field of Linguistics, tailored to their own interests and needs. You will work closely with a member of staff to design a programme of inquiry into an area of interest, enabling you to delve deeper into your chosen topic. The module is intended to serve as a springboard into higher-level research, by providing specialist training in your chosen area, with close supervision from a member of staff with substantial relevant expertise.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Meaning in the Real WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7046Semester 17No

Meaning in the Real World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The study of linguistic meaning has many real-world applications. In the areas of law, healthcare, politics and other domains of public life, one must grapple with issues such as ambiguity, vagueness, and context-sensitivity. This module will investigate how analytical tools from formal semantics can be applied in order to highlight and address a diverse range of problems in these areas. We will apply the tools from Extensional Semantics to a set of real-world cases. Examples might include legal cases involving an ambiguity in the wording of a contract, the expression of pain in healthcare settings, and recent controversies over the use of racial slurs by politicians. By conducting your own investigation of a real-world case study that raises issues about the nature of linguistic meaning, you will learn about the ways in which linguistics can shed light on contemporary societal and political issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Puzzles in SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7049Semester 27No

Puzzles in Semantics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez
Overlap: LIN6049
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a problem-based module that will enable you to get hands-on experience on working through data sets from English and from other languages, and to learn how to link up your data analyses to semantic theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Sociolinguistics: English in UseLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4211Semester 24Closed

Sociolinguistics: English in Use

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: This module concerns the contexts in which English is used, and the fact that the patterns and variations in language used in the everyday are worthy of analysis. The aim is to demonstrate how language-in-use can be studied systematically, and to show how English is used in particular situations and in the module of activities, speech situations, public discourse, and interpersonal interactions that we might otherwise take for granted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 33.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 34.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 33.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Introduction to Experimental LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7039Semester 27No

Introduction to Experimental Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides students with introductory training in theoretical and practical elements of experimental linguistics. The module will include hands-on training in statistics and hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection (including training in ethical human subjects research protocols), and data analysis. The module will also engage students in considering strengths and limitations of various kinds of linguistics data, and how multiple sources of data and methods of data collection can be combined to enhance understanding. Students will develop their critical reading skills and gain practice in presenting primary source literature to their peers. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Semantics: Puzzles in MeaningLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6049Semester 26Yes

Advanced Semantics: Puzzles in Meaning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez
Overlap: LIN7049
Prerequisite: LIN5217/LIN5209
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a problem-based module that will enable you to get hands-on experience on working through data sets from English and from other languages, and to learn how to link up your analyses to theories on the topic. This module will also enable you to further develop your critical thinking and problem-solving skills more generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Phonology I: Introduction to Sound SystemsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4210Semester 24Yes

Phonology I: Introduction to Sound Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Chong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is an introduction to the theoretical study of sound systems in the world's languages. We focus on the analysis of phonological data within a linguistically principled framework, and much of our learning will be by 'doing' - thus a large portion of the classroom time and assignments will be spent on data analysis from a wide variety of languages. We will work on extracting patterns from linguistic data, characterizing these patterns and representing them formally. Basic concepts to be covered include phonemes and allophones, distinctive features, natural classes, rule formalism, rule ordering and the difference/relation between underlying (abstract) and surface forms. Other concepts include syllable structure; stress; prosodic structure; and optimality theory. This module is a pre-requisite for LIN312 Unfamiliar Languages.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multilingualism and BilingualismLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7034Semester 17No

Multilingualism and Bilingualism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: LIN6034
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the field of bilingualism and multilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspective. Topics to be covered include the definition of bilingualism and multilingualism and types of language contact, code-switching, bilingual and multilingual education and policy, as well as language development in individuals who are proficient in more than one language, and the cognitive effects of speaking more than one language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Meaning in the Real WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6046PSemester 17Yes

Meaning in the Real World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: "LIN6046, LIN7046"
Prerequisite: LIN5209/LIN5217
Corequisite: None

Description: The study of linguistic meaning has many real-world applications. In the areas of law, healthcare, politics and other domains of public life, one must grapple with issues such as ambiguity, vagueness, and context-sensitivity. This module will investigate how analytical tools from formal semantics can be applied in order to highlight and address a diverse range of problems in these areas. We will apply the tools from the Level 5 module Aspects of Meaning to a set of real-world cases. Examples might include legal cases involving an ambiguity in the wording of a contract, the expression of pain in healthcare settings, and recent controversies over the use of racial slurs by politicians. By conducting your own investigation of a real-world case study that raises issues about the nature of linguistic meaning, you will learn about the ways in which linguistics can shed light on contemporary societal and political issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Sex, Gender and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6019Semester 16Closed

Sex, Gender and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Salina Cuddy
Overlap: LIN7019
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will be an option for students on the single-honours English Language and Linguistics degree (QQH1) and for students doing joint-honours degrees that include Linguistics. In this module, students will engage in a comprehensive investigation of language as it relates to gender and sexuality. Making use of recent theoretical innovations in the field of gender and sexuality studies, the module will provide students with exposure to the descriptive claims that have been made in the literature regarding the linguistic practices of women and men, as well as the various theoretical frameworks that have been proposed to account for those claims. Students will also be encouraged to link these descriptive facts with more recent analytical accounts of gendered and sexual power relations in society. Building upon the theoretical and methodological foundation students acquire in their first two years of study, this module adds a practical/critical dimension to the study of sociolinguistics, and demonstrates to students the potential political importance of linguistics research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Sex, Gender and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6019PSemester 17No

Sex, Gender and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Salina Cuddy
Overlap: "LIN6019, LIN7019"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will be an option for students on the single-honours English Language and Linguistics degree (QQH1) and for students doing joint-honours degrees that include Linguistics. In this module, students will engage in a comprehensive investigation of language as it relates to gender and sexuality. Making use of recent theoretical innovations in the field of gender and sexuality studies, the module will provide students with exposure to the descriptive claims that have been made in the literature regarding the linguistic practices of women and men, as well as the various theoretical frameworks that have been proposed to account for those claims. Students will also be encouraged to link these descriptive facts with more recent analytical accounts of gendered and sexual power relations in society. Building upon the theoretical and methodological foundation students acquire in their first two years of study, this module adds a practical/critical dimension to the study of sociolinguistics, and demonstrates to students the potential political importance of linguistics research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and JusticeLawLAW6173Semester 26No

Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leila Selena Ullrich

Description: This course situates the study of criminology in a global and inter-disciplinary context to destabilize state- and Euro-centric conceptions of crime, punishment and justice. It starts by proposing different beginnings for criminology that reveal that in some sense the discipline has always been global. We begin with anthropological studies of so-called 'primitive' societies. How are social transgressions conceptualized and dealt with in stateless settings? Is there a concept of 'crime' to begin with? What work does the concept of crime do in organizing society? Who is being protected and who is being disciplined? We then explore two formative contexts for criminal justice: slavery and colonialism. What is the relationship between modern police forces and slave patrols? How has the `colonial encounter¿ shaped penal and policing regimes in postcolonial and metropolitan states?

After examining these `different beginnings¿, students will explore what it means to globalize crime and justice. What are we to make of 'international crimes' such as war crimes, crimes against humanity, crimes of aggression and genocide? Does it make sense to punish individuals for collective violence such as genocide in the same way as for murder? Should we reconcile, restore or transform rather than punish after mass violence?

The final part of the course looks at the global production of new forms, discourses and constituencies of criminalization and how they exclude and include people from society. Criminal justice technologies and discourses, for example, are increasingly applied to exclude refugees and migrants while some LGBTQ+ subjects are provisionally accepted into the category of 'good citizens'. How can we make sense of these new forms of criminalization and the offenders and victims they produce? How do criminal states, multinational corporations, people smugglers, child soldiers, foreign fighters, female terrorists and victims of trafficking confound our categories of victim/perpetrator in a highly racialized and gendered context of global inequality?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Art of LawLawLAW6171Semester 16Yes

The Art of Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isobel Roele

Description: The Art of Law provides an introduction to a range of ways in which law and the visual arts come together now and in the past. The module will explore how law appears in artworks including painting, sculpture, photography, and film. It will also consider when, how and why works of art appear in state institutions like courthouses, Inns of Court, government buildings, and international organisations, and how state and international organisations make use of art work in their public outreach activities.
Students will develop an understanding of basic art historical approaches and methods including psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxian, post- and anti-colonial, and queer, approaches. They will use these to navigate cutting-edge interdisciplinary research in the field of Law and the Arts. They will make their own art work, engage in class discussions, visit art galleries, watch films, and undertake an independent research project.
For the creative project, students may choose between making a 5-minute film; an A2 poster; or 5-frame photo-essay.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Principles of Revenue LawLawLAW6172Full year6No

Principles of Revenue Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The objective of this module is to introduce you to the fundamental principles of taxation law in the United Kingdom. The policies underlying fiscal legislation, the budgetary process, and the place of tax within English legal structure all are considered. A background in mathematics is not a prerequisite for this module, as the module focuses on legal principles, policies and regulation. Included amongst the topics addressed are the taxation of trades and earnings, capital gains tax, corporation and inheritance tax, and the jurisprudence of tax avoidance. Tax law is taught in context. The module fosters the skill of handling complex legal material, and teaches you to write clearly and persuasively. More specifically, the abilities to read and interpret statutory material, to understand and interpret the structure of language, and to perceive varieties of meaning and nuance all are taught. These are vital skills for any lawyer - regardless of intended area of practice. You should develop an ability to apply the law as derived from the cases, statutes and other sources to a set of given facts which are similar but not identical to those encountered in the cases. The module should also improve your ability to read and distinguish between cases. The module is taught within the wider taxation programme at Queen Mary, and strong links exist between Revenue Law and postgraduate modules and teachers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Comparative Constitutional LawLawLAW6160Semester 16No

Comparative Constitutional Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mario Mendez
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4001

Description: This course will examine from a comparative perspective the legal structures and concepts typically found in constitutions, including constitution-amending & constitution-making; constitutional interpretation and judicial review; the distinction between legislative and executive authority; federalism and subsidiarity; rights controversies (e.g. free speech); the relationship between the domestic constitution and international law. Throughout our study of specific topics, it will consider questions such as: What separates "constitutional" law from other domestic law? What is the role, if any, of comparative constitutional law in domestic constitutional law adjudication? How does our study of comparative constitutional law adapt to a global society? A wide range of constitutional systems will be engaged with in relation to specific themes including: the UK; Australia; Canada; EU & ECHR; Finland; France; Germany; Hungary; India; Japan; New Zealand; Poland; South Africa; Spain; Sweden; United States

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Syntax I: The Structure of EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4209Semester 24Yes

Syntax I: The Structure of English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a compulsory module for English Language and Linguistics students which provides students with (i) a knowledge of basic descriptive grammatical terms and how they are used in the study of English; (ii) a knowledge of the core grammatical constructions of English; (iii) a set of tools to use in tackling the structure of English sentences; (iv) an understanding of and ability to use basic descriptive tools such as tree structures and transformations in analysing the grammar of English. This module is a pre-requisite for LIN037 Explaining Grammatical Structure.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
History of EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN212Semester 25Yes

History of English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Carmen Ebner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the socio-historical events that determined the shape and uses of the English language over time. Applying concepts from sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, and general linguistic analysis, we will explore how English has changed over 1500 years, and how similar processes continue to operate on the language today. Lectures will focus on social and historical events, while seminars will involve close analysis of the structure of Old, Middle, Early Modern and Present-Day English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Language and MindLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN213Semester 15Closed

Language and Mind

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Linnaea Stockall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN101
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will provide an introduction to contemporary research on psycholinguistics. It will focus on language processing and language acquisition. Areas studied will include: language comprehension; language production; typical and atypical language acquisition; language in the brain; language and thought.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Law in AsiaLawLAW6461Semester 16No

Law in Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module introduces students to the basic elements that make up the range of legal systems in Asia including their histories, diversity, complexity and differences with Western legal systems. Through a study of a selection of legal systems in Asia, the course will enable to students to examine certain legal topics and explore how they compare with each other. These may include aspects of constitutional, criminal, civil and family law systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Law and ReligionLawLAW6460Semester 26Yes

Law and Religion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module explores the relationship of law and religion and how law deals with religion. While using material from British legal systems it also includes theoretical material from non-legal writing and, as relevant, comparative material. The course explores what religion is and how it is theorised. It covers historical material drawing links between the dominant legal culture and religion . It explores how secularisation has been variedly theorised. It includes discussion of legal responses to religious claims and how different religions are positioned or treated by the dominant legal order and public sphere.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Renewable Energy MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT427Semester 27Yes

Renewable Energy Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: A module designed to develop the tools required to apply a fundamental understanding of the application of new energy and renewable energy systems to the problems faced by climate change and global energy security. Particular focus is on the application of materials for the development of novel and new energy recovery systems such as nanostructured surfaces for solar harvesting and ultra tough composites for wind turbines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Chemistry for MaterialsSchool of Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT5002Semester 15Yes

Chemistry for Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Petra Szilagyi

Description: The role of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics in materials science. The module will begin wilth derivation and description of some fundamental kinematics and thermodynamic phenomena such as Gibbs free energy, rate equations, equilibria etc. The effect of variables such as temperature and pressure will be examined. The module will go and to demonstrate with examples how these can be applied to solve problems for gas, solution, and solid phase scenarios with a particular emphasis on polymer synthesis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Innovation StrategyEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT307Semester 16No

Innovation Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This is an important subject for everyone who has an interest in business and wants to understand how innovation can affect the success and failure of firms. Successful innovation is a very complex process and has to be very carefully managed. There is no 'right way' to manage innovation. Therefore it is important to analyse the innovation process from a range of different perspectives, for example, the role of the state in innovation and the core competencies of the firm.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Data Analytics for Decision MakingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceMIC7001Semester 27No

Data Analytics for Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Data is an integral part of our lives, as it can help us solve everyday problems as well as drive scientific and technological progress that advance society and improve our quality of life. From transport to healthcare to shopping, everyday activities are increasingly leaving digital footprints that are transforming the workplace. As the world becomes ever more data-driven, many employers are increasingly searching for people with the analytical skills who can help them make sense of it by gaining insights and knowledge from the datasets that are generated around us.

This micro-credential will introduce you to the fundamentals of data analytics, which are the first steps to becoming a highly-skilled data scientist. You will learn how to analyse, interpret and communicate data effectively to make better decisions. This micro-credential is made up of three sub courses, which will cover data analytics fundamentals, data mining techniques and data science ethics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Environmental LawLawLAW6459Semester 26Yes

International Environmental Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebecca Bates

Description: The module focuses on origins, development, main principles of international environmental law. It addresses the historical origins of IEL (the Stockholm Conference on Human Environment; the Rio Conference on Environment and Development; the Johannesburg Summit on Sustainable Development. It also deals with sources of IEL and underlying main principles such as the environmental impact assessment; the precautionary principle; intergenerational equity; human rights and environmental protection' human rights and environment. Further, it deals with sectoral particular subjects of IEL, such as climate change; biodiversity; protection of marine environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Data Analytics for Decision MakingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceMIC7001Semester 17No

Data Analytics for Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Data is an integral part of our lives, as it can help us solve everyday problems as well as drive scientific and technological progress that advance society and improve our quality of life. From transport to healthcare to shopping, everyday activities are increasingly leaving digital footprints that are transforming the workplace. As the world becomes ever more data-driven, many employers are increasingly searching for people with the analytical skills who can help them make sense of it by gaining insights and knowledge from the datasets that are generated around us.

This micro-credential will introduce you to the fundamentals of data analytics, which are the first steps to becoming a highly-skilled data scientist. You will learn how to analyse, interpret and communicate data effectively to make better decisions. This micro-credential is made up of three sub courses, which will cover data analytics fundamentals, data mining techniques and data science ethics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Environmental Properties of MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7040Semester 17No

Environmental Properties of Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT507

Description: Recycling - possibilities of recycling schemes for different types of materials like glasses, plastics and metals will be discussed.
Environmental politics - such as the EU end of life vehicle directive will be discussed as well as other political drivers for creating a sustainable society.
Ecodesign - the benefits of designing for recycling using a cradle to grave design methodology. Examining in detail designs for single material or reduced number of materials systems that can be easily disassembled.
Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) - Detail of how the life cycle analysis is undertaken, including instruction in the use of appropriate life cycle analysis software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dissertation ProseminarLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7005Semester 27No

Dissertation Proseminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Research at postgraduate level places special demands on the developing researcher, for which appropriate training is needed. The two primary goals of this module are to prepare students for the practical challenges of postgraduate research (including the development of a research question/agenda, advanced library research, ethics and practical dimensions of research collection, outlining and writing a dissertation, abstract-writing, oral presentation, and other related skills) and to initiate students into specialised research in their chosen dissertation area. The first part of the module (before reading week) will cover core, generic postgraduate training for all students on the MA, taught through group sessions. The second part of the module (after reading week) will require students to apply this knowledge (as well as knowledge from core modules in Semester 1) to their chosen area of research by pursuing independent reading and research towards their potential dissertation topics (to be completed during the summer term), taught through individual meetings with supervisors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7006Full year7No

Dissertation in Linguistics

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: During this module, students (in coordination with a supervisor) will select a topic for advanced study; collect and analyze data to adequately address the chosen topic; and write a 15,000 word dissertation. Through the dissertation, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Applied Dental MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT220Semester 16Yes

Applied Dental Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karin Hing

Description: This module will provide an understanding of the interrelationships that exist between different dental materials and that dictate their usage in clinical practice in order to develop depth and applied knowledge of the key specialist dental materials including the science that underpins their technical usage.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 45.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Formal SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7210Semester 17No

Formal Semantics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module trains students in the craft of doing formal semantics. It introduces Frege's hypothesis that functional application is the mechanism by which the meaning of a complex phrase is composed from the meanings of its constituent parts. It applies this method to the analysis of a variety of core semantic phenomena, including argument structure, adjectival modification, definite descriptions, relative clauses, binding and quantification. These phenomena are all extensional, meaning that insightful analyses of them can be developed without recourse to theories of possible worlds, situations, or temporal intervals. Emphasis throughout is on training students to be able to produce explicit detailed analyses of novel data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Language and Health CommunicationLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6204Semester 26Yes

Language and Health Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nelya Koteyko
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Health communication is becoming increasingly important in a world faced with new health challenges from obesity to Ebola, anxiety to diabetes. This module considers the role of language in our experience of and beliefs about health and illness. Students will learn how health communication differs among various communities, both monolingual and multilingual, from the grassroots level, such as in families, to broader groups, for example, between health professionals and patients. It also considers the effects of social diversity, such as the age, gender and ethnicity of patients and healthcare professionals. Students will become proficient in analysing a range of relevant uses of language, including narratives about health and illness, the representation of health and illness in the media, computer-mediated communication about illness, and public health information, persuasion and campaigns.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Science of BiocompatibilityEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT6312Semester 26Yes

Science of Biocompatibility

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karin Hing

Description: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts related to biocompatibility. It will cover topics including proteins and protein adsorption, cells and tissue interactions (attachment, fluid shear and mechanotransduction), biomaterial blood and cell interactions, Inflammation, wound healing and foreign body response and Toxicity, hypersensitivity and infection.
The In vitro testing of biomaterials will be considered with respect to
- chemical exchange and degradation
- cell response (proliferation vs differentiation)
- evaluation of material compatibility
- evaluation of device functionality (biomechanics, remodelling/adaptation)
Matters related to clinical trials and regulatory approval will be considered including clean manufacturing, microbiology, packaging and sterility assurance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 45.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7209Semester 17No

Syntax

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Empirical results in a broad range of languages have now made the understanding of the basic building blocks of syntactic theory fundamental to any advanced work in linguistics, not only in syntax and semantics, but within any area of linguistics. This module will familiarize students with the basic elements of syntactic construction, serving at the same time as an introduction for students with less background, and as a critical overview, for those more advanced. Emphasis will be put on the development of argumentation skills and the ability to undertake independent analysis of linguistic data, as well as on the development of critical thinking in evaluating competing approaches to the same paradigms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Interaction and DiscourseLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5204Semester 15Yes

Interaction and Discourse

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colleen Cotter
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: Language is central to spoken and written interaction. In this module, students will learn about the major theoretical frameworks that have been developed to analyze how spoken interaction is structured, how different kinds of texts communicate social and pragmatic meaning, and the ways in which larger social and cultural structures are reflected in patterns of language use. The module will introduce students to such frameworks as Politeness and Interpersonal Pragmatics, Conversation Analysis, Narrative Analysis, and (Critical) Discourse Analysis. Students will have the opportunity to conduct qualitative analyses on a variety of different spoken and written texts, and will develop the basic skills necessary for future research in qualitative sociolinguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Semantics of African American EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5203Semester 25Yes

Semantics of African American English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN402/LIN4209 and LIN5209/LIN5217
Corequisite: None

Description: With an estimated 30 million speakers, African American English is a major dialect of English. At the same time, it continues to suffer from the stigma of being considered 'bad English'. Yet just like with any other language, the surface variety that we see in AAE belies a complex, rule-governed system. We will study the grammar of AAE with a particular emphasis on those properties that determine how meaning is conveyed. An array of distinctive semantic features will be investigated, for example in the domains of tense, aspect, pronouns, quotatives and negation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors SchemeMathematical SciencesMTH6110Semester 26No

Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows undergraduates to gain valuable transferable skills whilst exploring the teaching profession first hand by working with a teacher in a local school. The key skills gained include communication and presentation of mathematics, team-working, active listening, time management and prioritisation. The module will be supported by regular classes and assessed by a combination of written reports and an oral presentation. Registration for this module requires validation; places will be limited and interviews to assess suitability will be held during Semester A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Research Methods in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5202Semester 25No

Research Methods in Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Devyani Sharma
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on how to conduct original empirical research in Linguistics. Students will get hands-on experience in conducting original research, including designing a project, collecting different types of linguistic data, doing qualitative and quantitative analysis, and presenting research findings. Since the best way to learn research methods is to practice them, students will do regular practical field assignments. They will also learn about the theoretical underpinnings of various research methods. The module will help prepare students for conducting independent research, but will also provide general transferrable skills such as how best to collect data to answer a specific question, how to understand and conduct statistical and other analysis, and how to interpret data patterns. The module is conducted as a seminar: active participation is expected and encouraged.

As a module it will be available to students registered on a single or joint honours programme involving English Language or Linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105Semester 26Yes

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Number TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH5130Semester 15Yes

Number Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shu Sasaki
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

Description: This module considers fundamental problems in number theory, related to the distribution of prime numbers and integer solutions to Diophantine equations. Students will learn the core concepts in number theory such as the existence of primitive roots modulo a prime, quadratic reciprocity and solving Pell's equation. Additionally, students will learn how to develop and implement algorithms to efficiently solve computational questions which arise in number theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4001Semester 14Yes

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4006"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
SAS for Business IntelligenceMathematical SciencesMTH782PSemester 17No

SAS for Business Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: Quantitative Business Intelligence refers to the general application of quantitative techniques to business insight generation or the business decision process.
This module builds on the Data Analytics module by increasing the level of sophistication of the techniques employed.
Students will use SAS to solve business problems related to hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression.
The module will also present techniques related to cleaning of noisy data, detection of outliers, filling in blanks which are key to any industry implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Probability and Statistics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5129Semester 15No

Probability and Statistics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take ECN115 ) and ( take MTH4216 or take MTH4116 )

Description: This module further develops the ideas introduced in the first year probability and statistics modules. It begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions required, such as covariance, correlation and independence of random variables. It then describes different types of statistical tests and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Numbers, Sets and FunctionsMathematical SciencesMTH4213Semester 14No

Numbers, Sets and Functions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Johnson
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4113
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: The modules cover the fundamental building blocks of mathematics (sets, sequences, functions, relations and numbers). It introduces the main number systems (natural numbers, integers, rational, real and complex numbers), outlining their construction and main properties. They also introduce the concepts of definition, theorem, proof and counterexample.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
German Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4000Full year4Yes

German Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4005"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH781PSemester 27No

Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin

Description: Data Analytics refers to the use of statistics on data sets to aid in business decision making and in developing business insights. This module introduces concepts associated with business analytics.
The emphasis of the module will be on realistic business cases. In order to develop the practical aspects of the subject the student will learn about some of the industry standard packages. such as Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) under Excel, Hadoop, R, and SPSS.
Some of these systems will be described at a high level in order to allow the student gain a global view of the field without having to master every single system.
The course will include a summary overview of the basic statistical techniques used to describe a data set and explore the implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786USemester 17No

Machine Learning with Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This course aims at providing students with Machine Learning skills based on the Python programming language as it is currently used in industry. Some of the presented methods are regression and classification techniques (linear and logistic regression, least-square); clustering; dimensionality reduction techniques such as PCA, SVD and matrix factorization. More advanced methods such as generalized linear models, neural networks and Bayesian inference using graphical models are also introduced. The course is self-contained in terms of the necessary mathematical tools (mostly probability) and coding techniques. At the end of the course, students will be able to formalize a ML task, choose the appropriate method in order to tackle it while being able to assess its performance, and to implement these algorithms in Python.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Anthropology and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7008Semester 27No

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall

Description: The module will introduce key theoretical themes and concepts in anthropology which relate to global health issues. A range of topics will be presented which demonstrate how anthropologists have understood global health issues as biological, cultural and social in nature. The content will include theoretical perspectives in medical anthropology, illness narratives, biopolitics, pharmaceutical governance, health citizenship, structural violence and social suffering, medical technologies, global mental health, the anthropology of communicable and non-communicable disease, medical pluralism, and the anthropology of bioethics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH734USemester 17No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Globalisation and Contemporary Medical EthicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7004Semester 27No

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amos Miran Epstein

Description: The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics: consent and consensus medical confidentiality, the discourse on distributive justice, human and animal research ethics, end-of-life ethics, transplant ethics, and reproductive ethics. The introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Human Rights and Public HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7005Semester 27No

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang

Description: This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761USemester 17No

Financial Instruments and Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762PSemester 27No

Continuous-time Models in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771P

Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786PFull year7No

Machine Learning with Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This module will introduce you to some of the most widely-used techniques in machine learning (ML). After reviewing the necessary background mathematics, we will investigate various ML methods, such as linear regression, polynomial regression and classification with logistic regression. The module covers a very wide range of practical applications, with an emphasis on hands-on numerical work using Python. At the end of the module, you will be able to formalise a ML task, choose the appropriate method to process it numerically, implement the ML algorithm in Python, and assess the method¿s performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761PSemester 17No

Financial Instruments and Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786PSemester 17No

Machine Learning with Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This module will introduce you to some of the most widely-used techniques in machine learning (ML). After reviewing the necessary background mathematics, we will investigate various ML methods, such as linear regression, polynomial regression and classification with logistic regression. The module covers a very wide range of practical applications, with an emphasis on hands-on numerical work using Python. At the end of the module, you will be able to formalise a ML task, choose the appropriate method to process it numerically, implement the ML algorithm in Python, and assess the method¿s performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
MSci ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH717UFull year7No

MSci Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis

Description: You will write a report that must present the study of some mathematical topic at fourth-year undergraduate level and must be your own work in the sense that it gives an original account of the material, but it need not contain new mathematical results. The list of potential projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted for a specific project only after agreement between the module organiser and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 16No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: Must not take other projects
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEF_6_S
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 26No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
Overlap: Must not take other projects
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEF_6_S
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154PSemester 16No

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4146Full year4No

Japanese Language and Culture I(a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4041, LAN4046, LAN4141"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150Semester 26No

Numerical Computing with C and C++

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5001

Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154Semester 16Yes

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Japanese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4046Semester 14No

Japanese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4041, LAN4045"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Actuarial Professional Development IIMathematical SciencesMTH5127Semester 15No

Actuarial Professional Development II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

Description: This is a compulsory module, counting towards your final degree classification, that is designed to help you build your professional and business skills and knowledge, and prepare for employment in the financial services industry. The module is a continuation of the skills development included in Actuarial Professional Development 1. The focus in this module is applying actuarial skills to business situations, developing a working knowledge of the Actuaries Code and related professional standards, and developing an awareness of key business issues that are relevant to the work of an actuary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Coding TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6108PSemester 26No

Coding Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shu Sasaki

Description: The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4045Full year4No

Japanese Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4040, LAN4046"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142PSemester 26No

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Coding TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6108Semester 26Yes

Coding Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Bayesian Statistical MethodsMathematical SciencesMTH6102Semester 16Yes

Bayesian Statistical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. You will be shown some of the drawbacks with classical statistical methods and that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction. At the end you will be able to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of situations and know how to use suitable software. Bayesian methods are being increasingly used across many applications and it is important that you know about them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH6101Semester 26Yes

Introduction to Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: Machine Learning is a rapidly growing field, at the boundary between Statistics and Computer Science. This course gives an understanding of the theoretical basis for machine learning and a set of concrete algorithms including decision tree learning and classification methods. Moreover, this course will introduce some classical statistical methods for high-dimensional data. The course also includes programming and use of algorithms on concrete data set.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Actuarial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5125Semester 25No

Actuarial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5124

Description: This module extends the methods used in Actuarial Mathematics I. We study concepts involved with gross premium reserves, including death strain, mortality profit and Thiele's equation. We show how to calculate life table functions, annuities and assurances involving two lives, assuming independence. We describe and use methods of valuing expected cashflows that are contingent upon multiple decrement events. We investigate projected cashflow techniques for pricing unit-linked contracts. We describe the principal forms of heterogeneity within a population.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Statistics for InsuranceMathematical SciencesMTH5126Semester 25No

Statistics for Insurance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module begins with a study of loss distributions, with and without reinsurance. We then study compound distributions and their applications in risk modelling. The module then introduces the concepts of copulas and extreme value theory. Finally, we study topics related to ruin theory and look at how insurance companies estimate their liabilities using run-off triangles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Introduction to ProbabilityMathematical SciencesMTH4207Semester 14No

Introduction to Probability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosemary Harris
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4107
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This is the first module in probability, covering events and random variables. It introduces the basic notions of probability theory and develops them to the stage where one can begin to use probabilistic ideas in statistical inference and modelling, and the study of stochastic processes. The first section deals with events, the axioms of probability, conditional probability and independence. The second introduces random variables both discrete and continuous, including distributions, expectation and variance. Joint distributions are covered briefly.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH781PSemester 17No

Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Baule

Description: Data Analytics refers to the use of statistics on data sets to aid in business decision making and in developing business insights. This module introduces concepts associated with business analytics.
The emphasis of the module will be on realistic business cases. In order to develop the practical aspects of the subject the student will learn about some of the industry standard packages. such as Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) under Excel, Hadoop, R, and SPSS.
Some of these systems will be described at a high level in order to allow the student gain a global view of the field without having to master every single system.
The course will include a summary overview of the basic statistical techniques used to describe a data set and explore the implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Programming for Business AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH785PSemester 17No

Programming for Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

Description: This module will provide an introduction to programming in a commercial environment including:
- Advanced use of Microsoft Excel for data analysis
- Usage of Macros to automate common tasks
- Introduction of Visual Basic for applications programming language (VBA)
- Writing custom Excel functions and subroutines using VBA
- Design of databases in Microsoft Access
- Querying data with Microsoft Access
- Externally loading data to Microsoft Access
- Using ActiveX Data objects
- The SQL query language

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Calculus IIMathematical SciencesMTH4201Semester 24Yes

Calculus II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rainer Klages
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take SPA4122 or take MTH4101
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4100 or take MTH4200

Description: This module is the second of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module introduces complex numbers, infinite series including power series, and develops techniques of differential and integral calculus in the multivariate setting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7001Semester 17No

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypothesis about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider association with income and distribution of money, resources, and power at global, national, and local level. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH712PSemester 17No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Iziumtseva

Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Medicines and Pharmaceutical MarketsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6109Semester 26No

Medicines and Pharmaceutical Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module considers drug discovery and the forms and stages of clinical trials. Examples will be given of the influence of networks of public-private partnership on drug approvals. A further focus will be on the regulation of medicines and how patterns of national and regional pharmaceutical production and supply are affected by international regulation such as TRIPS, TTIP and international institutions such as the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The module will also give a comparative overview of national regulatory standards for the production, quality control, distribution, prescribing of medicines, and systems of pharmacovigilance. It will also cover issues related to access to medicine and identify areas in which the market has failed to meet global health needs. For example no new drugs have been developed since the 1950s for `neglected diseases¿ such as chagas in Latin America and leishmaniasis in Africa, and current drugs for these diseases are prohibitively expensive; at the same time infectious disease in poorer societies remains untreated, and the global market for anti-depressants has grown.

The module will be assessed by an essay that will be linked to a 15 minute formative presentation that will take place during the seminar time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7000Semester 17No

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Seif Shaheen

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743USemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Calculus IMathematical SciencesMTH4200Semester 14No

Calculus I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Oscar Bandtlow
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take MTH4100
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This is the first of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques and background from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module develops the concepts and techniques of differentiating and integrating with supporting work on algebra, coordinate transformations and curve sketching.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4142Full year4Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4042, LAN4047, LAN4147"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description:
Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language.

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743PSemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750USemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151PSemester 16No

Partial Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Juan Antonio Valiente Kroon

Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141PSemester 16No

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142Semester 26Yes

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134Semester 16Yes

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: The module will develop the general theory of linear models, building on theory taught in Statistical Modelling I. This module will introduce generalised linear models, which can be used for modelling data such as binary data and count data, where a normal distribution would not be appropriate. These developments dramatically extend the range of problems that can be studied. The methods will be implemented using R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134PSemester 16No

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad

Description: This is the part of linear models often called analysis of variance. It concentrates on models whose explanatory variables are qualitative. These methods are used in almost all areas of business, economics, science and industry where qualitative and quantitative data are collected.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4042Semester 24Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4040, LAN4047"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107Semester 16Yes

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shabnam Beheshti
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107PSemester 16No

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Clark

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Applied Linear AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH5212Semester 15Yes

Applied Linear Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5112
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

Description: This module covers concepts in linear algebra and its applications. The ideas for two- and three-dimensional space covered by the appropriate first year module will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH5123Semester 15Yes

Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Weini Huang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: Differential equations frequently arise in application of mathematics to science, engineering , social science and economics. This module provides an introduction to the methods of analysis and solution of simple classes of ordinary differential equations. The topics covered will include first- and second-order differential equations, autonomous systems of differential equations and analysis of stability of their solutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Actuarial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH5124Semester 15No

Actuarial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Baule
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

Description: Mathematics is used extensively to value annuities and assurances. We study compound interest, rates of discount, and interest compounded continuously. We will understand the idea of present value and how present value allows us to appraise investment projects. We cover annuities-certain. We consider life tables and use them to find the expected present value of life annuities and life assurances, premiums if life assurances are paid for by life annuities, and surrender value of life assurances.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113PSemester 26No

Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathrin Glau

Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Ring TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6158Semester 26No

Ring Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

Description: The modern axiomatic approach to mathematics is demonstrated in the study of algebraic structures. This module will focus on ring theory, which includes integral domains, ideals, homomorphisms and isomorphism theorems, polynomial rings, the Euclidean algorithm, and fields of fractions. It will be illustrated by some familiar examples, such as the rings of integers and polynomials in one variable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Probability and Statistics IMathematical SciencesMTH4116Semester 24Yes

Probability and Statistics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wolfram Just
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4216
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

Description: This module develops the theory of probability from the module `Introduction to Probability' and then introduces the fundamental ideas of classical statistics. It covers descriptive statistics, the estimation of population moments using data and the basic ideas of statistical inference, hypothesis testing and interval estimation. These methods will be applied to data from a range of applications, including business, economics, science and medicine. A simple statistics package will be used to perform the calculations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Vectors and MatricesMathematical SciencesMTH4115Semester 24No

Vectors and Matrices

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4215
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

Description: Properties of two- and three-dimensional space turn up almost everywhere in mathematics. For example, vectors represent points in space, equations describe shapes in space and transformations move shapes around in spaces; a fruitful idea is to classify transformations by the points and shapes that they leave fixed. Most mathematicians like to be able to 'see' in special terms why something is true, rather than simply relying on formulas. This model ties together the most useful notions from geometry - which give the meaning of the formulas - with the algebra that gives the methods of calculation. It is an introductory module assuming nothing beyond the common core of A-level Mathematics or equivalent.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PFull year7No

Optimisation for Business Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH776PSemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PSemester 27No

Optimisation for Business Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH709USemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6102
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH6134

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745USemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH5101 or take MTH5100 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750PSemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700USemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

Description: This module is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, which will provide preparation for the MSci project. You will learn how to review critically and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. You will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that you are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork. You will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141Semester 16Yes

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Neural Networks and Deep LearningMathematical SciencesMTH767PSemester 27No

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jingwei Liang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module introduces you to several state-of-the-art methodologies for machine learning with neural networks (NNs). After discussing the basic theory of constructing and calibrating NNs, we consider various types of NN suitable for different purposes, such as convolutional NNs, recurrent NNs, autoencoders and generative adversarial networks. This module includes a wide range of practical applications; you will implement each type of network using Python for your weekly coursework assignments, and will calibrate these networks to real datasets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Introduction to Computer ProgrammingMathematical SciencesMTH5001Semester 25No

Introduction to Computer Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Prellberg
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4116 or take MTH4216 ) and ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take ECN115 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

Description: This module develops computer programming skills that are fundamental to applying theoretical results from Mathematics and Statistics in business and industry. Students will learn to write programs in a widely used programming language to solve problems coming from real world situations using theoretical results from the mathematics and statistics modules they took previously. These computational skills are applicable to any role that requires quantitative analysis and evidence-based decision making.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140PSemester 16No

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151Semester 16Yes

Partial Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Juan Antonio Valiente Kroon
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132PSemester 26No

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140Semester 16Yes

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PFull year7No

Programming in Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132Semester 26Yes

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PSemester 17No

Programming in Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157Semester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5125 and take MTH5129

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157PSemester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106PSemester 16No

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
SMS Placement TutorialMathematical SciencesMTH5200AFull year5No

SMS Placement Tutorial

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module is designed to prepare students to identify and apply for placement as part of their third year of study. It will also support them in being equipped to get maximum benefit from their time out on placement and how to complete the various assessments and reports required.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 5
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106Semester 16Yes

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 5 matching mth

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Actuarial StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH5131Semester 25No

Actuarial Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module builds on the statistical theory of the Level 5 modules Probability and Statistics II and Statistical Modelling I. It begins with estimation of population parameters and a study of exploratory data analysis, in particular measures of correlation. It then introduces concepts from Bayesian Statistics and uses them to calculate Bayesian estimators. Finally, we study topics on generalised linear models (GLMs), including that of fitting a GLM to a dataset and interpreting its output.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Mathematical and Actuarial Work ExperienceMathematical SciencesMTH5200Full year5No

Mathematical and Actuarial Work Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The Work Experience (or Professional Placement) year consists of one year spent working with an employer in a mathematical, actuarial or related role. The year is undertaken between the second and fourth years of your degree programme. The module is assessed, and will contribute towards your final degree title. Assessment will be through a combination of a learning journal, a learning objectives task with employer input and feedback, a report and a short presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 5
Statistical Modelling IMathematical SciencesMTH5120Semester 25No

Statistical Modelling I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Lorenzo Rossi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129 and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: This is a first module on linear models and it concentrates on modelling the relationship between a continuous response variable and one or more continuous explanatory variables. Linear models are very widely used in almost every field of business, economics, science and industry where quantitative data are collected. They are also the basis for several more advanced statistical techniques covered in Level 6 modules. This module is concerned with both the theory and applications of linear models and covers problems of estimation, inference and interpretation. Graphical methods for model checking will be discussed and various model selection techniques introduced. Computer practical sessions, in which the Minitab statistical package is used to perform the necessary computations and on which the continuous assessment is based, form an integral part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Time Series Analysis for BusinessMathematical SciencesMTH783PSemester 27No

Time Series Analysis for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6139P

Description: This module will present the basic techniques of Time Series analysis.
These will allow the student to better understand how to use historical business data series.
The student will learn how to extract any trend and cyclic component of a data series, calculate the autocorrelation, learn about autoregressive and moving average models, and cointegration.
The module will develop the notions around realistic business examples and solutions will be provided either in SAS or in Excel/VBA.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113Semester 26No

Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathrin Glau
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6154

Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Linear Programming and GamesMathematical SciencesMTH5114Semester 25No

Linear Programming and Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Justin Ward
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: This module introduces students to the practical modelling of real-world operational problems, together with the mathematical theory behind the most widespread tools for solving these problems. Students will learn how to model common operational problems as linear programs, will study the basic, underlying theory of linear programming, and gain some familiarity with how widely used software tools for solving such problems work. Building on these concepts, students will also learn basic game theory, including how to model and solve optimisation problems that involve future uncertainty or a competing adversary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Actuarial Financial EngineeringMathematical SciencesMTH6112Semester 26No

Actuarial Financial Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6155
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced techniques in financial mathematics for actuaries, building on the foundational material in Financial Mathematics 1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuous time models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
DissertationLanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM005Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kiera Vaclavik
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Dissertation

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105PSemester 26No

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6212Semester 26Yes

Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SML6211
Corequisite: DBS clearance

Description: This module introduces students to language teaching at school. It includes French, German, Spanish, and Russian. The module can count for a degree in those languages. It is the second of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the practical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other one (SML6211 which runs during the first semester) focuses on theoretical issues.
Through the completion of this module, and building up on the theoretical knowledge which you have acquired in SML6211, you develop practical knowledge of how to design and deliver materials for the purpose of teaching foreign languages. You focus on practical aspects of second/ foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and design of teaching materials. You complete a teaching placement in a local primary or secondary school, where you have an opportunity to apply the theoretical knowledge gained in SML6211 in the actual teaching and learning context. This involves planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. The module also enables you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.
Important: As you are required to complete a placement in a local school, you will have to provide clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) towards the end of semester 1 BEFORE this module in semester 2. Please contact the module organiser for further information.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787USemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739USemester 17No

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

Description: This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
SAS for Business IntelligenceMathematical SciencesMTH782PSemester 27No

SAS for Business Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: Quantitative Business Intelligence refers to the general application of quantitative techniques to business insight generation or the business decision process.
This module builds on the Data Analytics module by increasing the level of sophistication of the techniques employed.
Students will use SAS to solve business problems related to hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression.
The module will also present techniques related to cleaning of noisy data, detection of outliers, filling in blanks which are key to any industry implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773USemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Probability and Statistics IMathematical SciencesMTH4216Semester 24Yes

Probability and Statistics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wolfram Just
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4116
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

Description: This module develops the theory of probability from the module `Introduction to Probability' and then introduces the fundamental ideas of classical statistics. It covers descriptive statistics, the estimation of population moments using data and the basic ideas of statistical inference, hypothesis testing and interval estimation. These methods will be applied to data from a range of applications, including business, economics, science and medicine. A simple statistics package will be used to perform the calculations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773PSemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745PSemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787PSemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739PSemester 17No

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis

Description: This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4151Full year4Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4056, LAN4156"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4152Full year4Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4052, LAN4057, LAN4157"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4147Full year4No

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4042, LAN4047, LAN4142"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Vectors and MatricesMathematical SciencesMTH4215Semester 24No

Vectors and Matrices

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Abhishek Saha
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4115
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

Description: Properties of two- and three-dimensional space turn up almost everywhere in mathematics. For example, vectors represent points in space, equations describe shapes in space and transformations move shapes around in spaces; a fruitful idea is to classify transformations by the points and shapes that they leave fixed. Most mathematicians like to be able to 'see' in special terms why something is true, rather than simply relying on formulas. This model ties together the most useful notions from geometry - which give the meaning of the formulas - with the algebra that gives the methods of calculation. It is an introductory module assuming nothing beyond the common core of A-level Mathematics or equivalent.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762USemester 27No

Continuous-time Models in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771U

Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 17No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Primoz Skraba

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 27No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139PSemester 26No

Time Series

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Yoo
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH783P

Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150PSemester 26No

Numerical Computing with C and C++

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis

Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4047Semester 24No

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4042, LAN4045"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139Semester 26Yes

Time Series

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Yoo
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4081Semester 14Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4061, CON4066, LAN4080, LAN4086"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155Semester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6112
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1. We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155PSemester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime
models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
United Kingdom Human Rights LawLawLAW6019Semester 16No

United Kingdom Human Rights Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Merris Amos

Description: This module concerns the interpretation and application of the Human Rights Act 1998 and other important issues concerning the legal protection of human rights in the United Kingdom. There will be a significant focus upon procedural issues including victims, respondents and remedies. Two substantive Convention rights will also be considered in detail - the right to life and freedom of expression.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4012Semester 24Yes

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4017"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Global Health, Governance and LawSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6009Semester 26Yes

Global Health, Governance and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jonathan Kennedy

Description: The protection of public health at the national and subnational level often depends significantly on various decisions made at the international or global level by regimes, including those related to trade, finance, law, diplomacy and inter-governmental relations. Such regimes can have a profound impact on the determinants of health as experienced within countries, at the national and local levels, and have become increasingly important as a result of ever-deepening forms of 'globalisation' and the threat of global hazards to health such as large-scale global environmental change. This module provides an introduction to the disciplines of international relations, international politics, international jurisprudence, globalization and global governance as they relate to global health. It will examine the content and operation of various supra-national policy instruments, structures, institutions and processes, and place these within the context of the right to health and contemporary controversies and topical issues being confronted by the global health community.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Law, Modernity and the HolocaustLawLAW6018Full year6No

Law, Modernity and the Holocaust

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison

Description: This module explores the Holocaust and the related Nazi racial-biological world view with particular reference to the role of law. Students will examine issues such as the occurrence of genocide in modernity, the role law played in reinforcing European anti-Semitism, the lessons for law and legal philosophy arising from Hitler's rise to power and the use of constitutional means to rule using emergency powers, the divergent views in legal theory linking law with democracy or dictatorship, the legalization of the Nazi racial-biological world-view through eugenics and anti-Jewish legislation, the coordination of legal and administrative officials throughout occupied Europe, the difficulties posed to notions of legal and moral accountability by 'state crime' and `state sanctioned massacre¿. The post WWII ambivalent role of law in responding to the holocaust will be examined along with the rise of 'genocide' as a concept of international criminal law, a subject of research and a prism for understanding the 'dark side' of modernity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Gender, Sexuality and HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6008Semester 26Yes

Gender, Sexuality and Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: Recent media coverage and debate over female genital mutilation, trafficking, circumcision, gender reassignment, trans issues, and LGBTQI healthcare provision, have moved gender and sexuality to be central issues in health and human rights. Often in public health and medicine, through the adopting of a biomedical model, 'gender' is coupled with 'woman' and heterosexuality assumed. Public and academic debate, though, regularly unpacks, even attacks, these assumptions. This module responds to such shifts and debates, encouraging students to explore contemporary issues around gender, sexuality and health in society through seminars and self-directed research. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate the broad array of potential developments around gender and sexuality in public and global health policy and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Evidence, Policy and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6007Semester 16No

Evidence, Policy and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Megan Clinch

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and practical / applied public health perspective. The literature covered in the module will draw attention to the nature of social systems that are influenced by a range of socially, culturally and politically mediated factors and variables. Its approach to the study of the social factors that influence health, public health programmes and health policy will differ from, but complement, the teaching and methods of study that are covered in the Epidemiology and Statistics module (ICM6040). Overall the module will develop and strengthen critical appraisal skills and help intercalating students develop a command of the multi-disciplinary field of Global Health. These are skills that will be new, and crucial throughout their studies and in particular during the second semester as students begin to consider their dissertation project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Research, Evidence and PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7108Semester 17No

Research, Evidence and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and applied public health perspective. It will use case studies to demonstrate the limitations of evidence, and to debunk the common misconception that there is a universal hierarchy of evidence. Instead, it will describe how different methods and different types of evidence are required to answer different policy questions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research, Evidence and PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7108Full year7No

Research, Evidence and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and applied public health perspective. It will use case studies to demonstrate the limitations of evidence, and to debunk the common misconception that there is a universal hierarchy of evidence. Instead, it will describe how different methods and different types of evidence are required to answer different policy questions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Disease Management: Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7107Full year7No

Disease Management: Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: The module is designed to build links between an appreciation of the clinical features of disease and their implications for the design of health programmes and plans. The module will build on the capstone module on the determinants of global health, and introduce students to different approaches and types of interventions aimed at preventing and controlling diseases. The module will cover epidemiology and the global burden of disease. Among the case studies that will be used to introduce students to public health policy and practice are: past and current efforts related to eradicate smallpox and polio; expanding access to treatment for HIV, TB and malaria; the control of communicable disease outbreaks and epidemics; unhealthy tobacco and alcohol consumption; mental illness; diabetes; and child obesity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Disease Management: Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7107Semester 17No

Disease Management: Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: The module is designed to build links between an appreciation of the clinical features of disease and their implications for the design of health programmes and plans. The module will build on the capstone module on the determinants of global health, and introduce students to different approaches and types of interventions aimed at preventing and controlling diseases. The module will cover epidemiology and the global burden of disease. Among the case studies that will be used to introduce students to public health policy and practice are: past and current efforts related to eradicate smallpox and polio; expanding access to treatment for HIV, TB and malaria; the control of communicable disease outbreaks and epidemics; unhealthy tobacco and alcohol consumption; mental illness; diabetes; and child obesity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Inequalities and the State of Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7101Semester 17No

Health Inequalities and the State of Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: This module will introduce students to the broad topic of global health. It will provide students with an understanding of the current pattern of health status across the world, and how human health indicators have evolved over time. In doing so, students will learn about the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and learn about different frameworks for classifying the different determinants of health and how they relate to each other. Students will critically examine how biological, social, economic and environmental determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. It goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. The module will introduce students to an examination of global health using the multiple lenses of different discourses and disciplines including: epidemiology; politics; human rights; philosophy; economics; and sociology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Inequalities and the State of Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7101Full year7No

Health Inequalities and the State of Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: This module will introduce students to the broad topic of global health. It will provide students with an understanding of the current pattern of health status across the world, and how human health indicators have evolved over time. In doing so, students will learn about the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and learn about different frameworks for classifying the different determinants of health and how they relate to each other. Students will critically examine how biological, social, economic and environmental determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. It goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. The module will introduce students to an examination of global health using the multiple lenses of different discourses and disciplines including: epidemiology; politics; human rights; philosophy; economics; and sociology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4011Semester 14Yes

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4016"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4122Full year4Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4022, LAN4027, LAN4127"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6025Full year6No

Spanish Language and Culture III

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6020, LAN6026"
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Global Public Health Dissertation ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7100Full year7No

Global Public Health Dissertation Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will consist of a self-directed research project, with some group and one-to-one support provided by online tutors. In general, the research project will not involve any primary data collection - but will rely on desk-based data collection and analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5012Semester 25Yes

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5010, LAN5017"
Prerequisite: LAN5011/LAN5016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture.The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5121Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5021, LAN5026, LAN5126"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5002Semester 25Yes

German Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
Overlap: "LAN5000, LAN5005"
Prerequisite: LAN5001/LAN5007 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4111Full year4Yes

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4016, LAN4116"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4026Semester 14No

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4025"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4080Full year4Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4060, CON4065, LAN4085, LAN4081"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language .

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4107Full year4No

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4002, LAN4007, LAN4102"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4056Semester 14No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4055"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4057Semester 24No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4052, LAN4056"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Trade Mark Law B (IPReg TMs Part B)LawIPLC137Semester 27Yes

Trade Mark Law B (IPReg TMs Part B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ashley Roughton

Description: The module will help the student acquire a more advanced knowledge of trade marks, primarily within the UK but with reference to other jurisdictions. This module aims to cover the more specific areas of trade mark law with reference to those intending to specialise in trade marks specifically.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Trademarks - ITMALawIPLM008Full year7No

Trademarks - ITMA

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: Exemption paper for MSc IP students undertaking the additional exemption exams associated with the professional stream programme (M3EZ). TRADEMARKS FOR INTENDING PATENT ATTORNEYS This module is for students undertaking M3U4/M3U5 additional exemption examinations on the Professional Programme. Students undertaking this module must also undertake IPLM027, IPLM028, IPLM041, IPLM044 plus either IPLM033 or IPLM044 in additiona to IPLM009. Part time (M3U5) students must take this option in their first year along with IPLM041, IPLM044, IPLM028 and IPLM009.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5025Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5020, LAN5026"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Trade Mark Law A (IPReg TMs Part A)LawIPLC136Semester 17Yes

Trade Mark Law A (IPReg TMs Part A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ashley Roughton

Description: This module offers an overview of the main trade mark principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK trade marks. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4020Full year4Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4025"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
French Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4010Full year4Yes

French Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4015"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4017Semester 24No

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4012"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Anthropology and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6006Semester 26No

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall

Description: This module will introduce the students to the ways in which anthropological theory and methods have been used in global health contexts. It will involve the students in the anthropological analyses of health, illness experience and health care. It will demonstrate the ways in which anthropology can contribute to an understanding of global health issues and inform global health programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
Media LawLawLAW6006Full year6No

Media Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: Media law is the study of the regulation of the media, whether in traditional print form, the broadcast media, or in the online arena. Increasingly, media regulations must be, and are being, adapted to take account of new technological developments as the dividing line between online media and traditional forms becomes less pronounced. Primarily we will be using English law as our starting point with cross jurisdictional comparisons being discussed as and where appropriate. In general however the module is thematic in nature and English law should be considered as a case study exploring how certain themes may arise and be dealt with in practice, as opposed to the be all and end all of the module coverage. The broad themes which we will explore in the course include regulation of the distribution of material by the media - for instance, the regimes in place under the Data Protection Act 1998, or the Contempt of Court Act 1981 and how and in what circumstances those may restrict the information which the media is permitted to distribute. Information privacy and the media's right to withhold the identity of sources will be considered. Laws regulating media output on the basis of the actual content distributed will also be analysed, including defamation issues faced by the media, blasphemy, hate speech and obscenity. In addition to considering how the general law applies to the media, we will also consider sector-specific regulation (televisual broadcasting, advertising), as well as extra-legal measures such as the voluntary codes of conduct for print content administered by the Press Complaints Commission and the Advertising Standards Authority.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Planetary HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7106Full year7No

Planetary Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: The module gives a scientific overview of the causes of global warming, climate change and the concept of planetary boundaries. It will then use case studies to discuss the complex set of interactions between human activity, global health status and ecological degradation. It considers the concepts of environmental and inter-generational justice as tools for critically analysing the complex interrelationship between political, economic, ecological and social factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6003Full year6No

Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary Care

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This core module on the BSc Global Public Health and Primary Care offers students the opportunity to pursue a topic of interest in depth and produce a critical and scholarly review of the literature. Students will select a project from a range on offer, mostly from supervisors in the Centre for Public Health and Primary Care, though some from other Institutes with QMUL may be available. Students may be allowed to devise their own project, and/or include analysis of raw data, through discussion with a supervisor. Projects will be supported by a series of seminars covering critical evaluation, literature searching, presentation and writing skills. Students will acquire skills in developing, planning, organising and focusing a project as they work on a one to one basis with their supervisor. They will also acquire skills in searching, critically appraising, summarising and synthesising the literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Human Rights and Public HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6004Semester 26No

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang

Description: This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Global Health Policy and GovernanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7105Full year7No

Global Health Policy and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anuj Kapilashrami

Description: The module will cover the emergence of systems of global governance, particularly as they relate to global, international and national health challenges. It will describe the way in which global and international health policy is constructed, covering the content, process and actors (e.g. the WHO, the Gates Foundation, bilateral aid agencies and the corporate sector). It will examine the challenges and tensions inherent in the development of global policies that are relevant to national and local contingencies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Planetary HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7106Semester 27No

Planetary Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: The module gives a scientific overview of the causes of global warming, climate change and the concept of planetary boundaries. It will then use case studies to discuss the complex set of interactions between human activity, global health status and ecological degradation. It considers the concepts of environmental and inter-generational justice as tools for critically analysing the complex interrelationship between political, economic, ecological and social factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Managing Wicked Problems in Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7027Semester 27No

Managing Wicked Problems in Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Harmer

Description: This module will explore contemporary global health issues from a range of diverse perspectives and disciplines. A key focus of the module is the media, both print and social. Although not new phenomena, 'fake news', alternative facts and post-truth pose an increasing challenge for global health. The module introduces these concepts and explains why and how the media can manipulate and shape behavior. The module introduces the concept of 'wicked problems' and explores a number of global health challenges through that lens.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Health Policy and GovernanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7105Semester 27No

Global Health Policy and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anuj Kapilashrami

Description: The module will cover the emergence of systems of global governance, particularly as they relate to global, international and national health challenges. It will describe the way in which global and international health policy is constructed, covering the content, process and actors (e.g. the WHO, the Gates Foundation, bilateral aid agencies and the corporate sector). It will examine the challenges and tensions inherent in the development of global policies that are relevant to national and local contingencies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Medicines and Pharmaceutical MarketsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7026Semester 27No

Medicines and Pharmaceutical Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module considers drug discovery and the forms and stages of clinical trials. Examples will be given of the influence of networks of public-private partnership on drug approvals. A further focus will be on the regulation of medicines and how patterns of national and regional pharmaceutical production and supply are affected by international regulation such as TRIPS, TTIP and international institutions such as the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The module will also give a comparative overview of national regulatory standards for the production, quality control, distribution, prescribing of medicines, and systems of pharmacovigilance. It will also cover issues related to access to medicine and identify areas in which the market has failed to meet global health needs. For example no new drugs have been developed since the 1950s for `neglected diseases¿ such as chagas in Latin America and leishmaniasis in Africa, and current drugs for these diseases are prohibitively expensive; at the same time infectious disease in poorer societies remains untreated, and the global market for anti-depressants has grown.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Planetary Health and International Health PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7022Semester 27No

Planetary Health and International Health Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: This module will introduce the student to historically grown concepts of ecological global health. It gives an overview of scientific background on planetary boundaries in relation to health and sustainable development, allowing people to comprehend and apply the analysis to case studies. The module will begin with a human rights approach to health and environmental justice as a tool for critical analysis of the complex interrelationship of historically grown political, economic, cultural and social factors that have impacted the planetary system, putting health of people at risk. It will engage with public policy, international relations, health centred global environmental governance and medical anthropological approaches to health and environment to provide students with the necessary tools to engage in current local, national, regional and global affairs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 7
Health Economic AnalysesSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7025Semester 27No

Health Economic Analyses

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Borislava Mihaylova

Description: The module will introduce learners to key microeconomic concepts and principles, their relevance to the health economy and the need for alternative approaches to priority setting and resource allocation. The module will then discuss key health economic analytical frameworks to inform resource allocation in health, exploring methods of economic evaluation, health policy evaluation, economic analysis of public health interventions, and analysis of inequalities in health and health care. Throughout the module, the focus will be on developing learners¿ ability to critically appraise, conceptualize, design, and carry out appropriate health economic analyses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6022Semester 26Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6020, LAN6027"
Prerequisite: LAN6021/LAN6026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5117Full year5No

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5012, LAN5017, LAN5112"
Prerequisite: LAN5011/LAN5016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4117Full year4No

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4012, LAN4017, LAN4112"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4121Full year4Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I(a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4026, LAN4126"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5001Semester 15Yes

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5000, LAN5007"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Understanding and Managing Human Resources for Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7018Semester 27No

Understanding and Managing Human Resources for Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: In this module, students will be introduced first to working definitions of human resources for health (HRH), health system management and health policies, and their relevance for achieving Sustainable Development Goals. Drawing from health systems research, management and economic theory, an overview of health and labour markets concepts will usher the discussion of appropriate tools for planning and managing health workforces in low- and high-income settings. Models to forecast HRH demand and supply will be explained, as well as quantitative methods to analyse health personnel's geographical distribution across services. Training and education systems for health personnel will be considered; particular emphasis will be given in strategies to recruit and retain health personnel in undeserved areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5011Semester 15Yes

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5010, LAN5016"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5116Full year5No

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5011, LAN5016, LAN5111"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5000Full year5Yes

German Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN5001, LAN5006"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4025Full year4No

Spanish Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4020, LAN4026"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5022Semester 25Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5020, LAN5027"
Prerequisite: LAN5021/LAN5026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4055Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4050, LAN4056"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4106Full year4No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4006, LAN4101"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Law and Professional Ethics (IPReg FL & PE)LawIPLC134Semester 17Yes

Fundamentals of Law and Professional Ethics (IPReg FL & PE)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: This module aims to give students general knowledge of the English legal system in order to understand sources of law, the effects on intellectual property and the interaction between intellectual property and other areas of law. Students will obtain knowledge of the legal system and legal language and the ability to apply this understanding to various legal questions.

Students receive a pre-teaching study pack one month prior to the start of the programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Patent LawLawIPLM140Semester 17No

Introduction to Patent Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of patent law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Intellectual Property in the United StatesLawIPLM148Semester 27No

Intellectual Property in the United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The course will introduce students to US IP law and will predominantly cover the protection of registered rights in the US such as patents and trade marks, but will also examine other important areas such as copyright law, design patents and publicity rights as well as aspects of IP licensing. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the fundmantal structures and principles applying in US law. It will also enhance the general perception of IP rights from a comparative perspective, and emphasis is placed therefore on those rules and principles that deviate from the law in the UK and the European Union. Please note that there will not be weekly lectures but that the course will be running as an intensive course over a period of two weeks,

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Patent Law (IPReg - PATs)LawIPLC133Semester 17Yes

Patent Law (IPReg - PATs)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Phillip Johnson

Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of patent law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)LawIPLC132Semester 17Yes

Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: This module offers an overview of the main copyright and design principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK copyright and design. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4007Semester 24No

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4005, LAN4002"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4016Semester 14No

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4015"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Public Health in PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6107Semester 16No

Public Health in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall

Description: In this module students will work with a staff member and community collaborator(s) on a global health project. Students will have the opportunity to apply their skills, knowledge and experience to a ""real-life"" public health problem. Working as a research team and being responsible for individual tasks, students will gain experience in delivering across the life cycle of the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
NetworkingGLH_6_A
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4006Semester 14No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4005"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6104Semester 16No

Health Systems Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Planetary Health and International Health PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6106Semester 26Yes

Planetary Health and International Health Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: This module will introduce the student to historically grown concepts of ecological global health. It gives an overview of scientific background on planetary boundaries in relation to health and sustainable development, allowing people to comprehend and apply the analysis to case studies. The module will begin with a human rights approach to health and environmental justice as a tool for critical analysis of the complex interrelationship of historically grown political, economic, cultural and social factors that have impacted the planetary system, putting health of people at risk. It will engage with public policy, international relations, health centred global environmental governance and medical anthropological approaches to health and environment to provide students with the necessary tools to engage in current local, national, regional and global affairs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 6
Globalisation and Contemporary Medical EthicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6002Semester 26Yes

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amos Miran Epstein

Description: The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics: (i)consent and consensus, (ii) medical confidentiality, (iii) the discourse on distributive justice, (iv) human and animal research ethics, (v) end-of-life ethics, (vi)transplant ethics, (vii)reproductive ethics. The introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6000Semester 16No

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Seif Shaheen

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6001Semester 16No

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypotheses about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider the distribution of wealth, income , resources, and power at global, national, and local levels. Redistributive mechanisms work through either government or market control, and the economic implications for inequalities will be compared and analysed. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Critical Health EconomicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7104Semester 17No

Critical Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will introduce core theories and concepts of health economics including: concepts of evidence, scarcity, demand, and need. Using case studies, it will describe the theories of the market, and discuss these in relation to specific characteristics of health and health care. It will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Critical Health EconomicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7104Semester 27No

Critical Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will introduce core theories and concepts of health economics including: concepts of evidence, scarcity, demand, and need. Using case studies, it will describe the theories of the market, and discuss these in relation to specific characteristics of health and health care. It will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Systems Policy and PerformanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7103Semester 17No

Health Systems Policy and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: This module will introduce students to various conceptual frameworks and theoretical understandings of health systems; and locate them within a social, economic, historical and global context. Students will learn about the functional components of a health system, including the mechanisms generating health systems resources, financing healthcare delivery, and designing the management-administrative systems of a health system. The module will cover the health systems challenges of low, middle and high income country settings and will look at the application of social and economic theories to health systems policy. It will describe and discuss the distinction between public and private financing, as well as the role of markets and hierarchies, and of private and public providers within health systems. Students will learn about the health system of one country that will be assigned to them at the beginning of term, and compare it to their home country as the basis for developing an in-depth knowledge and understanding of two health systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Health Systems Policy and PerformanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7103Semester 27No

Health Systems Policy and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: This module will introduce students to various conceptual frameworks and theoretical understandings of health systems; and locate them within a social, economic, historical and global context. Students will learn about the functional components of a health system, including the mechanisms generating health systems resources, financing healthcare delivery, and designing the management-administrative systems of a health system. The module will cover the health systems challenges of low, middle and high income country settings and will look at the application of social and economic theories to health systems policy. It will describe and discuss the distinction between public and private financing, as well as the role of markets and hierarchies, and of private and public providers within health systems. Students will learn about the health system of one country that will be assigned to them at the beginning of term, and compare it to their home country as the basis for developing an in-depth knowledge and understanding of two health systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political EconomySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7014Semester 27No

Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we examine trends towards the reform of health systems in the context of globalisation. Particular attention is given to the impact of neoliberal policy and commercialisation; the move towards universal health coverage; policy on integration; and decentralisation. The role of actors in shaping policy will also be covered, as well as the impact of trade and investment related agreements on health systems. The impact of other aspects of globalisation on health systems - such as migration - will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7017Semester 17No

Health Systems Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Japanese Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4141Full year4Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I(a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4041, LAN4046, LAN4146"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Gender, Sexuality and HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7013Semester 27No

Gender, Sexuality and Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: Recent media coverage and debate over female genital mutilation, trafficking, circumcision, gender reassignment, trans issues, and LGBTQI healthcare provision, have moved gender and sexuality to be central issues in health and human rights. Often in public health and medicine, through the adopting of a biomedical model, 'gender' is coupled with `woman¿ and heterosexuality assumed. Public and academic debate, though, regularly unpacks, even attacks, these assumptions. This module responds to such shifts and debates, encouraging students to explore contemporary issues around gender, sexuality and health in society through seminars and self-directed research. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate the broad array of potential developments around gender and sexuality in public and global health policy and practice. This module aims to develop and deepen the students' knowledge and skills regarding gender and sexuality around global health policy and practice. It aims to develop an understanding of the diversity of conceptions and debates inside and around global health in responding to challenges to traditional and biomedical understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality, and to allow students to re-evaluate their own approaches and assumptions using appropriate theories and experiences. It aims to develop in students an understanding of the current debates, encouraging them to reflect on challenges and corresponding political and social movements. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate novel developments, interventions and policies. The module aims also to allow students to conduct a piece of research on a topic of their own interest or from a list of suggestions, developing both their research practice and allowing engagement with contemporary or critical issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4116Full year4No

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4016, LAN4111"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4127Full year4No

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4022, LAN4027, LAN4122"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5007Semester 15No

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN5001, LAN5006"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5010Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5011, LAN5015"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4157Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
Overlap: "LAN4052, LAN4057, LAN4152"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Italian Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4171Full year4Yes

Italian Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: LAN4176
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Italian.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Italian (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4052Semester 24Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4050, LAN4057"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4023Semester 24Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4026"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it is highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4041Semester 14Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4040, LAN4046"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4022Semester 24Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4020, LAN4027"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4102Full year4Yes

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4002, LAN4007, LAN4107"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4087Semester 24No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4062, CON4067, LAN4082, LAN4085"
Prerequisite: CON4061/CON4066/LAN4081/LAN4086 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4101Full year4Yes

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4006, LAN4106"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4051Semester 14Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4050, LAN4056"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4050Full year4Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4055"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Study Project - Business StreamLawIPLM137Full year7No

Study Project - Business Stream

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The module consists of independent research; an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law. The chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

The study project for business stream students will be a specific element of work relating to the IP field in general.

This will give the candidate a chance to experience the specific issues regarding research, data analyses and IP specific analysis experienced by IP Professionals on a daily basis within the workplace.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Competition Law OverviewLawIPLM131Full year7No

Competition Law Overview

Credits: 0.0
Contact:

Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of Competition law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 7
Effective and Efficient EvaluationSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7112Semester 27No

Effective and Efficient Evaluation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sandra Eldridge

Description: The module will introduce learners to principles of effective and efficient evaluation, exploring different uses of health data in evaluation, for example in recruitment, or to measure outcomes. It will cover research designs that use health data or can be conducted within health data, including cluster-randomised trials, stepped-wedge designs, trials-within-cohorts/registries, interrupted-time-series. The role of devices such as wearables or mobile phone apps in evaluation, cost-effective analyses, use of qualitative methods, and ethics of evaluation will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Trade Mark Law (IPReg TMs)LawIPLC131Semester 17Yes

Trade Mark Law (IPReg TMs)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ashley Roughton

Description: The module will help the student acquire a solid basis of the law of trade marks, primarily within the UK but with reference to other jurisdictions. The focus will be on the national registration systems based on the European Trade Mark Directive, the Community Trade Mark system, and with reference to other International registration systems and filing strategies will be considered as well. The core underlying purpose of the module is the fundamental teaching of basic trade marks to the trainee IP attorney.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Study Project - Professional StreamLawIPLM127Full year7No

Study Project - Professional Stream

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The module is taught over the 1st and 2nd semester by way of intensive small and whole group seminars.

The module is an indispensable element of the programme since it allows students to gain, in addition to the more abstract legal content taught, not only exposure to the demands of practice as a patent or trade mark attorney, or indeed other legal professions (including the ability to work in teams) but it is also a distinguishing element of our MSc programme which underpins the entire ethos and philosophy of a programme that is based upon preparation for such careers.

The module gives students a 'real life' experience of the role a patent and/or trade mark attorney would experience in their every day role within the IP Field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
French Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4015Full year4No

French Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4016"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Health Data in PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7111Semester 17No

Health Data in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carol Dezateux

Description: The module provides an introduction to health data in practice with a focus on health care delivery challenges and patient and population health outcomes from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will provide students with a grounding in legal and ethical frameworks governing health data access and use, and the role of patient, health professional and public engagement for delivering the full potential of health data sciences for public benefit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4002Semester 24Yes

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4007"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
German Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4005Full year4No

German Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4006"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Contemporary Issues in Health and Society in the Global ContextSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6100Semester 16No

Contemporary Issues in Health and Society in the Global Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Harmer

Description:

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Global Health DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6102Full year6No

Global Health Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description:

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political EconomySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6010Semester 26Yes

Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we examine trends towards the reform of health systems in the context of globalisation. Particular attention is given to the impact of neoliberal policy and commercialisation; the move towards universal health coverage; policy on integration; and decentralisation. The role of actors in shaping policy will also be covered, as well as the impact of trade and investment related agreements on health systems. The impact of other aspects of globalisation on health systems - such as migration - will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6011Semester 16No

Health Systems Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Medicines and PharmaceuticalsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5004Semester 25No

Medicines and Pharmaceuticals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module will cover the WHO's approach to governing safe and rational access to medicines; international and national regulatory apparatuses; the global drug development and supply chain; and the role of clinical trials in protecting patients before and after drugs have entered the market place. It will explore barriers to access to essential and rational medicines including access to trials data; pricing and patents; health system barriers; and direct to consumer advertising. It will look at government controls over marketing and long term surveillance and pharmacovigilance and why fraudulent behaviour takes place.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Advanced Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5005Semester 25No

Advanced Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valentina Gallo

Description: Students will build on their skills and knowledge developed in year 1 and will review and revise the measurement of rates, ratios, proportions, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, statistical significance tests, and data presentation (tables, graphs and charts). They will be introduced to statistical modelling and be expected to also conduct some data analysis. Students will also be introduced to concepts and practices related to statistical modelling (such as linear regression and logistic regression). The second half of the module will get students to develop skills and experience in study design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Maternal and Child Health and NutritionSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5003Semester 25Yes

Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: The module will commence with clinical-epidemiological introductions to pregnancy and childbirth, neonatal and infant health, and child health and nutrition. It would go into further detail on skilled birth attendants and access to emergency obstetric care, breastfeeding, approaches to child survival and international child health policy, HIV, and nutrition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Understanding Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7102Full year7No

Understanding Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will develop skills in critical appraisal, interpreting the results of commonly-used statistical techniques and routine morbidity and mortality measures. Students will be taught to critically interpret data, results and statistical analysis presented in research papers, and obtain the building blocks on which to build evidence-based practice. The course takes a non-mathematical approach to study design and statistical analysis starting with clinical examples and explaining how statistics can help answer real life questions. The module will not teach statistical methods in detail, but students will be expected to calculate percentages and other simple summary measures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5002Semester 15No

Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: This module will be a compulsory module for the 2nd year BSc in Global Health. It builds on the 1st year module 'Introduction to reading, writing and analysis in Global Health' through which the students have developed skills in setting research questions, critical appraisal of multi-disciplinary texts, essay writing, library skills and good academic practice. This module further develops academic research and writing skills, building an awareness of the epistemological basis of different kinds of qualitative and quantitative research, and asking students to then apply this knowledge to critically appraise different approaches and methods in qualitative and quantitative research. Additionally, students will actively use their knowledge by writing a critique of a qualitative or quantitative study on a Global Health topic. This module complements the 1st and 2nd year provision in Epidemiology and Statistics, which trains students in the understanding, appraisal and interpretation of epidemiological research. The module also encourages students to not only begin to evaluate a research method's appropriateness for a study, but also to consider research ethics and to engage in reflexivity as a researcher. As such, this module provides the basis for further methods training that will be taught as part of the 3rd year dissertation module. Also, by critically appraising different approaches and methods in qualitative and qualitative research, students build a firm basis for conducting their own research dissertation at the end of the BSc programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Understanding Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7102Semester 17No

Understanding Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will develop skills in critical appraisal, interpreting the results of commonly-used statistical techniques and routine morbidity and mortality measures. Students will be taught to critically interpret data, results and statistical analysis presented in research papers, and obtain the building blocks on which to build evidence-based practice. The course takes a non-mathematical approach to study design and statistical analysis starting with clinical examples and explaining how statistics can help answer real life questions. The module will not teach statistical methods in detail, but students will be expected to calculate percentages and other simple summary measures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Evidence, Policy and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7010Semester 17No

Evidence, Policy and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Megan Clinch

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and practical / applied public health perspective. The literature covered in the module will draw attention to the nature of social systems that are influenced by a range of socially, culturally and politically mediated factors and variables. Its approach to the study of the social factors that influence health, public health programmes and health policy will differ from, but complement, the teaching and methods of study that are covered in the Epidemiology and Statistics module (ICM6040). Overall the module will develop and strengthen critical appraisal skills and help intercalating students develop a command of the multi-disciplinary field of Global Health. These are skills that will be new, and crucial throughout their studies and in particular during the second semester as students begin to consider their dissertation project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Health, Governance and LawSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7012Semester 27No

Global Health, Governance and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jonathan Kennedy

Description: The protection of public health at the national and subnational level often depends significantly on various decisions made at the international or global level by regimes, including those related to trade, finance, law, diplomacy and inter-governmental relations. Such regimes can have a profound impact on the determinants of health as experienced within countries, at the national and local levels, and have become increasingly important as a result of ever-deepening forms of `globalisation¿ and the threat of global hazards to health such as large-scale global environmental change. This module provides an introduction to the disciplines of international relations, international politics, international jurisprudence, globalization and global governance as they relate to global health. It will examine the content and operation of various supra-national policy instruments, structures, institutions and processes, and place these within the context of the right to health and contemporary controversies and topical issues being confronted by the global health community.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4126Full year4No

Spanish Language and Culture I(a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4026, LAN4121"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4112Full year4Yes

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4012, LAN4017, LAN4117"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4156Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4056, LAN4151"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5006Full year5No

German Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5000, LAN5007"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German(particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4027Semester 24No

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4022, LAN4025"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4040Full year4Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4045, LAN4041"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4086Semester 14No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4061, CON4066, LAN4081, LAN4085"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5005Semester 25No

German Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN5002, LAN5006"
Prerequisite: LAN5001/LAN5007 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4021Semester 14Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4020, LAN4026"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description:
Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures.
The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language.
The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4085Full year4No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4060, CON4065, LAN4080, LAN4086"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4082Semester 24Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4062, CON4067, LAN4085, LAN4087"
Prerequisite: CON4061/CON4066/LAN4081/LAN4086 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5026Semester 15No

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5021, LAN5025"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5122Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5022, LAN5027, LAN5127"
Prerequisite: LAN5021/LAN5026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Patents - CIPALawIPLM009Full year7No

Patents - CIPA

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Phillip Johnson

Description: Exemption paper for MSc IP students undertaking the additional exemption exams associated with the professional stream programme (M3EZ). TRADEMARKS FOR INTENDING PATENT ATTORNEYS This module is for students undertaking M3U4/M3U5 additional exemption examinations on the Professional Programme. Students undertaking this module must also undertake IPLM027, IPLM028, IPLM041, IPLM044 plus either IPLM033 or IPLM044 in additiona to IPLM009. Part time (M3U5) students must take this option in their first year along with IPLM041, IPLM044, IPLM028 and IPLM009.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
The Law of Patents I and IILawIPLM041Full year7No

The Law of Patents I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Phillip Johnson

Description: This module is for MSc students in IP following the professional or business stream.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Trade Mark Law I and IILawIPLM044Full year7No

Trade Mark Law I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact:

Description: This module is for MSc students in IP following the professional and business stream.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
The Germans and the Jews since 1871HistoryHST6329Semester 16Yes

The Germans and the Jews since 1871

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Kinga Bloch

Description: In the period covered by this module, from 1871 to the present, interactions between Gentiles and Jews in Germany underwent a dramatic and unprecedented set of upheavals. What were the main problems, struggles and achievements in this period of German-Jewish history? This module will initially focus on debating the chances and limits of emancipation and assimilation of Jews in Imperial Germany and on discussing the so-called Jewish Renaissance in the Weimar Republic. A survey of the expansion and the role of antisemitism and its political manifestations in German society will provide a platform for studying the Nazi take-over of power and the Holocaust. The module concludes with the post-war history of Jews in Germany, addressing contemporary challenges such as the integration of Russian-speaking Jews and the future of German Jewry. Students consider the ethical questions that arise when approaching a challenging area of historical enquiry, and learn to identify information needs appropriate to different situations. They develop professional and informed attitudes, which enable them to evaluate the contemporary issues of emancipation, assimilation, and acculturation in a historical context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_56_A
The Atlantic Slave Trade: Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth CenturiesHistoryHST6339Semester 26Yes

The Atlantic Slave Trade: Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Centuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Reuben Loffman

Description: During the era of the Atlantic slave trade, more than twelve million Africans were forcibly transported to colonies in the Americas. Rather than focusing solely on European merchants, this module focuses more on how Africans experienced the Atlantic trade and the ways in which they challenged the oppressive systems under which they were forced to labour. It provides a broadly chronological introduction to the ways in which Africans became slaves, the Middle Passage, and the establishment of plantations in the New World. It will make use of a vast array of primary sources, including slave narratives, photographs, and abolitionist tracts, to examine the origins, form, and structure of the Atlantic trade from a global perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
The Physiology of Shock, Shock Syndromes and Tools of ResuscitationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7068Semester 17No

The Physiology of Shock, Shock Syndromes and Tools of Resuscitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: In this module, students will learn how to identify patients in shock, evaluate which patients require resuscitation, and examine tools by which this is achieved. Students will review the most common causes of shock and learn how to classify shock syndromes, maximise the cardiovascular response to shock, choose fluid therapy (dose/type) for resuscitation, and select which inopressors to apply. Students will develop further insights into cardiovascular physiology and have a clear and in depth understanding of what is meant by resuscitation. Students will learn via a series of online lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Animal Madness in the Human Zoo: The History of Animal Experimentation and the Human ConditionHistoryHST5408Semester 25Yes

Animal Madness in the Human Zoo: The History of Animal Experimentation and the Human Condition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edmund Ramsden

Description: Throughout history our understanding of what it is to be human has depended upon our perceptions of, and relations with, non-human animals. In this module we will trace the emergence and development of animal experimentation from the mid-19th century through to the late 20th and examine how it has informed our understanding of human behaviours, emotions and their discontents. Beginning with Charles Darwin's interactions with the orangutan Jenny in London Zoo through to the use, on an industrial scale, of laboratory animals to understand stress-related illnesses and devise drugs to relieve them, students will explore the profound effect various species, such as rats, mice, dogs and monkeys, have had on the human condition in the modern era.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome EngineeringSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7145Semester 27No

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This module introduces the students to the different types of pluripotent stem cells which are used for research and in therapeutics. The emphasis will be on induced pluripotent stem cells, where the focus will be on generation, verification, and applications of these cells. Additionally, techniques that are used for genome engineering will be covered which will be integrated in applications of induced pluripotent stem cells.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Fundamentals of ResearchSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7067Semester 17No

Fundamentals of Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ben Bloom

Description: In this module students will learn the basic skills required for academic medicine, including research design, statistical analysis, and methodology. Students will be introduced to a variety of databases including FOAMed and develop the necessary skills to evaluate the scientific literature. With the emphasis on personal research, students will be made aware of current legislation and ethics surrounding clinical research. The module will conclude with students learning how to submit their work for publication and present their research for differing audiences. Student learning will be supported by a series of online lectures and discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Paediatric Trauma and Limb ReconstructionSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7066Semester 27No

Paediatric Trauma and Limb Reconstruction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kyle James

Description: This is a optional module that will focus on the pathophysiology and spectrum of paediatric orthopaedic injuries, along with the assessment and structured approach to limb deformities in both adults and children.

The module will provide students with a deep knowledge of the evidence and controversy around common paediatric fractures and the fundamental basic science behind growing bones and injuries to them. It will also give students a structured approach to quantifying post-traumatic limb deformity and then analysing how that can be corrected using an array of powerful implant choices. There will also be an opportunity for practical application of all these skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Emergency MedicineSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7048Full year7No

Dissertation in Emergency Medicine

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Thomas

Description: This module will allow students to develop specialist knowledge and insight on a topic of their choice, related to Emergency and Resuscitation Medicine. Students may choose to organise their dissertation in the form of a narrative review, systematic review, guideline development, research project, audit, or quality assurance project.

Students will develop the ability to synthesise and analyse information and data, to breakdown complex issues, and to compare and contrast alternative view points. This will allow an appraisal and judgement of the direction of the field informed by latest developments and opinion. Students will be supported by regular online supervisory contact with a tutor with expertise in their field of research interest. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing the students' ability to disseminate knowledge at a professional level, with a view toward publication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Open Fractures and Orthoplastic Surgical CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7065Semester 37No

Open Fractures and Orthoplastic Surgical Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alex Vris

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the multi-specialty management of open fractures, from pre-hospital care to definitive ortho-plastic surgical treatment

The module will provide students with a deep knowledge of how open fractures can be treated by a combined, collaborative approach between surgical disciplines, from the emergency room, to first debridement and then definitive fixation and soft tissue cover. Skeletal stabilisation and soft tissue reconstruction are discussed in detail, including decision-making around implants and choice of grafts/flaps for covering skin defects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6012Semester 16No

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baker

Description: An overview of topics in cellular and molecular neuroscience that are fundamental to other BSc neuroscience course units. Neuron and glial organisation, synapses and circuits, signal transduction and neurotransmission, ion channel physiology, receptors, trophic factors, signalling pathways, neuroplasticity, neuro-inflammation and inflammatory damage to the nervous system, cell death, molecular biology of brain tumours, stem cell neurobiology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual HistoryHistoryHST7799Full year7No

Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: This course provides an essential grounding in modern intellectual history and political thought. It introduces students to the most important kinds of methodology practised in the field of intellectual history since the nineteenth century, and some of the most influential thinkers and themes in the history of political thought since antiquity. It is divided into two parts, corresponding to semesters one and two respectively. The first part covers a variety of key philosophical, historical, political and sociological theorists whose work has inspired a range of approaches in the history of ideas in Anglo-American and European scholarship. The second part involves in-depth exploration of the thought of a selection of major authors and thematic concerns in the history of European political thought, considering them in the light of the different methodologies surveyed in the first part.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal SystemsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6011Semester 26No

Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adina Michael-Titus

Description: History of neurology, challenges in drug discovery for neurological & psychiatric conditions, neuropathology of basal ganglia disorders, epilepsy, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, stroke and head injury; Imaging and biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, genomics, proteomics and metabonomics; neurobiology of endocannabinoids; neurotransmitter release.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Capitalism and Political ThoughtHistoryHST7703Semester 27No

Capitalism and Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Waseem Yaqoob

Description: This course examines the pivotal role that capitalism has played in political thought from the early twentieth century to the present. It shows how a range of thinkers blurred the boundaries between political and economic analysis in order to reformulate key political concepts and variously to argue, for the maintenance, transformation or overthrow of capitalism. The course starts with a number of figures seeking to grasp the imperial and racial character of the global market system, before exploring how these arguments were transformed by total war, revolution and decolonisation. The course then turns to the ways in which questions of financialisation, inequality, automation and climate crisis came to shape how capitalism is understood. Thinkers studied include: W.E.B. Dubois, Rosa Luxemburg, John Maynard Keynes, W. Arthur Lewis, Eric Williams, Gunnar Myrdal, Joan Robinson, Friedrich Hayek, Silvia Federici and Thomas Piketty.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Patria and Cosmopolis: Nation, Country, and Humanity in Political Thought, from ancient Greece to the Age of RevolutionsHistoryHST7704Semester 17No

Patria and Cosmopolis: Nation, Country, and Humanity in Political Thought, from ancient Greece to the Age of Revolutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Georgios Varouxakis

Description: The module analyses the reflections on patriotism or love of country, cosmopolitanism or attachment to Humanity, and the nation or alternative groups commanding people¿s loyalties in the thought of a great range of thinkers, from classical antiquity to the threshold of the modern era - the time of the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions. Besides many thinkers from a wide range of periods, the module focuses on the significant contributions of non-European or female authors (Augustine of Hippo, Ibn Khaldun, Toussaint Louverture, Mary Wollstonecraft, Germaine de Staël) and their distinct perspectives. Students will master the vital importance of historical contextualization in understanding the changing meanings of concepts as important as patriotism, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, nation, state, race, ethnicity, and related terms. The module will also highlight the issues related to the reception and use of older concepts, ideas and texts in later times and how they were interpreted, misinterpreted or distorted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease in the Hospital and in the CommunitySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7046Full year7No

Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease in the Hospital and in the Community

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This is a compulsory module covering aspects of communicable disease control in the hospital and community. After an introduction to practical epidemiology with special reference to clinical microbiology and infectious disease in the community, the module focuses on the relationship between the NHS, PHE, infection control teams, environmental health services and other relevant bodies in the UK. The module also explores the worldwide public health issues which have implications for public health in the UK. The role of the scientist and clinical laboratory in infection control and public health is explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Empire and Early Modern Political ThoughtHistoryHST7702Semester 17No

Empire and Early Modern Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: European states raced to establish empires in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries that would provide them with resources to assist in their struggles with each other to survive. As those states engaged in this process of expansion, various authors reflected on what it would mean to be the subject of such empires, thereby developing the concept of rights. At the same time, others used the tools of political thought, including concepts of virtue, greatness, interest, and reason of state, to animate the instruments of empire, including joint stock corporations such as the East India Company. These authors articulated modern understandings of the ways in which states project their power as well the rules of the international order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6009Semester 26No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module provides students an appreciation of the operations of organisations and functions of management. It introduces students to principles and models of and developments in management. The module explores the behaviour of organisations and their interactions with the industry, national and global environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Contemporary Issues in Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6010Semester 36No

Contemporary Issues in Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6009
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module builds on IFP/IFJ6009 Introduction to Business and Management by developing students' analytical and problem solving skills, through the examination of challenging contemporary issues within Business. Students will analyse and comment on Business issues in essays, reports and presentations to the level that will lead to potential success on a range of masters degree programmes in the School of Business and Management.

Students will also be taken on external visits to encourage the application of theoretical knowledge in real life situations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
FinanceLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6008Semester 36No

Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6007
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will introduce students to the basic principles of finance and investment. Finance is essentially about pricing, but the essentials of corporate and international finance will also be covered. There will be an introduction to the theory of financial markets and their regulation, and a brief look at the concept of market efficiency. However, most of the focus will be concentrated on the relationship between risk and return, the principles behind portfolio evaluation, the behaviour of asset prices and the role of institutions and trading systems in modern financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Early Modern Theories of StateHistoryHST7203Semester 27No

Early Modern Theories of State

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Quentin Skinner

Description: Some early-modern political theorists locate the authority to make laws and exercise political control in the figure of the ruler or prince. The seminar will begin by examining the most celebrated example, Machiavelli's The Prince (1513). Others locate these powers in the body of the republic or people. Thomas More's Utopia (1516) and Machiavelli¿s Discourses (c1519) offer contrasting examples, and the next four sessions of the seminar will focus on these texts. The second half of the course will then turn to Hobbes¿s contrasting claim in Leviathan (1651) that these powers lie instead with the fictional person of the state. The main aim of the seminar will thus be to engage in a close reading of four classic texts of early-modern political thought.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The War on TerrorHistoryHST6741Full year6No

The War on Terror

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr James Ellison
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The War on Terror and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq remain the most controversial issues of our time. International public debate about their cause, course and effect remains acute yet it is often political, partisan and rarely balanced or complex. This module seeks to put 9/11 and its consequences in historical context by asking historically-informed questions about Western intervention in the Middle East and using an array of recently released primary sources to try to answer them. The aim is to approach the most contentious events of the contemporary era with the historian's informed, detached understanding. That process begins with analysis of the origins of the modern Middle East and the post-Cold War conflicts which led to regional and international instability and the rise of terrorist organisations, principally Al-Qaeda. It goes on to consider the alliance developed by Tony Blair and George Bush after 9/11, the fight against the Taliban, regime change in Iraq and the disintegration of that country with all of its often tragic consequences for its peoples, the region and global security. Students will critically appraise a vast array of congressional and parliamentary material, and develop the skills needed to draw-up political briefs. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_6_A
Finance and Economics Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6014Semester 26No

Finance and Economics Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6013
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6013 by choosing their conceptual framework, building and testing their model and their writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM963Full year7No

Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal Diseases

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Global History of Pandemics from Plague to CoronavirusHistoryHST6767Full year6No

Global History of Pandemics from Plague to Coronavirus

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr John Mendelsohn

Description: Covid-19 stopped the world in its tracks. For most people, this is an unprecedented experience. Yet humanity has been here before. This module explores the long and global history of communities, governments, and experts confronting crisis in the form of epidemic disease. The module proceeds through four pandemic periods: (1) plague and smallpox since 1500; (2) cholera since 1800; (3) influenza since 1900; (4) novel viruses emerging from animals to humankind since 1980 - HIV/AIDS, Ebola, new influenzas, SARS, Covid-19. We will interrogate each period with three questions: How have pandemics shaped world history - and vice versa? How have diverse cultures and empires, states, communities, sciences, and international organisations learned from pandemics and from the outcomes of policies and responses? How, and why, have societies united or divided over concepts and practices of purity and danger, security and crisis, evoked by pandemics? This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations (DL version)School of Medicine and DentistryICMM961Semester 17No

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations (DL version)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debra Fonalleras-Marcos

Description: This module allows the students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of the gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigations. It is intended as an update for those with some experience in endoscopy and as an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module. Specific learning objectives of this module includes:

To study the structure of an endoscope and how it works; Understanding the indications, contraindication and complications of the main diagnostic endoscopic techniques: gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and capsule endoscopy; Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images; Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients; How to organise and run an endoscopy service; Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy; Formulate their own options for investigating various GI symptoms/diseases; Describe the nuclear medicine techniques available for assessing diseases of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract; Learn the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for assessing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM962Full year7No

Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal Diseases

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Europe in Revolution: 1848HistoryHST6372Semester 16Yes

Europe in Revolution: 1848

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella

Description: The 1848 revolutions marked the birth of political modernity in Europe, inaugurating working class consciousness and giving birth to feminism. Democracy and socialism were the product of such political experiences. They also represented the last pan-European revolutionary moment in history, one in which the entire continent experienced radical change, from Sicily to Ireland. This module will analyse the causes of this revolutionary wave, its political culture and impact on societies as well as its enduring legacies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_56_A
Saladin, Richard the Lionheart & the Third CrusadeHistoryHST6710Full year6No

Saladin, Richard the Lionheart & the Third Crusade

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Helen Flatley
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Saladin's defeat of the Franks at Hattin and his subsequent conquest of Jerusalem on 2 October 1187 prompted Latin Europe to launch the Third Crusade. Across the West, tens of thousands took the cross for this expedition, among them Richard the Lionheart, king of England. The war that followed saw Saladin and Richard - two great champions of the age - contest control of the Holy Land. This special subject module explores the careers of both leaders and the wider history of the Third Crusade, drawing upon the testimony of Christian and Muslim contemporaries. Topics explored will include: the role of jihad in Saladin's rise to power; the progress and significance of the siege of Acre; Richard¿s standing as a military genius; the nature of negotiation and diplomacy during the crusade; and the roles of myth and memory in constructing Richard¿s and Saladin¿s historical reputations. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
Lives, Letters and Lifestyles: English Political Society during the Wars of the RosesHistoryHST6713Full year6No

Lives, Letters and Lifestyles: English Political Society during the Wars of the Roses

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Virginia Davis
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This QMUL Model special subject module will provide students with an understanding of fifteenth century English history, introducing one of the major sources for the period, the substantial letter collection of the Paston family. Personal letters were extremely rare before the mid-fifteenth century and this is an exceptional collection which, alongside other smaller collections relating to other gentry and merchant families, are extensively used by historians to throw light on the political, social and economic history of England during a period of extensive social and political change. This module gives students the opportunity to engage with local history and heritage, and meet with archivists to build up a network of professional contacts outside of the university. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_456_A
The Soviet Union: Red Flag Unfurled, 1917-1991HistoryHST5397Semester 15Yes

The Soviet Union: Red Flag Unfurled, 1917-1991

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew David Willimott

Description: This module will chart the rise and fall of the USSR, from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the collapse of Soviet Communism in 1991. Along the way, we will meet familiar characters, including Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev. But we will also be introduced to the ordinary people that called themselves Soviets. The module will cover themes including ideology, gender, sex and sexuality, race and anti-racism, religion, and multi-nationalism. We will travel from Moscow to Siberia, via the Caucasus and Central Asia, exploring the Soviet Union through a variety of primary sources, including political writings, party resolutions, newspapers, letters, memoirs, agitation and propaganda, and material history. We will think critically about the historiographical arguments and controversies that have defined Soviet studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Human Rights in History: Origins, Foundations, ProspectsHistoryHST5405Semester 25Yes

Human Rights in History: Origins, Foundations, Prospects

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: Where do human rights come from? Historians began treating 'human rights' as a distinct historical subject about a decade ago, and since then the field has grown considerably. In this short time the field has shifted from a celebration of the origins and roots of a universal language for making moral claims, to more critical interpretations of historical origins that question the consequences of this inheritance for contemporary politics and global justice. In this module, we will examine the origins of the idea of human rights, how it became institutionalized in law and international politics, and how its history and prospects have become so fiercely contested today. We will reflect on the history of abolitionism, human rights, and humanitarianism in a global setting, and analyse the impact of modern international and multi-cultural perspectives on the evolution of 'human rights history'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Tissue-specific Stem CellsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7144Semester 27No

Tissue-specific Stem Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristin Braun

Description: This module aims to provide in depth knowledge of the role of tissue-specific stem cells during tissue homeostasis and wound-healing, as well as current and future applications in regenerative medicine. The course will cover tissue-specific stem cells present in tissues derived from each of the three primary germ cell layers:
Ectoderm (e.g. neural; melanocyte; epidermis; eye lens)
Endoderm (e.g. respiratory; intestine; liver; bladder; pancreas)
Mesoderm (e.g. kidney; mesenchymal; bone; muscle; hematopoietic; heart)

In addition, this module will examine cutting-edge experimental techniques (e.g. lineage tracing; cellular barcoding; xenotransplantation; sphere formation assays) that are used to evaluate adult stem cells.

Students will develop skills including critical analysis of scientific literature, interpretation of experimental design, evaluation of statistical analysis, and design of presentations. Essential generic skills include critical thinking, organisation, writing, and oral communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spine, Spinal Cord and Nerve InjuriesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7063Semester 27No

Spine, Spinal Cord and Nerve Injuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Syed Aftab

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the patho-physiology of trauma to the head, spinal column, spinal cord and the central and peripheral nervous system.

This module will provide students with the knowledge to critically evaluate head and neurological injuries. Non-operative and operative treatment will be discussed in order for students to fully understand the options available and help to refine decision making skills in order to instigate the most appropriate treatment.

Ethical issues surrounding traumatic head and spinal cord injuries will also be critically discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Fracture Biology and Limb TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7064Semester 27No

Fracture Biology and Limb Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nick Arest

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the basic science of bone and fracture biology as well as specific injuries within the upper and lower limbs.

This module will provide students with the knowledge to critically evaluate extremity trauma. Non-operative and operative treatment will be discussed in order for students to fully appreciate the strengths, weaknesses and controversies around each option. Students will be able to apply their basic science knowledge to individual cases, in a stepwise and methodological approach to fracture treatment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research Methods in HSSLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6011Semester 16No

Research Methods in HSS

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Social Sciences. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, a draft chapter, an annotated bibliography and a reflective task. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
1066! The Norman ConquestHistoryHST6114Semester 26Yes

1066! The Norman Conquest

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Virginia Davis

Description: This module will provide students with a good understanding of the causes, course and consequences of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 which decisively shifted England's relations with continental Europe from a Scandinavian to a Norman French focus. The course is divided into three parts. The first explores the last decades of Anglo-Saxon England including links between England and Normandy before 1066; the second investigates the succession crisis of the 1060s, the invasion of 1066 and the subsequent resistance and rebellions while the third addresses the impact of the Norman Conquest on different aspects of government and society, including landholding and lordship, the church and the physical landscape. Seminars will draw upon an extensive range of rich and diverse primary source available to historians of the Norman Conquest. Issues relating to the relationship between England and the Continent continue to resonate and this course offers an opportunity to explore a key moment in the history of this relationship. There will be an optional fieldtrip to Battle Abbey, the site of the 1066 battle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Islam in Africa and the Indian Subcontinent: Conquest, Islamisation and Co-existenceHistoryHST6116Semester 26Yes

Islam in Africa and the Indian Subcontinent: Conquest, Islamisation and Co-existence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Anna Chrysostomides

Description: Have you ever wondered about the origin of Sufism in India? When Islam reached Algeria or Sudan and how the communities there responded? This module offers students the opportunity to explore the advent of Islam in two, often neglected, geographical areas - Africa and the Indian Subcontinent - in the medieval and early modern period (600-1600). Lectures will provide a chronological perspective, while seminars will focus on a range of thematic primary sources such as: Sufi poetry, historical chronicles, religious literature, letters, archaeological evidence, art and material history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Independent Study ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3020Semester 23No

Independent Study Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3000
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of UK academic culture, and help them develop the linguistic, analytic and argumentative skills, in both written and spoken work, necessary to succeed on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce linguistically sophisticated work which demonstrates a clear line of argumentation. The students will produce a research-based Independent Study Project essay of 3000 words within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. This will be a developmental project, with both formative and summative assessment through a portfolio (including research proposal, annotated bibliography, essay plan, and reflective writing), an oral presentation of the project, and a final draft of the essay. The students will be encouraged to employ strategies to reflect on their writing and its effectiveness. Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Latin for MA studentsHistoryHST7700Full year7No

Latin for MA students

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr David Harrap

Description: This is a course in classical Latin, with emphasis on its role in political, scientific and philosophical writings in different historical periods through to the nineteenth century. It is suitable for complete beginners, but will also provide a thorough revision course for students who already have some knowledge of Latin.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 7
MarketingLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3019Semester 23No

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with the opportunity to understand and apply key marketing theory and concepts to a variety of products, services, brands and organisations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of marketing including: the marketing process, company and marketing strategy, the market place and consumers, information, buyer behaviour, the marketing mix, branding, product life-cycle, creating value, supply chain, retailing and wholesaling, advertising, PR and Sales, direct marketing, E-Business, ethics and CSR.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read through an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Advanced Clinical Microbiology and Laboratory ManagementSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7044Full year7No

Advanced Clinical Microbiology and Laboratory Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module extends the knowledge acquired in the other modules of this degree to create an in depth knowledge of infectious disease. Students also are equipped with knowledge essential to the efficient management of a diagnostic laboratory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dissertation - MA HistoryHistoryHST7621Full year7No

Dissertation - MA History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Martyn Frampton

Description: The MA History Dissertation provides an opportunity for you to complete an independent research project within an area of historical inquiry related to their chosen `stream¿ for Mastering the Field You will be encouraged to pursue your own intellectual interests, applying the skills you have developed on your other MA modules. You will be assigned an appropriate supervisor for your chosen topic, and will begin meeting with them in Semester 2, with the bulk of the research and writing completed during Semester 3, leading to completion of a 12,000 word dissertation by the early summer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6007Semester 26No

Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will equip students with the standard methods and analytical tools of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, with emphasis on the relationship between the decisions of individual agents, the operation of markets and the general state of the economy. The microeconomics component will analyse the nature of competition a firm faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, while the macroeconomics one will focus on growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Pakistan and the Politics of the PastHistoryHST6764Full year6No

Pakistan and the Politics of the Past

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Chris Moffat

Description: Pakistan was born in 1947 out of the partition of India, and split again in 1971 following the liberation of Bangladesh. Histories of conflict and loss have left their mark on Pakistani politics and culture. But so too have they been repressed in a nationalist narrative that celebrates Pakistan as a `new Medina¿, a homeland for South Asia¿s Muslims. This Special Subject approaches `history¿ as a terrain of struggle in Pakistan. It traces how different `pasts¿ has been mobilised, by the powerful but also by marginalised communities, exploring why these contests matter for Pakistan¿s present and its possible futures. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The First Age of Globalisation: Money, Race, and Empire 1850-1933HistoryHST6766Full year6No

The First Age of Globalisation: Money, Race, and Empire 1850-1933

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noam Maggor

Description: The period between the American Civil War and the Global Great Depression was an era of unprecedented global interconnectedness, not unlike our own. Telegraph wires, steamships, and railways crossed oceans and continental frontiers, fundamentally changing how human beings understood their relationship to each other and to their world. Students in this Special Subject will explore this period from a variety of perspectives, moving far afield - from London, Buenos Aires, and Bombay, to Chicago, Cairo, and Nanjing, from the prairies and mountains of North America to the Indian sub-continent, the Nile valley, and the hinterlands of Latin America. We will encounter a diverse cast of characters, including imperial officials, racialized labourers, department-store consumers, indigenous peoples, British financiers, industrial workers, indebted farmers, cosmopolitan intellectuals, and more. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Kennedy YearsHistoryHST6730Full year6No

The Kennedy Years

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Mark White
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: What sets apart the Special Subject from your previous undergraduate modules is the degree of specialization and the emphasis on primary sources. The basic aim of this Special Subject is to examine the presidency of John F. Kennedy from 1961 to 1963. This will involve an analysis of his handling of foreign policy issues such as Cuba, Berlin and Vietnam, his approach to key domestic issues such as civil rights, and his assassination. His iconic image and his character will also explored. This module is defined more broadly than this, however, and will foster an understanding of the global impact of American politics. The early part of the module will focus on Kennedy's career before reaching the White House and the 1960 presidential campaign. The latter part of the module will include an assessment of the presidency of Lyndon Johnson and the careers of JFK's brothers, Robert and Edward Kennedy, and his wife, Jackie. These topics will be examined by using a wide range of primary sources. Indeed developing the ability to examine documentation is one of the chief objectives of this module. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
American Film History: Hollywood and the Second World WarHistoryHST6761Full year6No

American Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Mark Glancy
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This Special Subject centers on American films made during the Second World War as well as much more recent American films that represent the war. We are not concerned with war films alone but also explore how films represent issues of class, gender, race and sexuality that arise in tandem with wartime histories. We will also study the methods and sources used by film historians as we investigate matters of film style, filmmakers, and classic films ranging from Casablanca (1942) to Inglorious Basterds (2009).
This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Inside Hitler's Germany: Power, Persecution, and ResistanceHistoryHST6763Full year6No

Inside Hitler's Germany: Power, Persecution, and Resistance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Cronin
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: How much do you know about Hitler's Germany? Although it is one of the most studied topics in modern history, the Nazi regime is frequently misunderstood. This Special Subject offers a comprehensive insight into the inner workings of the regime, its effects on German society, and the ways in which it has been remembered. Some of the questions we will tackle include: How and why did the Nazis come to power? How much did ordinary Germans support the regime? Who resisted? Which groups did the Nazis persecute, and why? We will also consider how the regime represented itself globally, and how Nazi ideology fits into broader histories of imperialism and colonialism. In studying this module, we will engage with an extensive historiography, and you will write assignments that make a strong and original contribution to the field. At the end, you can consider yourself an expert in one of history's most notorious regimes. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
English Language and Study SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3000Semester 23No

English Language and Study Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to UK academic culture, and help them acquire the linguistic and academic skills (both oral and written) that will provide a foundation for future success on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce work of the requisite linguistic and academic standard for undergraduate study, focusing in particular on linguistic (syntactic and grammatical) patterns and use of synonymy in academic writing, and cohesion and coherence in essays, with assessment through both course work and exam. Students will write a timed exam essay of 500-600 words and a longer 1500 word Extended Essay as course work within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. The module will include a Portfolio as course work which provides the opportunity for reflection and review/redrafting of writing . Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Topics in EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6006Semester 36No

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6005
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: Topics to Econometrics will extend the student's knowledge of regression analysis to topics in time series, panel data analysis and instrumental variables. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate advanced applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of time series regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigationsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM949Semester 17No

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debra Fonalleras-Marcos

Description: This module allows the students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of the gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigations. It is intended as an update for those with some experience in endoscopy and as an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module. Specific learning objectives of this module includes:

To study the structure of an endoscope and how it works; Understanding the indications, contraindication and complications of the main diagnostic endoscopic techniques: gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and capsule endoscopy; Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images; Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients; How to organise and run an endoscopy service; Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy; Formulate their own options for investigating various GI symptoms/diseases; Describe the nuclear medicine techniques available for assessing diseases of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract; Learn the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for assessing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
History Research DissertationHistoryHST6700Full year6No

History Research Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Todman

Description: The History Research Dissertation provides an opportunity for you to complete an in-depth research project within an area of historical enquiry that is linked to your level 6 special subject. You will be encouraged to pursue your own intellectual interests in relation to your special subject, and supported by your special subject convener who will supervise your dissertation research. In Semester A, you will attend a series of dissertation workshops that are designed to give you an understanding and awareness, at an advanced level, of the conceptual and methodological challenges of conducting an extended research project. You will then engage in self-led research directed towards the completion of an assessed 10,000 word dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Cold War America 1945-1975HistoryHST6301Semester 26Yes

Cold War America 1945-1975

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark White

Description: This module will examine the major developments in United States history from the end of the Second World War to Watergate. The issues to be covered include the onset of the Cold War, McCarthyism, civil rights, the Cuban missile crisis, Vietnam, 1960s culture, Watergate, and the institution of the presidency. The roles played by key individuals, such as John Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Richard Nixon, will be explored. Declassified documents will be used in analyzing some of these topics. The module aims to develop students' basic knowledge of this era in American history, to hone their analytical skills, to develop their ability to examine documentation, and to heighten their ability to respond to historiographical debates. Students will develop an understanding of the global impact of American politics, from the Vietnam War to the Civil Rights Movement, and will compare international perspectives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_56_A
Decolonisation and HistoryHistoryHST6411Semester 26Yes

Decolonisation and History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Robert Waters

Description: What does it mean to `decolonise history¿? In this module, we will consider the contemporary demand to 'decolonise history' from a historical perspective, exploring how history as a practice - historical thinking, history making, history writing - has operated as a key terrain in the struggle against empire. The module explores how the questions of who gets to narrate history, in what form, and to what audience, became crucial to the struggles for and against colonisation and empire. The module will also introduce you to the ways in which the movement for decolonisation remade what history might be, and what it might do in the world. We will explore the various forms that the relationship between history and decolonisation have taken in the past, and think about the contingency of the forms that relationship takes in our present.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
American Horror Stories: The Fiction and Film Worlds of Stephen King from Carrie to ItHistoryHST6380Semester 26Yes

American Horror Stories: The Fiction and Film Worlds of Stephen King from Carrie to It

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Jacobsen

Description: With a career spanning over 40 years, Stephen King is one of the world's most popular and influential writers, his stories and iconic characters forming an integral part of the American cultural landscape. Film adaptations of his work continue to receive critical acclaim and extraordinary box office success. The analysis of Horror film and fiction can reveal cultural anxieties at significant socio-historic moments. In this module, we will explore the ways in which Stephen King's shorter novels, novellas and film adaptations of his work interrogate the American psyche, capturing its fears and apprehensions at defining points in modern history. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this module will use King's work as a lens through which to examine developments in American horror cinema and fiction, investigating the articulation of cultural anxieties from the New England Puritan imagination in the influential works of Edgar Allen Poe and H.P. Lovecraft to the disillusioned aftermath of the Vietnam War in 'Carrie' and contemporary contexts of gender, empowerment and sexuality in 'Gerald's Game'. While the module will focus on the Horror texts for which King is renowned, we will look at his contribution to other genres, from the depiction of boyhood in 'Stand by Me' to the prison melodrama of the world's favourite movie, 'The Shawshank Redemption'. We will read and reflect on what we can learn about our own writing from King's memoir and reflection on the writing process, 'On Writing'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Empire and Political ThoughtHistoryHST6408Semester 16Yes

Empire and Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: We often think of the state as the crucible of modern political thought. Many of the ideas that are fundamental to the way in which we live today were, however, developed in the process of forging the vast European empires that spanned the globe from the sixteenth century to the twentieth. These include our understandings of human rights, property, the international laws that govern the global system, and even the concept of the state itself. This module will also examine the various ways in which non-European peoples reacted to and engaged with such ideas. The aim of this module will be to show that modern political thought did not develop in exclusively European contexts but, rather, through a centuries-old engagement between European and non-European societies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Race in the United States: Plantation Slavery to #BlackLivesMatterHistoryHST5395Semester 15Yes

Race in the United States: Plantation Slavery to #BlackLivesMatter

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noam Maggor

Description: This module interrogates the resilient power of racism in American history from the founding of the United States to the recent past. We will survey African American history from slavery through the Civil Rights era, broadly defined, and to more contemporary struggles. We will embed this history in the larger sweep of American history, covering topics such as plantation slavery, abolitionism and emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the ¿New Negro,¿ the long Civil Rights Movement, and the age of Trump/Obama. We will discuss the legacy of prominent African-American thinkers, activists, and political leaders, as well as the perspectives of ordinary black men and women. With the use of scholarly works and primary sources, we will reflect on the invention and re-invention of ¿race¿ and question what African-American history should mean for our understanding of American capitalism, empire, democracy, society, and culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Black Metropolis: London, New York and Paris from Imperialism to DecolonisationHistoryHST5396Semester 15Yes

Black Metropolis: London, New York and Paris from Imperialism to Decolonisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Claire Dunstan

Description: Throughout the 20th century the cities of London, New York and Paris became important sites of various black internationalist political and cultural movements. Drawing together methodologies from urban, social and intellectual history, this course will give students a deep understanding of the prominence that London, Paris and New York took on in black life both within England, France and the United States, and internationally. It will encourage students to think of cities as both creations and creators of local, national and international black historical activism from Garveyism to the "New Negro" Movement and the birth of négritude, through to the West African Students Union movement and Black Pantherism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Consumed: American Consumer Culture from the 18th to the 21st CenturyHistoryHST5394Semester 15Yes

Consumed: American Consumer Culture from the 18th to the 21st Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Cohen

Description: From Amazon.com to the Mall of America - some of the world's most sophisticated selling technologies emerged in the United States. In fact, some have called consumption America's true national pastime. But how did this culture of consumption take shape? And what does it mean for a global community today? Surveying the transformation of America's consumer culture, this module explores what power the consumer has commanded in American society. We will examine how critiques of consumption shaped the course of American politics, economics and social order. And as we enter an era where everything - including health, friendship and even love is commodified - we will explore the limits of consumer culture. Will the twenty-first century finally see the end of consumer culture as we know it?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Trauma to the Pelvis and TorsoSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7062Semester 17No

Trauma to the Pelvis and Torso

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kashif Akhtar

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the mechanism and patho-physiology of trauma of the pelvis and torso.

Students will evaluate the common injury patterns within the chest, abdomen and pelvis, both penetrating and blunt. They will critically appraise treatment algorithms and resuscitation strategies for these life-threatening injuries and develop a clear comprehension of how to recognise the clinical priorities within individual cases and instigate appropriate courses of action.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Art and Power in Early Modern EuropeHistoryHST6219Semester 16Yes

Art and Power in Early Modern Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hannah Williams

Description: What power does art have? How can it be used to control, manipulate, entice, and inspire? This module offers students the chance to explore the power of art in one of the most dynamic periods of European history and artistic production - from the royal and papal courts of the seventeenth century, through the Counter-Reformation and the Enlightenment, to the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century. In this module, students will encounter iconic sites (Versailles, the Vatican) and artists (Caravaggio, Bernini, Gentileschi, Rubens, Velazquez, Boucher, David, Vigée-Lebrun). Students will also learn to analyse different kinds of objects and spaces (sculpture, paintings, palaces, churches), go on museum and site visits, and think about power in a range of discourses (politics, religion, sex, science, gender, and money). From the churches of baroque Rome to the toppling statues of Paris in the Revolution, what can art tell us about the histories of power in Europe?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Burn and Wound HealingSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7058Semester 37No

Burn and Wound Healing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Niall Martin

Description: The module will be offered as an elective module for the MSc in Trauma Science and will deepen and broaden the knowledge on patients with burns injuries. It will allow students to develop a more critical and evaluative approach to the care of burns patients, through a complete overview of assessment, stabilization and management in respect to the most recent literature. There are also sections on electrical and chemical burns.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Research MethodsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7059Semester 17No

Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elaine Cole

Description: The module will introduce basic principles of research design and strategy, ranging from the formulation of research problems to the critical assessment of alternative approaches to research. Students will gain a through grounding of most common research methods in medical science. Students will also develop an appreciation for research ethics specific to the discipline of medical science.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7061Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mrs Elaine Cole

Description: This module will allow students to undertake a dissertation project on a topic within the science and practice of trauma care. Each student will be able to chose a pertinent topic within the individuals' specialism and career aspirations. Students will be supervised and will receive guidance by their academic tutor (supervisor). Students will have to write a 10,000-20,000 words dissertation. The work shall discuss the most relevant aspects of the chosen topic and demonstrate the student's ability to select the most appropriate research methodology to conduct the chosen research. During this module, students (in coordination with a supervisor) will select a topic for advanced study; collect and analyze data to adequately address the chosen topic; and write a 10,000-20,000 word dissertation. Through the dissertation, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
History Research ProjectHistoryHST5901Semester 25No

History Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Saunders

Description: This module builds on the skills you have developed in first year to prepare you for your final-year dissertation. You will produce a research project, involving independent research and writing, within a framework of skills workshops and peer review sessions. You will have flexibility in choosing the topic and format of your project from a selection of options reflecting the chronological, geographic, and thematic range of the School. You will also work within Writing Partner groups to read each other's work and provide feedback as your project develops.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Islam and the West in the Middle AgesHistoryHST6106Semester 16Yes

Islam and the West in the Middle Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Helen Flatley

Description: In the course of the Middle Ages, Islam and the West came into closer contact through the agencies of frontier societies, trade and cultural interchange, and crusade and holy war. This advanced module explores the forms, representations and outcomes of these interactions in Iberia, southern Italy and the Levantine Crusader States, encouraging students to consider issues of commonality and difference across space and time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to LiberalismHistoryHST7321Semester 27No

Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella

Description: The module explores attitudes to empire and imperial expansion between the 18th and the 19th century. It will cover debates on empire in Europe and will focus first on Enlightenment attitudes (from Diderot, Herder, Raynal to Adam Smith and Edmund Burke), and then on nineteenth century writers, from Benjamin Constant, to Sismondi, Cattaneo, Mill and Tocqueville. By so doing, the module will discuss at the relationship between ideas of freedom civilisation, culture, international trade and Empire, and will provide an analysis of the meanings of concepts of Empire.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation - MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual HistoryHistoryHST7603Full year7No

Dissertation - MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: The dissertation for the MA in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 12,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
London and its MuseumsHistoryHST5606Semester 25Yes

London and its Museums

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chloe Ward

Description: This module will begin by looking at the historical development of museums from the random gathering of natural and man-made objects found in the cabinet of curiosities of the Renaissance to the institutional role played by modern and contemporary museums. We will have the opportunity to explore London's collections for the purpose of contextualizing and critically evaluating the cultural and historical value, purpose, educational role and key public function of different types of exhibiting space and exhibitions. Along with developing knowledge of the contents of collections, the module will focus on ideas of collecting, curatorial knowledge and theories of display, with the aim of deconstructing the cultural narratives and ideological representations provided by each exhibiting space. The entirety of this module will take place outside of the university campus as each week will see the class visiting a different museum. In weekly visits to museums and galleries in London, students will consider history in a broader perspective, evaluate museum space and exhibition experiences, and demonstrate how historical research can be applied in the environment of museum studies, public engagement, and art analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_456_A
Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7042Full year7No

Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module will provide the trainee with detailed knowledge and understanding of the structure, function, mode of action and resistance mechanisms of antimicrobial agents. They will gain knowledge and experience of the use and monitoring of antimicrobial therapy and the impact on patient management in a variety of clinical settings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Cancer BiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6020Semester 16No

Cancer Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This module is only available to students on the intercalated BSc in Experimental Pathology programme. This module will define neoplasia, describe the macro and microscopic appearance of range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. Specifically, the causes of the transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The module will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Experimental NeuropathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6021Semester 16No

Experimental Neuropathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases covering techniqiues such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects cover trauma, Alzheimers Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tautopathies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1789-1890HistoryHST7319Semester 17No

In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1789-1890

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Stewart

Description: This course examines the impact of the French Revolution upon the shape of nineteenth-century political thought. The course demonstrates its central role in the inception of socialism and positivism in the definition of modern Conservatism and in the inhibiting part it played in the development of nineteenth-century liberalism, republicanism and democracy. It goes on to examine how these elements of thought were modified by the emergence of the 'social question' (individualization and the workers movements) and by the experience of the 1848 Revolution. Finally, it examines the growing preoccupation with questions of secularism, social democracy and empire in the 1850's and after. Among the thinkers examined are Condorcet, Constant, De Maistre, Saint-Simon and Proudhon: Mill and Carlyle; Hegel, Marx, Lorenz von Stein and Lasalle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Neuroscience Research ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6016Semester 26No

Neuroscience Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip

Description: This is a practical-based module wherein students conduct original research supervised by an academic member of staff for a period of approximately 10-12 weeks. Students are required to explore the background of the research and its rationale, construct hypotheses to be tested, learn necessary skills with which to conduct the work, compile results and analyse them. They will write a dissertation of approximately 8-10,000 words including critical analysis of literature, reporting of experimental design
and results as well as their evaluation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
History from the Margins: Minorities in Early Modern EuropeHistoryHST6759Full year6No

History from the Margins: Minorities in Early Modern Europe

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Liesbeth Corens
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take HST6216
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Early modern society and culture was not monolithic. Religious, ethnic, and social differences pushed some to the margins of power and influence. Our big historical narratives and consequently our modules are often shaped by history's winners. This module invites students to look at England, Europe, and the world through the lenses of those at the margins. Jews in the Mediterranean, Black Londoners, Moriscos in the Iberian Peninsula, Roma travellers across England, Catholics under Queen Elizabeth, Calvinist exiles from Catholic France, all have their own story to tell and nuance to add to our understanding of the early modern world. This course will consider moments of discrimination as well as of interaction, and study minorities not as victims but search for their agency. Thereby, we put in relief the perspectives historians take on the past, challenge straightforward national stories, and articulate the diverging experiences of past people. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Behind Closed Doors: Houses, Interiors and Domestic Life, c.1660-c.1830HistoryHST6720Full year6No

Behind Closed Doors: Houses, Interiors and Domestic Life, c.1660-c.1830

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Amanda Vickery
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This special subject module unlocks the front door of the Englishman's castle, to peer into the privacies of life at home from c. 1660-1830. It will vividly recreate the texture of life at home, from bed bugs and insects breeding behind the wallpapers, to new goods, fashions and rituals, from the performances of the drawing room to the secrets of the dressing room. The module sits on the research frontier, and crosses disciplinary boundaries, drawing on anthropology, historical geography, the history of architecture and decorative arts, material culture and museum studies. Domestic life will come out of the closet. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_56_A
Research Methods in Finance and EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6013Semester 16No

Research Methods in Finance and Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, an annotated bibliography, a reflective task and one complete draft chapter. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Supernatural in Modern BritainHistoryHST6354Semester 26Yes

The Supernatural in Modern Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rhodri Hayward

Description: This module provides a broad introduction to the changing ideas of the self and supernatural nineteenth-century Britain. Using a mixture of primary and secondary sources, it will look at how supernatural events - from ghostly encounters through to astral projection were experienced and understood across the course of the nineteenth century. It will pose questions about the moral and political impact of these experiences and the different models of selfhood that were deployed in making sense of them, paying particular attention to the interaction between social, medical and religious history. Students model a holistic approach to the study of the supernatural, drawing on religious, mind sciences, and historical perspectives. They analyse and interrogate claims made in mesmeric, hypnotic and psychical research, and critically evaluate different understandings of the supernatural, the imagination, and the nature of selfhood.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_56_A
The Idea of 'the West': A History from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First CenturyHistoryHST6746Full year6No

The Idea of 'the West': A History from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Georgios Varouxakis
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This module analyses the history of different ideas of 'the West' from its earliest uses in the eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century. This history will be studied from the perspective of both 'Western' and `non-Western' thinkers and authors. Students will gain a deep and many-sided mastery of a concept with a long history, which is highly relevant to contemporary debates and ways of thinking, and yet is rarely defined or analysed historically. The main contribution of the module will be to problematise and historicise the concept of the West and show when it emerged, why, and how meanings have changed over the last two centuries. The module is ambitious in its analysis, its geographical and cultural coverage, and its aim to develop students¿ historical perspectives and critical skills. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Britain from the 1905 Aliens Act to BrexitHistoryHST6757Full year6No

Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Britain from the 1905 Aliens Act to Brexit

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Robert Waters
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: How has race shaped modern Britain? This module traces the shifting meanings and boundaries of race in Britain between the panic over Jewish immigration at the end of the nineteenth century and the anti-European and Islamophobic politics of the early twenty-first. We will historicize race as a constant but shifting presence in British social, cultural and political life, particularly as it has turned on issues of immigration. The module includes a sustained focus on the importance of black and Asian experiences and political mobilizations for understanding this history, and on the critical perspectives of British black and Asian intellectuals.
This module must be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Video Games: History, Culture and Representation from Pacman to PokemonHistoryHST6405Semester 16Closed

Video Games: History, Culture and Representation from Pacman to Pokemon

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Jacobsen

Description: A truly transnational industry with a current annual value of $100 billion and an estimated 1.2 billion players worldwide, the video game has had an incalculable impact upon global culture. This module traces the origins, development, socio-cultural significance and critical appreciation of the form from its beginnings in the amusement arcades to the mobile games of the present day. Considering video games as uniquely interactive visual sources, the module will employ a diverse range of methods, approaches and critical contexts, from the circumstances of socioeconomic national production in Japan, Europe and the US to global gaming cultures, the representation of history, the video game's relationship to cinema and the theoretical ways in which we might understand the nature of human leisure and play.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Witches, Demons and Magic in Late Medieval and Early Modern EuropeHistoryHST6215Semester 16Yes

Witches, Demons and Magic in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eyal Poleg

Description: The central theme of this module is the 'supernatural' in the early modern world. The module will explore beliefs in witches, demons and magic, and phenomena such as angels, ghosts, dreams and miracles using case studies from a range of European countries across the period 1450 - 1750. It will investigate the interplay between popular and elite ideas about witchcraft and magic and how these changed over the course of the period. Topics will include: witchcraft, sabbats, the diabolic pact and black magic; witch trials, torture and execution; demonic possession and exorcism; angels, ghosts and fairies; and monsters and miracles. Students will be given the opportunity to discuss a range of textual and visual primary sources including woodcuts, witchcraft trials, popular pamphlets and official treatises (all in translation). Students will model a holistic approach to the study of the 'supernatural' in the early modern world, and reflect on the meanings that witchcraft and the supernatural continue to hold in the modern world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Critical Care and TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7054Semester 27No

Critical Care and Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Susan Brundage

Description: This module will provide students with a solid background in the rapidly evolving area of critical care. In this module the students will develop an evaluative approach to critical care. Special attention will be given to "hot topics" such as shock therapy, ventilator management, infectious disease. The module will provide students with the latest evidence based in trauma care and the ability to analyze it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
A Half-Century of Extremes: Germany 1890-1945HistoryHST5391ASemester 15Yes

A Half-Century of Extremes: Germany 1890-1945

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Cronin

Description: This module provides a systematic account of German history from 1890 to 1945. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country from the accession of Kaiser Wilhelm II to the end of the Second World War. Special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar Republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
A Half-Century of Extremes: Germany 1945-1990HistoryHST5391BSemester 25Yes

A Half-Century of Extremes: Germany 1945-1990

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Cronin

Description: This module provides a systematic account of German history in the second half of the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which have shaped the country up to today. Students will reflect critically on contemporary issues in Germany, on the burden of the German past, and on the place of Germany in Europe. The module covers the Allied occupation after World War II, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification. Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Brain and Spinal Cord InjurySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7053Semester 17No

Brain and Spinal Cord Injury

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Grainne Mckenna

Description: This module will cover the pathophysiology of Brain and Spinal Cord injury. The course teaches student to critically evaluate the principles of diagnosis and treatment for patients with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. The material covered will include description of specific type of injuries. Students will discuss cases involving different clinical scenarios. Once completed the students will be able to describe the mechanisms and dysfunction inherent to traumatic brain injury and to outline the key elements of their management. Particular reference is given to the recent scientific literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Haemorrhage and Response to InjurySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7051Semester 17No

Haemorrhage and Response to Injury

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ross Davenport

Description: This module will provide students with the tools to evaluate different clinical situations and broaden the knowledge on diagnosis and management of shock syndrome. Particular attention will be on the deranged physiology underlying the onset of acute traumatic coagulopathy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Torso TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7052Semester 27No

Torso Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chris Alywin

Description: The torso module will focus on the mechanism and pathophysiology of torso injuries. The module seeks to provide students with a more critical knowledge of common patterns for torso injuries and will provide students with the tools to recognise and initiate treatments for the most common and life threatening injuries. This is offered as a compulsory module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
History of Political ThoughtHistoryHST5614BSemester 25Yes

History of Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Waseem Yaqoob

Description: How has the meaning of `democracy¿ changed over the centuries? Where did the language of rights come from? How have slavery and empire been justified - and criticised? Beginning with some of the earliest examples of political theorising in the ancient world, and ending in the twentieth century, this module introduces students to some of the most important thinkers and debates in the history of political thought. Individual thinkers and major texts will be discussed each week, together with major debates and issues. Students will look at arguments and controversies as they unfolded in different historical circumstances, becoming familiar with the concepts, problems, and debates that have shaped political thought. They will acquire a solid grounding in the development of, and differences among, the various philosophical and ideological traditions that have shaped modern politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Race and the Desire for DifferenceHistoryHST5615Semester 25Yes

Race and the Desire for Difference

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Layton

Description: Race is not a biological fact. It is a social category historically made. In 1963 James Baldwin affirmed: 'I am not a negro. I am a man. But if you think I am a negro, it means you need it. And the question you must ask yourself is, why?' This module explores how race emerged and developed in history as a powerful category for differentiating peoples. It examines how empire has played a role in histories of racism and emphasises the global dimensions of racism. In doing so, we see how ideas about race and experiences of racism are locally situated and vary over time and space. The module ranges over different geographic territory with examples from Britain and Europe, South Asia, Africa, and America. We will examine the connections between race, religion, sex, class, and migration. While the module will look at how the idea of race has been used to separate people, we will also examine how people throughout history have defied and challenged the categories of racial difference in their daily life and in social and cultural movements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Art and the City from Michelangelo to Blade RunnerHistoryHST5413Semester 15Closed

Art and the City from Michelangelo to Blade Runner

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hannah Williams
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take HST6410

Description: In our current climate of rapid urbanization, this module explores histories of art and the city from the Renaissance to the present. From Michelangelo¿s sculpture of David (1504) on a public square in Florence, to Ridley Scott¿s dystopian vision of Los Angeles in Blade Runner (1982), via Impressionist views of 19th-century Paris, and graffiti on the Berlin wall, we will be thinking about how artists have engaged with cities and how that has changed over time. What crucial roles do artworks play in city space, whether political, commercial, commemorative, or subversive? How has art shaped the history and development of cities? And what impact does it have on the experience of our urban environments? This module explores a range of urban sites and spaces (squares, streets, walls, transport systems, parks) and different kinds of artworks (public sculpture, painting, monuments, street art, photography, film), with case studies from cities around the world. Students will have the opportunity to engage with their own urban environment and explore critical themes including: boundaries and borders; community and civic identity; crime and transgression; religion; memory; mobility; dystopia; and iconoclasm.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Modern Art in Britain, Europe, and America: 1900-1950HistoryHST6378Semester 26Yes

Modern Art in Britain, Europe, and America: 1900-1950

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chloe Ward

Description: This module explores the development of Modern Art between the turn of the twentieth century and the Second World War. We will examine the major art movements of the period - from colourful Fauve painting to the drama of Abstract Expressionism - and will discover how artists sought to challenge aesthetic traditions by formulating innovative 'avant-garde' methods and theories. Through works of art, this module investigates the aesthetic and political landscape of Western Europe and the United States, and traces the emergence of Modernism in the early twentieth century.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_6_A
History Advanced Research ProjectHistoryHST7902Semester 17No

History Advanced Research Project

Credits: 20.0
Contact: Dr James Ellison

Description: In this module, you will undertake a practical historical research project in partnership with one of our academics. These projects will be drawn from our staff's current research interests, and might include: compiling and analysing a database; preparing a biographical or bibliographical companion; conducting oral history interviews; translation or transcription of previously unpublished sources. Prior to embarking upon the project, you will receive training in the methodological tools employed by historians, and assistance in preparing an application for your preferred project. A range of project options will be available, though students are not guaranteed their first choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
History InternshipHistoryHST7903Semester 27No

History Internship

Credits: 20.0
Contact: Dr Claire Trenery

Description: This module gives you the opportunity to complete an internship placement with one of our local partners in the museum, public history, archival, or education sectors. Working alongside practitioners in the field, you will be introduced to the skills employed by public historians, such as curating exhibitions, creating digital resources, cataloguing archival materials, or participating in outreach. The placement allows you to put into practice in a professional environment the knowledge and skills gained through the MA degree. Prior to embarking upon your placement, you will receive training in the practices and responsibilities of professionals working in history-related fields, and assistance in preparing an application for your placement from the options available. The placement will be sixteen hours per week over a period of six weeks, and you will be supported throughout by the School of History. A range of placements with partner-organisations will be available, though students are not guaranteed their first choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Trauma: the DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7050Semester 17No

Trauma: the Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elaine Cole

Description: The aim of the module is to provide the knowledge to consider and manage trauma as a disease entity. The module starts with an historical overview of trauma and trauma systems and then proceeds to analyze the different aspects on how to deliver a specialist trauma care, from pre hospital care through the entire patient's care pathway.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mastering the FieldHistoryHST7901Full year7No

Mastering the Field

Credits: 40.0
Contact: Prof Martyn Frampton

Description: In this module, you will master your chosen field of historical study. You will choose to specialise in one of several streams, each taught by experts who will guide you through the important concepts, debates, and problems that engage historians working in that field today. You'll be encouraged to reflect critically on key texts in the field, as you develop the historiographical awareness that will prepare you for your dissertation. Streams may include: Global Britain; Global History and Decolonisation; Modern America; Modern Europe, Medieval Europe, Medieval Islamic World, Material and Visual Culture; History of Emotions, Medicine and Science.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Pre-Hospital Care and Mass CasualtiesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7049Semester 37No

Pre-Hospital Care and Mass Casualties

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: Students will learn about a wide range of topics within the pre-hospital care environment, including scene management, critical care interventions, and mass casualty events. Please note, this module does not seek to provide training in pre-hospital care, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to the pre-hospital environment. Students also will gain an understanding of specific issues faced by those who work in the pre-hospital environment. Hospital based practitioners will gain knowledge regarding the types of care that can be provided pre-hospital and how mass casualty events are managed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 7
Laboratory MethodsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6015Semester 16No

Laboratory Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xuenong Bo

Description: Finding, reading and evaluating research literature, experimental design and statistics, ethics of experimentation, how to give oral presentations, essay & dissertation writing, record keeping, molecular biology methods, in situ hybridization, western blot, use of microscopes, flow cytometry, histochemistry and tract tracing, electrophysiological methods, proteomics, cell culture, gene therapy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, Nineteenth-Twentieth CenturiesHistoryHST7316Semester 27No

Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, Nineteenth-Twentieth Centuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Georgios Varouxakis

Description: This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of what some of the most important political thinkers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (before the emergence of what is called 'contemporary political theory' since the 1970s) thought and wrote about the phenomena and concepts referred to as `nationalism', `patriotism¿ and `cosmopolitanism¿. Thinkers focused upon include eighteenth-century predecessors such as Immanuel Kant, Johann Gottfried Herder, J. G. Fichte, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Richard Price, Jeremy Bentham, as well as nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers such as John Stuart Mill, Walter Bagehot, John [Lord] Acton, Matthew Arnold, Giuseppe Mazzini, Alexis de Tocqueville, Auguste Comte, Thomas Hill Green, Henry Sidgwick, Frederic Harrison, J. R. Seeley, Karl Marx, Herbert Spencer, Rabindranath Tagore, Ernest Barker, Alfred Zimmern, Otto Bauer, Harold Laski, Bertrand Russell, Elie Kedourie, John Plamenatz, Isaiah Berlin and others. The emphasis of the module is not on `nationalist¿ or `cosmopolitan¿ thinkers as such, but on what political thinkers thought and wrote about the nation, patriotism, nationalism, internationalism, and cosmopolitanism from the time of the French Revolution to the Cold War.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The 'Heart of Darkness'? Identity, Power and Politics in the Congo c.1870-2010HistoryHST6737Full year6No

The 'Heart of Darkness'? Identity, Power and Politics in the Congo c.1870-2010

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Reuben Loffman
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This QMUL Model module challenges conceptions of Central Africa as the Heart of Darkness, a place disconnected from civilization and unintelligible to all save for the hardened anthropologist. It starts during the intensification of European encounters in the region from late nineteenth-century and ends by covering the most deadly conflicts since the Second World War. It engages with broad historical questions relating to ethnic formation, violence, international development, and the mission encounter. To reveal the complexities involved in power relations in the Congo, this module will make use of a vast array of different kinds of sources from a range of cultural perspectives, such as literary accounts, photographs, and film, and will investigate Central African history in a global context. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Experimental NeuropathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6014Semester 16No

Experimental Neuropathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases covering techniqiues such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects cover trauma, Alzheimers Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tautopathies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Reinventing Ourselves: Psychology, Sex and Chemistry in Modern BritainHistoryHST6735Full year6No

Reinventing Ourselves: Psychology, Sex and Chemistry in Modern Britain

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rhodri Hayward
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Historians and philosophers have claimed that a massive transformation in our idea of the self took place in the twentieth century. Novel concepts developed in psychology, physiology, endocrinology, psychiatry, sexology, ethology and psychoanalysis promoted a new sense of the complexity and tractability of identity in the British population. Students analyse how the subject matter is approached from these different disciplines, learn to interrogate claims made in psychological and life sciences, and critically evaluate how perspectives from medical sociology can be incorporated into the history of medicine. Focusing on the middle decades of the twentieth century, this module surveys the vast range of materials individuals drew upon in constructing their identities and the new political and social relationships that these made possible. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_6_A
Disconnected Pathways: Disorders of Spinal SystemsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6013Semester 16No

Disconnected Pathways: Disorders of Spinal Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip

Description: Basic and advanced anatomy of peripheral nerve and spinal cord; acute and chronic pain, visceral pain, pain models, management of pain , trophic factors, peripheral nerve injury, neuronal and glial responses to injury, regeneration and repair of nerve injuries, basic and clinical sciences of spinal cord injury.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to PoliticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3003Semester 23No

Introduction to Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over political concepts. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential terms used to understand politics, including politics, power, states, elitism, pluralism and Marxism. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
The Age of Revolutions: Global PerspectivesHistoryHST6743Full year6No

The Age of Revolutions: Global Perspectives

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The module examines the global nature of the age of revolutions between the late eighteenth century and mid-nineteenth century, focusing in particular on those parts of the world and on those revolutionary events traditionally treated by historians as marginal or peripheral. It provides an overview of the period through a set of case studies, ranging from events in Latin and Central America to the Mediterranean and Asia, as well as through the analysis of their global political and ideological entanglements. The module is organized around a variety of approaches. First it provides an introduction to the methodology of global history and its implications for the study of the age of revolutions. Second, it offers a thematic and comparative analysis of the shared features of the revolutions around the world (the role of the army and nature of revolutionary wars, the relationship between religion and revolutionary ideologies, counter-revolutionary culture, secret societies). Finally, it discusses specific case studies (the Haitian revolution,the Greek revolution of 1821, etc) and explores connections and transnational influences across the world. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesHST_6_A
MacroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3014Semester 23No

Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3013
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: Macroeconomics studies the interaction of different parts of the economy. It stresses broad aggregates, such as the total demand for goods by households or total spending on machinery and building by firms. The full attention, however, will be on the big picture that is the big issues that affect the economy - growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6006Semester 16Yes

Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: COM6006
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or knowledge of French equivalent to at least level C1 of CEFR
Corequisite: None

Description: This module centres on narratology, the structural study of fictional narrative. Narratological analysis addresses questions such as: How can we talk about the selection of detail in fiction? What are the implications of having characters narrate their own stories? You will study a major work of narratology, and apply its principles to some classic French literary texts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. Creative writing work in French, based on the set texts - rewriting passages, composing additional episodes, etc. - plays an important part in the module, developing your understanding of texts and techniques as well as your linguistic skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6007Semester 16No

Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will equip students with the standard methods and analytical tools of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, with emphasis on the relationship between the decisions of individual agents, the operation of markets and the general state of the economy. The microeconomics component will analyse the nature of competition a firm faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, while the macroeconomics one will focus on growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
MicroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3013Semester 13No

Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: Microeconomics studies in detail the demand behaviour of consumers and the supply contact of producers, showing how markets work and why different markets exhibit different forms of performance. It analyses the external environment in which a firm operates that is the nature of competition it faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, the general state of the economy and the global environment, and how consumers respond to all these inputs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Film and EthicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6207PSemester 27No

Film and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the relationship between ethics and diverse forms of cinema, tracing the emergence of a relatively new but increasingly influential approach to the medium. How can the interactions between documentary filmmakers, their subjects and viewers be understood in ethical terms? What is specific about the way narrative cinema frames the moral dilemmas and decisions around which it so often revolves? To what extent does the filmic institution render viewers ethically complicit in scenarios of suffering and violence? What is distinctive about the contribution of cinema to debates in ethical philosophy? And how do given films relate to the poststructuralist ethical preoccupation with the possibility of unconditional openness towards the other? Students will address these and other questions through analysis of a wide-ranging corpus of films and critical, theoretical and philosophical texts produced in Europe, North America and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4021Semester 13No

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: LAN4021
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish.

Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.

In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 3
Topics in EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6006Semester 26No

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6005
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: Topics to Econometrics will extend the student's knowledge of regression analysis to topics in time series, panel data analysis and instrumental variables. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate advanced applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of time series regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
The History of the UK since 1956Languages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3024Semester 33No

The History of the UK since 1956

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3023
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK since the Suez Crisis of 1956. It examines key political, economic, and diplomatic events and developments during the period. It also addresses cultural and social changes during the second half of the twentieth century and considers their impact upon the contemporary United Kingdom.
In addition, and continuing the process begun in module IFP/IFJ3023 The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955, the module will help students develop further their skills in interpreting and assessing evidence and presenting their informed conclusions orally and in writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955Languages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3023Semester 23No

The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK from the beginning of the twentieth century to 1955. It examines key political, economic, ideological, diplomatic and military events and developments during the period.

In addition, the module will help students develop skills in interpreting and assessing evidence, and in effective writing and oral presentation. To this end, two weeks of the module address issues of research and methodology specific to the academic discipline of History. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the module assessments, while also preparing students for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3024 The History of the UK since 1956.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Project in Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG6212Full year6No

Project in Environmental Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

Description: An independent project based upon field, and/or laboratory, and/or numerical modelling work within the field of Environmental Science. NB This module is compulsory for all final-year students registered for an Environmental Science degree (F850) and is not available to students registered for any geography degree. By the end of the second term in your second year you will have to put forward a proposal for your topic, you will be allocated a supervisor based on this proposal. The main research takes place during the summer vacation between your second and third years. Any laboratory analysis should be completed by the end of the first semester in your third year. The work should be preceded by an exploratory study during the Easter vacation of your second year. Data analysis and writing up of the project takes place during the first and second terms of your third year. You are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss the project. The results of your research are presented in a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. Not open to associate students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesGEG_6_S
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and ConceptsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6017Semester 26No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alexander Blanchard
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module introduces students, who may not have English as their first language, to modern political ideas and to international relations. It examines general issues such as: What is politics about? Why and how do we study Politics? What kinds of ideas and institutions is politics concerned with? It examines key concepts which inform political debate and the historical development of such key concepts. Political ideas and concepts to be studied include the state, the nation, race, ideologies, citizenship and democracy. Students will also examine key political ideologies in detail. Ideologies to be studied will include Marxism, feminism, liberalism, conservatism and socialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Human Geography of LondonLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3006Semester 23No

The Human Geography of London

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3005
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: On the front cover of this module outline is a montage of photographs of Stratford in East London, the former location of the London Olympic Games 2012. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, as it is now known, is located very near to Queen Mary University of London and in a town where people live, work, attend school and college, worship, shop and conduct their daily lives. Improving the local economy of a very poor part of London was one of the major reasons why the Olympic Park was constructed in Stratford, to generate employment, more housing and enable young people living there to have more access to sport and leisure facilities; the idea was to raise a poorer neighbourhood socially and economically. Human Geography is concerned about this kind of aspiration for neighbourhoods, its research being focused particularly on issues of inequality. The fact that the former London Olympic Park is situated in one of the most multicultural parts of London is also of significance to Human Geographers, not just with regard to their livelihoods but also their culture. Human Geography is the study of people, places and plans.In this second semester, in relation to London as a city, we apply some of the geographies we learned in the first semester and we explore other geographies that will enable us to understand London's global connections as well as our experiencing of London. For example, in Weeks 9 and 10, we examine the contribution of migrants to London especially as a hidden work force. During the semester, there are four virtual field studies: in Week 3, a walk in Brick Lane where we explore this area's history of migration over three hundred years and the signs of changes that suggest new urban mobilities; in Week 6, a walk in Stratford to consider there the regeneration legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games; in Week 11, a walk in the City of London where we learn about the Great Recession of 2008 and its impact on London's economy; in Week 12, a walk around Trafalgar Square to consider previous historic themes of the module as they relate to this space as well as political and cultural themes that the Square resonates. Through these virtual field studies students learn about the London that is often invisible to the tourist eye.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM944Semester 27No

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Sifrim

Description: This is an advanced course in the field of neurogastroenterology including the application of basic science and research to the problems seen in the clinics. Part of the module includes teaching and experience of complex diagnostic techniques within a GI physiology unit, such as oesophageal and small bowel manometry, high-resolution manometry, impedance, nuclear medicine techniques etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal InfectionsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM945Semester 27No

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal Infections

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Applied Mathematics for BusinessLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3016Semester 23No

Applied Mathematics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nageena Frost
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Accounting, Business and Management or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any Business degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM943Semester 27No

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal Diseases

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Parveen Kumar

Description: This is a comprehensive course on all aspects of adult luminal gastroenterology, excluding functional gastrointestinal diseases. There is a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3015Semester 23No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key business theory and concepts to a variety of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of business including Leadership and Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, I.T., the Internal and External Business Environment, Strategy, Operations Management and Project Management.

Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Economic GeographiesGeographyGEG5129Semester 25Yes

Economic Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joe Penny

Description: This module offers a broad introduction to key debates within Economic Geography. It explores: the geographies of production and global production networks; the recentering of Economic Geography through engagement with the Global South and development; the centrality of uneven development in capitalist economic social relations; the connections between globalisation and local socio-spatial relations; and 'alternative' or `diverse' economic practices that challenge neoliberalism. The module will challenge students to understand how economic processes of valuation, production, consumption and exchange play out in practice in time and place.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Introduction to English LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3007Semester 23No

Introduction to English Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to some of the most important British writers, novels, short stories and poetry from mid nineteenth to mid twentieth century, including works by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Louis Stevenson, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, T.S. Eliot, Ford Maddox Ford, Jean Rhys, George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, L.P. Hartley and J.G. Ballard.
Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Introduction to American LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3008Semester 33No

Introduction to American Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3007
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to:

- The twentieth-century American short story, including stories by Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, Edith Wharton, Dorothy Parker, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Tennessee Williams, John Cheever, Richard Yates, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, Alice Walker, Raymond Carver, Jayne Anne Phillips, Ann Beattie, Don DeLillo, A.M. Homes, Lorrie Moore and Eric Puchner.
- Early to late twentieth-century fiction including novels by F. Scott IF3009Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Carson McCullers, J.D. Salinger,Saul Bellow, John Updike, Jay McInerney, Bret Easton Ellis, Anne Tyler and E. Annie Proulx.

Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Toxicology and CBRNSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7079Semester 27No

Toxicology and CBRN

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elizabeth Thomas

Description: In this module, students will learn about acute toxicology as applied to critical illness. They will gain an understanding of toxidromes, diagnosis of poisoning, and the approach to both supportive and toxin specific care. Importantly, students also will learn about the decontamination of patients and safe working in a CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear) environment. Students will learn via a series of on-line lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Professional and Research SkillsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7091Full year7No

Professional and Research Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: The overall aim of this module is to ensure that the trainee has the underpinning knowledge of the importance of research, development and innovation across the NHS and in healthcare science in particular and to provide the underpinning knowledge for the research project

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGeographyGEG5128Semester 25Yes

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza

Description: This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions. These issues will be examined in different regions of the world, enabling students from different disciplinary backgrounds to analyze the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts on development theory and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Diagnostic Tools in Critical IllnessSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7078Semester 17No

Diagnostic Tools in Critical Illness

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: This module aims to provide students with an understanding of diagnostic work up in the early phases of resuscitation. Students will improve their ability to interpret bed side metabolic parameters provided by blood gas analysis, and their ability to interpret the chest radiograph and acute computed tomography imaging as applied to acute care in critical illness. They will also gain an understanding of the role of focused ultrasound and echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute illness and guiding resuscitation. Students will learn via a series of on-line lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Liver and Pancreatic DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM934Semester 17No

Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Graham Foster

Description: This module provides the students with a comprehensive overview of the study of liver and pancreatic diseases in adults, with a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Topics: Causes of liver disease (alcohol, drugs). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. HCV. HBV. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Virological assays. Liver histology. Liver cancer - surgical aspects and chemotherapy. New drugs for viral hepatitis. Liver and HIV. Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. How interferon works. Benign liver lesions. Liver disease in children. Imaging of the liver

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
French IILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5202ASemester 15Yes

French II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE5202
Prerequisite: FRE4200/FRE4202/FRE4204 or a knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL Level B1+
Corequisite: None

Description: This module develops French grammar, comprehension, oral, aural and analytical skills, with an emphasis on the appropriate use of register in both spoken and written French and preparation for the Year Abroad.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5206Full year5Yes

French II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE5202
Prerequisite: FRE4204 or knowledge of French Language equivalent to CEFR Level A2
Corequisite: None

Description: Entry level in French: A2, exit level: B2 (CEFRL). Module designed to provide students with a deeper and more specific knowledge of French grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation and to further develop the four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in seminars and by activity-based, mixed-skills classes which incorporate oral expression and comprehension as well as reading comprehension, written expression and translation. The module is intended primarily for students doing a BA in Modern Languages involving French (Single or Joint Honours degree).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 3.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 6: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 7: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 3.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 11: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 12: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 13: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 14: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM933Semester 17No

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal Disease

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ping Wang

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic science of gastroenterology. It covers the anatomy, embryology, histology, immunology, physiology (pharmacology and neuroscience), cell biology and genetics of gut function. In addition, lectures focus on research methodologies allowing students to appraise the evidence base underpinning the taught content. Important study skills such as drafting an essay, critical appraisal and referencing, are also covered allowing the students to write an essay or other long documents, with referencing (for examples using endnote).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
European and American Art CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3010Semester 23No

European and American Art Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in Art Cinema (European, New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema). It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of art cinema styles and movements, including Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, British and New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema, as well as to key concepts such as auteurism. It will help students to build on and continue to develop skills learned in IFP/IFJ 3009 in analysing films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills and will assist them in the successful completion of the assessments for the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Pure Mathematics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3011Semester 13No

Pure Mathematics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Statistics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3012Semester 23No

Statistics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3011
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: Statistics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic statistics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The statistics course focuses on the development of statistics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: measures of the centre, spread, skewness and kurtosis of a distribution, probability and probability distributions (binomial, poisson and normal).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6005Semester 16No

Introduction to Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: Introduction to Econometrics will introduce the student to regression analysis used in studies that test hypotheses and empirically fit models in economics. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Film Studies HollywoodLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6003Semester 16No

Film Studies Hollywood

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module examines several theoretical aspects of studying film that students will encounter in a core module of an MA Film Studies, including such concepts as how to 'read' a film, cinematic codes, narrative and genre analysis, and various theoretical approaches (narrative, genre, etc). The module will also explore the history of Hollywood cinema from the 1930s to the present day. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Film Studies AlternativeLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6004Semester 26No

Film Studies Alternative

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6003
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module builds on IFP6003 / IFJ6003 Film Studies: an Introduction to Hollywood Cinema by examining a number of movements and styles from British, European and Asian cinema, as well as New Hollywood Cinema. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Film and EthicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6207Semester 26Yes

Film and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM5203 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the relationship between ethics and diverse forms of cinema, tracing the emergence of a relatively new but increasingly influential approach to the medium. How can the interactions between documentary filmmakers, their subjects and viewers be understood in ethical terms? What is specific about the way narrative cinema frames the moral dilemmas and decisions around which it so often revolves? To what extent does the filmic institution render viewers ethically complicit in scenarios of suffering and violence? What is distinctive about the contribution of cinema to debates in ethical philosophy? And how do given films relate to the poststructuralist ethical preoccupation with the possibility of unconditional openness towards the other? Students will address these and other questions through analysis of a wide-ranging corpus of films and critical, theoretical and philosophical texts produced in Europe, North America and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
French Language and Culture I (a) for IFPLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP4011Semester 13No

French Language and Culture I (a) for IFP

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: LAN4011
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French .

Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.

In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 3
Finance and Economics Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6014Semester 36No

Finance and Economics Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6013
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6013 by choosing their conceptual framework, building and testing their model and their writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Introduction to International RelationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3004Semester 23No

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3003
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over concepts of International Politics. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential theories used to understand International Politics, including Realism, Liberalism and Marxism. It also examines some major issues in International Politics, including war and peace, greater powers and imperialism, and international political economy.
Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Human GeographyLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3005Semester 13No

Introduction to Human Geography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: This module introduces to students some of the topical themes in Human Geography, explored, for example, through globalisation in relation to the fashion industry, media and communications, migration and citizenship. The concept of local-global is examined with reference to food security and the environment, poverty, development and Aid, and global politics as relevant to understanding nation and identity in the twenty-first century. Throughout the semester, themes are considered through lectures, a field study, documentary screenings, seminar activities and two debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Research Methods in Finance and EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6013Semester 26No

Research Methods in Finance and Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, an annotated bibliography, a reflective task and one complete draft chapter. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Environmental HazardsGeographyGEG6203Semester 16Yes

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Steele

Description: Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Liver and Pancreatic DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM942Semester 17No

Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Graham Foster

Description: This module provides the students with a comprehensive overview of the study of liver and pancreatic diseases in adults, with a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Topics: Causes of liver disease (alcohol, drugs). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. HCV. HBV. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Virological assays. Liver histology. Liver cancer - surgical aspects and chemotherapy. New drugs for viral hepatitis. Liver and HIV. Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. How interferon works. Benign liver lesions. Liver disease in children. Imaging of the liver

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
New York: Nature and the CityGeographyGEG6150Semester 26No

New York: Nature and the City

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG6231 or take GEG5150

Description: As a world city undergoing a series of dramatic social and biophysical transformations, from a key site in the development of colonial rule to more recent urban design for climate change resilience, New York is a city where major ideas of nature have been negotiated, narrated and practised. Preparatory lectures and a seven-day field course focus on the changing geographies of nature in New York and their connections to the wider geographies of global environmental change, the Anthropocene and urban sustainability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Urban African EconomiesGeographyGEG6151Semester 26Yes

Urban African Economies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith

Description: Conventional social science has tended to downplay the creativity of urban African societies and economies as well as their `capacity to produce metaphors for their own possible futures¿ (Sarr 2020). Combining approaches from urban, economic and development geography, this module provides students with a critical and historically grounded understanding of urban African economies. It revitalises debates on work, value and exchange through an engagement with local expressions of informality, hustle and solidarity entrepreneurship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
MicroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3013Semester 23No

Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: Microeconomics studies in detail the demand behaviour of consumers and the supply contact of producers, showing how markets work and why different markets exhibit different forms of performance. It analyses the external environment in which a firm operates that is the nature of competition it faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, the general state of the economy and the global environment, and how consumers respond to all these inputs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
MacroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3014Semester 33No

Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3013
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: Macroeconomics studies the interaction of different parts of the economy. It stresses broad aggregates, such as the total demand for goods by households or total spending on machinery and building by firms. The full attention, however, will be on the big picture that is the big issues that affect the economy - growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM941Semester 17No

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal Disease

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ping Wang

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic science of gastroenterology. It covers the anatomy, embryology, histology, immunology, physiology (pharmacology and neuroscience), cell biology and genetics of gut function. In addition, lectures focus on research methodologies allowing students to appraise the evidence base underpinning the taught content. Important study skills such as drafting an essay, critical appraisal and referencing, are also covered allowing the students to write an essay or other long documents, with referencing (for examples using endnote).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
The Human Geography of LondonLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3006Semester 33No

The Human Geography of London

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3005
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: On the front cover of this module outline is a montage of photographs of Stratford in East London, the former location of the London Olympic Games 2012. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, as it is now known, is located very near to Queen Mary University of London and in a town where people live, work, attend school and college, worship, shop and conduct their daily lives. Improving the local economy of a very poor part of London was one of the major reasons why the Olympic Park was constructed in Stratford, to generate employment, more housing and enable young people living there to have more access to sport and leisure facilities; the idea was to raise a poorer neighbourhood socially and economically. Human Geography is concerned about this kind of aspiration for neighbourhoods, its research being focused particularly on issues of inequality. The fact that the former London Olympic Park is situated in one of the most multicultural parts of London is also of significance to Human Geographers, not just with regard to their livelihoods but also their culture. Human Geography is the study of people, places and plans.In this second semester, in relation to London as a city, we apply some of the geographies we learned in the first semester and we explore other geographies that will enable us to understand London's global connections as well as our experiencing of London. For example, in Weeks 9 and 10, we examine the contribution of migrants to London especially as a hidden work force. During the semester, there are four virtual field studies: in Week 3, a walk in Brick Lane where we explore this area's history of migration over three hundred years and the signs of changes that suggest new urban mobilities; in Week 6, a walk in Stratford to consider there the regeneration legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games; in Week 11, a walk in the City of London where we learn about the Great Recession of 2008 and its impact on London's economy; in Week 12, a walk around Trafalgar Square to consider previous historic themes of the module as they relate to this space as well as political and cultural themes that the Square resonates. Through these virtual field studies students learn about the London that is often invisible to the tourist eye.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Project and DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7099Full year7No

Project and Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: The overall aim of this module, building on the Research Methods module is for the student to undertake research that shows originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret new information in a specialism of healthcare science. The student will undertake an original piece of research involving the application of scientific investigation to one or more clinical situations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 75.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Extremity & Vascular TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7075Semester 27No

Extremity & Vascular Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nick Arest

Description: This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal and extremities vascular trauma. Students will be encouraged to use a critical and scientifically robust approach to plan patient care and to develop problem solving skills in the context of orthopedic trauma. Particular attention will be given to cases of blunt and penetrating injuries to the extremities and the resultant vascular abnormalities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Military and HumanitarianSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7076Semester 37No

Military and Humanitarian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christos Giannou

Description: This module will provide students with a background into both military and civilian austere events. The module will cover triage, pre-hospital care, mass casualty management and surge capacity, ballistics, chemical and biological trauma. The latest techniques learnt by the military will be proposed and critically evaluated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Emergency CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7077Semester 37No

Emergency Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Cdr Paul Rees

Description: In this module, students will review a wide range of acute medical disease processes, developing knowledge about their pathophysiology and clinical presentation. Topics will include acute coronary syndromes, diabetic and non-diabetic endocrine emergencies, acute non-traumatic and traumatic neurosurgical emergencies, and infectious disease and tropical medicine. Students also will develop the skills required to manage these diseases, by evaluating clinical scenarios.

Students will learn via a series of online lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 7
Paediatric Emergency MedicineSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7231Semester 37No

Paediatric Emergency Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: Students will learn about a wide range of topics within the field of paediatric resuscitation, including airway management, critical care interventions, and common paediatric emergencies. Please note, this module does not seek to provide training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to paediatric resuscitation. Hospital based practitioners will gain knowledge regarding the resuscitative management of common paediatric emergencies, including issues specific to looking after children such as distraction techniques, and safeguarding.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Cardiac Arrest, Airway Management, Oxygenation, Analgesia and Procedural SedationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7069Semester 27No

Cardiac Arrest, Airway Management, Oxygenation, Analgesia and Procedural Sedation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryl Wood

Description: This module will equip students with knowledge of oxygen delivery, advanced airway care, respiratory support, procedural sedation/analgesia, and state of the art treatment of cardiorespiratory arrest in adults and children. In the first part of the module, students will review the mechanisms for respiratory failure, non-invasive ventilation, and advanced airway care. Students also will learn best practice in acute care analgesia and sedation. In the second part of the module, students will focus on the best practice care for patients in cardiopulmonary arrest in a wide range of scenarios. In the final section of the module, students will focus on the critically ill child and mother.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Independent Scientific PaperSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7074Full year7No

Independent Scientific Paper

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Thomas

Description: This module will allow students to develop specialist knowledge and insight on a topic of their choice, related to Emergency and Resuscitation Medicine. Students may choose to organise their scientific paper in the form of a systematic review (with meta-analysis), narrative review, retrospective (medical-records) review, or prospective (low-risk) cohort study (e.g. education study).
Students will develop the ability to synthesis and analyse information and data, to break down complex issues and to compare and contrast alternative viewpoints. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing the students' ability to disseminate knowledge at a professional level, with a view towards publication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Child with a Neurological or Haematological ProblemSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7217Full year7No

The Child with a Neurological or Haematological Problem

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: Although less common, neurological and haematological presentations in children can present a diagnostic and managerial challenge in the ED. In the first part of this module students will cover common neurological presentations including headache, seizures, ataxia, neuromuscular disorders, and stroke. In the second part the focus will be on haematological presentations including neutropenia, ITP, pancytopenia, and tumour lysis syndrome.
Please note, this module does not seek to provide students with clinical training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3018Semester 23No

Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3015
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key management theory and practice to a range of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of management including models of management, the environment and cultures of management, managing internationally, corporate responsibility, planning and decision making, strategy, managing structure and people, creativity and innovation, motivation, communication, teams, managing quality and performance, budgetary control.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Accounting for Business DecisionsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3017Semester 23No

Accounting for Business Decisions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key management accounting theory and concepts to decision making for a variety of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of
Costing, Budgeting, Absorption costing, Marginal costing, Cost-Volume-Profit analysis (Break Even analysis). All with the aim of enhancing student understanding and appreciation in business decision making.


Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of interactive activities. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook. The students will be encouraged to discuss and analyse tasks in lectures and seminars.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
English Language and Study SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6000Full year6No

English Language and Study Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Michele King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module encourages student engagement through a blended learning approach, permitting students to demonstrate their independent study skills increasingly to an exit level. The module provides students with a critical understanding of UK academic culture, and motivates them to develop the linguistic, analytical and argumentative skills necessary to succeed on a postgraduate degree programme in both written and spoken work. The module introduces how to incorporate evidence successfully into academic text, and raises awareness regarding issues of plagiarism. Students are exposed to different styles of academic texts within the disciplines of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Finance and Economics, focusing on the development and evaluation of critical argument as well as on linguistic features, such as syntactic and grammatical patterns. The module assessment is both formative and summative and is flexible enough to allow students to develop ideas around their subject specific areas. The portfolio incorporates an extended essay which also externalises the writing process effectively. Students write a series of text responses and demonstrate reading and writing skills to an exit level in two comprehension assessments. In addition, students are assessed in their ability to lead and engage in academic presentations and discussions, using (where appropriate) an online platform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Film StudiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3009Semester 13No

Introduction to Film Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in film studies, and to the history of Classical Hollywood Cinema as well as to some of its major genres. It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of topics, including cinematic codes; mise-en scene; genre; stars; classical Hollywood narrative. It will help students to develop skills in analysing ('reading') films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the assessments for the module, while also preparing them for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3010 Film Studies: Art Cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Independent Study ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3020Semester 33No

Independent Study Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3000
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of UK academic culture, and help them develop the linguistic, analytic and argumentative skills, in both written and spoken work, necessary to succeed on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce linguistically sophisticated work which demonstrates a clear line of argumentation. The students will produce a research-based Independent Study Project essay of 3000 words within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. This will be a developmental project, with both formative and summative assessment through a portfolio (including research proposal, annotated bibliography, essay plan, and reflective writing), an oral presentation of the project, and a final draft of the essay. The students will be encouraged to employ strategies to reflect on their writing and its effectiveness. Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Film Studies AlternativeLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6004Semester 36No

Film Studies Alternative

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6003
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module builds on IFP6003 / IFJ6003 Film Studies: an Introduction to Hollywood Cinema by examining a number of movements and styles from British, European and Asian cinema, as well as New Hollywood Cinema. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Introduction to EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6005Semester 26No

Introduction to Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: Introduction to Econometrics will introduce the student to regression analysis used in studies that test hypotheses and empirically fit models in economics. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
MarketingLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3019Semester 33No

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: The module provides students with the opportunity to understand and apply key marketing theory and concepts to a variety of products, services, brands and organisations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of marketing including: the marketing process, company and marketing strategy, the market place and consumers, information, buyer behaviour, the marketing mix, branding, product life-cycle, creating value, supply chain, retailing and wholesaling, advertising, PR and Sales, direct marketing, E-Business, ethics and CSR.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read through an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Humanities and Social Sciences Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6012Semester 36No

Humanities and Social Sciences Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6011
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Socail Sciencess. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6011 by selecting this sample, designing, piloting and conducting their questionnaires, analysing their findings and writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Introduction to PoliticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3003Semester 13No

Introduction to Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over political concepts. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential terms used to understand politics, including politics, power, states, elitism, pluralism and Marxism. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal ScienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM939Full year7No

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal Science

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Dissertation - Clinical Case ReportsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM948Full year7No

Dissertation - Clinical Case Reports

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Alicia Green

Description: In this module students will write up four case reports of patients from their clinical practice. The student should describe the case using skills and knowledge acquired from previous modules. In addition, they will be expected to relate each case to basic science and/or research relevant to the case ( e.g. evidence for treatment, pathology of disease, etc.)
There are several reasons that may make a clinical case interesting for publication which include:
1. Unusual presentations or unknown disease
2. Unusual aetiology for a disease
3. Challenging differential diagnosis
4. Errors in diagnosis, their causes and consequences
5. Unreported or unusual side effects or adverse interactions concerning medications
6. New associations or variations in disease courses
7. Presentations, diagnoses and/or management of new and emerging diseases
8. An unexpected association between diseases or symptoms
9. An unexpected event in the course of observing or treating a patient
10. Findings that give new insight into the possible pathogenesis of a disease or an adverse effect
Case reports should be short, no more than 2000-3000 words with a maximum of 15 references and 3 figures for each case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Research Methods in HSSLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6011Semester 26No

Research Methods in HSS

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Social Sciences. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, a draft chapter, an annotated bibliography and a reflective task. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Pure Mathematics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3011Semester 23No

Pure Mathematics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Statistics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3012Semester 33No

Statistics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3011
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: Statistics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic statistics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The statistics course focuses on the development of statistics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: measures of the centre, spread, skewness and kurtosis of a distribution, probability and probability distributions (binomial, poisson and normal).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal InfectionsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM937Semester 27No

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal Infections

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Introduction to International RelationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3004Semester 33No

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3003
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over concepts of International Politics. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential theories used to understand International Politics, including Realism, Liberalism and Marxism. It also examines some major issues in International Politics, including war and peace, greater powers and imperialism, and international political economy.
Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Human GeographyLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3005Semester 23No

Introduction to Human Geography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: This module introduces to students some of the topical themes in Human Geography, explored, for example, through globalisation in relation to the fashion industry, media and communications, migration and citizenship. The concept of local-global is examined with reference to food security and the environment, poverty, development and Aid, and global politics as relevant to understanding nation and identity in the twenty-first century. Throughout the semester, themes are considered through lectures, a field study, documentary screenings, seminar activities and two debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
European and American Art CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3010Semester 33No

European and American Art Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in Art Cinema (European, New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema). It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of art cinema styles and movements, including Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, British and New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema, as well as to key concepts such as auteurism. It will help students to build on and continue to develop skills learned in IFP/IFJ 3009 in analysing films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills and will assist them in the successful completion of the assessments for the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Laboratory ManagementSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7098Full year7No

Laboratory Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: In this module students are introduced to the key concepts of laboratory management.The students will study and reflect on: Good management practice. Legislation relevant to diagnostic laboratories. Health and safety in the laboratory. Development of standard operating procedures. Quality assurance in the laboratory. LEAN evaluation and Audit processes. Methods of evaluation of new methods for use in the diagnostic laboratory. Have a knowledge of the role of new technologies e.g. molecular and automation in the diagnostic laboratory. Understand of the role of th diagnostic laboratory within the NHS and with external agencies such as the HPA and WHO. Occupational health

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Contemporary Issues in Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6010Semester 26No

Contemporary Issues in Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6009
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module builds on IFP/IFJ6009 Introduction to Business and Management by developing students' analytical and problem solving skills, through the examination of challenging contemporary issues within Business. Students will analyse and comment on Business issues in essays, reports and presentations to the level that will lead to potential success on a range of masters degree programmes in the School of Business and Management.

Students will also be taken on external visits to encourage the application of theoretical knowledge in real life situations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
The Child with a Respiratory or Cardiovascular ProblemSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7216Semester 27No

The Child with a Respiratory or Cardiovascular Problem

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of specific issues relevant to paediatric respiratory and cardiovascular presentations to the emergency department. During this module students will learn about common respiratory such as asthma, bronchiolitis and croup, before moving on to cardiac presentations including heart murmurs, arrhythmias, hypertension, and chest pain.
Please note, this module does not seek to provide students with clinical training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
FinanceLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6008Semester 26No

Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6007
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will introduce students to the basic principles of finance and investment. Finance is essentially about pricing, but the essentials of corporate and international finance will also be covered. There will be an introduction to the theory of financial markets and their regulation, and a brief look at the concept of market efficiency. However, most of the focus will be concentrated on the relationship between risk and return, the principles behind portfolio evaluation, the behaviour of asset prices and the role of institutions and trading systems in modern financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6009Semester 16No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module provides students an appreciation of the operations of organisations and functions of management. It introduces students to principles and models of and developments in management. The module explores the behaviour of organisations and their interactions with the industry, national and global environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Applied Mathematics for BusinessLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3016Semester 13No

Applied Mathematics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Accounting, Business and Management or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any Business degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
The Young Infant/Neonate and the AdolescentSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7215Semester 17No

The Young Infant/Neonate and the Adolescent

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.
Students will learn about a range of topics including: the normal baby, neonatal seizures, congenital heart disease, metabolic conditions; and in adolescents - self-harm, pseudoseizures, vaginal bleeding, sexually transmitted diseases, and anxiety + depression.
Please note, this module does not seek to provide students with clinical training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4051Semester 14No

Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4050"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy. The overall desired outcome is for learners to acquire a basic level of the language to cope effectively with a range of commonly occurring circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is built around written and audio texts and tasks, designed to develop and enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Arabic, and they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 4
Introduction to English LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3007Semester 13No

Introduction to English Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to some of the most important British writers, novels, short stories and poetry from mid nineteenth to mid twentieth century, including works by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Louis Stevenson, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, T.S. Eliot, Ford Maddox Ford, Jean Rhys, George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, L.P. Hartley and J.G. Ballard.
Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Introduction to American LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3008Semester 23No

Introduction to American Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3007
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to:

- The twentieth-century American short story, including stories by Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, Edith Wharton, Dorothy Parker, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Tennessee Williams, John Cheever, Richard Yates, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, Alice Walker, Raymond Carver, Jayne Anne Phillips, Ann Beattie, Don DeLillo, A.M. Homes, Lorrie Moore and Eric Puchner.
- Early to late twentieth-century fiction including novels by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Carson McCullers, J.D. Salinger,Saul Bellow, John Updike, Jay McInerney, Bret Easton Ellis, Anne Tyler and E. Annie Proulx.

Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
The History of the UK since 1956Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP3024Semester 23No

The History of the UK since 1956

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3023
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK since the Suez Crisis of 1956. It examines key political, economic, and diplomatic events and developments during the period. It also addresses cultural and social changes during the second half of the twentieth century and considers their impact upon the contemporary United Kingdom.
In addition, and continuing the process begun in module IFP/IFJ3023 The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955, the module will help students develop further their skills in interpreting and assessing evidence and presenting their informed conclusions orally and in writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4001Semester 14No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4006"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to