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Module directory 2021-22

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2021-22. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescriptionThemeAvailable to
Project DissertationMathematical SciencesMTHM038Full year7No

Project Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin

Description: Each MSc Mathematics student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematics Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematics Exam Board Chair, in consultation with the MSc Mathematics Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted.

A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in mathematics or statistics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Project DissertationMathematical SciencesMTHM038Full year7No

Project Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin

Description: Each MSc Mathematics student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematics Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematics Exam Board Chair, in consultation with the MSc Mathematics Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted.

A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in mathematics or statistics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115PSemester 16No

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115Semester 16Yes

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Advanced Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH793PSemester 17No

Advanced Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module builds on the earlier module 'Machine Learning with Python', covering a number of advanced techniques in machine learning, such as dimensionality reduction, support vector machines, decision trees, random forests, and clustering. Although the underlying theoretical ideas are clearly explained, this module is very hands-on, and you will implement various applications using Python in the weekly coursework assignments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Coding TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6108PSemester 26No

Coding Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shu Sasaki

Description: The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142PSemester 26No

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Coding TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6108Semester 26Yes

Coding Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
SAS for Business IntelligenceMathematical SciencesMTH782PSemester 17No

SAS for Business Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: Quantitative Business Intelligence refers to the general application of quantitative techniques to business insight generation or the business decision process.
This module builds on the Data Analytics module by increasing the level of sophistication of the techniques employed.
Students will use SAS to solve business problems related to hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression.
The module will also present techniques related to cleaning of noisy data, detection of outliers, filling in blanks which are key to any industry implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Bayesian Statistical MethodsMathematical SciencesMTH6102Semester 16Yes

Bayesian Statistical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. You will be shown some of the drawbacks with classical statistical methods and that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction. At the end you will be able to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of situations and know how to use suitable software. Bayesian methods are being increasingly used across many applications and it is important that you know about them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Trading and Risk Systems DevelopmentMathematical SciencesMTH789PSemester 27No

Trading and Risk Systems Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

Part I: Programming skills
- Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
- Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
- Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
- Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
- Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
- Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
- Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
- Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
- Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
- Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
- Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

Part II: The development framework
- Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
- Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
- Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
- Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

(note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Financial Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH792PSemester 27No

Financial Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

Description: This module will provide students with a general understanding of current applications of Data Analytics to the Finance and in particular to derivatives and investment banking.
It will revolve around problems that will be explained as part of the module delivery such as volatility surface management, yield curve evolution and FX volatility/correlation management.
It will provide students with a overview of some standard tools in the field such as Python, R, Excel/VBA and the Power BI Excel functionality.

Students are not expected to have any familiarity with coding or any of the topics above as the module will develop these from scratch.

It will provide students with the understanding of a field necessary to boost their careers in finance in roles such as trading, structuring, management, risk management and quantitative positions in investment banks and hedge funds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Introduction to Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH6101Semester 26Yes

Introduction to Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: Machine Learning is a rapidly growing field, at the boundary between Statistics and Computer Science. This course gives an understanding of the theoretical basis for machine learning and a set of concrete algorithms including decision tree learning and classification methods. Moreover, this course will introduce some classical statistical methods for high-dimensional data. The course also includes programming and use of algorithms on concrete data set.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH781PSemester 27No

Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin

Description: Data Analytics refers to the use of statistics on data sets to aid in business decision making and in developing business insights. This module introduces concepts associated with business analytics.
The emphasis of the module will be on realistic business cases. In order to develop the practical aspects of the subject the student will learn about some of the industry standard packages. such as Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) under Excel, Hadoop, R, and SPSS.
Some of these systems will be described at a high level in order to allow the student gain a global view of the field without having to master every single system.
The course will include a summary overview of the basic statistical techniques used to describe a data set and explore the implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Psychology of Play and GamesBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY337Semester 26No

Psychology of Play and Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathan Emery

Description: This module will present contemporary research on play in animals, children and adults, focusing on psychological theories, especially during development. The module will also utilise an applied approach to studying how different psychological mechanisms may underlie playing different games, such as board, role-playing and video games, achieved by playing and discussing games in class. Students will debate societal issues related to games, such as the role of video games in violence or game addiction, but also the positive effects of games.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH734USemester 17No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH6991Semester 26No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 6
Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762PSemester 27No

Continuous-time Models in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771P

Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Programming for Business AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH785PSemester 17No

Programming for Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

Description: This module will provide an introduction to programming in a commercial environment including:
- Advanced use of Microsoft Excel for data analysis
- Usage of Macros to automate common tasks
- Introduction of Visual Basic for applications programming language (VBA)
- Writing custom Excel functions and subroutines using VBA
- Design of databases in Microsoft Access
- Querying data with Microsoft Access
- Externally loading data to Microsoft Access
- Using ActiveX Data objects
- The SQL query language

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761USemester 17No

Financial Instruments and Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
MSci ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH717UFull year7No

MSci Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis

Description: You will write a report that must present the study of some mathematical topic at fourth-year undergraduate level and must be your own work in the sense that it gives an original account of the material, but it need not contain new mathematical results. The list of potential projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted for a specific project only after agreement between the module organiser and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134PSemester 16No

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad

Description: This is the part of linear models often called analysis of variance. It concentrates on models whose explanatory variables are qualitative. These methods are used in almost all areas of business, economics, science and industry where qualitative and quantitative data are collected.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6934Semester 16No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Iziumtseva
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

Description: This module aims to present some advanced probabilistic concepts and demonstrate their application to stochastic modelling of real-world situations. The topics covered vary from year to year but may include, for example, limit theorems, renewal theory, and continuous-time Markov processes. In addition to exposure to proofs and theoretical material, students develop practical skills through a large number of problems and worked examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Ring TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6158Semester 26No

Ring Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

Description: The modern axiomatic approach to mathematics is demonstrated in the study of algebraic structures. This module will focus on ring theory, which includes integral domains, ideals, homomorphisms and isomorphism theorems, polynomial rings, the Euclidean algorithm, and fields of fractions. It will be illustrated by some familiar examples, such as the rings of integers and polynomials in one variable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761PSemester 17No

Financial Instruments and Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151PSemester 16No

Partial Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Juan Antonio Valiente Kroon

Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142Semester 26Yes

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134Semester 16Yes

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: The module will develop the general theory of linear models, building on theory taught in Statistical Modelling I. This module will introduce generalised linear models, which can be used for modelling data such as binary data and count data, where a normal distribution would not be appropriate. These developments dramatically extend the range of problems that can be studied. The methods will be implemented using R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113PSemester 26No

Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathrin Glau

Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107PSemester 16No

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Clark

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107Semester 16Yes

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shabnam Beheshti
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141PSemester 16No

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
CeramicsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM068Semester 17No

Ceramics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Reece

Description: Review to physical and structural origin of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of ceramics. Relate this knowledge to their applications and commercial importance. Review the processing and characterisation of ceramics. (Particular reference will be made to the following structural ceramics: alumina; silicon nitride; zirconia; and silicon carbide.) Review of functional ceramics: varistors; ferroelectrics; piezoelectrics; pyroelectrics; optoelectronics; and ferrites. Throughout the module the students will develop their knowledge so that they can relate structure, properties and applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH781PSemester 17No

Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Baule

Description: Data Analytics refers to the use of statistics on data sets to aid in business decision making and in developing business insights. This module introduces concepts associated with business analytics.
The emphasis of the module will be on realistic business cases. In order to develop the practical aspects of the subject the student will learn about some of the industry standard packages. such as Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) under Excel, Hadoop, R, and SPSS.
Some of these systems will be described at a high level in order to allow the student gain a global view of the field without having to master every single system.
The course will include a summary overview of the basic statistical techniques used to describe a data set and explore the implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH791USemester 27No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH791PSemester 27No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771USemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106PSemester 16No

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PSemester 27No

Optimisation for Business Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PFull year7No

Optimisation for Business Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH712PSemester 17No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Iziumtseva

Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771PSemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743USemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157PSemester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113Semester 26No

Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathrin Glau
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6154

Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157Semester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5125 and take MTH5129

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750USemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743PSemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141Semester 16Yes

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132PSemester 26No

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132Semester 26Yes

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Actuarial Financial EngineeringMathematical SciencesMTH6112Semester 26No

Actuarial Financial Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6155
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced techniques in financial mathematics for actuaries, building on the foundational material in Financial Mathematics 1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuous time models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106Semester 16Yes

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 5 matching mth

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151Semester 16Yes

Partial Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Juan Antonio Valiente Kroon
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140PSemester 16No

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140Semester 16Yes

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Probability and Statistics for Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH794PSemester 27No

Probability and Statistics for Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Yoo
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions of probability and the distributions of random variables which underpin statistical methods. It then describes different types of statistical tests of hypotheses and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Tissue Engineering and Regenerative MedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM064Semester 17No

Advanced Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury

Description: This specialised module covers a range of topics in Tissue Engineering. It will develop the knowledge base of the student with emphasis on the current research directions of this rapidly emerging topic supported by skills developed in the laboratory. The students will understand the multidisciplinary principles underpinning tissue engineering, They will appreciate principles that underlie behind a series of strategies to repair both tissues and organs. They will be able to apply their engineering background to biological systems. They will develop skills to enable them to be fully conversant with current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790USemester 17No

Programming in C++ for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6150

Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790PSemester 17No

Programming in C++ for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Social DevelopmentBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY339Semester 26No

Social Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Echols

Description: This is an advanced, interactive seminar. In it, you will examine how social influences shape development across the lifespan, and how social behaviour is in turn linked to brain development. We will discuss the theories and latest research on how interactions between individuals and their environment shape social, emotional, and cognitive development. Topics will span the neural and developmental basis of normal social functioning, problematic social behaviours such as aggression, interventions to decrease these behaviours, as well as how societal-level structures impact social development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105PSemester 26No

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Renewable Energy MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM061Semester 27No

Renewable Energy Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: A module designed to develop the tools required to apply a fundamental understanding of the application of new energy and renewable energy systems to the problems faced by climate change and global energy security. Particular focus is on the application of materials for the development of novel and new energy recovery systems such as nanostructured surfaces for solar harvesting and ultra tough composites for wind turbines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH776PSemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Environmental Properties of MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM040Semester 17No

Environmental Properties of Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maria-Magdalena Titirici

Description: Recycling - possibilities of recycling schemes for different types of materials like glasses, plastics and metals will be discussed.
Environmental politics - such as the EU end of life vehicle directive will be discussed as well as other political drivers for creating a sustainable society.
Ecodesign - the benefits of designing for recycling using a cradle to grave design methodology. Examining in detail designs for single material or reduced number of materials systems that can be easily disassembled.
Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) - Detail of how the life cycle analysis is undertaken, including instruction in the use of appropriate life cycle analysis software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH709USemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6102
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH6134

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PFull year7No

Programming in Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Neural Networks and Deep LearningMathematical SciencesMTH767PSemester 27No

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jingwei Liang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module introduces you to several state-of-the-art methodologies for machine learning with neural networks (NNs). After discussing the basic theory of constructing and calibrating NNs, we consider various types of NN suitable for different purposes, such as convolutional NNs, recurrent NNs, autoencoders and generative adversarial networks. This module includes a wide range of practical applications; you will implement each type of network using Python for your weekly coursework assignments, and will calibrate these networks to real datasets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PSemester 17No

Programming in Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787USemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787PSemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750PSemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5026Semester 15No

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5021, LAN5025"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155PSemester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime
models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700USemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

Description: This module is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, which will provide preparation for the MSci project. You will learn how to review critically and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. You will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that you are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork. You will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155Semester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6112
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1. We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745USemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH5101 or take MTH5100 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150PSemester 26No

Numerical Computing with C and C++

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis

Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Japanese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4046Semester 14No

Japanese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4041, LAN4045"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4146Full year4No

Japanese Language and Culture I(a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4041, LAN4046, LAN4141"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127PSemester 26No

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mahdi Godazgar

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127Semester 26Yes

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mahdi Godazgar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Nature, Nurture and Mental HealthBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY333PSemester 16No

Nature, Nurture and Mental Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Margherita Malanchini

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a new, rapidly evolving, and often controversial area, of psychology and psychiatry. We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules including social, biological and abnormal psychology to explore how genetic and environmental factors come together to cause mental illnesses such as major depression, schizophrenia and autism. Drawing on the most recent research from quantitative and molecular genetics we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in the field including the continuum between traits and disorders, the nature vs nurture debate, genetic determinism and the ethical implications of genetic research of mental illness.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Probability and Statistics for Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH794PSemester 17No

Probability and Statistics for Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Neofytos Rodosthenous
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions of probability and the distributions of random variables which underpin statistical methods. It then describes different types of statistical tests of hypotheses and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors SchemeMathematical SciencesMTH6110Semester 26No

Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows undergraduates to gain valuable transferable skills whilst exploring the teaching profession first hand by working with a teacher in a local school. The key skills gained include communication and presentation of mathematics, team-working, active listening, time management and prioritisation. The module will be supported by regular classes and assessed by a combination of written reports and an oral presentation. Registration for this module requires validation; places will be limited and interviews to assess suitability will be held during Semester A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Japanese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4045Full year4No

Japanese Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4040, LAN4046"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105Semester 26Yes

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Advanced Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH793PSemester 27No

Advanced Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module builds on the earlier module 'Machine Learning with Python', covering a number of advanced techniques in machine learning, such as dimensionality reduction, support vector machines, decision trees, random forests, and clustering. Although the underlying theoretical ideas are clearly explained, this module is very hands-on, and you will implement various applications using Python in the weekly coursework assignments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Trading and Risk Systems DevelopmentMathematical SciencesMTH789USemester 27No

Trading and Risk Systems Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

Part I: Programming skills
- Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
- Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
- Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
- Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
- Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
- Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
- Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
- Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
- Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
- Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
- Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

Part II: The development framework
- Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
- Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
- Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
- Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

(note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773USemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786USemester 17No

Machine Learning with Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This course aims at providing students with Machine Learning skills based on the Python programming language as it is currently used in industry. Some of the presented methods are regression and classification techniques (linear and logistic regression, least-square); clustering; dimensionality reduction techniques such as PCA, SVD and matrix factorization. More advanced methods such as generalized linear models, neural networks and Bayesian inference using graphical models are also introduced. The course is self-contained in terms of the necessary mathematical tools (mostly probability) and coding techniques. At the end of the course, students will be able to formalize a ML task, choose the appropriate method in order to tackle it while being able to assess its performance, and to implement these algorithms in Python.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773PSemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 27No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700PSemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ian Morris

Description: This course is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, and network research in particular. The module will serve as preparation for the research project that students will undertake as a major part of the MSc programme in Mathematics and Mathematics of Networks. The students will learn how to critically review and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork.The students will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 17No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Primoz Skraba

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762USemester 27No

Continuous-time Models in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771U

Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786PFull year7No

Machine Learning with Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This module will introduce you to some of the most widely-used techniques in machine learning (ML). After reviewing the necessary background mathematics, we will investigate various ML methods, such as linear regression, polynomial regression and classification with logistic regression. The module covers a very wide range of practical applications, with an emphasis on hands-on numerical work using Python. At the end of the module, you will be able to formalise a ML task, choose the appropriate method to process it numerically, implement the ML algorithm in Python, and assess the method¿s performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745PSemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786PSemester 17No

Machine Learning with Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This module will introduce you to some of the most widely-used techniques in machine learning (ML). After reviewing the necessary background mathematics, we will investigate various ML methods, such as linear regression, polynomial regression and classification with logistic regression. The module covers a very wide range of practical applications, with an emphasis on hands-on numerical work using Python. At the end of the module, you will be able to formalise a ML task, choose the appropriate method to process it numerically, implement the ML algorithm in Python, and assess the method¿s performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
SAS for Business IntelligenceMathematical SciencesMTH782PSemester 27No

SAS for Business Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: Quantitative Business Intelligence refers to the general application of quantitative techniques to business insight generation or the business decision process.
This module builds on the Data Analytics module by increasing the level of sophistication of the techniques employed.
Students will use SAS to solve business problems related to hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression.
The module will also present techniques related to cleaning of noisy data, detection of outliers, filling in blanks which are key to any industry implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739PSemester 17No

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis

Description: This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739USemester 17No

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

Description: This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154PSemester 16No

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154Semester 16Yes

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150Semester 26No

Numerical Computing with C and C++

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5001

Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 16No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: Must not take other projects
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEF_6_S
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 26No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
Overlap: Must not take other projects
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEF_6_S
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4106Full year4No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4006, LAN4101"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4007Semester 24No

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4005, LAN4002"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4055Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4050, LAN4056"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4042Semester 24Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4040, LAN4047"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Intellectual Property in the United StatesLawIPLM148Semester 27No

Intellectual Property in the United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The course will introduce students to US IP law and will predominantly cover the protection of registered rights in the US such as patents and trade marks, but will also examine other important areas such as copyright law, design patents and publicity rights as well as aspects of IP licensing. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the fundmantal structures and principles applying in US law. It will also enhance the general perception of IP rights from a comparative perspective, and emphasis is placed therefore on those rules and principles that deviate from the law in the UK and the European Union. Please note that there will not be weekly lectures but that the course will be running as an intensive course over a period of two weeks,

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4025Full year4No

Spanish Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4020, LAN4026"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4006Semester 14No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4005"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4016Semester 14No

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4015"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political EconomySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7014Semester 27No

Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we examine trends towards the reform of health systems in the context of globalisation. Particular attention is given to the impact of neoliberal policy and commercialisation; the move towards universal health coverage; policy on integration; and decentralisation. The role of actors in shaping policy will also be covered, as well as the impact of trade and investment related agreements on health systems. The impact of other aspects of globalisation on health systems - such as migration - will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Gender, Sexuality and HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7013Semester 27No

Gender, Sexuality and Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: Recent media coverage and debate over female genital mutilation, trafficking, circumcision, gender reassignment, trans issues, and LGBTQI healthcare provision, have moved gender and sexuality to be central issues in health and human rights. Often in public health and medicine, through the adopting of a biomedical model, 'gender' is coupled with `woman¿ and heterosexuality assumed. Public and academic debate, though, regularly unpacks, even attacks, these assumptions. This module responds to such shifts and debates, encouraging students to explore contemporary issues around gender, sexuality and health in society through seminars and self-directed research. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate the broad array of potential developments around gender and sexuality in public and global health policy and practice. This module aims to develop and deepen the students' knowledge and skills regarding gender and sexuality around global health policy and practice. It aims to develop an understanding of the diversity of conceptions and debates inside and around global health in responding to challenges to traditional and biomedical understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality, and to allow students to re-evaluate their own approaches and assumptions using appropriate theories and experiences. It aims to develop in students an understanding of the current debates, encouraging them to reflect on challenges and corresponding political and social movements. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate novel developments, interventions and policies. The module aims also to allow students to conduct a piece of research on a topic of their own interest or from a list of suggestions, developing both their research practice and allowing engagement with contemporary or critical issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5022Semester 25Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5020, LAN5027"
Prerequisite: LAN5021/LAN5026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Introduction to Patent LawLawIPLM140Semester 17No

Introduction to Patent Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of patent law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Fundamentals of Law and Professional Ethics (IPReg FL & PE)LawIPLC134Semester 17Yes

Fundamentals of Law and Professional Ethics (IPReg FL & PE)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: This module aims to give students general knowledge of the English legal system in order to understand sources of law, the effects on intellectual property and the interaction between intellectual property and other areas of law. Students will obtain knowledge of the legal system and legal language and the ability to apply this understanding to various legal questions.

Students receive a pre-teaching study pack one month prior to the start of the programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Patent Law (IPReg - PATs)LawIPLC133Semester 17Yes

Patent Law (IPReg - PATs)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of patent law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Critical Health EconomicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7104Semester 27No

Critical Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will introduce core theories and concepts of health economics including: concepts of evidence, scarcity, demand, and need. Using case studies, it will describe the theories of the market, and discuss these in relation to specific characteristics of health and health care. It will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Systems Policy and PerformanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7103Semester 27No

Health Systems Policy and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: This module will introduce students to various conceptual frameworks and theoretical understandings of health systems; and locate them within a social, economic, historical and global context. Students will learn about the functional components of a health system, including the mechanisms generating health systems resources, financing healthcare delivery, and designing the management-administrative systems of a health system. The module will cover the health systems challenges of low, middle and high income country settings and will look at the application of social and economic theories to health systems policy. It will describe and discuss the distinction between public and private financing, as well as the role of markets and hierarchies, and of private and public providers within health systems. Students will learn about the health system of one country that will be assigned to them at the beginning of term, and compare it to their home country as the basis for developing an in-depth knowledge and understanding of two health systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Critical Health EconomicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7104Semester 17No

Critical Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will introduce core theories and concepts of health economics including: concepts of evidence, scarcity, demand, and need. Using case studies, it will describe the theories of the market, and discuss these in relation to specific characteristics of health and health care. It will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)LawIPLC132Semester 17Yes

Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: This module offers an overview of the main copyright and design principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK copyright and design. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Health Systems Policy and PerformanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7103Semester 17No

Health Systems Policy and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: This module will introduce students to various conceptual frameworks and theoretical understandings of health systems; and locate them within a social, economic, historical and global context. Students will learn about the functional components of a health system, including the mechanisms generating health systems resources, financing healthcare delivery, and designing the management-administrative systems of a health system. The module will cover the health systems challenges of low, middle and high income country settings and will look at the application of social and economic theories to health systems policy. It will describe and discuss the distinction between public and private financing, as well as the role of markets and hierarchies, and of private and public providers within health systems. Students will learn about the health system of one country that will be assigned to them at the beginning of term, and compare it to their home country as the basis for developing an in-depth knowledge and understanding of two health systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5015Full year5No

French Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5010, LAN5016"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5005Semester 25No

German Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN5002, LAN5006"
Prerequisite: LAN5001/LAN5007 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5006Full year5No

German Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5000, LAN5007"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German(particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4156Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4056, LAN4151"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4127Full year4No

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4022, LAN4027, LAN4122"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4052Semester 24Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4050, LAN4057"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4041Semester 14Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4040, LAN4046"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4102Full year4Yes

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4002, LAN4007, LAN4107"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4116Full year4No

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4016, LAN4111"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4101Full year4Yes

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4006, LAN4106"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4051Semester 14Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4050, LAN4056"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4087Semester 24No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4062, CON4067, LAN4082, LAN4085"
Prerequisite: CON4061/CON4066/LAN4081/LAN4086 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4050Full year4Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4055"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4005Full year4No

German Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4006"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4023Semester 24Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4026"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it is highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4015Full year4No

French Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4016"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4022Semester 24Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4020, LAN4027"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4002Semester 24Yes

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4007"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Study Project - Professional StreamLawIPLM127Full year7No

Study Project - Professional Stream

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The module is taught over the 1st and 2nd semester by way of intensive small and whole group seminars.

The module is an indispensable element of the programme since it allows students to gain, in addition to the more abstract legal content taught, not only exposure to the demands of practice as a patent or trade mark attorney, or indeed other legal professions (including the ability to work in teams) but it is also a distinguishing element of our MSc programme which underpins the entire ethos and philosophy of a programme that is based upon preparation for such careers.

The module gives students a 'real life' experience of the role a patent and/or trade mark attorney would experience in their every day role within the IP Field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5041Semester 15Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5040, LAN5046"
Prerequisite: LAN4040/LAN4045 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: IDesigned for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Trade Mark Law (IPReg TMs)LawIPLC131Semester 17Yes

Trade Mark Law (IPReg TMs)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module will help the student acquire a solid basis of the law of trade marks, primarily within the UK but with reference to other jurisdictions. The focus will be on the national registration systems based on the European Trade Mark Directive, the Community Trade Mark system, and with reference to other International registration systems and filing strategies will be considered as well. The core underlying purpose of the module is the fundamental teaching of basic trade marks to the trainee IP attorney.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5021Semester 15Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5020, LAN5026"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Effective and Efficient EvaluationSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7112Semester 27No

Effective and Efficient Evaluation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sandra Eldridge

Description: The module will introduce learners to principles of effective and efficient evaluation, exploring different uses of health data in evaluation, for example in recruitment, or to measure outcomes. It will cover research designs that use health data or can be conducted within health data, including cluster-randomised trials, stepped-wedge designs, trials-within-cohorts/registries, interrupted-time-series. The role of devices such as wearables or mobile phone apps in evaluation, cost-effective analyses, use of qualitative methods, and ethics of evaluation will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Data in PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7111Semester 17No

Health Data in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carol Dezateux

Description: The module provides an introduction to health data in practice with a focus on health care delivery challenges and patient and population health outcomes from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will provide students with a grounding in legal and ethical frameworks governing health data access and use, and the role of patient, health professional and public engagement for delivering the full potential of health data sciences for public benefit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Understanding Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7102Full year7No

Understanding Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will develop skills in critical appraisal, interpreting the results of commonly-used statistical techniques and routine morbidity and mortality measures. Students will be taught to critically interpret data, results and statistical analysis presented in research papers, and obtain the building blocks on which to build evidence-based practice. The course takes a non-mathematical approach to study design and statistical analysis starting with clinical examples and explaining how statistics can help answer real life questions. The module will not teach statistical methods in detail, but students will be expected to calculate percentages and other simple summary measures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Japanese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5040Full year5Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5041, LAN5045"
Prerequisite: LAN4040/LAN4045 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Understanding Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7102Semester 17No

Understanding Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will develop skills in critical appraisal, interpreting the results of commonly-used statistical techniques and routine morbidity and mortality measures. Students will be taught to critically interpret data, results and statistical analysis presented in research papers, and obtain the building blocks on which to build evidence-based practice. The course takes a non-mathematical approach to study design and statistical analysis starting with clinical examples and explaining how statistics can help answer real life questions. The module will not teach statistical methods in detail, but students will be expected to calculate percentages and other simple summary measures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5012Semester 25Yes

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5010, LAN5017"
Prerequisite: LAN5011/LAN5016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture.The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5020Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5021, LAN5025"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4151Full year4Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4056, LAN4156"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5002Semester 25Yes

German Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
Overlap: "LAN5000, LAN5005"
Prerequisite: LAN5001/LAN5007 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4047Semester 24No

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4042, LAN4045"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4147Full year4No

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4042, LAN4047, LAN4142"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4040Full year4Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4045, LAN4041"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4086Semester 14No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4061, CON4066, LAN4081, LAN4085"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4112Full year4Yes

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4012, LAN4017, LAN4117"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4085Full year4No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4060, CON4065, LAN4080, LAN4086"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4082Semester 24Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4062, CON4067, LAN4085, LAN4087"
Prerequisite: CON4061/CON4066/LAN4081/LAN4086 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4001Semester 14Yes

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4006"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4081Semester 14Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4061, CON4066, LAN4080, LAN4086"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4027Semester 24No

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4022, LAN4025"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Trade Mark Law I and IILawIPLM044Full year7No

Trade Mark Law I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact:

Description: This module is for MSc students in IP following the professional and business stream.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
The Law of Patents I and IILawIPLM041Full year7No

The Law of Patents I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact:

Description: This module is for MSc students in IP following the professional or business stream.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4012Semester 24Yes

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4017"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4021Semester 14Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4020, LAN4026"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description:
Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures.
The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language.
The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Health Inequalities and the State of Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7101Full year7No

Health Inequalities and the State of Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: This module will introduce students to the broad topic of global health. It will provide students with an understanding of the current pattern of health status across the world, and how human health indicators have evolved over time. In doing so, students will learn about the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and learn about different frameworks for classifying the different determinants of health and how they relate to each other. Students will critically examine how biological, social, economic and environmental determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. It goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. The module will introduce students to an examination of global health using the multiple lenses of different discourses and disciplines including: epidemiology; politics; human rights; philosophy; economics; and sociology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4011Semester 14Yes

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4016"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4000Full year4Yes

German Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4001, LAN4005"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Research, Evidence and PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7108Semester 17No

Research, Evidence and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and applied public health perspective. It will use case studies to demonstrate the limitations of evidence, and to debunk the common misconception that there is a universal hierarchy of evidence. Instead, it will describe how different methods and different types of evidence are required to answer different policy questions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research, Evidence and PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7108Full year7No

Research, Evidence and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and applied public health perspective. It will use case studies to demonstrate the limitations of evidence, and to debunk the common misconception that there is a universal hierarchy of evidence. Instead, it will describe how different methods and different types of evidence are required to answer different policy questions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Disease Management: Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7107Semester 17No

Disease Management: Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: The module is designed to build links between an appreciation of the clinical features of disease and their implications for the design of health programmes and plans. The module will build on the capstone module on the determinants of global health, and introduce students to different approaches and types of interventions aimed at preventing and controlling diseases. The module will cover epidemiology and the global burden of disease. Among the case studies that will be used to introduce students to public health policy and practice are: past and current efforts related to eradicate smallpox and polio; expanding access to treatment for HIV, TB and malaria; the control of communicable disease outbreaks and epidemics; unhealthy tobacco and alcohol consumption; mental illness; diabetes; and child obesity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Disease Management: Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7107Full year7No

Disease Management: Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: The module is designed to build links between an appreciation of the clinical features of disease and their implications for the design of health programmes and plans. The module will build on the capstone module on the determinants of global health, and introduce students to different approaches and types of interventions aimed at preventing and controlling diseases. The module will cover epidemiology and the global burden of disease. Among the case studies that will be used to introduce students to public health policy and practice are: past and current efforts related to eradicate smallpox and polio; expanding access to treatment for HIV, TB and malaria; the control of communicable disease outbreaks and epidemics; unhealthy tobacco and alcohol consumption; mental illness; diabetes; and child obesity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Public Health Dissertation ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7100Full year7No

Global Public Health Dissertation Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: The module will consist of a self-directed research project, with some group and one-to-one support provided by online tutors. In general, the research project will not involve any primary data collection - but will rely on desk-based data collection and analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Health Inequalities and the State of Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7101Semester 17No

Health Inequalities and the State of Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

Description: This module will introduce students to the broad topic of global health. It will provide students with an understanding of the current pattern of health status across the world, and how human health indicators have evolved over time. In doing so, students will learn about the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and learn about different frameworks for classifying the different determinants of health and how they relate to each other. Students will critically examine how biological, social, economic and environmental determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. It goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. The module will introduce students to an examination of global health using the multiple lenses of different discourses and disciplines including: epidemiology; politics; human rights; philosophy; economics; and sociology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5001Semester 15Yes

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5000, LAN5007"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5027Semester 25No

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5022, LAN5025"
Prerequisite: LAN5021/LAN5026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5017Semester 25No

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5015, LAN5012"
Prerequisite: LAN5011/LAN5016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5011Semester 15Yes

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5010, LAN5016"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4122Full year4Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4022, LAN4027, LAN4127"
Prerequisite: LAN4021/LAN4026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5000Full year5Yes

German Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN5001, LAN5006"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4080Full year4Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON4060, CON4065, LAN4085, LAN4081"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language .

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6027Semester 26No

Spanish Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6022, LAN6025"
Prerequisite: LAN6021/LAN6026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4111Full year4Yes

French Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4016, LAN4116"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4026Semester 14No

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4025"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4057Semester 24No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4052, LAN4056"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4107Full year4No

German Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN4002, LAN4007, LAN4102"
Prerequisite: LAN4001/LAN4006 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5127Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5022, LAN5027, LAN5122"
Prerequisite: LAN5021/LAN5026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4056Semester 14No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4055"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5126Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5021, LAN5026, LAN5126"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Law and ReligionLawLAW6460Semester 26Yes

Law and Religion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module explores the relationship of law and religion and how law deals with religion. While using material from British legal systems it also includes theoretical material from non-legal writing and, as relevant, comparative material. The course explores what religion is and how it is theorised. It covers historical material drawing links between the dominant legal culture and religion . It explores how secularisation has been variedly theorised. It includes discussion of legal responses to religious claims and how different religions are positioned or treated by the dominant legal order and public sphere.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Law in AsiaLawLAW6461Semester 16No

Law in Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module introduces students to the basic elements that make up the range of legal systems in Asia including their histories, diversity, complexity and differences with Western legal systems. Through a study of a selection of legal systems in Asia, the course will enable to students to examine certain legal topics and explore how they compare with each other. These may include aspects of constitutional, criminal, civil and family law systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Trademarks - ITMALawIPLM008Full year7No

Trademarks - ITMA

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: Exemption paper for MSc IP students undertaking the additional exemption exams associated with the professional stream programme (M3EZ). TRADEMARKS FOR INTENDING PATENT ATTORNEYS This module is for students undertaking M3U4/M3U5 additional exemption examinations on the Professional Programme. Students undertaking this module must also undertake IPLM027, IPLM028, IPLM041, IPLM044 plus either IPLM033 or IPLM044 in additiona to IPLM009. Part time (M3U5) students must take this option in their first year along with IPLM041, IPLM044, IPLM028 and IPLM009.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Trade Mark Law A (IPReg TMs Part A)LawIPLC136Semester 17Yes

Trade Mark Law A (IPReg TMs Part A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: This module offers an overview of the main trade mark principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK trade marks. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Trade Mark Law B (IPReg TMs Part B)LawIPLC137Semester 27Yes

Trade Mark Law B (IPReg TMs Part B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module will help the student acquire a more advanced knowledge of trade marks, primarily within the UK but with reference to other jurisdictions. This module aims to cover the more specific areas of trade mark law with reference to those intending to specialise in trade marks specifically.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4020Full year4Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4025"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4017Semester 24No

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4010, LAN4012"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4010Full year4Yes

French Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4011, LAN4015"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Health Economic AnalysesSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7025Semester 27No

Health Economic Analyses

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Borislava Mihaylova

Description: The module will introduce learners to key microeconomic concepts and principles, their relevance to the health economy and the need for alternative approaches to priority setting and resource allocation. The module will then discuss key health economic analytical frameworks to inform resource allocation in health, exploring methods of economic evaluation, health policy evaluation, economic analysis of public health interventions, and analysis of inequalities in health and health care. Throughout the module, the focus will be on developing learners¿ ability to critically appraise, conceptualize, design, and carry out appropriate health economic analyses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Environmental LawLawLAW6459Semester 26Yes

International Environmental Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebecca Bates

Description: The module focuses on origins, development, main principles of international environmental law. It addresses the historical origins of IEL (the Stockholm Conference on Human Environment; the Rio Conference on Environment and Development; the Johannesburg Summit on Sustainable Development. It also deals with sources of IEL and underlying main principles such as the environmental impact assessment; the precautionary principle; intergenerational equity; human rights and environmental protection' human rights and environment. Further, it deals with sectoral particular subjects of IEL, such as climate change; biodiversity; protection of marine environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Planetary Health and International Health PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7022Semester 27No

Planetary Health and International Health Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: This module will introduce the student to historically grown concepts of ecological global health. It gives an overview of scientific background on planetary boundaries in relation to health and sustainable development, allowing people to comprehend and apply the analysis to case studies. The module will begin with a human rights approach to health and environmental justice as a tool for critical analysis of the complex interrelationship of historically grown political, economic, cultural and social factors that have impacted the planetary system, putting health of people at risk. It will engage with public policy, international relations, health centred global environmental governance and medical anthropological approaches to health and environment to provide students with the necessary tools to engage in current local, national, regional and global affairs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Family LawLawLAW6031Full year6Yes

Family Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Anjana Bahl

Description: This module will cover:

The scope and function of family law in society; Marriage/nullity/civil partnerships; Divorce and divorce reform; The parent and child relationship; The Children Act 1989 and private disputes relating to children; Family property rights; Financial provision and property adjustment on divorce; Domestic violence, abuse and molestation; The Human Rights Act 1998.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Family Law ALawLAW6031ASemester 16Yes

Family Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shazia Choudhry
Prerequisite: Consult course convenor

Description: 1. The scope and function of family law in society
2. Marriage/nullity/civil partnerships
3. Divorce and divorce reform
4. The parent and child relationship
5. The Children Act 1989 and private disputes relating to children
6. Family property rights
7. Financial provision and property adjustment on divorce
8. Domestic violence, abuse and molestation
9. The Human Rights Act 1998

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Planetary HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7106Full year7No

Planetary Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: The module gives a scientific overview of the causes of global warming, climate change and the concept of planetary boundaries. It will then use case studies to discuss the complex set of interactions between human activity, global health status and ecological degradation. It considers the concepts of environmental and inter-generational justice as tools for critically analysing the complex interrelationship between political, economic, ecological and social factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5016Semester 15No

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5011, LAN5015"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Planetary HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7106Semester 27No

Planetary Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

Description: The module gives a scientific overview of the causes of global warming, climate change and the concept of planetary boundaries. It will then use case studies to discuss the complex set of interactions between human activity, global health status and ecological degradation. It considers the concepts of environmental and inter-generational justice as tools for critically analysing the complex interrelationship between political, economic, ecological and social factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Health Policy and GovernanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7105Semester 27No

Global Health Policy and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anuj Kapilashrami

Description: The module will cover the emergence of systems of global governance, particularly as they relate to global, international and national health challenges. It will describe the way in which global and international health policy is constructed, covering the content, process and actors (e.g. the WHO, the Gates Foundation, bilateral aid agencies and the corporate sector). It will examine the challenges and tensions inherent in the development of global policies that are relevant to national and local contingencies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Health Policy and GovernanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7105Full year7No

Global Health Policy and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anuj Kapilashrami

Description: The module will cover the emergence of systems of global governance, particularly as they relate to global, international and national health challenges. It will describe the way in which global and international health policy is constructed, covering the content, process and actors (e.g. the WHO, the Gates Foundation, bilateral aid agencies and the corporate sector). It will examine the challenges and tensions inherent in the development of global policies that are relevant to national and local contingencies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Understanding and Managing Human Resources for Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7018Semester 27No

Understanding and Managing Human Resources for Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: In this module, students will be introduced first to working definitions of human resources for health (HRH), health system management and health policies, and their relevance for achieving Sustainable Development Goals. Drawing from health systems research, management and economic theory, an overview of health and labour markets concepts will usher the discussion of appropriate tools for planning and managing health workforces in low- and high-income settings. Models to forecast HRH demand and supply will be explained, as well as quantitative methods to analyse health personnel's geographical distribution across services. Training and education systems for health personnel will be considered; particular emphasis will be given in strategies to recruit and retain health personnel in undeserved areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7017Semester 17No

Health Systems Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5025Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5020, LAN5026"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4121Full year4Yes

Spanish Language and Culture I(a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN4021, LAN4026, LAN4126"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4142Full year4Yes

Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN4042, LAN4047, LAN4147"
Prerequisite: LAN4041/LAN4046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description:
Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language.

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4117Full year4No

French Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN4012, LAN4017, LAN4112"
Prerequisite: LAN4011/LAN4016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5007Semester 15No

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann
Overlap: "LAN5001, LAN5006"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5010Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5011, LAN5015"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Italian Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4171Full year4Yes

Italian Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: LAN4176
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Italian.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Italian (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4157Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
Overlap: "LAN4052, LAN4057, LAN4152"
Prerequisite: LAN4051/LAN4056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 4
Cultural Diversity and LawLawLAW6458Semester 26Yes

Cultural Diversity and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module explores how different legal systems manage cultural diversity, which includes religious, ethnic and linguistic diversity. The module is based on the English legal system as the core case study and compares it to the experience of other legal systems in the management of cultural diversity. The comparative study of legal approaches to cultural diversity includes an exploration of legal pluralism, the significance of long-standing and newer diversities introduced through immigration, the problems of assimilation and integration, and paradigms of citizenship, multiculturalism and secularism, and also a study of individual topics ranging from family law to anti-discrimination law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5122Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: "LAN5022, LAN5027, LAN5127"
Prerequisite: LAN5021/LAN5026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5101Full year5Yes

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5001, LAN5007, LAN5107"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Law and PharmacologyLawLAW6170Full year6No

Law and Pharmacology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Amber Marks

Description: In the medico-legal field, medicines regulation has, until recently (E.Jackson, Law and the Regulation of Medicines (Hart, 2012)) received relatively little scholarly attention, and drug offences have been largely neglected in undergraduate courses on criminal law. These two areas of law (medicines regulation and recreational drug use ) are rarely considered together despite both being concerned with pharmacology and its impact on consumers, and despite raising similar ethical questions (autonomy, paternalism, the role of the state in public and private health) and facing similar threats from those seeking to maximise profit.
The purpose of the module will be to identify and critically evaluate normative frameworks in this area, in search of theoretical coherence. The course will identify relevant legal and theoretical frameworks and regulatory agencies. The focus will be on UK law but will also include international treaties and European law. The module will combine domestic and comparative jurisprudence, and will also adopt a law-reform flavour given the evolving nature of science and law in this area . The module may particularly interest those students who are studying medical law, those propose to enter into a practising law career, a law, regulatory or policy-reform role, or who may enter into associated fields such as consumer lobbying and activism, or governmental legal offices.

Questions to be considered will include: What are the normative implications of a shift in regulatory perspective in relation to recreational drugs from the criminal to the public health model? How tenable is the distinction drawn in law between medicinal drugs and recreational drugs? What are the regulatory implications of a product¿s classification as medicinal? What is the role and nature of the harm/benefit nexus in the design of regulatory measures?

In the second semester students will explore several case-studies, including novel psychoactive substances, cannabis law reform and nicotine replacement therapy before proceeding to research and make oral presentations on their own chosen topics for the coursework element, for which they will receive supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Corporate Insolvency LawLawLAW6158Semester 16No

Corporate Insolvency Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shalini Perera
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take LAW6036

Description: The global financial crisis heightened interest in and increased calls for efficiency with respect to insolvency procedures, the insolvency aspects of the taking of security, rescue mechanisms, the accountability of decision makers in the context of insolvency, and the structuring of transactions involving credit and security. The aim of this course is to analyse from a UK perspective the different aspects of the insolvency and/or debt restructuring of corporations. To achieve this aim, the module covers the various procedures available in cases of insolvency and restructuring, the relationship between the general law of property and obligations and insolvency, the law of credit and security issues in the context of distress scenarios, and corporate rescue mechanisms. The course would enable students to identify common aspects in the dynamics, techniques and mechanisms to deal with distress scenarios and discover innovative trends in a continuously developing area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
DissertationLawLAW6035Full year6No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze

Description: The content of the dissertation is determined by the student, with limited guidance by a supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Company LawLawLAW6036Full year6No

Company Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shalini Perera

Description: The principles of modern Company Law including the formation of companies, the corporate constitution, the protection of persons dealing with a company, corporate financing, management, the duties of directors, corporate governance, the protection of minority shareholders and insolvency.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
International Human Rights LawLawLAW6034Full year6No

International Human Rights Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW6134

Description: The demand for international human rights law is growing and demands far exceeds supply. This Interantiona Human Rights law module aims to provide students with a unique and thorough practical and theoretical understanding of the subject. The module will also examine the effectiveness of the united Nations system of human rights protection as well as the European, Africa and Inter-American systems. International human rights law is challenging and will provide students with practical knowledge of how to use international human rights law and plead human rights cases. The module will also contribute to the development of a comparative and cross-cultural perspective on the basic rights and freedoms. The module will focus on civil and political rights and on economic, social and cultural rights. The protection will be analysed from the perspective of industrialised and developing states.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesLAW_456_A
Employment Law: Tribunal Practice and ProcedureLawLAW6027Semester 26Yes

Employment Law: Tribunal Practice and Procedure

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elizabeth Gillow

Description: Employment Law: Practice and Procedure will look at modern working practices in the UK including the "gig economy" and zero hours contracts. It will examine the most common claims presented to the Employment Tribunal. The module will demonstrate how such claims are brought (and defended), the process leading up to a tribunal hearing and what to expect at a final hearing. Students will then be expected to run (in groups) a number of evening sessions (one or two per student depending on numbers) to members of the public who are either thinking about bringing a claim to the tribunal or who are preparing for a hearing as a litigant in person. Students will not be required to represent the claimants in the Employment Tribunal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Practical
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesLAW_6_A
Securing Human Rights Compliance: A Case Study on the United KingdomLawLAW6457Full year6No

Securing Human Rights Compliance: A Case Study on the United Kingdom

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Sanchita Hosali

Description: This clinical practice module will provide a unique opportunity to gain detailed insight into human rights law and legal procedures in the United Kingdom; examining parliamentary committees and processes; national human rights institutions; ombudsmen and regulators; and an introduction into non-ligation advocacy. The module will also provide the opportunity to experience the practice based environment of a leading human rights NGO through a unique work experience placement with the British Institute of Human Rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_456_S
Law of the European UnionLawLAW5105Semester 25No

Law of the European Union

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW4009

Description: This module introduces students to some fundamental characteristics of the law of the European Union.
It is divided into three parts, concerned respectively with how EU law is made, how it is applied and enforced and finally what it is used for. We will consider the historical development of the European Union, its institutional structure and its legal instruments, the interaction between Union and national law and the role of national courts in enforcing Union Law, the rules relating to free movement in the internal market and the legal principles underlying the relationships between the EU and its neighbours.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Contemporary Issues in Law and BusinessLawLAW4010Semester 24No

Contemporary Issues in Law and Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - School Of Law

Description: This course is an introduction to the disciplines of law and business studies and aims to develop a critical understanding of both the legal framework of business activity and the economic and global commercial context in which law operates.
We will draw upon law and legal thought to reflect critically on contemporary business issues. The module will commence with an introduction to the English Legal system followed by an examination of contract law, company law and employment law (among others) which are the legal jurisdictions easily relatable to business.
Thereafter, the module will aim to develop an appreciation of current global economic and business issues and the challenges they pose for law and law makers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
The Practice of Law in a Clinical EnvironmentLawLAW6156Full year6No

The Practice of Law in a Clinical Environment

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Frances Ridout

Description: This module is a unique opportunity to develop your knowledge of substantive law and legal procedure while working with live clients and practicing lawyers from some of London's most reputable law firms and chambers. It is both academic and practical, requiring a great deal of commitment and flexibility. In return, this module provides each student with six live clients where they are the advising student lawyer with responsibility for the case (under supervision), as well as small seminar groups and active engagement with the Clinical Team.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_56_A
Criminal Law (Level 5)LawLAW5005Full year5No

Criminal Law (Level 5)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Saskia Hufnagel

Description: This module will cover:

Introduction: the scope and character of the criminal law and its objectives; Deconstructing a typical crime - Criminal Damage;
The General Principles of Criminal Responsibility: Criminal conduct - the actus reus; principles of causation; crimes of omission; Criminal fault - the mens rea; General defences; capacity and incapacity; insanity and diminished responsibility, intoxication, duress, necessity, self defence.
Particular Crimes: Offences against the person: homicide; wounding and assaults, including assaults aggravated by hatred, sexual offences; Offences against property: theft and fraud.
Preliminary or inchoate offences: Conspiracy; Attempt.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6116Full year6No

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6016, LAN6111"
Prerequisite: LAN5010/LAN5015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6011Semester 16Yes

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6010, LAN6016"
Prerequisite: LAN5010/LAN5015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6025Full year6No

Spanish Language and Culture III

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6020, LAN6026"
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5146Full year5No

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5041, LAN5046, LAN5141"
Prerequisite: LAN4040/LAN4045 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5121Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN5021, LAN5026, LAN5126"
Prerequisite: LAN4020/LAN4025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5087Semester 25No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON5062, CON5067, LAN5082, LAN5085"
Prerequisite: CON5061/CON5062/LAN5081/LAN5086 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
French Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6017Semester 26No

French Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6012, LAN6015"
Prerequisite: LAN6011/LAN6016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5086Semester 15No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON5061, CON5066, LAN5081, LAN5085"
Prerequisite: CON4060/CON4065/LAN4080/LAN4085 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5050Full year5Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN5051, LAN5055"
Prerequisite: LAN4050/LAN4055 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5047Semester 25No

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5042, LAN5045"
Prerequisite: LAN5041/LAN5046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level A2 / B1in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Jurisprudence and Legal Theory (Paris)LawLAW6621Full year6No

Jurisprudence and Legal Theory (Paris)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: 1. Introduction to Jurisprudence, Legal Philosophy and Legal Theory
2. Classical natural law
3. Modern developments in natural law
4. Early positivism: Bentham and Austin
5. Modern positivism: HLA Hart and Analytical Jurisprudence; Kelsen's Pure Theory of Law
6. Legal Realism
7. Social theory I: Marx
8. Social theory II: Durkheim
9. Critical legal theory and the 'Jurisprudence of Difference'
10. Dworkin
11. Raz
12. Postmodernism: Law without Foundations?
13. Selected topics:
a. Law and Morality
b. Civil Disobedience
c. Punishment
d. Economic Analysis of Law
e. Femenist Legal Theory
f. Autonomy of Law

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5117Full year5No

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5012, LAN5017, LAN5112"
Prerequisite: LAN5011/LAN5016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 4)LawLAW6601Full year6No

Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 4)

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Double Degree in English and French Law with Paris 1. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the assessments set by the collaborative institution in order to be granted a LLB Degree in English and French Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 6
Intellectual Property - Industrial PropertyLawLAW6456Semester 26Yes

Intellectual Property - Industrial Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: The module focuses on the law of the United Kingdom (and the European Union) relating to those forms of intellectual property that are sometimes described as industrial property. It covers (i) patent law, (ii) the law of trade secrets, (iii) the law of registered trade marks and (iv) the tort of passing off. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related RightsLawLAW6455Semester 16No

Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: The module focuses on the substantive law of copyright and related rights in the United Kingdom. It covers (i) the subsistence, ownership and term of copyright, (ii) exclusive economic rights and infringement (iv) exceptions and limitations to infringement and (v) moral rights. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5081Semester 15Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON5061, CON5066, LAN5080, LAN5086"
Prerequisite: CON4060/CON4065/LAN4080/LAN4085 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for low intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5082Semester 25Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON5062, CON5067, LAN5080, LAN5087"
Prerequisite: CON5061/CON5062/LAN5081/LAN5086 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Criminal SentencingLawLAW6169Semester 26No

Criminal Sentencing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jeffrey Kennedy

Description: This module will provide students with a critical introduction to the legal and philosophical issues involved in decisions of how we respond to crimes following conviction. In doing so, students will come to understand and evaluate the rules, principles, and processes of criminal sentencing. While focusing on the law of England and Wales, the module will take a broader perspective by engaging the central questions that arise across different jurisdictions relating to the aims, nature, and significance of sentencing, who should be able to participate in the decision, how judicial discretion should be guided or constrained. Students will therefore come to understand the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Law, Justice and EthicsLawLAW6155Semester 26No

Law, Justice and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze

Description: Democratic government is commonly assumed to be essential to a just legal system. But is that assumption always correct? Do our traditions of active and vigorous legislation, zealous litigation, and professional lawyering guarantee justice? Are there ways in which they wholly undermine justice? What about public discourse, arts or the media? Do they always promote the kind of open, free society in which law and justice thrive? These questions receive sharp scrutiny in the writings of Plato. In this module, we examine how some classic ideas about justice and democracy, have shaped law and society for centuries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Administrative LawLawLAW6166Semester 16No

Administrative Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ian Yeats
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4001

Description: 1. The notion of administrative justice and remedies for wrongs by public bodies.
2. Judicial review procedures and remedies.
3. Who is and what kind of decisions are amenable to judicial review?
4. Who may make a claim or intervene in judicial review proceedings?
5. Advanced study of the grounds of judicial review:
a. illegality
b. irrationality
c. proportionality
d. procedural impropriety (including art 6 ECHR)
e. review of law and fact
6. Legitimate expectations and fettering of discretion
7. The status of unlawful administrative actions.
8. The role of tribunals and ombudsmen.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 3)LawLAW6600Full year6No

Year Abroad (Maitrise) Paris I (Year 3)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Double Degree in English and French Law with Paris 1. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the assessments set by the collaborative institution in order to be granted a LLB Degree in English and French Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 6
Public International Law ALawLAW6032ASemester 16Yes

Public International Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: This is an introductory module in Public International Law. The broad aim is to introduce students who have not studied international law before to its core principles, including methodology, sources and techniques of legal reasoning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Public International LawLawLAW6032Full year6Yes

Public International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: This is an introductory module in Public International Law. The broad aim is to introduce students who have not studied international law before to its core principles, including methodology, sources and techniques of legal reasoning. Topics covered include: The nature and purpose of international law; subjects of international law; state jurisdiction and immunity, including diplomatic immunity and jurisdiction in criminal matters; the law of treaties; the law of the sea; implementation and enforcement; international law and the individual; state responsibility; state succession, the law of international organizations including United Nations Law; the settlement of disputes; international law and national legal systems especially the municipal law of the United Kingdom.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Advanced United Kingdom Human Rights LawLawLAW6020Semester 26No

Advanced United Kingdom Human Rights Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Merris Amos
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4001 or take LAW6019

Description: This module builds on knowledge acquired in the module UK Human Rights Law. Following a recap of the major features of the Human Rights Act 1998, the focus will be on substantive human rights law including: freedom from torture and inhuman and degrading treatment (Article 3); respect for private life (Article 8); respect for home (Article 8); freedom of religion (Article 9); and protection of property (Article 1 Protocol 1). The module will conclude with a consideration of institutional protection of human rights in the UK and options for reform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Jurisprudence and Legal TheoryLawLAW6021Full year6No

Jurisprudence and Legal Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr John Adenitire

Description: Main currents of modern Western legal thought: natural law theory (classical and modern forms); legal positivism (Austin, Bentham and the legal theory of sovereignty; Hart's concept of law; Kelsen's pure theory of law); classical social theory and law; aspects of legal realism an critical legal studies; Dworkin's interpretative theory and law as integrity; punishment; corrective justice, civil disobedience; rights; feminist legal theory; economic analysis of law; legal autopoiesis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_456_S
Comparative LawLawLAW6164Semester 26No

Comparative Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marc Van Hoecke

Description: This module offers a general introduction to comparative law. It offers information on other Western legal systems, predominantly as to private law, most notably French and German law, which have strongly influenced many legal systems within Europe and beyond. It will show how legal systems have to be understood in their (historical, social and economic) context and how law in action may sometimes be rather different from law in the books, so that in practice there may be more similarities or differences than the written law would suggest. In order to understand a legal system one has to understand its underlying legal (and general) culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
European Union LawLawLAW4009Semester 24Yes

European Union Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW5105

Description: This module introduces students to some fundamental characteristics of the law of the European Union.
It is divided into three parts, concerned respectively with how EU law is made, how it is applied and enforced and finally what it is used for. We will consider the historical development of the European Union, its institutional structure and its legal instruments, the interaction between Union and national law and the role of national courts in enforcing Union Law, the rules relating to free movement in the internal market and the legal principles underlying the relationships between the EU and its neighbours.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Equity and TrustsLawLAW5003Full year5No

Equity and Trusts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Allen
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW6056

Description: This module will cover:

Express trusts: The three certainties in the creation of trusts; The beneficiary principle and unincorporated associations; Formalities in the creation of trusts; Dispositions of equitable interests; The duties of trustees; Breach of trust.
Resulting trusts: Trusts of homes, including proprietary estoppel.
Constructive trusts: Proprietary constructive trusts; Personal liability to account for dishonest assistance and knowing receipt
Tracing and equitable proprietary claims: Theoretical aspects of equity, property law and restitution

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6111Full year6Yes

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6011, LAN6116"
Prerequisite: LAN5010/LAN5015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Spanish Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6022Semester 26Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6020, LAN6027"
Prerequisite: LAN6021/LAN6026 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Tort LawLawLAW5001Full year5No

Tort Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rachael Mulheron

Description: This module will cover:

Some introductory concepts in torts; Introducing negligence (eg, where negligence causes death, the types of damages, statute of limitations); Duty of care: elements; scope; statutory exceptions; immunities; acts versus omissions; Setting the standard of care; Determining breach; Proving causation - classical test, exceptions thereto; Duty of care and breach; Remoteness of damage; Defences to negligence; Negligently-inflicted pure economic; Liability of public authorities; Occupiers liability; Negligently-inflicted pure psychiatric injury; Employers liability; Vicarious liability; Breach of statutory duty; Misfeasance in public office; Product liability statutory regime; Private and public nuisance; The action in Rylands v Fletcher; Defamation; Intentional interference with economic relations and other economic torts; Reflections on the role of Torts in modern society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5142Full year5Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5042, LAN5047, LAN5147"
Prerequisite: LAN5041/LAN5046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6010Full year6Yes

French Language and Culture III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6011, LAN6015"
Prerequisite: LAN5010/LAN5015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5141Full year5Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5041, LAN5046, LAN5146"
Prerequisite: LAN4040/LAN4045 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6016Semester 16No

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN6011, LAN6015"
Prerequisite: LAN5010/LAN5015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5116Full year5No

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5011, LAN5016, LAN5111"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5080Full year5Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: "CON5060, CON5065, LAN5081, LAN5085"
Prerequisite: CON4060/CON4065/LAN4080/LAN4085 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for low intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language .

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5057Semester 25No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
Overlap: "LAN5055, LAN5052"
Prerequisite: LAN5051/LAN5056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1 in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Law and GlobalisationLawLAW6463Semester 26No

Law and Globalisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: Debate on globalisation remains very polarised with different perspectives regarding the extent to which law serves as a shield against or a driver of globalisation. This module looks at the impact of globalisation on legal systems as well as the role played by the law to regulate globalisation. This module will focus on law at various levels (i.e. national, regional, international and transnational), the activities of international organisations (such as WTO, World Bank and IMF), and the role played by multinational enterprises in a globalised legal landscape.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5046Semester 15No

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5041, LAN5045"
Prerequisite: LAN4040/LAN4045 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Street LawLawLAW6462Semester 26No

Street Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Frances Ridout
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW6156

Description: StreetLaw is a vehicle by which the public can be made more aware of their rights and responsibilities. This module educates students about public engagement, pro bono work, StreetLaw and clinical legal education. Students learn specific areas of law and run three StreetLaw projects designed to educate different groups in the community on that area of law. Strategy, reflection, feedback, and principles of teaching / engaging audiences will be key features which are encountered during each StreetLaw project.

Students need to work with LAC staff to complete a DBS check before starting the module (university assistance will be provided).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Practical
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_56_A
Introduction to French Private LawLawLAW6202Semester 26Yes

Introduction to French Private Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the rules that govern the relationships between individuals, being physical persons or moral persons. It provides an introduction to the sources of French private law, the court system in France, and the basic principles, procedures, and values that govern contractual and non-contractual obligations. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Chinese Law and InstitutionsLawLAW6453Semester 26No

Chinese Law and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module focuses on the origins, evolutions, and practices of the Chinese legal system. The first part addresses the historical and institutional foundations of the Chinese legal system. The second part provides critical insights into a number of selected aspects of Chinese private and public law with the overall purpose to critically assess the main legal challenges China is facing today. Taking stock of China's central role in the globalisation process, the third part considers the interactions and interdependence between the Chinese legal system and the international legal order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5056Semester 15No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5051, LAN5055"
Prerequisite: LAN4050/LAN4055 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Introduction to French Public LawLawLAW6201Semester 16No

Introduction to French Public Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the students to the rules that govern the organisation, the functioning and the attributions of the French political and administrative entities, as well as the relationship between citizens and state institutions. Based primarily on an analysis of French constitutional law and administrative law, this module should provide the students with an in depth introduction to the institutions and sources of law that are at the heart of French public law. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Equity and Trusts (Level 6)LawLAW6056Full year6No

Equity and Trusts (Level 6)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Allen

Description: This module will cover:

Express trusts: The three certainties in the creation of trusts; The beneficiary principle and unincorporated associations; Formalities in the creation of trusts; Dispositions of equitable interests; The duties of trustees; Breach of trust; Resulting trusts; Trusts of homes, including proprietary estoppel; Constructive trusts: Proprietary constructive trusts; Personal liability to account for dishonest assistance and knowing receipt;
Tracing and equitable proprietary claims; Restitution of unjust enrichment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Health LawLawLAW6163Full year6Yes

Health Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ruth Fletcher

Description: This module teaches students how to research, work with and develop health law. Health law is concerned with the promotion of health and well-being through access to treatment and medicines, the governance of health as a public good, the regulation of relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, and the righting of wrongs that may occur in health systems. Health law presents an excellent opportunity for students to work across the sub-disciplines of crime, tort and public law, to draw on ethics, human rights and socio-legal perspectives in building legal arguments, and to assess the impact of professional standards, patients and carers' experiences, government policy and corporate provision on law in practic

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Competition Law ALawLAW6048ASemester 16Yes

Competition Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: 1. Market definition
2. Article 81 EC
3. Vertical restraints
4. Article 82 EC
5. Competition Act 1998 and Enterprise Act 2002
6. Market investigation references
7. Cartels
8. EC mergers
9. UK mergers
10. Practice, enforcement and procedure
11. Collective dominance

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Tissue-specific Stem CellsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7144Semester 27No

Tissue-specific Stem Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristin Braun

Description: This module aims to provide in depth knowledge of the role of tissue-specific stem cells during tissue homeostasis and wound-healing, as well as current and future applications in regenerative medicine. The course will cover tissue-specific stem cells present in tissues derived from each of the three primary germ cell layers:
Ectoderm (e.g. neural; melanocyte; epidermis; eye lens)
Endoderm (e.g. respiratory; intestine; liver; bladder; pancreas)
Mesoderm (e.g. kidney; mesenchymal; bone; muscle; hematopoietic; heart)

In addition, this module will examine cutting-edge experimental techniques (e.g. lineage tracing; cellular barcoding; xenotransplantation; sphere formation assays) that are used to evaluate adult stem cells.

Students will develop skills including critical analysis of scientific literature, interpretation of experimental design, evaluation of statistical analysis, and design of presentations. Essential generic skills include critical thinking, organisation, writing, and oral communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Competition LawLawLAW6048Full year6Yes

Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: The purpose of this module is to teach you the basic provisions of both EC and UK competition law. The module will provide you with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EC and UK competition law is applied. The module will aim to consider important business phenomena in the market such as anticompetitive agreements, abuse of market dominance and mergers between firms. It is hoped that by the end of the module you will gain a good understanding of the competition rules of the EC and the UK in order to help you identify situations in which such phenomena may arise. The module is taught on the basis of on one-and-a-halfhour lecture each week and one-and-a-half-hour tutorials held biweekly. In addition, the module includes several case studies based on real cases. You will be asked to prepare the case studies beforehand and be ready to discuss them in the class. The case studies will give you a taste of what competition law in practice is really like. They will also provide an excellent guidance on how to approach competition law problems in the examination room and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Law, Modernity and the HolocaustLawLAW6018Full year6No

Law, Modernity and the Holocaust

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison

Description: This module explores the Holocaust and the related Nazi racial-biological world view with particular reference to the role of law. Students will examine issues such as the occurrence of genocide in modernity, the role law played in reinforcing European anti-Semitism, the lessons for law and legal philosophy arising from Hitler's rise to power and the use of constitutional means to rule using emergency powers, the divergent views in legal theory linking law with democracy or dictatorship, the legalization of the Nazi racial-biological world-view through eugenics and anti-Jewish legislation, the coordination of legal and administrative officials throughout occupied Europe, the difficulties posed to notions of legal and moral accountability by 'state crime' and `state sanctioned massacre¿. The post WWII ambivalent role of law in responding to the holocaust will be examined along with the rise of 'genocide' as a concept of international criminal law, a subject of research and a prism for understanding the 'dark side' of modernity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
United Kingdom Human Rights LawLawLAW6019Semester 16No

United Kingdom Human Rights Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Merris Amos

Description: This module concerns the interpretation and application of the Human Rights Act 1998 and other important issues concerning the legal protection of human rights in the United Kingdom. There will be a significant focus upon procedural issues including victims, respondents and remedies. Two substantive Convention rights will also be considered in detail - the right to life and freedom of expression.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Law ReviewLawLAW6162Full year6No

Law Review

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Morris

Description: In this module, you will take on the role of legal editor, publisher, and potential legal author while working to support the Queen Mary Yearbook of Interdisciplinary Legal Studies and the Queen Mary Human Rights Law Review. You will consider the role of law journals in the dissemination and impact of scholarship; be exposed to, critique and evaluate a diverse range of legal scholarship; and develop skills in copy-editing (including writing style, conformity with citation guides and accuracy of quotations and footnotes), law review production (including arranging for peer review and author liaison), and writing for publication. You will work both individually and in small teams. This module will require your active participation and full commitment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Experience in Legal PracticeLawLAW5000Full year5No

Experience in Legal Practice

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Mrs Christina Perry

Description: Students will be selected for a work placement with Reed Smith LLP. The programme will begin with Reed Smith LLP but it is anticipated that it will expand to other employers. It is envisaged that the work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful applicants will each be allocated a tutor, who will visit the student at the placement twice in the year. The employer will also provide a mentor in the workplace at each employer to track performance. It is anticipated that during the work placement the students will undertake a wide range of activities to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students completing the module will be expected to return to college twice in the year: once to review the programme and on the second occasion to provide support to the students who are planning to undertake the year in practice in the following years. Students will also complete a reflective portfolio during the placement and they must present this portfolio at the end of the placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Land LawLawLAW4006Full year4Yes

Land Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Ivor Edmunds

Description: This module will cover:

Fundamental concepts; Contracts relating to land; Adverse Possession; Leases/Licences; Mortgages; Co-ownership and the family home; Freehold covenants; Easements; Protection of interests in land: registered land and unregistered land.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Experimental Pathology ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6024Full year6No

Experimental Pathology Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: The project will normally be a piece of original research which is expected to occupy at least half of the time throughout the course. It will normally involve experimental work or measurements on patients undergoing clinical investigation, and is presented as a written report of not more than 8000 words submitted at the end of the project. The report is assessed by internal examiners and forms the basis of student vivas by our external examiners. The main body of the report is often divided intosections like a journal paper: introduction, materials, results, discussion, references and appendices.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Public LawLawLAW4001Full year4Yes

Public Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Mario Mendez

Description: This module will cover:

General characteristics of the UK constitution; Institutions of the European Union and Council of Europe; Rule of law; Parliamentary sovereignty; European Union law and the challenge to parliamentary sovereignty; Separation of powers; Accountability; Sources of power: primary and secondary legislation, prerogative powers; Constitutional conventions; European Union law-making process; Constitutional functions of judges; United Kingdom Supreme Court; Appointing, scrutinising and dismissing judges; International courts and tribunals; European Convention on Human Rights; Human Rights Act 1998 and proposals for a British Bill of Rights; Reform of the European Union; Treaty ratification; Proposals for constitutional reform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6021Semester 16Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6020, LAN6026"
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Cardiovascular PathophysiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6023Semester 26No

Cardiovascular Pathophysiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Greenwald

Description: Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world and is fast becoming a comparable problem in the developing countries. The module describes some of the mechanical factors that underlie the pathogenesis and progression of vascular disease. This requires a brief outline of fluid dynamical and elasticity theory sufficient to understand the properties of extensible and non-linearly elastic materials such as arteries, and the behaviour of blood flowing in them. This approach is not commonly followed in the preclinical medical course, but it provides an essential adjunct to the biochemical and metabolic description of cardiovascular disease that students will encounter in their clinical studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Spanish Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6126Full year6No

Spanish Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: LAN6121
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
The Holocaust and its Aftermath in Literature and FilmHistoryHST6749Full year6No

The Holocaust and its Aftermath in Literature and Film

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Kinga Bloch
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The Holocaust is the defining event of the mid-twentieth century and its aftermath shaped the history of Western Europe. This module takes a broad approach to the study of this cataclysmic episode. In the autumn term we examine Nazi policy towards the Jews between 1933 and 1945. Our investigations focus on questions of the legitimization of physical violence towards Jews, room for manoeuver and personal responsibility of the perpetrators, as well as reactions and forms of resistance against the persecution policies among the Jews. In the spring term we analyse - based on juridical forms of dealing with the past - visual and literary attempts of confronting and coming to terms with the Holocaust. Central to this debate are films and novels from Germany, the UK, the USA and France and Israel, such as the crime novels by Philip Kerr or Quentin Tarrantino's film 'Inglorious Basterds'. We take a closer look at ideas of morality during periods of dictatorship and genocide and examine concepts of justice. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_456_A
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5112Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5012, LAN5017, LAN5117"
Prerequisite: LAN5011/LAN5016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6015Full year6No

French Language and Culture III

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6010, LAN6016"
Prerequisite: LAN5010/LAN5015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5111Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN5011, LAN5016, LAN5116"
Prerequisite: LAN4010/LAN4015 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Applied Linear AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH5212Semester 15Yes

Applied Linear Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5112
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

Description: This module covers concepts in linear algebra and its applications. The ideas for two- and three-dimensional space covered by the appropriate first year module will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5156Full year5No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN5051, LAN5056, LAN5151"
Prerequisite: LAN54050/LAN4055 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Japanese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5045Full year5No

Japanese Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5040, LAN5046"
Prerequisite: LAN4040/LAN4045 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2/ B1) in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and JusticeLawLAW6173Semester 26No

Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leila Selena Ullrich

Description: This course situates the study of criminology in a global and inter-disciplinary context to destabilize state- and Euro-centric conceptions of crime, punishment and justice. It starts by proposing different beginnings for criminology that reveal that in some sense the discipline has always been global. We begin with anthropological studies of so-called 'primitive' societies. How are social transgressions conceptualized and dealt with in stateless settings? Is there a concept of 'crime' to begin with? What work does the concept of crime do in organizing society? Who is being protected and who is being disciplined? We then explore two formative contexts for criminal justice: slavery and colonialism. What is the relationship between modern police forces and slave patrols? How has the `colonial encounter¿ shaped penal and policing regimes in postcolonial and metropolitan states?

After examining these `different beginnings¿, students will explore what it means to globalize crime and justice. What are we to make of 'international crimes' such as war crimes, crimes against humanity, crimes of aggression and genocide? Does it make sense to punish individuals for collective violence such as genocide in the same way as for murder? Should we reconcile, restore or transform rather than punish after mass violence?

The final part of the course looks at the global production of new forms, discourses and constituencies of criminalization and how they exclude and include people from society. Criminal justice technologies and discourses, for example, are increasingly applied to exclude refugees and migrants while some LGBTQ+ subjects are provisionally accepted into the category of 'good citizens'. How can we make sense of these new forms of criminalization and the offenders and victims they produce? How do criminal states, multinational corporations, people smugglers, child soldiers, foreign fighters, female terrorists and victims of trafficking confound our categories of victim/perpetrator in a highly racialized and gendered context of global inequality?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
American Horror Stories: The Fiction and Film Worlds of Stephen King from Carrie to ItHistoryHST6380Semester 26Yes

American Horror Stories: The Fiction and Film Worlds of Stephen King from Carrie to It

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Jacobsen

Description: With a career spanning over 40 years, Stephen King is one of the world's most popular and influential writers, his stories and iconic characters forming an integral part of the American cultural landscape. Film adaptations of his work continue to receive critical acclaim and extraordinary box office success. The analysis of Horror film and fiction can reveal cultural anxieties at significant socio-historic moments. In this module, we will explore the ways in which Stephen King's shorter novels, novellas and film adaptations of his work interrogate the American psyche, capturing its fears and apprehensions at defining points in modern history. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this module will use King's work as a lens through which to examine developments in American horror cinema and fiction, investigating the articulation of cultural anxieties from the New England Puritan imagination in the influential works of Edgar Allen Poe and H.P. Lovecraft to the disillusioned aftermath of the Vietnam War in 'Carrie' and contemporary contexts of gender, empowerment and sexuality in 'Gerald's Game'. While the module will focus on the Horror texts for which King is renowned, we will look at his contribution to other genres, from the depiction of boyhood in 'Stand by Me' to the prison melodrama of the world's favourite movie, 'The Shawshank Redemption'. We will read and reflect on what we can learn about our own writing from King's memoir and reflection on the writing process, 'On Writing'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Principles of Revenue LawLawLAW6172Full year6No

Principles of Revenue Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The objective of this module is to introduce you to the fundamental principles of taxation law in the United Kingdom. The policies underlying fiscal legislation, the budgetary process, and the place of tax within English legal structure all are considered. A background in mathematics is not a prerequisite for this module, as the module focuses on legal principles, policies and regulation. Included amongst the topics addressed are the taxation of trades and earnings, capital gains tax, corporation and inheritance tax, and the jurisprudence of tax avoidance. Tax law is taught in context. The module fosters the skill of handling complex legal material, and teaches you to write clearly and persuasively. More specifically, the abilities to read and interpret statutory material, to understand and interpret the structure of language, and to perceive varieties of meaning and nuance all are taught. These are vital skills for any lawyer - regardless of intended area of practice. You should develop an ability to apply the law as derived from the cases, statutes and other sources to a set of given facts which are similar but not identical to those encountered in the cases. The module should also improve your ability to read and distinguish between cases. The module is taught within the wider taxation programme at Queen Mary, and strong links exist between Revenue Law and postgraduate modules and teachers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Comparative Constitutional LawLawLAW6160Semester 16No

Comparative Constitutional Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mario Mendez
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4001

Description: This course will examine from a comparative perspective the legal structures and concepts typically found in constitutions, including constitution-amending & constitution-making; constitutional interpretation and judicial review; the distinction between legislative and executive authority; federalism and subsidiarity; rights controversies (e.g. free speech); the relationship between the domestic constitution and international law. Throughout our study of specific topics, it will consider questions such as: What separates "constitutional" law from other domestic law? What is the role, if any, of comparative constitutional law in domestic constitutional law adjudication? How does our study of comparative constitutional law adapt to a global society? A wide range of constitutional systems will be engaged with in relation to specific themes including: the UK; Australia; Canada; EU & ECHR; Finland; France; Germany; Hungary; India; Japan; New Zealand; Poland; South Africa; Spain; Sweden; United States

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Modern Arabic Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5055Full year5No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: "LAN5050, LAN5056"
Prerequisite: LAN4050/LAN4055 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
CriminologyLawLAW6045Full year6No

Criminology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison

Description: Sociological and psychological approaches to the aetiology of criminal behaviour; questions of criminal justice policy-making. Topics include: the aims and values of the criminal justice system; the definition of crime both in a theoretical and a practical sense; studies of particular types of crime (eg 'white collar' crime and crimes of the powerful, juvenile crime); penal policy with regard to particular types of crime; crime and public opinion; crime and the mass media; police organisation; prisons and the penal crisis; the role of victims of crime. The module focuses on the contemporary British context but adopts historical and comparative perspectives where relevant.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 8.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 7.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Project and DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7099Full year7No

Project and Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: The overall aim of this module, building on the Research Methods module is for the student to undertake research that shows originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret new information in a specialism of healthcare science. The student will undertake an original piece of research involving the application of scientific investigation to one or more clinical situations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 75.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
The Art of LawLawLAW6171Semester 16Yes

The Art of Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isobel Roele

Description: The Art of Law provides an introduction to a range of ways in which law and the visual arts come together now and in the past. The module will explore how law appears in artworks including painting, sculpture, photography, and film. It will also consider when, how and why works of art appear in state institutions like courthouses, Inns of Court, government buildings, and international organisations, and how state and international organisations make use of art work in their public outreach activities.
Students will develop an understanding of basic art historical approaches and methods including psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxian, post- and anti-colonial, and queer, approaches. They will use these to navigate cutting-edge interdisciplinary research in the field of Law and the Arts. They will make their own art work, engage in class discussions, visit art galleries, watch films, and undertake an independent research project.
For the creative project, students may choose between making a 5-minute film; an A2 poster; or 5-frame photo-essay.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Media LawLawLAW6006Full year6No

Media Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: Media law is the study of the regulation of the media, whether in traditional print form, the broadcast media, or in the online arena. Increasingly, media regulations must be, and are being, adapted to take account of new technological developments as the dividing line between online media and traditional forms becomes less pronounced. Primarily we will be using English law as our starting point with cross jurisdictional comparisons being discussed as and where appropriate. In general however the module is thematic in nature and English law should be considered as a case study exploring how certain themes may arise and be dealt with in practice, as opposed to the be all and end all of the module coverage. The broad themes which we will explore in the course include regulation of the distribution of material by the media - for instance, the regimes in place under the Data Protection Act 1998, or the Contempt of Court Act 1981 and how and in what circumstances those may restrict the information which the media is permitted to distribute. Information privacy and the media's right to withhold the identity of sources will be considered. Laws regulating media output on the basis of the actual content distributed will also be analysed, including defamation issues faced by the media, blasphemy, hate speech and obscenity. In addition to considering how the general law applies to the media, we will also consider sector-specific regulation (televisual broadcasting, advertising), as well as extra-legal measures such as the voluntary codes of conduct for print content administered by the Press Complaints Commission and the Advertising Standards Authority.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Contract Law II: Terms, Breach and RemediesLawLAW4105Semester 24No

Contract Law II: Terms, Breach and Remedies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Christina Perry
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take LAW4104

Description: This module continues the study of the principles of contract at common law and in equity and how these are applied to agreements. Students will study contractual terms, express and implied, and the general regulation of terms, including exclusion clauses; the discharge of contracts, including breach and frustration; and remedies for breaches of contract.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Law of EvidenceLawLAW6037Full year6No

Law of Evidence

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Peter Alldridge

Description: This module will cover:

Burden and standard of proof; Witnesses; Examination in chief; Cross-examination; Sexual history evidence; Illegality or unfairly obtained evidence; Identification evidence; Confessions; Privilege against self-incrimination and the right to silence; Public interest privilege (PII); Legal professional and legal advice privilege; Hearsay; Evidence of previous bad character and other misconduct; Expert and opinion evidence in criminal trials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Experimental NeuropathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6021Semester 16No

Experimental Neuropathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases covering techniqiues such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects cover trauma, Alzheimers Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tautopathies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Neuroscience Research ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6016Semester 26No

Neuroscience Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip

Description: This is a practical-based module wherein students conduct original research supervised by an academic member of staff for a period of approximately 10-12 weeks. Students are required to explore the background of the research and its rationale, construct hypotheses to be tested, learn necessary skills with which to conduct the work, compile results and analyse them. They will write a dissertation of approximately 8-10,000 words including critical analysis of literature, reporting of experimental design
and results as well as their evaluation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Cancer BiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6020Semester 16No

Cancer Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This module is only available to students on the intercalated BSc in Experimental Pathology programme. This module will define neoplasia, describe the macro and microscopic appearance of range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. Specifically, the causes of the transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The module will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Contract Law I: Formation and VitiationLawLAW4104Semester 14No

Contract Law I: Formation and Vitiation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Christina Perry

Description: This module introduces students to the principles of contract at common law and in equity and how these are applied to agreements. Students will study formative elements, including offer and acceptance, consideration, promissory estoppel, intention to create legal relations, certainty of terms and vagueness; vitiating elements, including mistake, misrepresentation and duress; and the enforcement of contractual rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6012Semester 26Yes

French Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France
Overlap: "LAN6011, LAN6017"
Prerequisite: LAN6011/LAN6016 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Law in an Online ContextLawLAW4013Semester 14No

Law in an Online Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elizabeth Gillow

Description: Law in Context will introduce students to a more concentrated consideration of their future careers, within and outside the Legal Professions. Students will develop their employability skills; and research and meet with prospective employers. In addition, students will learn research and contextualised writing skills needed for all career aspirations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 4
Spanish Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6121Full year6Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: LAN6126
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5151Full year5Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5051, LAN5056, LAN5156"
Prerequisite: LAN54050/LAN4055 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6020Full year6Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6021, LAN6025"
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Commercial and Consumer Law ALawLAW6028ASemester 26No

Commercial and Consumer Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Iris Benohr

Description: The objectives of the module are twofold. First, to give students a good grounding in the main principles of a key components of commercial law¿namely, the law of sale; secondly, to introduce students to a topic of growing importance, namely, consumer law. The module aims to build on skills and knowledge which will already have been acquired during the study of other subjects, in particular, contract and property law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5107Full year5No

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN5001, LAN5007, LAN5101"
Prerequisite: LAN4000/LAN4005 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5051Semester 15Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5050, LAN5056"
Prerequisite: LAN4050/LAN4055 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5052Semester 25Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
Overlap: "LAN5050, LAN5057"
Prerequisite: LAN5051/LAN5056 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5042Semester 25Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5040, LAN5047"
Prerequisite: LAN5041/LAN5046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5147Full year5No

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: "LAN5042, LAN5047, LAN5142"
Prerequisite: LAN5041/LAN5046 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level A2 / B1in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Spanish Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6026Semester 16No

Spanish Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
Overlap: "LAN6021, LAN6025"
Prerequisite: LAN5020/LAN5025 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
Video Games: History, Culture and Representation from Pacman to PokemonHistoryHST6405Semester 16Yes

Video Games: History, Culture and Representation from Pacman to Pokemon

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Jacobsen

Description: A truly transnational industry with a current annual value of $100 billion and an estimated 1.2 billion players worldwide, the video game has had an incalculable impact upon global culture. This module traces the origins, development, socio-cultural significance and critical appreciation of the form from its beginnings in the amusement arcades to the mobile games of the present day. Considering video games as uniquely interactive visual sources, the module will employ a diverse range of methods, approaches and critical contexts, from the circumstances of socioeconomic national production in Japan, Europe and the US to global gaming cultures, the representation of history, the video game's relationship to cinema and the theoretical ways in which we might understand the nature of human leisure and play.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Behind Closed Doors: Houses, Interiors and Domestic Life, c.1660-c.1830HistoryHST6720Full year6No

Behind Closed Doors: Houses, Interiors and Domestic Life, c.1660-c.1830

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Amanda Vickery
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This special subject module unlocks the front door of the Englishman's castle, to peer into the privacies of life at home from c. 1660-1830. It will vividly recreate the texture of life at home, from bed bugs and insects breeding behind the wallpapers, to new goods, fashions and rituals, from the performances of the drawing room to the secrets of the dressing room. The module sits on the research frontier, and crosses disciplinary boundaries, drawing on anthropology, historical geography, the history of architecture and decorative arts, material culture and museum studies. Domestic life will come out of the closet. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_56_A
Laboratory ManagementSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7098Full year7No

Laboratory Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: In this module students are introduced to the key concepts of laboratory management.The students will study and reflect on: Good management practice. Legislation relevant to diagnostic laboratories. Health and safety in the laboratory. Development of standard operating procedures. Quality assurance in the laboratory. LEAN evaluation and Audit processes. Methods of evaluation of new methods for use in the diagnostic laboratory. Have a knowledge of the role of new technologies e.g. molecular and automation in the diagnostic laboratory. Understand of the role of th diagnostic laboratory within the NHS and with external agencies such as the HPA and WHO. Occupational health

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Art and Power in Early Modern EuropeHistoryHST6219Semester 16Yes

Art and Power in Early Modern Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hannah Williams

Description: What power does art have? How can it be used to control, manipulate, entice, and inspire? This module offers students the chance to explore the power of art in one of the most dynamic periods of European history and artistic production - from the royal and papal courts of the seventeenth century, through the Counter-Reformation and the Enlightenment, to the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century. In this module, students will encounter iconic sites (Versailles, the Vatican) and artists (Caravaggio, Bernini, Gentileschi, Rubens, Velazquez, Boucher, David, Vigée-Lebrun). Students will also learn to analyse different kinds of objects and spaces (sculpture, paintings, palaces, churches), go on museum and site visits, and think about power in a range of discourses (politics, religion, sex, science, gender, and money). From the churches of baroque Rome to the toppling statues of Paris in the Revolution, what can art tell us about the histories of power in Europe?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Supernatural in Modern BritainHistoryHST6354Semester 26Yes

The Supernatural in Modern Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Bartlett

Description: This module provides a broad introduction to the changing ideas of the self and supernatural nineteenth-century Britain. Using a mixture of primary and secondary sources, it will look at how supernatural events - from ghostly encounters through to astral projection were experienced and understood across the course of the nineteenth century. It will pose questions about the moral and political impact of these experiences and the different models of selfhood that were deployed in making sense of them, paying particular attention to the interaction between social, medical and religious history. Students model a holistic approach to the study of the supernatural, drawing on religious, mind sciences, and historical perspectives. They analyse and interrogate claims made in mesmeric, hypnotic and psychical research, and critically evaluate different understandings of the supernatural, the imagination, and the nature of selfhood.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_56_A
History Research ProjectHistoryHST5901Semester 25No

History Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Peart

Description: This module builds on the skills you have developed in first year to prepare you for your final-year dissertation. You will produce a research project, involving independent research and writing, within a framework of skills workshops and peer review sessions. You will have flexibility in choosing the topic and format of your project from a selection of options reflecting the chronological, geographic, and thematic range of the School. You will also work within Writing Partner groups to read each other's work and provide feedback as your project develops.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Witches, Demons and Magic in Late Medieval and Early Modern EuropeHistoryHST6215Semester 16Yes

Witches, Demons and Magic in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Merle Rubin

Description: The central theme of this module is the 'supernatural' in the early modern world. The module will explore beliefs in witches, demons and magic, and phenomena such as angels, ghosts, dreams and miracles using case studies from a range of European countries across the period 1450 - 1750. It will investigate the interplay between popular and elite ideas about witchcraft and magic and how these changed over the course of the period. Topics will include: witchcraft, sabbats, the diabolic pact and black magic; witch trials, torture and execution; demonic possession and exorcism; angels, ghosts and fairies; and monsters and miracles. Students will be given the opportunity to discuss a range of textual and visual primary sources including woodcuts, witchcraft trials, popular pamphlets and official treatises (all in translation). Students will model a holistic approach to the study of the 'supernatural' in the early modern world, and reflect on the meanings that witchcraft and the supernatural continue to hold in the modern world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Race and the Desire for DifferenceHistoryHST5615Semester 25Yes

Race and the Desire for Difference

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leslie James

Description: Race is not a biological fact. It is a social category historically made. In 1963 James Baldwin affirmed: 'I am not a negro. I am a man. But if you think I am a negro, it means you need it. And the question you must ask yourself is, why?' This module explores how race emerged and developed in history as a powerful category for differentiating peoples. It examines how empire has played a role in histories of racism and emphasises the global dimensions of racism. In doing so, we see how ideas about race and experiences of racism are locally situated and vary over time and space. The module ranges over different geographic territory with examples from Britain and Europe, South Asia, Africa, and America. We will examine the connections between race, religion, sex, class, and migration. While the module will look at how the idea of race has been used to separate people, we will also examine how people throughout history have defied and challenged the categories of racial difference in their daily life and in social and cultural movements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Laboratory MethodsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6015Semester 16No

Laboratory Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xuenong Bo

Description: Finding, reading and evaluating research literature, experimental design and statistics, ethics of experimentation, how to give oral presentations, essay & dissertation writing, record keeping, molecular biology methods, in situ hybridization, western blot, use of microscopes, flow cytometry, histochemistry and tract tracing, electrophysiological methods, proteomics, cell culture, gene therapy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
History of Political ThoughtHistoryHST5614BSemester 25Yes

History of Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Waseem Yaqoob

Description: How has the meaning of `democracy¿ changed over the centuries? Where did the language of rights come from? How have slavery and empire been justified - and criticised? Beginning with some of the earliest examples of political theorising in the ancient world, and ending in the twentieth century, this module introduces students to some of the most important thinkers and debates in the history of political thought. Individual thinkers and major texts will be discussed each week, together with major debates and issues. Students will look at arguments and controversies as they unfolded in different historical circumstances, becoming familiar with the concepts, problems, and debates that have shaped political thought. They will acquire a solid grounding in the development of, and differences among, the various philosophical and ideological traditions that have shaped modern politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Experimental NeuropathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6014Semester 16No

Experimental Neuropathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases covering techniqiues such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects cover trauma, Alzheimers Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tautopathies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Fundamentals of ResearchSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7067Semester 17No

Fundamentals of Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ben Bloom

Description: In this module students will learn the basic skills required for academic medicine, including research design, statistical analysis, and methodology. Students will be introduced to a variety of databases including FOAMed and develop the necessary skills to evaluate the scientific literature. With the emphasis on personal research, students will be made aware of current legislation and ethics surrounding clinical research. The module will conclude with students learning how to submit their work for publication and present their research for differing audiences. Student learning will be supported by a series of online lectures and discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Physiology of Shock, Shock Syndromes and Tools of ResuscitationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7068Semester 17No

The Physiology of Shock, Shock Syndromes and Tools of Resuscitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: In this module, students will learn how to identify patients in shock, evaluate which patients require resuscitation, and examine tools by which this is achieved. Students will review the most common causes of shock and learn how to classify shock syndromes, maximise the cardiovascular response to shock, choose fluid therapy (dose/type) for resuscitation, and select which inopressors to apply. Students will develop further insights into cardiovascular physiology and have a clear and in depth understanding of what is meant by resuscitation. Students will learn via a series of online lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Paediatric Trauma and Limb ReconstructionSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7066Semester 27No

Paediatric Trauma and Limb Reconstruction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kyle James

Description: This is a optional module that will focus on the pathophysiology and spectrum of paediatric orthopaedic injuries, along with the assessment and structured approach to limb deformities in both adults and children.

The module will provide students with a deep knowledge of the evidence and controversy around common paediatric fractures and the fundamental basic science behind growing bones and injuries to them. It will also give students a structured approach to quantifying post-traumatic limb deformity and then analysing how that can be corrected using an array of powerful implant choices. There will also be an opportunity for practical application of all these skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Open Fractures and Orthoplastic Surgical CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7065Semester 37No

Open Fractures and Orthoplastic Surgical Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alex Vris

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the multi-specialty management of open fractures, from pre-hospital care to definitive ortho-plastic surgical treatment

The module will provide students with a deep knowledge of how open fractures can be treated by a combined, collaborative approach between surgical disciplines, from the emergency room, to first debridement and then definitive fixation and soft tissue cover. Skeletal stabilisation and soft tissue reconstruction are discussed in detail, including decision-making around implants and choice of grafts/flaps for covering skin defects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Emergency MedicineSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7048Full year7No

Dissertation in Emergency Medicine

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: This module will allow students to develop specialist knowledge and insight on a topic of their choice, related to Emergency and Resuscitation Medicine. Students may choose to organise their dissertation in the form of a narrative review, systematic review, guideline development, research project, audit, or quality assurance project.

Students will develop the ability to synthesise and analyse information and data, to breakdown complex issues, and to compare and contrast alternative view points. This will allow an appraisal and judgement of the direction of the field informed by latest developments and opinion. Students will be supported by regular online supervisory contact with a tutor with expertise in their field of research interest. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing the students' ability to disseminate knowledge at a professional level, with a view toward publication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease in the Hospital and in the CommunitySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7046Full year7No

Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease in the Hospital and in the Community

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This is a compulsory module covering aspects of communicable disease control in the hospital and community. After an introduction to practical epidemiology with special reference to clinical microbiology and infectious disease in the community, the module focuses on the relationship between the NHS, PHE, infection control teams, environmental health services and other relevant bodies in the UK. The module also explores the worldwide public health issues which have implications for public health in the UK. The role of the scientist and clinical laboratory in infection control and public health is explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Disconnected Pathways: Disorders of Spinal SystemsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6013Semester 16No

Disconnected Pathways: Disorders of Spinal Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip

Description: Basic and advanced anatomy of peripheral nerve and spinal cord; acute and chronic pain, visceral pain, pain models, management of pain , trophic factors, peripheral nerve injury, neuronal and glial responses to injury, regeneration and repair of nerve injuries, basic and clinical sciences of spinal cord injury.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
The Age of Revolutions: Global PerspectivesHistoryHST6743Full year6No

The Age of Revolutions: Global Perspectives

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The module examines the global nature of the age of revolutions between the late eighteenth century and mid-nineteenth century, focusing in particular on those parts of the world and on those revolutionary events traditionally treated by historians as marginal or peripheral. It provides an overview of the period through a set of case studies, ranging from events in Latin and Central America to the Mediterranean and Asia, as well as through the analysis of their global political and ideological entanglements. The module is organized around a variety of approaches. First it provides an introduction to the methodology of global history and its implications for the study of the age of revolutions. Second, it offers a thematic and comparative analysis of the shared features of the revolutions around the world (the role of the army and nature of revolutionary wars, the relationship between religion and revolutionary ideologies, counter-revolutionary culture, secret societies). Finally, it discusses specific case studies (the Haitian revolution,the Greek revolution of 1821, etc) and explores connections and transnational influences across the world. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesHST_6_A
History InternshipHistoryHST7903Semester 27No

History Internship

Credits: 20.0
Contact: Dr Claire Trenery

Description: This module gives you the opportunity to complete an internship placement with one of our local partners in the museum, public history, archival, or education sectors. Working alongside practitioners in the field, you will be introduced to the skills employed by public historians, such as curating exhibitions, creating digital resources, cataloguing archival materials, or participating in outreach. The placement allows you to put into practice in a professional environment the knowledge and skills gained through the MA degree. Prior to embarking upon your placement, you will receive training in the practices and responsibilities of professionals working in history-related fields, and assistance in preparing an application for your placement from the options available. The placement will be sixteen hours per week over a period of six weeks, and you will be supported throughout by the School of History. A range of placements with partner-organisations will be available, though students are not guaranteed their first choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
History Advanced Research ProjectHistoryHST7902Semester 17No

History Advanced Research Project

Credits: 20.0
Contact: Dr James Ellison

Description: In this module, you will undertake a practical historical research project in partnership with one of our academics. These projects will be drawn from our staff's current research interests, and might include: compiling and analysing a database; preparing a biographical or bibliographical companion; conducting oral history interviews; translation or transcription of previously unpublished sources. Prior to embarking upon the project, you will receive training in the methodological tools employed by historians, and assistance in preparing an application for your preferred project. A range of project options will be available, though students are not guaranteed their first choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mastering the FieldHistoryHST7901Full year7No

Mastering the Field

Credits: 40.0
Contact: Dr Martyn Frampton

Description: In this module, you will master your chosen field of historical study. You will choose to specialise in one of several streams, each taught by experts who will guide you through the important concepts, debates, and problems that engage historians working in that field today. You'll be encouraged to reflect critically on key texts in the field, as you develop the historiographical awareness that will prepare you for your dissertation. Streams may include: Global Britain; Global History and Decolonisation; Modern America; Modern Europe, Medieval Europe, Medieval Islamic World, Material and Visual Culture; History of Emotions, Medicine and Science.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
History: Methods, Approaches, ChallengesHistoryHST7900Full year7No

History: Methods, Approaches, Challenges

Credits: 40.0
Contact: Dr Martyn Frampton

Description: In this module, we explore the methods that historians employ, different approaches to studying history, and the challenges we must overcome. This module will support you in the transition to postgraduate study, as you acquire the skills and training required for the other modules on the MA programme, including the dissertation. You will be encouraged to explore the perspectives and practices that you find most engaging, whether cultural, social, political, intellectual, or some other form of historical inquiry. At the same time, we will reflect on the diversity of historical experience and interpretation, and the values that shape your own research and writing. The module will also include site visits to London archives and museums.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, Nineteenth-Twentieth CenturiesHistoryHST7316Semester 27No

Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, Nineteenth-Twentieth Centuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Georgios Varouxakis

Description: This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of what some of the most important political thinkers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (before the emergence of what is called 'contemporary political theory' since the 1970s) thought and wrote about the phenomena and concepts referred to as `nationalism', `patriotism¿ and `cosmopolitanism¿. Thinkers focused upon include eighteenth-century predecessors such as Immanuel Kant, Johann Gottfried Herder, J. G. Fichte, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Richard Price, Jeremy Bentham, as well as nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers such as John Stuart Mill, Walter Bagehot, John [Lord] Acton, Matthew Arnold, Giuseppe Mazzini, Alexis de Tocqueville, Auguste Comte, Thomas Hill Green, Henry Sidgwick, Frederic Harrison, J. R. Seeley, Karl Marx, Herbert Spencer, Rabindranath Tagore, Ernest Barker, Alfred Zimmern, Otto Bauer, Harold Laski, Bertrand Russell, Elie Kedourie, John Plamenatz, Isaiah Berlin and others. The emphasis of the module is not on `nationalist¿ or `cosmopolitan¿ thinkers as such, but on what political thinkers thought and wrote about the nation, patriotism, nationalism, internationalism, and cosmopolitanism from the time of the French Revolution to the Cold War.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Anthropology and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7008Semester 27No

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall

Description: The module will introduce key theoretical themes and concepts in anthropology which relate to global health issues. A range of topics will be presented which demonstrate how anthropologists have understood global health issues as biological, cultural and social in nature. The content will include theoretical perspectives in medical anthropology, illness narratives, biopolitics, pharmaceutical governance, health citizenship, structural violence and social suffering, medical technologies, global mental health, the anthropology of communicable and non-communicable disease, medical pluralism, and the anthropology of bioethics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
The Formation of the Early Islamic World: Muslims, Jews and Christians, 600-945 CEHistoryHST6754Full year6No

The Formation of the Early Islamic World: Muslims, Jews and Christians, 600-945 CE

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Anna Chrysostomides
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This special subject investigates the formation of early Islam and the interactions between Islam, Judaism and Christianity in the late antique and early medieval Near East. We will follow how the minority Muslim rulers navigated relationships with the majority Jewish and Christian communities they ruled over through examining textual and archaeological primary sources. We will employ a multi-disciplinary approach, drawing upon the methodologies of history, archaeology, anthropology and theology, and will be exploring such topics as: the formation of Islamic law and the place of non-Muslims within it; when and how the Muslim profession of faith developed; the debate surrounding the licit or illicit nature of images within Islam and what it held in common with contemporary Christian and Jewish debates over images; historically shared beliefs, traditions and celebrations amongst Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities; ethnic tensions between Arab and non-Arab Muslims; inter-religious marriage; and conflicts between these communities and how they were resolved.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 12.50% Practical
Level: 6
Modern Art in Britain, Europe, and America: 1900-1950HistoryHST6378Semester 26Yes

Modern Art in Britain, Europe, and America: 1900-1950

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amanda Christina Hui Sciampacone

Description: This module explores the development of Modern Art between the turn of the twentieth century and the Second World War. We will examine the major art movements of the period - from colourful Fauve painting to the drama of Abstract Expressionism - and will discover how artists sought to challenge aesthetic traditions by formulating innovative 'avant-garde' methods and theories. Through works of art, this module investigates the aesthetic and political landscape of Western Europe and the United States, and traces the emergence of Modernism in the early twentieth century.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_6_A
The 'Heart of Darkness'? Identity, Power and Politics in the Congo c.1870-2010HistoryHST6737Full year6No

The 'Heart of Darkness'? Identity, Power and Politics in the Congo c.1870-2010

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Reuben Loffman
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This QMUL Model module challenges conceptions of Central Africa as the Heart of Darkness, a place disconnected from civilization and unintelligible to all save for the hardened anthropologist. It starts during the intensification of European encounters in the region from late nineteenth-century and ends by covering the most deadly conflicts since the Second World War. It engages with broad historical questions relating to ethnic formation, violence, international development, and the mission encounter. To reveal the complexities involved in power relations in the Congo, this module will make use of a vast array of different kinds of sources from a range of cultural perspectives, such as literary accounts, photographs, and film, and will investigate Central African history in a global context. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Reinventing Ourselves: Psychology, Sex and Chemistry in Modern BritainHistoryHST6735Full year6No

Reinventing Ourselves: Psychology, Sex and Chemistry in Modern Britain

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Martin
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Historians and philosophers have claimed that a massive transformation in our idea of the self took place in the twentieth century. Novel concepts developed in psychology, physiology, endocrinology, psychiatry, sexology, ethology and psychoanalysis promoted a new sense of the complexity and tractability of identity in the British population. Students analyse how the subject matter is approached from these different disciplines, learn to interrogate claims made in psychological and life sciences, and critically evaluate how perspectives from medical sociology can be incorporated into the history of medicine. Focusing on the middle decades of the twentieth century, this module surveys the vast range of materials individuals drew upon in constructing their identities and the new political and social relationships that these made possible. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_6_A
Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7000Semester 17No

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Seif Shaheen

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7001Semester 17No

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypothesis about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider association with income and distribution of money, resources, and power at global, national, and local level. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Darwinian Revolution: The History of a Dangerous IdeaHistoryHST6404Semester 16Yes

The Darwinian Revolution: The History of a Dangerous Idea

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edmund Ramsden

Description: The "Darwinian Revolution" is considered one of the major intellectual transformations of the 19th and 20th centuries. This module will explore the background, formation and consequences of Charles Darwin's work, placing it firmly in intellectual and social context, from the Age of Revolution through to more recent controversies regarding sociobiology, eugenics and biological racism. This QMUL Model module will focus on the shift from natural history to biology, on changing conceptions of evolution in France, Britain, Germany and the United States, and on the ways in which evolutionary ideas have challenged and influenced scientific, religious, political, and social thought. Students will critically engage with both historical and scientific sources, with an emphasis on the history of biology and evolutionary theory. Students will be encouraged to reflect on how ideas of evolution have been used in contemporary debates, and how history can be used to interrogate and complicate these interpretations. There is an important comparative dimension to the module, as it looks at evolutionary ideas in France, Germany, Britain and the United States. Students will gain and understanding of how and why evolutionary ideas took the form that they did in different national contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Molecular biology and pathogensisSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7093Full year7No

Molecular biology and pathogensis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olivier Marches

Description: This module offers the student teaching and workshops covering the principles of molecular biology, the biology of bacteria, and explores the use of current molecular techniques in the research and diagnosis of infectious disease. The human immune system is studied followed by a study of the interaction of micro-organisms with the host immune system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
The Atlantic Slave Trade: Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth CenturiesHistoryHST6339Semester 26Yes

The Atlantic Slave Trade: Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Centuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Reuben Loffman

Description: During the era of the Atlantic slave trade, more than twelve million Africans were forcibly transported to colonies in the Americas. Rather than focusing solely on European merchants, this module focuses more on how Africans experienced the Atlantic trade and the ways in which they challenged the oppressive systems under which they were forced to labour. It provides a broadly chronological introduction to the ways in which Africans became slaves, the Middle Passage, and the establishment of plantations in the New World. It will make use of a vast array of primary sources, including slave narratives, photographs, and abolitionist tracts, to examine the origins, form, and structure of the Atlantic trade from a global perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
Introduction to Clinical MicrobiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7092Full year7No

Introduction to Clinical Microbiology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module introduces the clinically important bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi.
The lectures focus on recent developments in classification, pathogenicity and identification of these organisms.
The lectures are studied in conjunction with the practical sessions of the core diagnostic microbiology and laboratory methods module to develop a complete understanding of the organism, mechanisms of pathogenicity and laboratory diagnosis of clinically important micro-organisms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Evidence, Policy and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7010Semester 17No

Evidence, Policy and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Megan Clinch

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and practical / applied public health perspective. The literature covered in the module will draw attention to the nature of social systems that are influenced by a range of socially, culturally and politically mediated factors and variables. Its approach to the study of the social factors that influence health, public health programmes and health policy will differ from, but complement, the teaching and methods of study that are covered in the Epidemiology and Statistics module (ICM6040). Overall the module will develop and strengthen critical appraisal skills and help intercalating students develop a command of the multi-disciplinary field of Global Health. These are skills that will be new, and crucial throughout their studies and in particular during the second semester as students begin to consider their dissertation project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal SystemsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6011Semester 26No

Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adina Michael-Titus

Description: History of neurology, challenges in drug discovery for neurological & psychiatric conditions, neuropathology of basal ganglia disorders, epilepsy, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, stroke and head injury; Imaging and biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, genomics, proteomics and metabonomics; neurobiology of endocannabinoids; neurotransmitter release.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6012Semester 16No

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baker

Description: An overview of topics in cellular and molecular neuroscience that are fundamental to other BSc neuroscience course units. Neuron and glial organisation, synapses and circuits, signal transduction and neurotransmission, ion channel physiology, receptors, trophic factors, signalling pathways, neuroplasticity, neuro-inflammation and inflammatory damage to the nervous system, cell death, molecular biology of brain tumours, stem cell neurobiology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Fracture Biology and Limb TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7064Semester 27No

Fracture Biology and Limb Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nick Arest

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the basic science of bone and fracture biology as well as specific injuries within the upper and lower limbs.

This module will provide students with the knowledge to critically evaluate extremity trauma. Non-operative and operative treatment will be discussed in order for students to fully appreciate the strengths, weaknesses and controversies around each option. Students will be able to apply their basic science knowledge to individual cases, in a stepwise and methodological approach to fracture treatment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Spine, Spinal Cord and Nerve InjuriesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7063Semester 27No

Spine, Spinal Cord and Nerve Injuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Syed Aftab

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the patho-physiology of trauma to the head, spinal column, spinal cord and the central and peripheral nervous system.

This module will provide students with the knowledge to critically evaluate head and neurological injuries. Non-operative and operative treatment will be discussed in order for students to fully understand the options available and help to refine decision making skills in order to instigate the most appropriate treatment.

Ethical issues surrounding traumatic head and spinal cord injuries will also be critically discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Clinical Microbiology and Laboratory ManagementSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7044Full year7No

Advanced Clinical Microbiology and Laboratory Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module extends the knowledge acquired in the other modules of this degree to create an in depth knowledge of infectious disease. Students also are equipped with knowledge essential to the efficient management of a diagnostic laboratory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
The War on TerrorHistoryHST6741Full year6No

The War on Terror

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr James Ellison
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: The War on Terror and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq remain the most controversial issues of our time. International public debate about their cause, course and effect remains acute yet it is often political, partisan and rarely balanced or complex. This module seeks to put 9/11 and its consequences in historical context by asking historically-informed questions about Western intervention in the Middle East and using an array of recently released primary sources to try to answer them. The aim is to approach the most contentious events of the contemporary era with the historian's informed, detached understanding. That process begins with analysis of the origins of the modern Middle East and the post-Cold War conflicts which led to regional and international instability and the rise of terrorist organisations, principally Al-Qaeda. It goes on to consider the alliance developed by Tony Blair and George Bush after 9/11, the fight against the Taliban, regime change in Iraq and the disintegration of that country with all of its often tragic consequences for its peoples, the region and global security. Students will critically appraise a vast array of congressional and parliamentary material, and develop the skills needed to draw-up political briefs. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesHST_6_A
Human Rights and Public HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7005Semester 27No

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang

Description: This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Patria and Cosmopolis: Nation, Country, and Humanity in Political Thought, from ancient Greece to the Age of RevolutionsHistoryHST7704Semester 17No

Patria and Cosmopolis: Nation, Country, and Humanity in Political Thought, from ancient Greece to the Age of Revolutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Georgios Varouxakis

Description: The module analyses the reflections on patriotism or love of country, cosmopolitanism or attachment to Humanity, and the nation or alternative groups commanding people¿s loyalties in the thought of a great range of thinkers, from classical antiquity to the threshold of the modern era - the time of the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions. Besides many thinkers from a wide range of periods, the module focuses on the significant contributions of non-European or female authors (Augustine of Hippo, Ibn Khaldun, Toussaint Louverture, Mary Wollstonecraft, Germaine de Staël) and their distinct perspectives. Students will master the vital importance of historical contextualization in understanding the changing meanings of concepts as important as patriotism, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, nation, state, race, ethnicity, and related terms. The module will also highlight the issues related to the reception and use of older concepts, ideas and texts in later times and how they were interpreted, misinterpreted or distorted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual HistoryHistoryHST7799Full year7No

Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: This course provides an essential grounding in modern intellectual history and political thought. It introduces students to the most important kinds of methodology practised in the field of intellectual history since the nineteenth century, and some of the most influential thinkers and themes in the history of political thought since antiquity. It is divided into two parts, corresponding to semesters one and two respectively. The first part covers a variety of key philosophical, historical, political and sociological theorists whose work has inspired a range of approaches in the history of ideas in Anglo-American and European scholarship. The second part involves in-depth exploration of the thought of a selection of major authors and thematic concerns in the history of European political thought, considering them in the light of the different methodologies surveyed in the first part.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Empire and Early Modern Political ThoughtHistoryHST7702Semester 17No

Empire and Early Modern Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: European states raced to establish empires in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries that would provide them with resources to assist in their struggles with each other to survive. As those states engaged in this process of expansion, various authors reflected on what it would mean to be the subject of such empires, thereby developing the concept of rights. At the same time, others used the tools of political thought, including concepts of virtue, greatness, interest, and reason of state, to animate the instruments of empire, including joint stock corporations such as the East India Company. These authors articulated modern understandings of the ways in which states project their power as well the rules of the international order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Capitalism and Political ThoughtHistoryHST7703Semester 27No

Capitalism and Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Waseem Yaqoob

Description: This course examines the pivotal role that capitalism has played in political thought from the early twentieth century to the present. It shows how a range of thinkers blurred the boundaries between political and economic analysis in order to reformulate key political concepts and variously to argue, for the maintenance, transformation or overthrow of capitalism. The course starts with a number of figures seeking to grasp the imperial and racial character of the global market system, before exploring how these arguments were transformed by total war, revolution and decolonisation. The course then turns to the ways in which questions of financialisation, inequality, automation and climate crisis came to shape how capitalism is understood. Thinkers studied include: W.E.B. Dubois, Rosa Luxemburg, John Maynard Keynes, W. Arthur Lewis, Eric Williams, Gunnar Myrdal, Joan Robinson, Friedrich Hayek, Silvia Federici and Thomas Piketty.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Global History of Pandemics from Plague to CoronavirusHistoryHST6767Full year6No

Global History of Pandemics from Plague to Coronavirus

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr John Mendelsohn

Description: Covid-19 stopped the world in its tracks. For most people, this is an unprecedented experience. Yet humanity has been here before. This module explores the long and global history of communities, governments, and experts confronting crisis in the form of epidemic disease. The module proceeds through four pandemic periods: (1) plague and smallpox since 1500; (2) cholera since 1800; (3) influenza since 1900; (4) novel viruses emerging from animals to humankind since 1980 - HIV/AIDS, Ebola, new influenzas, SARS, Covid-19. We will interrogate each period with three questions: How have pandemics shaped world history - and vice versa? How have diverse cultures and empires, states, communities, sciences, and international organisations learned from pandemics and from the outcomes of policies and responses? How, and why, have societies united or divided over concepts and practices of purity and danger, security and crisis, evoked by pandemics? This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Early Modern Theories of StateHistoryHST7203Semester 27No

Early Modern Theories of State

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Quentin Skinner

Description: Some early-modern political theorists locate the authority to make laws and exercise political control in the figure of the ruler or prince. The seminar will begin by examining the most celebrated example, Machiavelli's The Prince (1513). Others locate these powers in the body of the republic or people. Thomas More's Utopia (1516) and Machiavelli¿s Discourses (c1519) offer contrasting examples, and the next four sessions of the seminar will focus on these texts. The second half of the course will then turn to Hobbes¿s contrasting claim in Leviathan (1651) that these powers lie instead with the fictional person of the state. The main aim of the seminar will thus be to engage in a close reading of four classic texts of early-modern political thought.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Europe in Revolution: 1848HistoryHST6372Semester 16Yes

Europe in Revolution: 1848

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella

Description: The 1848 revolutions marked the birth of political modernity in Europe, inaugurating working class consciousness and giving birth to feminism. Democracy and socialism were the product of such political experiences. They also represented the last pan-European revolutionary moment in history, one in which the entire continent experienced radical change, from Sicily to Ireland. This module will analyse the causes of this revolutionary wave, its political culture and impact on societies as well as its enduring legacies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_56_A
Saladin, Richard the Lionheart & the Third CrusadeHistoryHST6710Full year6No

Saladin, Richard the Lionheart & the Third Crusade

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Asbridge
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Saladin's defeat of the Franks at Hattin and his subsequent conquest of Jerusalem on 2 October 1187 prompted Latin Europe to launch the Third Crusade. Across the West, tens of thousands took the cross for this expedition, among them Richard the Lionheart, king of England. The war that followed saw Saladin and Richard - two great champions of the age - contest control of the Holy Land. This special subject module explores the careers of both leaders and the wider history of the Third Crusade, drawing upon the testimony of Christian and Muslim contemporaries. Topics explored will include: the role of jihad in Saladin's rise to power; the progress and significance of the siege of Acre; Richard¿s standing as a military genius; the nature of negotiation and diplomacy during the crusade; and the roles of myth and memory in constructing Richard¿s and Saladin¿s historical reputations. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
Lives, Letters and Lifestyles: English Political Society during the Wars of the RosesHistoryHST6713Full year6No

Lives, Letters and Lifestyles: English Political Society during the Wars of the Roses

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Virginia Davis
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This QMUL Model special subject module will provide students with an understanding of fifteenth century English history, introducing one of the major sources for the period, the substantial letter collection of the Paston family. Personal letters were extremely rare before the mid-fifteenth century and this is an exceptional collection which, alongside other smaller collections relating to other gentry and merchant families, are extensively used by historians to throw light on the political, social and economic history of England during a period of extensive social and political change. This module gives students the opportunity to engage with local history and heritage, and meet with archivists to build up a network of professional contacts outside of the university. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_456_A
Sea Power and Empire: Piracy, Race and ModernityHistoryHST6386Semester 26Yes

Sea Power and Empire: Piracy, Race and Modernity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Layton

Description: Sea power was essential to the rise of the British Empire and the making of the modern world. From the mid-eighteenth century to the present day, the spectre of 'piracy' haunted those states that sought to project power in a globalising, international order premised on notions of 'civilisation' on the one hand, and merciless state-violence on the other. This module begins by examining how the British encountered (and transformed) seafaring communities in Asia¿in Indian, Arabian, Southeast Asian and Chinese waters¿before examining piracy¿s postcolonial role in shaping both international law and countercultures of resistance in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Searching For Sisterhood: Feminist Activism in Britain 1968-1988HistoryHST6392Semester 16Yes

Searching For Sisterhood: Feminist Activism in Britain 1968-1988

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lyndsey Jenkins

Description: The women¿s liberation movement was one of the most influential and imaginative protest movements ever witnessed in Britain, seeking structural, political, social and cultural change. Contemporary feminists still benefit from - while often critiquing - their legacy. In this module, we will explore activists' urgent and creative demands for change in all aspects of their lives, through their insistence that the personal was political. We will analyse how factors such as geography, class, race, sexuality and dis/ability shaped their campaigns. We will investigate efforts to gain equal pay and receive 'wages for housework', examine protests which attempted to `Reclaim the Night¿ and abolish virginity testing for migrant women, and consider women¿s involvement in protest movements against racism and nuclear power. Throughout, we will use women¿s own testimonies to help us understand their ideas - including magazines, artwork and oral histories ¿ and consider the importance of women¿s history itself.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Professional and Research SkillsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7091Full year7No

Professional and Research Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: The overall aim of this module is to ensure that the trainee has the underpinning knowledge of the importance of research, development and innovation across the NHS and in healthcare science in particular and to provide the underpinning knowledge for the research project

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Toxicology and CBRNSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7079Semester 27No

Toxicology and CBRN

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: In this module, students will learn about acute toxicology as applied to critical illness. They will gain an understanding of toxidromes, diagnosis of poisoning, and the approach to both supportive and toxin specific care. Importantly, students also will learn about the decontamination of patients and safe working in a CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear) environment. Students will learn via a series of on-line lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Germans and the Jews since 1871HistoryHST6329Semester 16Yes

The Germans and the Jews since 1871

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Kinga Bloch

Description: In the period covered by this module, from 1871 to the present, interactions between Gentiles and Jews in Germany underwent a dramatic and unprecedented set of upheavals. What were the main problems, struggles and achievements in this period of German-Jewish history? This module will initially focus on debating the chances and limits of emancipation and assimilation of Jews in Imperial Germany and on discussing the so-called Jewish Renaissance in the Weimar Republic. A survey of the expansion and the role of antisemitism and its political manifestations in German society will provide a platform for studying the Nazi take-over of power and the Holocaust. The module concludes with the post-war history of Jews in Germany, addressing contemporary challenges such as the integration of Russian-speaking Jews and the future of German Jewry. Students consider the ethical questions that arise when approaching a challenging area of historical enquiry, and learn to identify information needs appropriate to different situations. They develop professional and informed attitudes, which enable them to evaluate the contemporary issues of emancipation, assimilation, and acculturation in a historical context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_56_A
Diagnostic Tools in Critical IllnessSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7078Semester 17No

Diagnostic Tools in Critical Illness

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: This module aims to provide students with an understanding of diagnostic work up in the early phases of resuscitation. Students will improve their ability to interpret bed side metabolic parameters provided by blood gas analysis, and their ability to interpret the chest radiograph and acute computed tomography imaging as applied to acute care in critical illness. They will also gain an understanding of the role of focused ultrasound and echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute illness and guiding resuscitation. Students will learn via a series of on-line lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Islam in Africa and the Indian Subcontinent: Conquest, Islamisation and Co-existenceHistoryHST6116Semester 26Yes

Islam in Africa and the Indian Subcontinent: Conquest, Islamisation and Co-existence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Anna Chrysostomides

Description: Have you ever wondered about the origin of Sufism in India? When Islam reached Algeria or Sudan and how the communities there responded? This module offers students the opportunity to explore the advent of Islam in two, often neglected, geographical areas - Africa and the Indian Subcontinent - in the medieval and early modern period (600-1600). Lectures will provide a chronological perspective, while seminars will focus on a range of thematic primary sources such as: Sufi poetry, historical chronicles, religious literature, letters, archaeological evidence, art and material history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome EngineeringSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7145Semester 27No

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet

Description: This module introduces the students to the different types of pluripotent stem cells which are used for research and in therapeutics. The emphasis will be on induced pluripotent stem cells, where the focus will be on generation, verification, and applications of these cells. Additionally, techniques that are used for genome engineering will be covered which will be integrated in applications of induced pluripotent stem cells.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
1066! The Norman ConquestHistoryHST6114Semester 26Yes

1066! The Norman Conquest

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Virginia Davis

Description: This module will provide students with a good understanding of the causes, course and consequences of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 which decisively shifted England's relations with continental Europe from a Scandinavian to a Norman French focus. The course is divided into three parts. The first explores the last decades of Anglo-Saxon England including links between England and Normandy before 1066; the second investigates the succession crisis of the 1060s, the invasion of 1066 and the subsequent resistance and rebellions while the third addresses the impact of the Norman Conquest on different aspects of government and society, including landholding and lordship, the church and the physical landscape. Seminars will draw upon an extensive range of rich and diverse primary source available to historians of the Norman Conquest. Issues relating to the relationship between England and the Continent continue to resonate and this course offers an opportunity to explore a key moment in the history of this relationship. There will be an optional fieldtrip to Battle Abbey, the site of the 1066 battle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7061Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Susan Brundage

Description: This module will allow students to undertake a dissertation project on a topic within the science and practice of trauma care. Each student will be able to chose a pertinent topic within the individuals' specialism and career aspirations. Students will be supervised and will receive guidance by their academic tutor (supervisor). Students will have to write a 10,000-20,000 words dissertation. The work shall discuss the most relevant aspects of the chosen topic and demonstrate the student's ability to select the most appropriate research methodology to conduct the chosen research. During this module, students (in coordination with a supervisor) will select a topic for advanced study; collect and analyze data to adequately address the chosen topic; and write a 10,000-20,000 word dissertation. Through the dissertation, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Trauma to the Pelvis and TorsoSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7062Semester 17No

Trauma to the Pelvis and Torso

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kashif Akhtar

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the mechanism and patho-physiology of trauma of the pelvis and torso.

Students will evaluate the common injury patterns within the chest, abdomen and pelvis, both penetrating and blunt. They will critically appraise treatment algorithms and resuscitation strategies for these life-threatening injuries and develop a clear comprehension of how to recognise the clinical priorities within individual cases and instigate appropriate courses of action.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Burn and Wound HealingSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7058Semester 37No

Burn and Wound Healing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Niall Martin

Description: The module will be offered as an elective module for the MSc in Trauma Science and will deepen and broaden the knowledge on patients with burns injuries. It will allow students to develop a more critical and evaluative approach to the care of burns patients, through a complete overview of assessment, stabilization and management in respect to the most recent literature. There are also sections on electrical and chemical burns.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Research MethodsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7059Semester 17No

Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elaine Cole

Description: The module will introduce basic principles of research design and strategy, ranging from the formulation of research problems to the critical assessment of alternative approaches to research. Students will gain a through grounding of most common research methods in medical science. Students will also develop an appreciation for research ethics specific to the discipline of medical science.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary Issues in Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6010Semester 36No

Contemporary Issues in Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6009
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module builds on IFP/IFJ6009 Introduction to Business and Management by developing students' analytical and problem solving skills, through the examination of challenging contemporary issues within Business. Students will analyse and comment on Business issues in essays, reports and presentations to the level that will lead to potential success on a range of masters degree programmes in the School of Business and Management.

Students will also be taken on external visits to encourage the application of theoretical knowledge in real life situations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7042Full year7No

Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe

Description: This module will provide the trainee with detailed knowledge and understanding of the structure, function, mode of action and resistance mechanisms of antimicrobial agents. They will gain knowledge and experience of the use and monitoring of antimicrobial therapy and the impact on patient management in a variety of clinical settings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6009Semester 26No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module provides students an appreciation of the operations of organisations and functions of management. It introduces students to principles and models of and developments in management. The module explores the behaviour of organisations and their interactions with the industry, national and global environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Latin for MA studentsHistoryHST7700Full year7No

Latin for MA students

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr David Harrap

Description: This is a course in classical Latin, with emphasis on its role in political, scientific and philosophical writings in different historical periods through to the nineteenth century. It is suitable for complete beginners, but will also provide a thorough revision course for students who already have some knowledge of Latin.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 7
FinanceLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6008Semester 36No

Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6007
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will introduce students to the basic principles of finance and investment. Finance is essentially about pricing, but the essentials of corporate and international finance will also be covered. There will be an introduction to the theory of financial markets and their regulation, and a brief look at the concept of market efficiency. However, most of the focus will be concentrated on the relationship between risk and return, the principles behind portfolio evaluation, the behaviour of asset prices and the role of institutions and trading systems in modern financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Dissertation - MA HistoryHistoryHST7621Full year7No

Dissertation - MA History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Martyn Frampton

Description: The MA History Dissertation provides an opportunity for you to complete an independent research project within an area of historical inquiry related to their chosen `stream¿ for Mastering the Field You will be encouraged to pursue your own intellectual interests, applying the skills you have developed on your other MA modules. You will be assigned an appropriate supervisor for your chosen topic, and will begin meeting with them in Semester 2, with the bulk of the research and writing completed during Semester 3, leading to completion of a 12,000 word dissertation by the early summer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Pakistan and the Politics of the PastHistoryHST6764Full year6No

Pakistan and the Politics of the Past

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Chris Moffat

Description: Pakistan was born in 1947 out of the partition of India, and split again in 1971 following the liberation of Bangladesh. Histories of conflict and loss have left their mark on Pakistani politics and culture. But so too have they been repressed in a nationalist narrative that celebrates Pakistan as a `new Medina¿, a homeland for South Asia¿s Muslims. This Special Subject approaches `history¿ as a terrain of struggle in Pakistan. It traces how different `pasts¿ has been mobilised, by the powerful but also by marginalised communities, exploring why these contests matter for Pakistan¿s present and its possible futures. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The First Age of Globalisation: Money, Race, and Empire 1850-1933HistoryHST6766Full year6No

The First Age of Globalisation: Money, Race, and Empire 1850-1933

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: The period between the American Civil War and the Global Great Depression was an era of unprecedented global interconnectedness, not unlike our own. Telegraph wires, steamships, and railways crossed oceans and continental frontiers, fundamentally changing how human beings understood their relationship to each other and to their world. Students in this Special Subject will explore this period from a variety of perspectives, moving far afield - from London, Buenos Aires, and Bombay, to Chicago, Cairo, and Nanjing, from the prairies and mountains of North America to the Indian sub-continent, the Nile valley, and the hinterlands of Latin America. We will encounter a diverse cast of characters, including imperial officials, racialized labourers, department-store consumers, indigenous peoples, British financiers, industrial workers, indebted farmers, cosmopolitan intellectuals, and more. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Inside Hitler's Germany: Power, Persecution, and ResistanceHistoryHST6763Full year6No

Inside Hitler's Germany: Power, Persecution, and Resistance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Cronin
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: How much do you know about Hitler's Germany? Although it is one of the most studied topics in modern history, the Nazi regime is frequently misunderstood. This Special Subject offers a comprehensive insight into the inner workings of the regime, its effects on German society, and the ways in which it has been remembered. Some of the questions we will tackle include: How and why did the Nazis come to power? How much did ordinary Germans support the regime? Who resisted? Which groups did the Nazis persecute, and why? We will also consider how the regime represented itself globally, and how Nazi ideology fits into broader histories of imperialism and colonialism. In studying this module, we will engage with an extensive historiography, and you will write assignments that make a strong and original contribution to the field. At the end, you can consider yourself an expert in one of history's most notorious regimes. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
American Film History: Hollywood and the Second World WarHistoryHST6761Full year6No

American Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Mark Glancy
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This Special Subject centers on American films made during the Second World War as well as much more recent American films that represent the war. We are not concerned with war films alone but also explore how films represent issues of class, gender, race and sexuality that arise in tandem with wartime histories. We will also study the methods and sources used by film historians as we investigate matters of film style, filmmakers, and classic films ranging from Casablanca (1942) to Inglorious Basterds (2009).
This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM963Full year7No

Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal Diseases

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations (DL version)School of Medicine and DentistryICMM961Semester 17No

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations (DL version)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debra Fonalleras-Marcos

Description: This module allows the students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of the gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigations. It is intended as an update for those with some experience in endoscopy and as an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module. Specific learning objectives of this module includes:

To study the structure of an endoscope and how it works; Understanding the indications, contraindication and complications of the main diagnostic endoscopic techniques: gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and capsule endoscopy; Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images; Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients; How to organise and run an endoscopy service; Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy; Formulate their own options for investigating various GI symptoms/diseases; Describe the nuclear medicine techniques available for assessing diseases of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract; Learn the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for assessing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM962Full year7No

Clinical Research in Gastro-intestinal Diseases

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Globalisation and Contemporary Medical EthicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7004Semester 27No

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amos Miran Epstein

Description: The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics: consent and consensus medical confidentiality, the discourse on distributive justice, human and animal research ethics, end-of-life ethics, transplant ethics, and reproductive ethics. The introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Kennedy YearsHistoryHST6730Full year6No

The Kennedy Years

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Mark White
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: What sets apart the Special Subject from your previous undergraduate modules is the degree of specialization and the emphasis on primary sources. The basic aim of this Special Subject is to examine the presidency of John F. Kennedy from 1961 to 1963. This will involve an analysis of his handling of foreign policy issues such as Cuba, Berlin and Vietnam, his approach to key domestic issues such as civil rights, and his assassination. His iconic image and his character will also explored. This module is defined more broadly than this, however, and will foster an understanding of the global impact of American politics. The early part of the module will focus on Kennedy's career before reaching the White House and the 1960 presidential campaign. The latter part of the module will include an assessment of the presidency of Lyndon Johnson and the careers of JFK's brothers, Robert and Edward Kennedy, and his wife, Jackie. These topics will be examined by using a wide range of primary sources. Indeed developing the ability to examine documentation is one of the chief objectives of this module. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
Decolonisation and HistoryHistoryHST6411Semester 26Yes

Decolonisation and History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Robert Waters

Description: What does it mean to `decolonise history¿? In this module, we will consider the contemporary demand to 'decolonise history' from a historical perspective, exploring how history as a practice - historical thinking, history making, history writing - has operated as a key terrain in the struggle against empire. The module explores how the questions of who gets to narrate history, in what form, and to what audience, became crucial to the struggles for and against colonisation and empire. The module will also introduce you to the ways in which the movement for decolonisation remade what history might be, and what it might do in the world. We will explore the various forms that the relationship between history and decolonisation have taken in the past, and think about the contingency of the forms that relationship takes in our present.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
History Research DissertationHistoryHST6700Full year6No

History Research Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Todman

Description: The History Research Dissertation provides an opportunity for you to complete an in-depth research project within an area of historical enquiry that is linked to your level 6 special subject. You will be encouraged to pursue your own intellectual interests in relation to your special subject, and supported by your special subject convener who will supervise your dissertation research. In Semester A, you will attend a series of dissertation workshops that are designed to give you an understanding and awareness, at an advanced level, of the conceptual and methodological challenges of conducting an extended research project. You will then engage in self-led research directed towards the completion of an assessed 10,000 word dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6001Semester 16No

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypotheses about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider the distribution of wealth, income , resources, and power at global, national, and local levels. Redistributive mechanisms work through either government or market control, and the economic implications for inequalities will be compared and analysed. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Empire and Political ThoughtHistoryHST6408Semester 16Yes

Empire and Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: We often think of the state as the crucible of modern political thought. Many of the ideas that are fundamental to the way in which we live today were, however, developed in the process of forging the vast European empires that spanned the globe from the sixteenth century to the twentieth. These include our understandings of human rights, property, the international laws that govern the global system, and even the concept of the state itself. This module will also examine the various ways in which non-European peoples reacted to and engaged with such ideas. The aim of this module will be to show that modern political thought did not develop in exclusively European contexts but, rather, through a centuries-old engagement between European and non-European societies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6000Semester 16No

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Seif Shaheen

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Emergency CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7077Semester 37No

Emergency Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: In this module, students will review a wide range of acute medical disease processes, developing knowledge about their pathophysiology and clinical presentation. Topics will include acute coronary syndromes, diabetic and non-diabetic endocrine emergencies, acute non-traumatic and traumatic neurosurgical emergencies, and infectious disease and tropical medicine. Students also will develop the skills required to manage these diseases, by evaluating clinical scenarios.

Students will learn via a series of online lectures delivered by experts in the field and will participate in discussion groups.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 7
Advanced Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5005Semester 25No

Advanced Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valentina Gallo

Description: Students will build on their skills and knowledge developed in year 1 and will review and revise the measurement of rates, ratios, proportions, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, statistical significance tests, and data presentation (tables, graphs and charts). They will be introduced to statistical modelling and be expected to also conduct some data analysis. Students will also be introduced to concepts and practices related to statistical modelling (such as linear regression and logistic regression). The second half of the module will get students to develop skills and experience in study design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Extremity & Vascular TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7075Semester 27No

Extremity & Vascular Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nick Arest

Description: This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal and extremities vascular trauma. Students will be encouraged to use a critical and scientifically robust approach to plan patient care and to develop problem solving skills in the context of orthopedic trauma. Particular attention will be given to cases of blunt and penetrating injuries to the extremities and the resultant vascular abnormalities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Military and HumanitarianSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7076Semester 37No

Military and Humanitarian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christos Giannou

Description: This module will provide students with a background into both military and civilian austere events. The module will cover triage, pre-hospital care, mass casualty management and surge capacity, ballistics, chemical and biological trauma. The latest techniques learnt by the military will be proposed and critically evaluated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Cardiac Arrest, Airway Management, Oxygenation, Analgesia and Procedural SedationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7069Semester 27No

Cardiac Arrest, Airway Management, Oxygenation, Analgesia and Procedural Sedation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryl Wood

Description: This module will equip students with knowledge of oxygen delivery, advanced airway care, respiratory support, procedural sedation/analgesia, and state of the art treatment of cardiorespiratory arrest in adults and children. In the first part of the module, students will review the mechanisms for respiratory failure, non-invasive ventilation, and advanced airway care. Students also will learn best practice in acute care analgesia and sedation. In the second part of the module, students will focus on the best practice care for patients in cardiopulmonary arrest in a wide range of scenarios. In the final section of the module, students will focus on the critically ill child and mother.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Independent Scientific PaperSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7074Full year7No

Independent Scientific Paper

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Thomas

Description: This module will allow students to develop specialist knowledge and insight on a topic of their choice, related to Emergency and Resuscitation Medicine. Students may choose to organise their scientific paper in the form of a systematic review (with meta-analysis), narrative review, retrospective (medical-records) review, or prospective (low-risk) cohort study (e.g. education study).
Students will develop the ability to synthesis and analyse information and data, to break down complex issues and to compare and contrast alternative viewpoints. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing the students' ability to disseminate knowledge at a professional level, with a view towards publication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Islam and the West in the Middle AgesHistoryHST6106Semester 16Yes

Islam and the West in the Middle Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Helen Flatley

Description: In the course of the Middle Ages, Islam and the West came into closer contact through the agencies of frontier societies, trade and cultural interchange, and crusade and holy war. This advanced module explores the forms, representations and outcomes of these interactions in Iberia, southern Italy and the Levantine Crusader States, encouraging students to consider issues of commonality and difference across space and time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesHST_56_A
Cold War America 1945-1975HistoryHST6301Semester 26Yes

Cold War America 1945-1975

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark White

Description: This module will examine the major developments in United States history from the end of the Second World War to Watergate. The issues to be covered include the onset of the Cold War, McCarthyism, civil rights, the Cuban missile crisis, Vietnam, 1960s culture, Watergate, and the institution of the presidency. The roles played by key individuals, such as John Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Richard Nixon, will be explored. Declassified documents will be used in analyzing some of these topics. The module aims to develop students' basic knowledge of this era in American history, to hone their analytical skills, to develop their ability to examine documentation, and to heighten their ability to respond to historiographical debates. Students will develop an understanding of the global impact of American politics, from the Vietnam War to the Civil Rights Movement, and will compare international perspectives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_56_A
Brain and Spinal Cord InjurySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7053Semester 17No

Brain and Spinal Cord Injury

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Grainne Mckenna

Description: This module will cover the pathophysiology of Brain and Spinal Cord injury. The course teaches student to critically evaluate the principles of diagnosis and treatment for patients with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. The material covered will include description of specific type of injuries. Students will discuss cases involving different clinical scenarios. Once completed the students will be able to describe the mechanisms and dysfunction inherent to traumatic brain injury and to outline the key elements of their management. Particular reference is given to the recent scientific literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Critical Care and TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7054Semester 27No

Critical Care and Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Susan Brundage

Description: This module will provide students with a solid background in the rapidly evolving area of critical care. In this module the students will develop an evaluative approach to critical care. Special attention will be given to "hot topics" such as shock therapy, ventilator management, infectious disease. The module will provide students with the latest evidence based in trauma care and the ability to analyze it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Haemorrhage and Response to InjurySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7051Semester 17No

Haemorrhage and Response to Injury

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ross Davenport

Description: This module will provide students with the tools to evaluate different clinical situations and broaden the knowledge on diagnosis and management of shock syndrome. Particular attention will be on the deranged physiology underlying the onset of acute traumatic coagulopathy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Torso TraumaSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7052Semester 27No

Torso Trauma

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chris Alywin

Description: The torso module will focus on the mechanism and pathophysiology of torso injuries. The module seeks to provide students with a more critical knowledge of common patterns for torso injuries and will provide students with the tools to recognise and initiate treatments for the most common and life threatening injuries. This is offered as a compulsory module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Pre-Hospital Care and Mass CasualtiesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7049Semester 37No

Pre-Hospital Care and Mass Casualties

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Harris

Description: Students will learn about a wide range of topics within the pre-hospital care environment, including scene management, critical care interventions, and mass casualty events. Please note, this module does not seek to provide training in pre-hospital care, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to the pre-hospital environment. Students also will gain an understanding of specific issues faced by those who work in the pre-hospital environment. Hospital based practitioners will gain knowledge regarding the types of care that can be provided pre-hospital and how mass casualty events are managed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 7
Trauma: the DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7050Semester 17No

Trauma: the Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elaine Cole

Description: The aim of the module is to provide the knowledge to consider and manage trauma as a disease entity. The module starts with an historical overview of trauma and trauma systems and then proceeds to analyze the different aspects on how to deliver a specialist trauma care, from pre hospital care through the entire patient's care pathway.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation - MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual HistoryHistoryHST7603Full year7No

Dissertation - MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Fitzmaurice

Description: The dissertation for the MA in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 12,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
The Idea of 'the West': A History from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First CenturyHistoryHST6746Full year6No

The Idea of 'the West': A History from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Ashcroft
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: This module analyses the history of different ideas of 'the West' from its earliest uses in the eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century. This history will be studied from the perspective of both 'Western' and `non-Western' thinkers and authors. Students will gain a deep and many-sided mastery of a concept with a long history, which is highly relevant to contemporary debates and ways of thinking, and yet is rarely defined or analysed historically. The main contribution of the module will be to problematise and historicise the concept of the West and show when it emerged, why, and how meanings have changed over the last two centuries. The module is ambitious in its analysis, its geographical and cultural coverage, and its aim to develop students¿ historical perspectives and critical skills. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesHST_6_A
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1789-1890HistoryHST7319Semester 17No

In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1789-1890

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gareth Stedman Jones

Description: This course examines the impact of the French Revolution upon the shape of nineteenth-century political thought. The course demonstrates its central role in the inception of socialism and positivism in the definition of modern Conservatism and in the inhibiting part it played in the development of nineteenth-century liberalism, republicanism and democracy. It goes on to examine how these elements of thought were modified by the emergence of the 'social question' (individualization and the workers movements) and by the experience of the 1848 Revolution. Finally, it examines the growing preoccupation with questions of secularism, social democracy and empire in the 1850's and after. Among the thinkers examined are Condorcet, Constant, De Maistre, Saint-Simon and Proudhon: Mill and Carlyle; Hegel, Marx, Lorenz von Stein and Lasalle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to LiberalismHistoryHST7321Semester 27No

Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella

Description: The module explores attitudes to empire and imperial expansion between the 18th and the 19th century. It will cover debates on empire in Europe and will focus first on Enlightenment attitudes (from Diderot, Herder, Raynal to Adam Smith and Edmund Burke), and then on nineteenth century writers, from Benjamin Constant, to Sismondi, Cattaneo, Mill and Tocqueville. By so doing, the module will discuss at the relationship between ideas of freedom civilisation, culture, international trade and Empire, and will provide an analysis of the meanings of concepts of Empire.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
History from the Margins: Minorities in Early Modern EuropeHistoryHST6759Full year6No

History from the Margins: Minorities in Early Modern Europe

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Liesbeth Corens
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take HST6216
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: Early modern society and culture was not monolithic. Religious, ethnic, and social differences pushed some to the margins of power and influence. Our big historical narratives and consequently our modules are often shaped by history's winners. This module invites students to look at England, Europe, and the world through the lenses of those at the margins. Jews in the Mediterranean, Black Londoners, Moriscos in the Iberian Peninsula, Roma travellers across England, Catholics under Queen Elizabeth, Calvinist exiles from Catholic France, all have their own story to tell and nuance to add to our understanding of the early modern world. This course will consider moments of discrimination as well as of interaction, and study minorities not as victims but search for their agency. Thereby, we put in relief the perspectives historians take on the past, challenge straightforward national stories, and articulate the diverging experiences of past people. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Medicines and Pharmaceutical MarketsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6109Semester 26No

Medicines and Pharmaceutical Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module considers drug discovery and the forms and stages of clinical trials. Examples will be given of the influence of networks of public-private partnership on drug approvals. A further focus will be on the regulation of medicines and how patterns of national and regional pharmaceutical production and supply are affected by international regulation such as TRIPS, TTIP and international institutions such as the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The module will also give a comparative overview of national regulatory standards for the production, quality control, distribution, prescribing of medicines, and systems of pharmacovigilance. It will also cover issues related to access to medicine and identify areas in which the market has failed to meet global health needs. For example no new drugs have been developed since the 1950s for `neglected diseases¿ such as chagas in Latin America and leishmaniasis in Africa, and current drugs for these diseases are prohibitively expensive; at the same time infectious disease in poorer societies remains untreated, and the global market for anti-depressants has grown.

The module will be assessed by an essay that will be linked to a 15 minute formative presentation that will take place during the seminar time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Britain from the 1905 Aliens Act to BrexitHistoryHST6757Full year6No

Race, Ethnicity and Immigration: Britain from the 1905 Aliens Act to Brexit

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Robert Waters
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take HST6700

Description: How has race shaped modern Britain? This module traces the shifting meanings and boundaries of race in Britain between the panic over Jewish immigration at the end of the nineteenth century and the anti-European and Islamophobic politics of the early twenty-first. We will historicize race as a constant but shifting presence in British social, cultural and political life, particularly as it has turned on issues of immigration. The module includes a sustained focus on the importance of black and Asian experiences and political mobilizations for understanding this history, and on the critical perspectives of British black and Asian intellectuals.
This module must be taken in conjunction with HST6700 History Research Dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Medicines and PharmaceuticalsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5004Semester 25No

Medicines and Pharmaceuticals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description: The module will cover the WHO's approach to governing safe and rational access to medicines; international and national regulatory apparatuses; the global drug development and supply chain; and the role of clinical trials in protecting patients before and after drugs have entered the market place. It will explore barriers to access to essential and rational medicines including access to trials data; pricing and patents; health system barriers; and direct to consumer advertising. It will look at government controls over marketing and long term surveillance and pharmacovigilance and why fraudulent behaviour takes place.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5002Semester 15No

Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: This module will be a compulsory module for the 2nd year BSc in Global Health. It builds on the 1st year module 'Introduction to reading, writing and analysis in Global Health' through which the students have developed skills in setting research questions, critical appraisal of multi-disciplinary texts, essay writing, library skills and good academic practice. This module further develops academic research and writing skills, building an awareness of the epistemological basis of different kinds of qualitative and quantitative research, and asking students to then apply this knowledge to critically appraise different approaches and methods in qualitative and quantitative research. Additionally, students will actively use their knowledge by writing a critique of a qualitative or quantitative study on a Global Health topic. This module complements the 1st and 2nd year provision in Epidemiology and Statistics, which trains students in the understanding, appraisal and interpretation of epidemiological research. The module also encourages students to not only begin to evaluate a research method's appropriateness for a study, but also to consider research ethics and to engage in reflexivity as a researcher. As such, this module provides the basis for further methods training that will be taught as part of the 3rd year dissertation module. Also, by critically appraising different approaches and methods in qualitative and qualitative research, students build a firm basis for conducting their own research dissertation at the end of the BSc programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Maternal and Child Health and NutritionSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5003Semester 25Yes

Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: The module will commence with clinical-epidemiological introductions to pregnancy and childbirth, neonatal and infant health, and child health and nutrition. It would go into further detail on skilled birth attendants and access to emergency obstetric care, breastfeeding, approaches to child survival and international child health policy, HIV, and nutrition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 5
Humanities and Social Sciences Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6012Semester 26No

Humanities and Social Sciences Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6011
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Socail Sciencess. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6011 by selecting this sample, designing, piloting and conducting their questionnaires, analysing their findings and writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Research Methods in HSSLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6011Semester 16No

Research Methods in HSS

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Social Sciences. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, a draft chapter, an annotated bibliography and a reflective task. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
English Language and Study SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6000Full year6No

English Language and Study Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Michele King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module encourages student engagement through a blended learning approach, permitting students to demonstrate their independent study skills increasingly to an exit level. The module provides students with a critical understanding of UK academic culture, and motivates them to develop the linguistic, analytical and argumentative skills necessary to succeed on a postgraduate degree programme in both written and spoken work. The module introduces how to incorporate evidence successfully into academic text, and raises awareness regarding issues of plagiarism. Students are exposed to different styles of academic texts within the disciplines of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Finance and Economics, focusing on the development and evaluation of critical argument as well as on linguistic features, such as syntactic and grammatical patterns. The module assessment is both formative and summative and is flexible enough to allow students to develop ideas around their subject specific areas. The portfolio incorporates an extended essay which also externalises the writing process effectively. Students write a series of text responses and demonstrate reading and writing skills to an exit level in two comprehension assessments. In addition, students are assessed in their ability to lead and engage in academic presentations and discussions, using (where appropriate) an online platform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Independent Study ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3020Semester 23No

Independent Study Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3000
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of UK academic culture, and help them develop the linguistic, analytic and argumentative skills, in both written and spoken work, necessary to succeed on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce linguistically sophisticated work which demonstrates a clear line of argumentation. The students will produce a research-based Independent Study Project essay of 3000 words within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. This will be a developmental project, with both formative and summative assessment through a portfolio (including research proposal, annotated bibliography, essay plan, and reflective writing), an oral presentation of the project, and a final draft of the essay. The students will be encouraged to employ strategies to reflect on their writing and its effectiveness. Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Statistics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3012Semester 23No

Statistics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3011
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: Statistics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic statistics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The statistics course focuses on the development of statistics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: measures of the centre, spread, skewness and kurtosis of a distribution, probability and probability distributions (binomial, poisson and normal).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
MarketingLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3019Semester 23No

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with the opportunity to understand and apply key marketing theory and concepts to a variety of products, services, brands and organisations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of marketing including: the marketing process, company and marketing strategy, the market place and consumers, information, buyer behaviour, the marketing mix, branding, product life-cycle, creating value, supply chain, retailing and wholesaling, advertising, PR and Sales, direct marketing, E-Business, ethics and CSR.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read through an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
European and American Art CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3010Semester 23No

European and American Art Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in Art Cinema (European, New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema). It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of art cinema styles and movements, including Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, British and New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema, as well as to key concepts such as auteurism. It will help students to build on and continue to develop skills learned in IFP/IFJ 3009 in analysing films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills and will assist them in the successful completion of the assessments for the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Pure Mathematics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3011Semester 13No

Pure Mathematics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Human GeographyLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3005Semester 13No

Introduction to Human Geography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: This module introduces to students some of the topical themes in Human Geography, explored, for example, through globalisation in relation to the fashion industry, media and communications, migration and citizenship. The concept of local-global is examined with reference to food security and the environment, poverty, development and Aid, and global politics as relevant to understanding nation and identity in the twenty-first century. Throughout the semester, themes are considered through lectures, a field study, documentary screenings, seminar activities and two debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introduction to International RelationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3004Semester 23No

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3003
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over concepts of International Politics. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential theories used to understand International Politics, including Realism, Liberalism and Marxism. It also examines some major issues in International Politics, including war and peace, greater powers and imperialism, and international political economy.
Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Research Methods in Finance and EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6013Semester 26No

Research Methods in Finance and Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, an annotated bibliography, a reflective task and one complete draft chapter. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6005Semester 26No

Introduction to Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: Introduction to Econometrics will introduce the student to regression analysis used in studies that test hypotheses and empirically fit models in economics. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
SMS Placement TutorialMathematical SciencesMTH5200AFull year5No

SMS Placement Tutorial

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module is designed to prepare students to identify and apply for placement as part of their third year of study. It will also support them in being equipped to get maximum benefit from their time out on placement and how to complete the various assessments and reports required.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 5
Film Studies AlternativeLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6004Semester 36No

Film Studies Alternative

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6003
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module builds on IFP6003 / IFJ6003 Film Studies: an Introduction to Hollywood Cinema by examining a number of movements and styles from British, European and Asian cinema, as well as New Hollywood Cinema. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3018Semester 33No

Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3015
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key management theory and practice to a range of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of management including models of management, the environment and cultures of management, managing internationally, corporate responsibility, planning and decision making, strategy, managing structure and people, creativity and innovation, motivation, communication, teams, managing quality and performance, budgetary control.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Film Studies HollywoodLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6003Semester 26No

Film Studies Hollywood

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: The module examines several theoretical aspects of studying film that students will encounter in a core module of an MA Film Studies, including such concepts as how to 'read' a film, cinematic codes, narrative and genre analysis, and various theoretical approaches (narrative, genre, etc). The module will also explore the history of Hollywood cinema from the 1930s to the present day. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to Film StudiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3009Semester 23No

Introduction to Film Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in film studies, and to the history of Classical Hollywood Cinema as well as to some of its major genres. It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of topics, including cinematic codes; mise-en scene; genre; stars; classical Hollywood narrative. It will help students to develop skills in analysing ('reading') films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the assessments for the module, while also preparing them for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3010 Film Studies: Art Cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
European and American Art CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3010Semester 33No

European and American Art Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in Art Cinema (European, New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema). It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of art cinema styles and movements, including Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, British and New Hollywood and contemporary Hollywood cinema, as well as to key concepts such as auteurism. It will help students to build on and continue to develop skills learned in IFP/IFJ 3009 in analysing films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills and will assist them in the successful completion of the assessments for the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to PoliticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3003Semester 23No

Introduction to Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over political concepts. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential terms used to understand politics, including politics, power, states, elitism, pluralism and Marxism. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introduction to International RelationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3004Semester 33No

Introduction to International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3003
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over concepts of International Politics. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential theories used to understand International Politics, including Realism, Liberalism and Marxism. It also examines some major issues in International Politics, including war and peace, greater powers and imperialism, and international political economy.
Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal ScienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM939Full year7No

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal Science

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Dissertation - Clinical Case ReportsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM948Full year7No

Dissertation - Clinical Case Reports

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Alicia Green

Description: In this module students will write up four case reports of patients from their clinical practice. The student should describe the case using skills and knowledge acquired from previous modules. In addition, they will be expected to relate each case to basic science and/or research relevant to the case ( e.g. evidence for treatment, pathology of disease, etc.)
There are several reasons that may make a clinical case interesting for publication which include:
1. Unusual presentations or unknown disease
2. Unusual aetiology for a disease
3. Challenging differential diagnosis
4. Errors in diagnosis, their causes and consequences
5. Unreported or unusual side effects or adverse interactions concerning medications
6. New associations or variations in disease courses
7. Presentations, diagnoses and/or management of new and emerging diseases
8. An unexpected association between diseases or symptoms
9. An unexpected event in the course of observing or treating a patient
10. Findings that give new insight into the possible pathogenesis of a disease or an adverse effect
Case reports should be short, no more than 2000-3000 words with a maximum of 15 references and 3 figures for each case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
The Child with a Respiratory or Cardiovascular ProblemSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7216Semester 27No

The Child with a Respiratory or Cardiovascular Problem

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of specific issues relevant to paediatric respiratory and cardiovascular presentations to the emergency department. During this module students will learn about common respiratory such as asthma, bronchiolitis and croup, before moving on to cardiac presentations including heart murmurs, arrhythmias, hypertension, and chest pain.
Please note, this module does not seek to provide students with clinical training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal InfectionsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM937Semester 27No

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal Infections

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Gender, Sexuality and HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6008Semester 26Yes

Gender, Sexuality and Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: Recent media coverage and debate over female genital mutilation, trafficking, circumcision, gender reassignment, trans issues, and LGBTQI healthcare provision, have moved gender and sexuality to be central issues in health and human rights. Often in public health and medicine, through the adopting of a biomedical model, 'gender' is coupled with 'woman' and heterosexuality assumed. Public and academic debate, though, regularly unpacks, even attacks, these assumptions. This module responds to such shifts and debates, encouraging students to explore contemporary issues around gender, sexuality and health in society through seminars and self-directed research. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate the broad array of potential developments around gender and sexuality in public and global health policy and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Young Infant/Neonate and the AdolescentSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7215Semester 17No

The Young Infant/Neonate and the Adolescent

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.
Students will learn about a range of topics including: the normal baby, neonatal seizures, congenital heart disease, metabolic conditions; and in adolescents - self-harm, pseudoseizures, vaginal bleeding, sexually transmitted diseases, and anxiety + depression.
Please note, this module does not seek to provide students with clinical training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Evidence, Policy and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6007Semester 16No

Evidence, Policy and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Megan Clinch

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and practical / applied public health perspective. The literature covered in the module will draw attention to the nature of social systems that are influenced by a range of socially, culturally and politically mediated factors and variables. Its approach to the study of the social factors that influence health, public health programmes and health policy will differ from, but complement, the teaching and methods of study that are covered in the Epidemiology and Statistics module (ICM6040). Overall the module will develop and strengthen critical appraisal skills and help intercalating students develop a command of the multi-disciplinary field of Global Health. These are skills that will be new, and crucial throughout their studies and in particular during the second semester as students begin to consider their dissertation project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Anthropology and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6006Semester 26No

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall

Description: This module will introduce the students to the ways in which anthropological theory and methods have been used in global health contexts. It will involve the students in the anthropological analyses of health, illness experience and health care. It will demonstrate the ways in which anthropology can contribute to an understanding of global health issues and inform global health programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
Communicable DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5000Semester 15No

Communicable Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Heather Mcmullen

Description: The module will commence by considering epidemiology and global burden of communicable disease. It will go on to take specific examples - HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, neglected tropical diseases, flu and pandemic flu, food poisoning and outbreak management, and vaccine-preventable diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Non-Communicable DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH5001Semester 15No

Non-Communicable Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valentina Gallo

Description: After an overview of epidemiology and global burden of non-communicable disease, the module considers disease case studies such as diabetes, heart disease, obesity, smoking, lung cancer and chronic respiratory disease, breast cancer and screening, and cervical cancer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Contemporary Issues in Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6010Semester 26No

Contemporary Issues in Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6009
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module builds on IFP/IFJ6009 Introduction to Business and Management by developing students' analytical and problem solving skills, through the examination of challenging contemporary issues within Business. Students will analyse and comment on Business issues in essays, reports and presentations to the level that will lead to potential success on a range of masters degree programmes in the School of Business and Management.

Students will also be taken on external visits to encourage the application of theoretical knowledge in real life situations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 2: Application and AnalysisLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6018Semester 26No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 2: Application and Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alexander Blanchard
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6017
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module introduces students to the study of international politics. The main objective of this course is to offer a comprehensive and critical overview of politics on a global scale. Having taken International Politics 1: ideas and concepts, students will build upon and apply their knowledge to case studies. The course will survey a range of topics including war, conflict, peace and intervention; the global economy; security studies and the environment. This module will also pay close attention to understanding how historical legacies continue to shape current global issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
FinanceLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6008Semester 26No

Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6007
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will introduce students to the basic principles of finance and investment. Finance is essentially about pricing, but the essentials of corporate and international finance will also be covered. There will be an introduction to the theory of financial markets and their regulation, and a brief look at the concept of market efficiency. However, most of the focus will be concentrated on the relationship between risk and return, the principles behind portfolio evaluation, the behaviour of asset prices and the role of institutions and trading systems in modern financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6009Semester 16No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Berlin Asong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module provides students an appreciation of the operations of organisations and functions of management. It introduces students to principles and models of and developments in management. The module explores the behaviour of organisations and their interactions with the industry, national and global environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Japanese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4041Semester 13No

Japanese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
Overlap: LAN4041
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese.

Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.

In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics. They will learn the Hiragana and Katakana scripts and around 30 kanji (Chinese characters).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 3
Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4051Semester 14No

Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4051, LAN4050"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy. The overall desired outcome is for learners to acquire a basic level of the language to cope effectively with a range of commonly occurring circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is built around written and audio texts and tasks, designed to develop and enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Arabic, and they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 4
The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP3023Semester 13No

The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK from the beginning of the twentieth century to 1955. It examines key political, economic, ideological, diplomatic and military events and developments during the period.

In addition, the module will help students develop skills in interpreting and assessing evidence, and in effective writing and oral presentation. To this end, two weeks of the module address issues of research and methodology specific to the academic discipline of History. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the module assessments, while also preparing students for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3024 The History of the UK since 1956.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
The History of the UK since 1956Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP3024Semester 23No

The History of the UK since 1956

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3023
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK since the Suez Crisis of 1956. It examines key political, economic, and diplomatic events and developments during the period. It also addresses cultural and social changes during the second half of the twentieth century and considers their impact upon the contemporary United Kingdom.
In addition, and continuing the process begun in module IFP/IFJ3023 The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955, the module will help students develop further their skills in interpreting and assessing evidence and presenting their informed conclusions orally and in writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4001Semester 14No

German Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: "LAN4000, LAN4006"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy. The overall desired outcome is for learners to acquire a basic level of the language to cope effectively with a range of commonly occurring circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is built around written and audio texts and tasks, designed to develop and enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German and they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 4
ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3018Semester 23No

Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3015
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key management theory and practice to a range of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of management including models of management, the environment and cultures of management, managing internationally, corporate responsibility, planning and decision making, strategy, managing structure and people, creativity and innovation, motivation, communication, teams, managing quality and performance, budgetary control.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and ConceptsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6017Semester 16No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alexander Blanchard
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module introduces students, who may not have English as their first language, to modern political ideas and to international relations. It examines general issues such as: What is politics about? Why and how do we study Politics? What kinds of ideas and institutions is politics concerned with? It examines key concepts which inform political debate and the historical development of such key concepts. Political ideas and concepts to be studied include the state, the nation, race, ideologies, citizenship and democracy. Students will also examine key political ideologies in detail. Ideologies to be studied will include Marxism, feminism, liberalism, conservatism and socialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to Film StudiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3009Semester 13No

Introduction to Film Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: This module gives students a broad introduction to some of the main issues and concepts in film studies, and to the history of Classical Hollywood Cinema as well as to some of its major genres. It provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills in relation to written texts as well as to films.

The module introduces a range of topics, including cinematic codes; mise-en scene; genre; stars; classical Hollywood narrative. It will help students to develop skills in analysing ('reading') films, in academic reading and writing as well as in oral presentation and seminar skills. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the assessments for the module, while also preparing them for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3010 Film Studies: Art Cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to PoliticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3003Semester 13No

Introduction to Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis and writing skills needed to understand debates over political concepts. It provides an introduction to debate on some of the essential terms used to understand politics, including politics, power, states, elitism, pluralism and Marxism. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Students will be required to prepare for lectures and seminars by reading and writing. Students will be required to read from a range of sources, including handouts and academic critiques to prepare for the lecture and the seminar. They will also be required to complete a range of written tasks related to their reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Humanities and Social Sciences Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6012Semester 36No

Humanities and Social Sciences Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6011
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Socail Sciencess. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6011 by selecting this sample, designing, piloting and conducting their questionnaires, analysing their findings and writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
English Language and Study SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3000Semester 13No

English Language and Study Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to UK academic culture, and help them acquire the linguistic and academic skills (both oral and written) that will provide a foundation for future success on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce work of the requisite linguistic and academic standard for undergraduate study, focusing in particular on linguistic (syntactic and grammatical) patterns and use of synonymy in academic writing, and cohesion and coherence in essays, with assessment through both course work and exam. Students will write a timed exam essay of 500-600 words and a longer 1500 word Extended Essay as course work within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. The module will include a Portfolio as course work which provides the opportunity for reflection and review/redrafting of writing . Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Research Methods in HSSLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6011Semester 26No

Research Methods in HSS

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Humanities and Social Sciences. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, a draft chapter, an annotated bibliography and a reflective task. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
English Language and Study SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6000Full year6No

English Language and Study Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Michele King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module encourages student engagement through a blended learning approach, permitting students to demonstrate their independent study skills increasingly to an exit level. The module provides students with a critical understanding of UK academic culture, and motivates them to develop the linguistic, analytical and argumentative skills necessary to succeed on a postgraduate degree programme in both written and spoken work. The module introduces how to incorporate evidence successfully into academic text, and raises awareness regarding issues of plagiarism. Students are exposed to different styles of academic texts within the disciplines of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Finance and Economics, focusing on the development and evaluation of critical argument as well as on linguistic features, such as syntactic and grammatical patterns. The module assessment is both formative and summative and is flexible enough to allow students to develop ideas around their subject specific areas. The portfolio incorporates an extended essay which also externalises the writing process effectively. Students write a series of text responses and demonstrate reading and writing skills to an exit level in two comprehension assessments. In addition, students are assessed in their ability to lead and engage in academic presentations and discussions, using (where appropriate) an online platform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Accounting for Business DecisionsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3017Semester 23No

Accounting for Business Decisions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key management accounting theory and concepts to decision making for a variety of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of
Costing, Budgeting, Absorption costing, Marginal costing, Cost-Volume-Profit analysis (Break Even analysis). All with the aim of enhancing student understanding and appreciation in business decision making.


Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of interactive activities. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook. The students will be encouraged to discuss and analyse tasks in lectures and seminars.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Applied Mathematics for BusinessLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3016Semester 23No

Applied Mathematics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nageena Frost
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Accounting, Business and Management or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any Business degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Accounting for Business DecisionsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3017Semester 33No

Accounting for Business Decisions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nageena Frost
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key management accounting theory and concepts to decision making for a variety of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of
Costing, Budgeting, Absorption costing, Marginal costing, Cost-Volume-Profit analysis (Break Even analysis). All with the aim of enhancing student understanding and appreciation in business decision making.


Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of interactive activities. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook. The students will be encouraged to discuss and analyse tasks in lectures and seminars.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
English Language and Study SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3000Semester 23No

English Language and Study Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to UK academic culture, and help them acquire the linguistic and academic skills (both oral and written) that will provide a foundation for future success on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce work of the requisite linguistic and academic standard for undergraduate study, focusing in particular on linguistic (syntactic and grammatical) patterns and use of synonymy in academic writing, and cohesion and coherence in essays, with assessment through both course work and exam. Students will write a timed exam essay of 500-600 words and a longer 1500 word Extended Essay as course work within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. The module will include a Portfolio as course work which provides the opportunity for reflection and review/redrafting of writing . Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introduction to American LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3008Semester 33No

Introduction to American Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3007
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to:

- The twentieth-century American short story, including stories by Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, Edith Wharton, Dorothy Parker, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Tennessee Williams, John Cheever, Richard Yates, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, Alice Walker, Raymond Carver, Jayne Anne Phillips, Ann Beattie, Don DeLillo, A.M. Homes, Lorrie Moore and Eric Puchner.
- Early to late twentieth-century fiction including novels by F. Scott IF3009Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Carson McCullers, J.D. Salinger,Saul Bellow, John Updike, Jay McInerney, Bret Easton Ellis, Anne Tyler and E. Annie Proulx.

Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM936Semester 27No

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Sifrim

Description: This is an advanced course in the field of neurogastroenterology including the application of basic science and research to the problems seen in the clinics. Part of the module includes teaching and experience of complex diagnostic techniques within a GI physiology unit, such as oesophageal and small bowel manometry, high-resolution manometry, impedance, nuclear medicine techniques etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal ScienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM947Full year7No

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal Science

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Human Rights and Public HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6004Semester 26No

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang

Description: This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM935Semester 27No

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal Diseases

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Parveen Kumar

Description: This is a comprehensive course on all aspects of adult luminal gastroenterology, excluding functional gastrointestinal diseases. There is a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Globalisation and Contemporary Medical EthicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6002Semester 26Yes

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amos Miran Epstein

Description: The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics: (i)consent and consensus, (ii) medical confidentiality, (iii) the discourse on distributive justice, (iv) human and animal research ethics, (v) end-of-life ethics, (vi)transplant ethics, (vii)reproductive ethics. The introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6003Full year6No

Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary Care

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy

Description: This core module on the BSc Global Public Health and Primary Care offers students the opportunity to pursue a topic of interest in depth and produce a critical and scholarly review of the literature. Students will select a project from a range on offer, mostly from supervisors in the Centre for Public Health and Primary Care, though some from other Institutes with QMUL may be available. Students may be allowed to devise their own project, and/or include analysis of raw data, through discussion with a supervisor. Projects will be supported by a series of seminars covering critical evaluation, literature searching, presentation and writing skills. Students will acquire skills in developing, planning, organising and focusing a project as they work on a one to one basis with their supervisor. They will also acquire skills in searching, critically appraising, summarising and synthesising the literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6007Semester 16No

Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will equip students with the standard methods and analytical tools of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, with emphasis on the relationship between the decisions of individual agents, the operation of markets and the general state of the economy. The microeconomics component will analyse the nature of competition a firm faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, while the macroeconomics one will focus on growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmIFP4021Semester 13No

Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
Overlap: LAN4021
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish.

Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.

In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 3
Topics in EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6006Semester 26No

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeenat Soobedar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6005
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: Topics to Econometrics will extend the student's knowledge of regression analysis to topics in time series, panel data analysis and instrumental variables. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate advanced applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of time series regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Retheorising Global DevelopmentGeographyGEG7137Semester 17Yes

Retheorising Global Development

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta

Description: This module will provide the theoretical framework underpinning all the modules for this programme. Teaching will be divided into 4 blocks each examining key substantive themes: (i) Hybrid worlds seminars will introduce students to key debates challenging the academic and disciplinary divides between economic and development geography. In particular these seminars will challenge the representation of the global South as a collection of people and places in need of development intervention and where geographic theory and knowledge travels to, and the economy as only operating in and through advanced economies. These seminars will encourage students to challenge these boundaries and recognise an increasingly interconnected global South and North. (ii) Gendered development futures seminars will focus on the gendered history of development highlighting the critical junctures at which the discipline has been engendered. It will introduce students to key gender and development theories and approaches and the changing nature and politics of gender scholarship. (iii) Citizenship, justice and democracy will focus on questions of contemporary citizenships and their position with regards to democracy and rights. Detailing feminist and postcolonial frameworks, it will highlight the uneven geographies and experiences of democracy, citizenship and rights. (iv) Transnational migration and mobilities will introduce students to contemporary theoretical approaches to migration and mobility focusing particularly on transnational theory. Unpacking the complex mobilities of people, commodities and money, these seminars will particularly focus on migrant remittances illustrating the increasingly contested nature of these flows in relation to the migration-development nexus and the 'financialisation of development'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Finance and Economics Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6014Semester 26No

Finance and Economics Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6013
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6013 by choosing their conceptual framework, building and testing their model and their writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Introduction to English LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3007Semester 13No

Introduction to English Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to some of the most important British writers, novels, short stories and poetry from mid nineteenth to mid twentieth century, including works by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Louis Stevenson, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, T.S. Eliot, Ford Maddox Ford, Jean Rhys, George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, L.P. Hartley and J.G. Ballard.
Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Introduction to American LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3008Semester 23No

Introduction to American Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3007
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to:

- The twentieth-century American short story, including stories by Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, Edith Wharton, Dorothy Parker, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Tennessee Williams, John Cheever, Richard Yates, Joyce Carol Oates, Grace Paley, Alice Walker, Raymond Carver, Jayne Anne Phillips, Ann Beattie, Don DeLillo, A.M. Homes, Lorrie Moore and Eric Puchner.
- Early to late twentieth-century fiction including novels by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Carson McCullers, J.D. Salinger,Saul Bellow, John Updike, Jay McInerney, Bret Easton Ellis, Anne Tyler and E. Annie Proulx.

Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Applied Mathematics for BusinessLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3016Semester 13No

Applied Mathematics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Accounting, Business and Management or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any Business degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives. Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work. Before each session, students will be asked to read from pre-specified chapters of the essential reading textbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and ConceptsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6017Semester 26No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 1: Ideas and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alexander Blanchard
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module introduces students, who may not have English as their first language, to modern political ideas and to international relations. It examines general issues such as: What is politics about? Why and how do we study Politics? What kinds of ideas and institutions is politics concerned with? It examines key concepts which inform political debate and the historical development of such key concepts. Political ideas and concepts to be studied include the state, the nation, race, ideologies, citizenship and democracy. Students will also examine key political ideologies in detail. Ideologies to be studied will include Marxism, feminism, liberalism, conservatism and socialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introduction to Politics and International Relations 2: Application and AnalysisLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6018Semester 36No

Introduction to Politics and International Relations 2: Application and Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nageena Frost
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6017
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module introduces students to the study of international politics. The main objective of this course is to offer a comprehensive and critical overview of politics on a global scale. Having taken International Politics 1: ideas and concepts, students will build upon and apply their knowledge to case studies. The course will survey a range of topics including war, conflict, peace and intervention; the global economy; security studies and the environment. This module will also pay close attention to understanding how historical legacies continue to shape current global issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Past Environmental ChangeGeographyGEG5229Semester 15No

Past Environmental Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take GEG4209

Description: This module investigates the nature and causes of the major climatic fluctuations of the last 2.5 million years at global to local scales and from million year to decadal timescales. The module explores the varied records of past environmental change, the evidence used to reconstruct and understand past environments and the response of the terrestrial, ocean and ice sheet systems and biota - including humans - to climate change. It integrates perspectives from different disciplines such as sedimentology, palaeontology, oceanography and archaeology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Fragile EnvironmentsGeographyGEG5231Semester 25No

Fragile Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG6231 or take GEG5150

Description: Marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments are increasingly subject to changing external stressors, including climate change, pollution, land-use and resource consumption. Examining the impact of multiple stressors, this module integrates physical, chemical, and biological understanding to explore the history and modification of environmental settings, why they are considered to be fragile, and how fragile environments and landscapes can be understood, assessed, managed and restored.
The module will be delivered through a residential overseas or UK field trip to visit fragile environments; the specific field location will be announced in advance each year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955Languages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3023Semester 23No

The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK from the beginning of the twentieth century to 1955. It examines key political, economic, ideological, diplomatic and military events and developments during the period.

In addition, the module will help students develop skills in interpreting and assessing evidence, and in effective writing and oral presentation. To this end, two weeks of the module address issues of research and methodology specific to the academic discipline of History. This developmental approach will assist students in the successful completion of the module assessments, while also preparing students for the assessment demands of module IFP/IFJ3024 The History of the UK since 1956.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3015Semester 13No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key business theory and concepts to a variety of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of business including Leadership and Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, I.T., the Internal and External Business Environment, Strategy, Operations Management and Project Management.

Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
MacroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3014Semester 33No

Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3013
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: Macroeconomics studies the interaction of different parts of the economy. It stresses broad aggregates, such as the total demand for goods by households or total spending on machinery and building by firms. The full attention, however, will be on the big picture that is the big issues that affect the economy - growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introduction to Business and ManagementLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3015Semester 23No

Introduction to Business and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to understand and apply key business theory and concepts to a variety of contemporary organizations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of business including Leadership and Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, I.T., the Internal and External Business Environment, Strategy, Operations Management and Project Management.

Each week, there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
The Human Geography of LondonLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3006Semester 33No

The Human Geography of London

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3005
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: On the front cover of this module outline is a montage of photographs of Stratford in East London, the former location of the London Olympic Games 2012. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, as it is now known, is located very near to Queen Mary University of London and in a town where people live, work, attend school and college, worship, shop and conduct their daily lives. Improving the local economy of a very poor part of London was one of the major reasons why the Olympic Park was constructed in Stratford, to generate employment, more housing and enable young people living there to have more access to sport and leisure facilities; the idea was to raise a poorer neighbourhood socially and economically. Human Geography is concerned about this kind of aspiration for neighbourhoods, its research being focused particularly on issues of inequality. The fact that the former London Olympic Park is situated in one of the most multicultural parts of London is also of significance to Human Geographers, not just with regard to their livelihoods but also their culture. Human Geography is the study of people, places and plans.In this second semester, in relation to London as a city, we apply some of the geographies we learned in the first semester and we explore other geographies that will enable us to understand London's global connections as well as our experiencing of London. For example, in Weeks 9 and 10, we examine the contribution of migrants to London especially as a hidden work force. During the semester, there are four virtual field studies: in Week 3, a walk in Brick Lane where we explore this area's history of migration over three hundred years and the signs of changes that suggest new urban mobilities; in Week 6, a walk in Stratford to consider there the regeneration legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games; in Week 11, a walk in the City of London where we learn about the Great Recession of 2008 and its impact on London's economy; in Week 12, a walk around Trafalgar Square to consider previous historic themes of the module as they relate to this space as well as political and cultural themes that the Square resonates. Through these virtual field studies students learn about the London that is often invisible to the tourist eye.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introduction to English LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3007Semester 23No

Introduction to English Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: The module provides students with opportunities to develop textual analysis skills within different literary forms and styles. It provides an introduction to some of the most important British writers, novels, short stories and poetry from mid nineteenth to mid twentieth century, including works by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Louis Stevenson, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, T.S. Eliot, Ford Maddox Ford, Jean Rhys, George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, L.P. Hartley and J.G. Ballard.
Each week, there will be a lecture together with a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work and whole class discussion. Before each session, students will be asked to read a handout and an academic critique on the primary text(s) to prepare for the lecture and the seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal InfectionsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM945Semester 27No

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal Infections

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft

Description: This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Geography in the WorldGeographyGEG4003Semester 14No

Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash

Description: This module explores geography as a `worldly¿ subject, both part of and shaped by the wider world, and engaged with key social and environmental issues. We consider the interconnection of society and the environment, addressing key themes such as natural hazards, environmental justice and the climate crisis. Developing a critical geographical perspective on urgent environmental and social issues means considering how geography¿s imperial origins have shaped the subject and are being addressed in on-going efforts to decolonise geography. We consider the use of cartography by powerful groups and maps as tools of resistance and empowerment by marginal groups, including indigenous people, to explore different sorts of geographical knowledges and relationships between knowledge and power. The module thus opens up questions about the politics of knowledge making and considers how racial and other forms of injustice and inequality are being addressed in geography. We apply this critical perspective to address pressing environmental and social issues in the contemporary world, such as: environmental justice and environmental racism; climate change; public space; access to nature; housing injustice; slope stability; political borders and migration; flooding and flood risk; and population growth and control. The module will include a virtual field trip to the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).

The Module aims to:
¿ Provide students with a critical geographical perspective for addressing key social and environmental issues, including environmental and climate justice.
¿ Provide knowledge and understanding of the key dimensions of contemporary environmental and social issues and how they are being addressed by geographers and within wider society by governments, institutions and activist groups
¿ Encourage an understanding of how critical perspectives on the origins and development of geography inform the discipline¿s focus on issues of racial and other forms of inequality and injustice."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM933Semester 17No

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal Disease

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ping Wang

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic science of gastroenterology. It covers the anatomy, embryology, histology, immunology, physiology (pharmacology and neuroscience), cell biology and genetics of gut function. In addition, lectures focus on research methodologies allowing students to appraise the evidence base underpinning the taught content. Important study skills such as drafting an essay, critical appraisal and referencing, are also covered allowing the students to write an essay or other long documents, with referencing (for examples using endnote).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Liver and Pancreatic DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM934Semester 17No

Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Graham Foster

Description: This module provides the students with a comprehensive overview of the study of liver and pancreatic diseases in adults, with a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Topics: Causes of liver disease (alcohol, drugs). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. HCV. HBV. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Virological assays. Liver histology. Liver cancer - surgical aspects and chemotherapy. New drugs for viral hepatitis. Liver and HIV. Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. How interferon works. Benign liver lesions. Liver disease in children. Imaging of the liver

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM944Semester 27No

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Sifrim

Description: This is an advanced course in the field of neurogastroenterology including the application of basic science and research to the problems seen in the clinics. Part of the module includes teaching and experience of complex diagnostic techniques within a GI physiology unit, such as oesophageal and small bowel manometry, high-resolution manometry, impedance, nuclear medicine techniques etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Directing FictionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7212Semester 27No

Directing Fiction

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Over the course of 12 weeks, this module requires students to form small production groups to develop and produce a festival-ready short film. Each week they are asked to create presentations that show a different stage in the production process. Taking them from development, through to the finished film. They learn the importance of research and process. The module is broken up between whole class lectures, student presentations and a series of small group meetings with the tutor to facilitate their journey.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Film Studies 2Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM7211Semester 27No

Film Studies 2

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The second part of the Film Studies course continues to delve into some of the most pressing and current questions of the discipline, while also being accessible to students who did not take the first part. We begin by looking at alternative filmic practices, from structural film¿s exploration of the elements of the medium to contemporary amateur practices. Cinema possesses the potential to deploy strategies to break binary representations: mainstream and marginal, human and non-human, self and other, dominant and dispossessed. We therefore look at the relationship of film and the nonhuman, explored through problematizing the notion of `landscape¿, iconic images of the nonhuman, and film¿s relationship with animals through the notion of vegan cinema. Approaching film as a recording device arguably foregrounds the ethical dimensions of the medium if it is thought of as type of witnessing. Finally, we consider the way cinema is shaped by as well as shapes history, moves through transnational spaces as well as becomes embedded in certain national contexts, and engage in decolonial perspectives on cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Feminist Film PhilosophyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7209Semester 27No

Feminist Film Philosophy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Lucy Bolton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Feminist Film Philosophy examines the relationships between feminist thinkers and film from a variety of perspectives. Tracing the history of women's critical writing about film in terms of aesthetics, ethics, politics and filmmaking, the module develops a sustained engagement between women and conceptual, philosophical questions prompted by film. This will range from Maya Deren and Virginia Woolf, to Luce Irigaray and Iris Murdoch; Kathleen Collins and Sally Potter, to bell hooks and Audre Lorde. The module will draw on a range of filmmakers , feminisms and philosophers in order to explore the various ways in which philosophy and film can be brought together to create a distinctive strand of feminist film philosophy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Film Studies 1Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM7210Semester 17No

Film Studies 1

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The first part of the Film Studies course provides an in-depth foundation in the discipline and its nuances. It examines the many ways in which a century of cinema has shaped our experience of space, time and reality. We analyse the spatio-temporal world of the film as a language organized through shot composition, mise-en-scene, art direction, production design, editing, sound, on screen and off screen space, deployed to dfferent effect across film forms and national contexts. Of all the modern arts, it is perhaps film that has been the most concerned with the many qualities of time. Central to the temporality of film are critical issues of whether film constructs or reveals the world, conveys or distorts 'real time', emancipates alternative identities, acts as interpretive interface between life and death, and whether idneed it suggsts or condemns the possibility of a shared collective time. We then consider various perspectives on film's relationship with the world through ethics, actuality, nonfiction filmmaking and iconic images.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM943Semester 27No

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal Diseases

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Parveen Kumar

Description: This is a comprehensive course on all aspects of adult luminal gastroenterology, excluding functional gastrointestinal diseases. There is a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Production Design: History, Theory, CraftLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7207Semester 17No

Production Design: History, Theory, Craft

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sue Harris
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the creative practice of production design in cinema, specifically in relation to architectural construction and set design. It takes a historical approach to design as an industrial practice shaped by technology, artistic and design movements, and the discipline of architecture. It proposes critical approaches founded in theory and practice to find ways of analysing film decor and identifying how it contributes to our understanding of film texts. The artistic and technical challenges posed by film design will be examined though close case study work and the completion of a 4,000 word essay.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Film Studies AlternativeLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6004Semester 26No

Film Studies Alternative

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP6003
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module builds on IFP6003 / IFJ6003 Film Studies: an Introduction to Hollywood Cinema by examining a number of movements and styles from British, European and Asian cinema, as well as New Hollywood Cinema. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Introduction to EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6005Semester 16No

Introduction to Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: Introduction to Econometrics will introduce the student to regression analysis used in studies that test hypotheses and empirically fit models in economics. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Research Methods in Finance and EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6013Semester 16No

Research Methods in Finance and Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will learn about the requirements of research at masters level, from learning to read critically, to choosing and selecting literature from the field, to narrowing down a topic area and designing their methodology, to writing a research proposal. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a research proposal, an annotated bibliography, a reflective task and one complete draft chapter. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback on their written work and also on their research design and general interaction with the research process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
French Language and Culture I (a) for IFPLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP4011Semester 13No

French Language and Culture I (a) for IFP

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi
Overlap: LAN4011
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French .

Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.

In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 3
Film Studies HollywoodLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP6003Semester 16No

Film Studies Hollywood

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP6000

Description: The module examines several theoretical aspects of studying film that students will encounter in a core module of an MA Film Studies, including such concepts as how to 'read' a film, cinematic codes, narrative and genre analysis, and various theoretical approaches (narrative, genre, etc). The module will also explore the history of Hollywood cinema from the 1930s to the present day. Students will analyse and comment on film in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on an MA in Film Studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Research Design and MethodsGeographyGEG7135Semester 27No

Research Design and Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff

Description: Research Design and Methods provides students with information about a range of research methods including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), creating online surveys, archival research, using film, interviewing and ethnography. In addition, students are provided with information about research design and the importance of ethical considerations. The module builds up to students producing their own research proposal that anticipates their dissertation research over the coming months.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Health, Governance and LawSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7012Semester 27No

Global Health, Governance and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jonathan Kennedy

Description: The protection of public health at the national and subnational level often depends significantly on various decisions made at the international or global level by regimes, including those related to trade, finance, law, diplomacy and inter-governmental relations. Such regimes can have a profound impact on the determinants of health as experienced within countries, at the national and local levels, and have become increasingly important as a result of ever-deepening forms of `globalisation¿ and the threat of global hazards to health such as large-scale global environmental change. This module provides an introduction to the disciplines of international relations, international politics, international jurisprudence, globalization and global governance as they relate to global health. It will examine the content and operation of various supra-national policy instruments, structures, institutions and processes, and place these within the context of the right to health and contemporary controversies and topical issues being confronted by the global health community.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
MacroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3014Semester 23No

Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3013
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: Macroeconomics studies the interaction of different parts of the economy. It stresses broad aggregates, such as the total demand for goods by households or total spending on machinery and building by firms. The full attention, however, will be on the big picture that is the big issues that affect the economy - growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Global working livesGeographyGEG7131Semester 17Yes

Global working lives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith

Description: The module explores the economic-development geographies of people's everyday struggles to make a living in the contemporary global economy. Drawing on research within and across the Global North and Global South, this module engages with an exciting 'labour geographies' research agenda, concerned with how workers are capable of fashioning the geography of capitalism to suit their own needs and self-production; and to identify geographical possibilities and labour market strategies through which 'workers may challenge, outmaneuver and perhaps even beat capital' in different locations. The module seeks to expose the spatial limits of mainstream 'universal' theories in geography which presume that 'the economy' and 'labour' can be theorised solely from the perspective of the formal spaces of advanced capitalist economies in the global North.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Human Geography of LondonLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3006Semester 23No

The Human Geography of London

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFP3005
Corequisite: IFP3020

Description: On the front cover of this module outline is a montage of photographs of Stratford in East London, the former location of the London Olympic Games 2012. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, as it is now known, is located very near to Queen Mary University of London and in a town where people live, work, attend school and college, worship, shop and conduct their daily lives. Improving the local economy of a very poor part of London was one of the major reasons why the Olympic Park was constructed in Stratford, to generate employment, more housing and enable young people living there to have more access to sport and leisure facilities; the idea was to raise a poorer neighbourhood socially and economically. Human Geography is concerned about this kind of aspiration for neighbourhoods, its research being focused particularly on issues of inequality. The fact that the former London Olympic Park is situated in one of the most multicultural parts of London is also of significance to Human Geographers, not just with regard to their livelihoods but also their culture. Human Geography is the study of people, places and plans.In this second semester, in relation to London as a city, we apply some of the geographies we learned in the first semester and we explore other geographies that will enable us to understand London's global connections as well as our experiencing of London. For example, in Weeks 9 and 10, we examine the contribution of migrants to London especially as a hidden work force. During the semester, there are four virtual field studies: in Week 3, a walk in Brick Lane where we explore this area's history of migration over three hundred years and the signs of changes that suggest new urban mobilities; in Week 6, a walk in Stratford to consider there the regeneration legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games; in Week 11, a walk in the City of London where we learn about the Great Recession of 2008 and its impact on London's economy; in Week 12, a walk around Trafalgar Square to consider previous historic themes of the module as they relate to this space as well as political and cultural themes that the Square resonates. Through these virtual field studies students learn about the London that is often invisible to the tourist eye.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
MicroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFP3013Semester 13No

Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFP3000

Description: Microeconomics studies in detail the demand behaviour of consumers and the supply contact of producers, showing how markets work and why different markets exhibit different forms of performance. It analyses the external environment in which a firm operates that is the nature of competition it faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, the general state of the economy and the global environment, and how consumers respond to all these inputs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
Finance and Economics Independent Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6014Semester 36No

Finance and Economics Independent Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennefer Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6013
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will provide students with the background knowledge and skills needed for the successful completion of a piece of empirical research in the field of Finance & Economics. Students will build upon skills and knowledge learnt in IFP/IFJ6013 by choosing their conceptual framework, building and testing their model and their writing up their findings in a 5,000 word report. The module is a collaborative module and students will be taught by members of staff from SLLF and from SEF . Students will be assessed by coursework only, consisting of a 5,000 word written report and a 10 minute individual presentation. Marks will be allocated by tutors in both schools, although more of the assessment weighting will be awarded by SLLF, the host school. Students will be provided with regular formative feedback in the form of tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Ecosystem ScienceGeographyGEG5224Semester 25Yes

Ecosystem Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell

Description: This module explores the fundamental environmental units: ecosystems. We use biological and physical science perspectives to examine the geographical distribution of ecosystems and to understand the principles and processes governing their structure and function. We study the exchange of materials and energy between biotic and abiotic ecosystem components, focusing on water and carbon cycles. We apply biogeoscience perspectives when interpreting how ecosystems change in response to internal system processes, environmental change, natural disturbance events and human activities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
GeomorphologyGeographyGEG5225Semester 15Yes

Geomorphology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take GEG4209

Description: This module introduces key concepts in geomorphology, exploring fundamental processes driving the development of landforms on Earth and other planetary surfaces. It considers geomorphological systems and processes ranging from the uplift of mountains and gravity-driven mass movement to sediment transport processes in river channels. The module will include discussion of key drivers (e.g. energy, weathering processes) as well as fundamental concepts such as equilibrium, thresholds, complexity, equifinality, feedbacks and magnitude-frequency relationships, through integrated lectures and practical modelling work.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
MarketingLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3019Semester 33No

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Deborah Hamer-Acquaah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: The module provides students with the opportunity to understand and apply key marketing theory and concepts to a variety of products, services, brands and organisations. It provides an introduction to some of the key topics and areas of marketing including: the marketing process, company and marketing strategy, the market place and consumers, information, buyer behaviour, the marketing mix, branding, product life-cycle, creating value, supply chain, retailing and wholesaling, advertising, PR and Sales, direct marketing, E-Business, ethics and CSR.

Each week there will be a lecture and a seminar. Students will be encouraged to contribute to seminars through pair work, group work, discussion, presentation and completion of case studies. Before each session, students will be asked to read through an article, news item or academic critique on the relevant topic to prepare for the lecture and seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 3
Independent Study ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3020Semester 33No

Independent Study Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3000
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide students with an understanding of UK academic culture, and help them develop the linguistic, analytic and argumentative skills, in both written and spoken work, necessary to succeed on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce linguistically sophisticated work which demonstrates a clear line of argumentation. The students will produce a research-based Independent Study Project essay of 3000 words within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. This will be a developmental project, with both formative and summative assessment through a portfolio (including research proposal, annotated bibliography, essay plan, and reflective writing), an oral presentation of the project, and a final draft of the essay. The students will be encouraged to employ strategies to reflect on their writing and its effectiveness. Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Statistics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3012Semester 33No

Statistics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3011
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: Statistics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic statistics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The statistics course focuses on the development of statistics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: measures of the centre, spread, skewness and kurtosis of a distribution, probability and probability distributions (binomial, poisson and normal).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
MicroeconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3013Semester 23No

Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: Microeconomics studies in detail the demand behaviour of consumers and the supply contact of producers, showing how markets work and why different markets exhibit different forms of performance. It analyses the external environment in which a firm operates that is the nature of competition it faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, the general state of the economy and the global environment, and how consumers respond to all these inputs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
The History of the UK since 1956Languages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3024Semester 33No

The History of the UK since 1956

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jack Mcgowan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ3023
Corequisite: IFJ3020

Description: This module is a broad survey of the history of the UK since the Suez Crisis of 1956. It examines key political, economic, and diplomatic events and developments during the period. It also addresses cultural and social changes during the second half of the twentieth century and considers their impact upon the contemporary United Kingdom.
In addition, and continuing the process begun in module IFP/IFJ3023 The History of the UK from 1900 to 1955, the module will help students develop further their skills in interpreting and assessing evidence and presenting their informed conclusions orally and in writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introduction to Human GeographyLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3005Semester 23No

Introduction to Human Geography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jill Fenton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: This module introduces to students some of the topical themes in Human Geography, explored, for example, through globalisation in relation to the fashion industry, media and communications, migration and citizenship. The concept of local-global is examined with reference to food security and the environment, poverty, development and Aid, and global politics as relevant to understanding nation and identity in the twenty-first century. Throughout the semester, themes are considered through lectures, a field study, documentary screenings, seminar activities and two debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Liver and Pancreatic DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM942Semester 17No

Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Graham Foster

Description: This module provides the students with a comprehensive overview of the study of liver and pancreatic diseases in adults, with a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Topics: Causes of liver disease (alcohol, drugs). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. HCV. HBV. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Virological assays. Liver histology. Liver cancer - surgical aspects and chemotherapy. New drugs for viral hepatitis. Liver and HIV. Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. How interferon works. Benign liver lesions. Liver disease in children. Imaging of the liver

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Topics in EconometricsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6006Semester 36No

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IFJ6005
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: Topics to Econometrics will extend the student's knowledge of regression analysis to topics in time series, panel data analysis and instrumental variables. The methods taught in this module are employed in the economics, finance and many social science disciplines. The level of mathematical treatment is equivalent to that covered on an undergraduate advanced applied econometrics course. As an applied course we will not dwell upon derivations but focus on using regression analysis. The module will provide a solid base in applied econometrics, enabling the student to become a competent user of time series regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ6007Semester 26No

Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ6000

Description: This module will equip students with the standard methods and analytical tools of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, with emphasis on the relationship between the decisions of individual agents, the operation of markets and the general state of the economy. The microeconomics component will analyse the nature of competition a firm faces, the type of industry in which it operates, the prices of its inputs, while the macroeconomics one will focus on growth, inflation, unemployment, fluctuations and crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Pure Mathematics for EconomicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmIFJ3011Semester 23No

Pure Mathematics for Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elmina Homapour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: IFJ3000

Description: Pure mathematics for economics provides students with a comprehensive preparation in basic pure mathematics skills needed for an undergraduate degree in Economics or related field. The mathematics course focuses on the development of pure mathematics skills required for success on any economics degree. These include: algebra, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, differential calculus, integration and partial derivatives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM941Semester 17No

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal Disease

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ping Wang

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic science of gastroenterology. It covers the anatomy, embryology, histology, immunology, physiology (pharmacology and neuroscience), cell biology and genetics of gut function. In addition, lectures focus on research methodologies allowing students to appraise the evidence base underpinning the taught content. Important study skills such as drafting an essay, critical appraisal and referencing, are also covered allowing the students to write an essay or other long documents, with referencing (for examples using endnote).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Paediatric Emergency MedicineSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7231Semester 37No

Paediatric Emergency Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: Students will learn about a wide range of topics within the field of paediatric resuscitation, including airway management, critical care interventions, and common paediatric emergencies. Please note, this module does not seek to provide training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to paediatric resuscitation. Hospital based practitioners will gain knowledge regarding the resuscitative management of common paediatric emergencies, including issues specific to looking after children such as distraction techniques, and safeguarding.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Child with a Neurological or Haematological ProblemSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7217Full year7No

The Child with a Neurological or Haematological Problem

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tessa Davis

Description: Although less common, neurological and haematological presentations in children can present a diagnostic and managerial challenge in the ED. In the first part of this module students will cover common neurological presentations including headache, seizures, ataxia, neuromuscular disorders, and stroke. In the second part the focus will be on haematological presentations including neutropenia, ITP, pancytopenia, and tumour lysis syndrome.
Please note, this module does not seek to provide students with clinical training in paediatric emergency medicine, but rather to provide an understanding of specific issues relevant to neonatal and adolescent presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigationsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM949Semester 17No

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debra Fonalleras-Marcos

Description: This module allows the students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of the gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigations. It is intended as an update for those with some experience in endoscopy and as an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module. Specific learning objectives of this module includes:

To study the structure of an endoscope and how it works; Understanding the indications, contraindication and complications of the main diagnostic endoscopic techniques: gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and capsule endoscopy; Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images; Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients; How to organise and run an endoscopy service; Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy; Formulate their own options for investigating various GI symptoms/diseases; Describe the nuclear medicine techniques available for assessing diseases of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract; Learn the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for assessing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, NarrativesLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5020Semester 15Yes

Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, Narratives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Armstrong
Overlap: "COM5020, FRE6020"
Prerequisite: FRE4201 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Belgium provides an ideal setting for comparative approaches to literature. Uniquely in the UK, this module explores the work of both French- and Dutch-speaking Belgian authors. It focuses on the treatment of identity in novels, short stories, and comics written between the mid-19th and the late 20th centuries. You will study French texts in the original language, and Dutch texts in translation. Topics covered include war and colonialism; space and place; language; Catholicism; and identity as performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Postcolonial Francospheres: Memories of Colonialism in the French-Speaking WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5041Semester 15Yes

Postcolonial Francospheres: Memories of Colonialism in the French-Speaking World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: FRE4041
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: France¿s former colonies are sites of postcolonial memories, explored in works of fiction by French-speaking writers from North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian Ocean, and the Caribbean. These writers often refuse the label of `Francophone¿ as a colonial hangover, both resisting and engaging with the concept of a `world literature in French¿, as they make the former colonial language their own. In this module, students will analyse novels, short stories, manifestos, and interviews by authors from across the postcolonial French-speaking world, situating them in relation to key debates and engaging with relevant theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Migration and MobilitiesGeographyGEG7129Semester 27Yes

Migration and Mobilities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta

Description: This module explores theoretical, empirical and policy dimensions of patterns and processes of migration and mobilities in a global context and consciously across the global North/global South 'divide' from a scalar, relational and networked perspective. Although the focus will be on the nature and dynamics of contemporary movement of people, the module will also incorporate an analysis of the movement of information, goods and capital as framed within the 'new mobilities paradigm'. Theoretically, the module analyses the key framings of contemporary migration in relation to transnationalism, diaspora and post-national citizenship. In turn, it will interrogate the nature and links between transnationalism, multiculturalism and/or integration; the migration-development nexus; the politics of irregularity and 'illegality'; the relationships between the emergence of global cities and a migrant division of labour; the nature of global gendered mobilities and power and mobility as well as the interrelations between conflict, violence and mobility.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Art in France: Manet to Early PicassoLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5003Semester 15Yes

Art in France: Manet to Early Picasso

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: COM5003
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores early modernist painting in France from Manet to the beginnings of Cubism. It focuses mainly on the works of Manet (from his Déjeuner sur l'herbe 1863), Monet, Morisot, Gauguin, Cézanne, and Picasso's early paintings (including Les Demoiselles d¿Avignon, 1906-7). Paintings will be discussed both as an aesthetic and a social practice. Topics studied include: the spectacle of the modern city, gender and representation, the dialogue between art and literature, the influence of non-European art forms, realism v modernism. No prior knowledge of art history is needed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Film Studies Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6202Full year6No

Film Studies Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Sue Harris
Overlap: Students are not normally permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: FLM5203
Corequisite: None

Description: Students must consult with the module organiser before finalising registration for this double module. It is designed as an optional module for Final Year students of Film Studies joint and single Honours programme. The aim of the module is to offer students on the Film Studies programmes an introduction to independent study by pursuing a sustained piece of research on a subject agreed with the module organiser and an assigned supervisor. The module will provide training in the research skills and methodologies that this demands via group sessions and individual supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Research Project by Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6211Full year6No

Research Project by Film Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: Students are not normally permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: FLM403
Corequisite: None

Description: Working individually or in small collaborative groups (by arrangement), students will devise, develop, plan and complete a dissertation by film practice. Research activity will be conducted in close consultation with allocated supervisors and through a process of drafting & revision. The form of the film practice can be either: documentary, cinematic essay, expanded cinema, artists¿ moving image, fiction, experimental fiction, or a combination of these.
Students are asked to locate their proposed film within an existing field of practice. How will the film respond to, criticize, challenge, or contribute to that field? Students are asked to consider all aspects of their filmmaking as driven by research aims, methods, processes, and, where applicable, questions. Filmmaking will follow specific research lines of activity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Film ArchaeologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM604Semester 26Yes

Film Archaeology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The origins of cinema, key moments of transformation and recent challenges to its form in the wake of digital technologies are the subjects examined in this module. Far from being simply a conflict between the magical tradition of Méliès and the documentary account of the Lumière brothers, cinema archaeology reveals the connections between various nineteenth century inventions concerned with movement, perception and transmission, and the advent of cinema. The course explores the various cultural influences that have contributed to the idea of 'cinema' at a particular time, such as those from painting, literature and theatre. Perhaps more significant are the moments of crisis brought about by the prospect of adding to film, such as the qualities of sound and colour. Most illuminating of all is film's competitive relation to its 'rivals': television, video, digital production and youtube. The course examines the question of whether film is a specific medium with enduring qualities, or whether its component parts are remade with every decade.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Forms of Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6038Semester 16No

Forms of Film Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood
Overlap: FLM7038
Prerequisite: Film Single hons only
Corequisite: None

Description: Mainstream narrative cinema has always benefitted from the formal innovations taking place at the margins of film practice. The formal, aesthetic and technical experiments conducted by the avant-garde were soon appropriated by the commercial film industry. Risks taken in the documentary field have led to new attitudes towards truth and actuality. This module focuses on what forms film practice can take beyond fiction and storytelling. The module aims to broaden the students' skills-base by focusing on documentary filmmaking and artists' moving image, encouraging formal experimentation and an active critique of the ways in which mainstream cinema and conventional televisual formats construct meanings and representations.

The module covers a range of practices, production procedures, technologies and techniques for concept development, and is structured to develop creative thinking, collaboration, crew dynamics and practical abilities. It is designed to ground the student in appropriate research and development methods along with practical and aesthetic skills to produce a short documentary or experimental film. Students choose from two short film project options: either a documentary portrait of a person, place or event, or a film that engages with process, concept and aesthetics, rather than with explicitly narrative content. In parallel, students produce an essay consisting of a close reading of a filmmaker or filmmakers working in a mode that relates to their short film production.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Volcanoes, Climate Change and SocietyGeographyGEG6229PSemester 26Yes

Volcanoes, Climate Change and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rhys Timms

Description: Volcanic eruptions can influence earth systems on a number of scales, from individual landforms to landscape development and global climatic change. Volcanic hazards can have global-scale social impacts and directly threaten the approximately 800 million people that live within 100 km of an active volcano. This module will provide students with knowledge about volcanic environments, the hazards they pose on many scales and potential benefits to societies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG5223PSemester 25Yes

Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw

Description: This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems. This knowledge is fundamental not only to research in Physical Geography, Environmental Science and many other disciplines, but provides a critical skill set used widely within a range of industries (including environmental management, local and national government, the utilities and the insurance sector).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Volcanoes, Climate Change and SocietyGeographyGEG6229Semester 26Yes

Volcanoes, Climate Change and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Bourne

Description: Volcanic eruptions can influence earth systems on a number of scales, from individual landforms to landscape development and global climatic change. Volcanic hazards can have global-scale social impacts and directly threaten the approximately 800 million people that live within 100 km of an active volcano. This module will provide students with knowledge about volcanic environments, the hazards they pose on many scales and potential benefits to societies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Kinship: Geographical PerspectivesGeographyGEG6146Semester 26Yes

Kinship: Geographical Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash

Description: This module offers a geographical approach to critically engage with ideas of kinship ¿ of who is related to whom and how ¿ and genealogical origins for understandings of human connection and difference (including ideas of global humanity, nation, ethnicity and race). It explores the cultures and science of genealogy, including family history, genetic genealogy and genetic accounts of the histories of national or ethnic groups, and addresses efforts to reconsider how kinship can be understood and practiced, including interspecies kinship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Public Life of CitiesGeographyGEG6148Semester 26Yes

The Public Life of Cities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch

Description: Focusing on the public life of contemporary cities, this module provides an engagement with urban geography and urban studies. Students will be introduced to a range of ideas, concepts and key thinkers that help to understand and analyse urban environments. Topics and case studies draw on cities from around the globe, centring on: matters of public space and publicness; urban transformation and social innovation; government and regulation; relations between social life and urban form; and the social production of space though encounters among people, objects, infrastructures and (im)material forces. Key questions examine how people manage common problems, share resources (or not) and organise different forms of collective culture. The aim is that students become better equipped to comprehend and weigh in on the problems and potentials of an increasingly urbanised world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Global Historical Geographies, 1492-1800GeographyGEG6105Semester 16Yes

Global Historical Geographies, 1492-1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn

Description: This module aims to introduce students to the complexities of the historical geography of globalisation from Christopher Columbus's landing in America to the end of the eighteenth century. During this period there were enormous changes in the relationships between places - particularly between Europe and the rest of the world - which had profound implications for the way in which the world worked then and which have also structured the ways in which the world works now. Based on the key module text Global Lives (Ogborn, 2008) the module distinguishes between various forms, phases and types of global connection: first encounters, settlement, trade both east and west, mariners' and pirates' travelling lives, the slave trade, plantation slavery in the Caribbean and North America, anti-slavery movements, and science and discovery in the Pacific. It uses biographical material to show how those processes shaped people's lives and were shaped by them. The module's substantive material will be taught through lectures, through student discussion sessions which will support the production of coursework and through museum visits which will show how these issues are being presented to contemporary audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Historical Geographies of Medicine: From Imperial Hygiene to Global HealthGeographyGEG6145Semester 16Yes

Historical Geographies of Medicine: From Imperial Hygiene to Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Taylor

Description: This module explores the relationship between medicine and projects of European imperial expansion. Focusing on the period 1750 to the present, the module examines how European encounters with unfamiliar bodies, places, and diseases led to changes in the practice of medicine as public health increasingly became a 'tool of empire'. Informed by scholarship from medical and environmental history, students learn how a geographical perspective can be used to interrogate the histories and contemporary legacies of these encounters with difference. Key topics that will be considered include: disease and environment; the emergence of racial medicine; sexuality and gender; and the colonial legacies of contemporary global health.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG5223Semester 25Yes

Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5144
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take GEG4004

Description: This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems. This knowledge is fundamental not only to research in Physical Geography, Environmental Science and many other disciplines, but provides a critical skill set used widely within a range of industries (including environmental management, local and national government, the utilities and the insurance sector).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Geographies of HomeGeographyGEG6102Semester 16Yes

Geographies of Home

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alison Blunt

Description: This module investigates geographies of home on scales ranging from the domestic to the global. Conceptually, the module considers the long-established 'suppression of home' (Reed, 1996), and its more recent revival in research across the humanities and social sciences. The module begins by tracing the celebration of home by humanistic geographers as a site of authentic meaning, value and experience, imbued with nostalgic memories and the love of a particular place. But humanistic geographers failed to analyse the home as a gendered space shaped by different and unequal relations of power and as a space that might be dangerous, violent and alienating rather than loving and secure. More complex and contested spaces of home have come to be studied by cultural geographers, often inspired by feminist and postcolonial theory. One central theme of this work has been an interest in the politics of home and identity, and the ways in which geographies of home are shaped not only by gender, but also by race, class, sexuality and age.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Ideas and Practice in GeographyGeographyGEG4009Full year4No

Ideas and Practice in Geography

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Taylor

Description: This module equips students with the skills and understanding needed to study for a degree in Geography or Environmental Science. It is built around weekly tutorials throughout the first and second semester that introduce students to study skills (such as reading, note-taking and referencing, essay writing, recognising and responding to feedback, making effective presentations preparing for examinations), as well as providing a forum for reflecting on topics and themes dealt with in other modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Health, Space and JusticeGeographyGEG5135Semester 15Yes

Health, Space and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown

Description: Situated within a critical geographies framework, this module focuses on the geographical study of health and biomedicine. The module considers significant developments that have taken place in the sub-discipline over the past several decades and evaluates how these have shaped geographical research in this area. Supported by examples drawn from across the countries of the Global North and Global South, the module prompts students to engage critically with the social and spatial unevenness of health, disease and illness and with geographers¿ concern for issues of inequality, inequity and justice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Colonial Lives and AfterlivesGeographyGEG5142Semester 25Yes

Colonial Lives and Afterlives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff

Description: This module will encourage students to explore the continuing impact in the present of the long history and broad geography of empire and colonization. Via attention to both the historical geographies of empire (including the histories of slavery and of settler colonialism) and current social, cultural and political issues, the module will demonstrate how questions of race and power structure imperial lives and afterlives. By considering how the past is not dead, students will develop skills in historical geography and critical interpretation and understand how they can be applied for social change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Ideas and Practice in Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG4008Full year4No

Ideas and Practice in Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Taylor

Description: This module equips students with the skills and understanding needed to study for a degree in Environmental Science. It is built around weekly tutorials throughout the first and second semester that introduce students to study skills (such as reading, note-taking and referencing, essay writing, recognising and responding to feedback, making effective presentations preparing for examinations), as well as providing a forum for reflecting on topics and themes dealt with in other modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
French IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6202ASemester 16Yes

French III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE6202, FRE602"
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is compulsory for final-year students of French, and provides advanced training in comprehension, composition, textual analysis and two-way translation as well as developing a high level of competence in written and oral French. Students are trained in the management of formal discussion in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Introductory French Part IILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4206Semester 24Yes

Introductory French Part II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE4204
Prerequisite: FRE4205 or equivalent knowledge of French
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers further knowledge in French language for students who acquired a good foundation with Introductory French Part I. It is aimed primarily at language specialists and students following programmes in the Faculty of Arts. The module provides further competence in all four main skills (reading, listening, speaking, writing). Teaching materials are selected with a view to acquiring a wider knowledge of contemporary Francophone culture and society. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. Private study is essential to keep up with the pace of the module. Language of instruction: French and English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 3.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 6.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 6: 3.00% Practical
  • Item 7: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 8: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and ArtLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5001Semester 15Yes

Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: "COM5001, FRE6050"
Prerequisite: FRE4201 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces you to French experiences of the 'annees noires' (the 'dark years') of the German Occupation of France and more especially to the ways in which these have been remembered, represented and interpreted in the art, film and literature of post-war France. It examines the reasons for this period's uneasy status as 'unfinished history' and explores some of the creative representations and reinterpretations of events that have been produced from the aftermath of war through to the present day. The module also involves the study of contemporary theories about cultural memory, from France and elsewhere. It considers how these theories have evolved and explores productive ways of drawing upon them to interpret the primary works studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Documentary Film - Theory and PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7201Semester 17No

Documentary Film - Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Documentary in its simplest of forms is a recording of an act. The film camera is first and foremost a recording instrument, whether it captures 'life caught unawares' or a fictional scenario. This module examines the history of 'non-fiction' filmmaking in the 20th and 21 st century through the understanding of documentary styles and genre. Political, social, ethical and historical issues will be addressed through the engagement of theory and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200ASemester 14Yes

French I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE4202A, FRE4205"
Prerequisite: A-Level or a knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL Level B1
Corequisite: None

Description: Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Cities and Regions in TransitionGeographyGEG4006Semester 24No

Cities and Regions in Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joe Penny

Description: Cities and Regions in Transition will enable BA Human Geography students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of contemporary change in the UK. Key themes to be addressed in seminar discussion include neo-liberalism, the North-South divide, culture-led urban regeneration, urban heritage and identity, migration and urban health. Students will be assessed via (i) a learning log to demonstrate their critical engagement with reading in preparation for the seminars and (ii) an additional essay to be completed after the fieldtrip on GEG4106.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Film and EthicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6207PSemester 27No

Film and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the relationship between ethics and diverse forms of cinema, tracing the emergence of a relatively new but increasingly influential approach to the medium. How can the interactions between documentary filmmakers, their subjects and viewers be understood in ethical terms? What is specific about the way narrative cinema frames the moral dilemmas and decisions around which it so often revolves? To what extent does the filmic institution render viewers ethically complicit in scenarios of suffering and violence? What is distinctive about the contribution of cinema to debates in ethical philosophy? And how do given films relate to the poststructuralist ethical preoccupation with the possibility of unconditional openness towards the other? Students will address these and other questions through analysis of a wide-ranging corpus of films and critical, theoretical and philosophical texts produced in Europe, North America and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Geographical Thought and PracticeGeographyGEG7120Full year7Yes

Geographical Thought and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff

Description: This module provides subject-specific research training in human geography and will cover core understanding of key concepts and approaches to human geography research; subject specific research and transferable skills; and qualitative and quantitative, subject specific methodological and presentation techniques. This module will equip students with the skills necessary to design and implement an extended piece of primary research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200Full year4Yes

French I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE4202, FRE4204"
Prerequisite: A-Level or a knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL Level B1
Corequisite: None

Description: Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Creative ProductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6201Semester 26No

Creative Production

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A Practical Film Making Module
Corequisite: None

Description: This is an optional module open to Film Studies students with an experience in practice (Production Skills and/or Directing Drama/Directing Fiction). It offers the opportunity to develop and build on knowledge of film making developed during the first two years of the degree, and the opportunity to make one short film in any style the student wishes to explore. The film is made by a group and not an individual. The module has a mixture of group meetings and whole class lectures and workshops.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Practical
Level: 6
French IILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5202ASemester 15Yes

French II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE5202
Prerequisite: FRE4200/FRE4202/FRE4204 or a knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL Level B1+
Corequisite: None

Description: This module develops French grammar, comprehension, oral, aural and analytical skills, with an emphasis on the appropriate use of register in both spoken and written French and preparation for the Year Abroad.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Environmental Research MethodsGeographyGEG5215Full year5No

Environmental Research Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Geraldene Wharton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5214

Description: This module provides training in research techniques for physical geography and environmental science students, building upon skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists and GEG4210 Getting Started in Geography and Environmental Science. All students will receive training in designing surveys and experiments, working with environmental data and carrying out fieldwork. They will also select from a portfolio of ¿short course options¿ providing opportunities to develop further their lab or data analysis skills. Delivery will typically involve laboratory, computing and/or fieldwork.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Environmental PollutionGeographyGEG7226Semester 17No

Environmental Pollution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell

Description: The module introduces students to the sources, pathways and effects of a range of inorganic and organic pollutants in soils, sediments and aquatic environments. It will address current methods of pollution control, focusing on risk-based methods of pollution management and appropriate management strategies for different pollutant types. Developing a process-based understanding of contaminant cycles through the catchment-coast continuum, students will learn how to apply this to environmental management scenarios using case study material. The module includes a one-day site or field visit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Health GeographiesGeographyGEG7143Semester 17No

Global Health Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown

Description: Global Health Geographies provides the opportunity to engage with the remarkable health challenges that face the world we live in today. Organised around central themes which outline the shift from international health to global health and identify the importance of geographical analyses to this transformation, the module draws on core geographical concerns with people, place, space, power and justice to promote critical encounters with the interdisciplinary field of global health.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Environmental PollutionGeographyGEG6226Semester 16No

Environmental Pollution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell

Description: The module introduces students to the sources, pathways and effects of a range of inorganic and organic pollutants in soils, sediments and aquatic environments. It will address current methods of pollution control, focusing on risk-based methods of pollution management and appropriate management strategies for different pollutant types. Developing a process-based understanding of contaminant cycles through the catchment-coast continuum, students will learn how to apply this to environmental management scenarios using case study material. The module includes a one-day site or field visit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
An Independent Geographical StudyGeographyGEG6000Full year6No

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

Description: As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesGEG_6_S
Economic GeographiesGeographyGEG5129Semester 25Yes

Economic Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joe Penny

Description: This module offers a broad introduction to key debates within Economic Geography. It explores: the geographies of production and global production networks; the recentering of Economic Geography through engagement with the Global South and development; the centrality of uneven development in capitalist economic social relations; the connections between globalisation and local socio-spatial relations; and 'alternative' or `diverse' economic practices that challenge neoliberalism. The module will challenge students to understand how economic processes of valuation, production, consumption and exchange play out in practice in time and place.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
French IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6202Full year6Yes

French III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE602
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is compulsory for final-year students of French, and provides advanced training in comprehension, composition, textual analysis and two-way translation as well as developing a high level of competence in written and oral French. Students are trained in the management of formal discussion in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental ScientistsGeographyGEG4004Full year4No

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos

Description: This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Geographical Research in PracticeGeographyGEG5103Full year5No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith

Description: Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester A, students attend weekly lectures that introduce key qualitative research techniques and approaches used in the discipline. Students work with local community organisations to appraise a local problem, demonstrate key research skills, and disseminate their findings to the wider community. In Semesters A and B, these research skills are further developed through tutorials focused on preparing students to do their IGS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6006Semester 16Yes

Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: COM6006
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or knowledge of French equivalent to at least level C1 of CEFR
Corequisite: None

Description: This module centres on narratology, the structural study of fictional narrative. Narratological analysis addresses questions such as: How can we talk about the selection of detail in fiction? What are the implications of having characters narrate their own stories? You will study a major work of narratology, and apply its principles to some classic French literary texts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. Creative writing work in French, based on the set texts - rewriting passages, composing additional episodes, etc. - plays an important part in the module, developing your understanding of texts and techniques as well as your linguistic skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Cognitive Film TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7058Semester 27No

Cognitive Film Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mario Slugan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Cognitive film theory introduces the students to the main currents in this branch of film studies and outlines its main concepts, debates, and methods. We will be primarily interested in problems of film classification (definitions of fiction, horror, etc.) and audience engagement (narrative comprehension, emotional responses, character engagement, bodily reactions, attitudes/desires/beliefs/behaviors films elicit, etc.). To do so we focus on the relationship of this brand of theorizing to continental philosophy, analytic philosophy, scientific method, dialectical theorizing, naturalism, and embodied cognition. Key theorists discussed include Munsterberg, Bordwell, Carroll, Plantinga, Smith, Tan, and Guerra and Gallese.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Final ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7200Full year7No

Final Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Launching in semester two of your programme and running the course of the summer, the Final Project module guides you to deepen your research skills and realise an ambitious, high-production, festivals-ready documentary film drawing on the methods and modes given attention to over the duration of the MA. The documentary film production is supported by a research portfolio and an academic essay in giving detailed and theoretically informed context to the topic and the form of the film produced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
French II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5206Full year5Yes

French II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE5202
Prerequisite: FRE4204 or knowledge of French Language equivalent to CEFR Level A2
Corequisite: None

Description: Entry level in French: A2, exit level: B2 (CEFRL). Module designed to provide students with a deeper and more specific knowledge of French grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation and to further develop the four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in seminars and by activity-based, mixed-skills classes which incorporate oral expression and comprehension as well as reading comprehension, written expression and translation. The module is intended primarily for students doing a BA in Modern Languages involving French (Single or Joint Honours degree).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 3.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 6: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 7: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 3.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 11: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 12: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 13: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 14: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Introductory French Part ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4205Semester 14Yes

Introductory French Part I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE4204, FRE4200A, FRE4202A"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers a foundation in French language to students with little or no previous knowledge of the language. It is aimed primarily at language specialists and students following programmes in the Faculty of Arts. The module provides competence in all four main skills (reading, listening, speaking, writing). Teaching materials are selected with a view to introducing students to contemporary Francophone culture and society. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. Private study is essential to keep up with the pace of the module. Language of instruction: French and English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 3.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 6.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 6: 3.00% Practical
  • Item 7: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 8: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Postcolonial Francospheres: Memories of Colonialism in the French-Speaking WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4041Semester 14Yes

Postcolonial Francospheres: Memories of Colonialism in the French-Speaking World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: FRE5041
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: France¿s former colonies are sites of postcolonial memories, explored in works of fiction by French-speaking writers from North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian Ocean, and the Caribbean. These writers often refuse the label of `Francophone¿ as a colonial hangover, both resisting and engaging with the concept of a `world literature in French¿, as they make the former colonial language their own. In this module, students will analyse novels, short stories, manifestos, and interviews by authors from across the postcolonial French-speaking world, situating them in relation to key debates and engaging with relevant theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Picturing a Nation: France and its Image from Marianne to #JesuisCharlieLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4042Semester 24Yes

Picturing a Nation: France and its Image from Marianne to #JesuisCharlie

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: COM5042
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines how images form the foundation of our understanding of French culture, and of how France understands itself. Students will be introduced to the methodology of visual studies and will be applying it to images of historical and cultural relevance to the French-speaking world, ranging from Marianne as the personification of `national¿ values, through the representation of the colonies in advertising, to the tradition of satire embodied in the magazine 'Charlie Hebdo'. Through these visual analyses, students will consider concepts such as cliché, symbol, and allegory, and reflect on questions of nationhood and cultural identity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Introductory FrenchLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4204Full year4Yes

Introductory French

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE4200, FRE4202, FRE4205, FRE4206"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is aimed at students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the French language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential French grammar and vocabulary and to develop the four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the French language, including its pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in seminars and by activity-based, mixed-skills classes which incorporate oral expression and comprehension as well as reading comprehension and written expression. Translation is also used from time to time as a way to practice grammar in context and to expand one's lexis. The module is intended primarily for students doing a BA in Modern Languages involving French (Single or Joint Honours degree).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 5: 3.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 6: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 7: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 3.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 11: 3.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 12: 1.50% Practical
  • Item 13: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 14: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Flood Risk Management and ModellingGeographyGEG6314Semester 26No

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw

Description: This module provides students with knowledge and skills related to flood risk management. It examines the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are explained and novel management options for reducing flood risk are critically reviewed. Potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are also explored. Practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1/2D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Forms of Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7038Semester 17No

Forms of Film Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood
Overlap: FLM6038
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Mainstream narrative cinema has always benefitted from the formal innovations taking place at the margins of film practice. The formal, aesthetic and technical experiments conducted by the avant-garde were soon appropriated by the commercial film industry. Risks taken in the documentary field have led to new attitudes towards truth and actuality. This module focuses on what forms film practice can take beyond fiction and storytelling. The module aims to broaden the students' skills-base by focusing on documentary filmmaking and artists' moving image, encouraging formal experimentation and an active critique of the ways in which mainstream cinema and conventional televisual formats construct meanings and representations.

The module covers a range of practices, production procedures, technologies and techniques for concept development, and is structured to develop creative thinking, collaboration, crew dynamics and practical abilities. It is designed to ground the student in appropriate research and development methods along with practical and aesthetic skills to produce a short documentary or experimental film. Students choose from two short film project options: either a documentary portrait of a person, place or event, or a film that engages with process, concept and aesthetics, rather than with explicitly narrative content. In parallel, students produce an essay consisting of a close reading of a filmmaker or filmmakers working in a mode that relates to their short film production.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced ReadingsGeographyGEG7142Semester 27No

Advanced Readings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey

Description: This module offers the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of an area of research through self-directed reading. In order to take this module, students must identify an area of interest that can be supervised by a member of the teaching team. The module is assessed by a 4000-5000 word paper that demonstrates advanced engagement with their chosen field of study. If supervision of the topic is agreed, students complete self-directed reading at an advanced level and discuss their readings and develop their paper at fortnightly supervision meetings. The structure of the report may vary according to the nature of the topic, and this is reflected in the word count range provided. Human Geography topics are expected to produce longer papers (up to 5000 words) while topics in Physical Geography and Environmental Science are likely to produce shorter papers (up to 4000 words) that may incorporate figures and data in certain circumstances.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Film and EthicsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6207Semester 26Yes

Film and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM5203 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the relationship between ethics and diverse forms of cinema, tracing the emergence of a relatively new but increasingly influential approach to the medium. How can the interactions between documentary filmmakers, their subjects and viewers be understood in ethical terms? What is specific about the way narrative cinema frames the moral dilemmas and decisions around which it so often revolves? To what extent does the filmic institution render viewers ethically complicit in scenarios of suffering and violence? What is distinctive about the contribution of cinema to debates in ethical philosophy? And how do given films relate to the poststructuralist ethical preoccupation with the possibility of unconditional openness towards the other? Students will address these and other questions through analysis of a wide-ranging corpus of films and critical, theoretical and philosophical texts produced in Europe, North America and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced ReadingsGeographyGEG7142Semester 17No

Advanced Readings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey

Description: This module offers the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of an area of research through self-directed reading. In order to take this module, students must identify an area of interest that can be supervised by a member of the teaching team. The module is assessed by a 4000-5000 word paper that demonstrates advanced engagement with their chosen field of study. If supervision of the topic is agreed, students complete self-directed reading at an advanced level and discuss their readings and develop their paper at fortnightly supervision meetings. The structure of the report may vary according to the nature of the topic, and this is reflected in the word count range provided. Human Geography topics are expected to produce longer papers (up to 5000 words) while topics in Physical Geography and Environmental Science are likely to produce shorter papers (up to 4000 words) that may incorporate figures and data in certain circumstances.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation 15,000 WordsGeographyGEG7138Full year7No

Dissertation 15,000 Words

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash

Description: The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation 12,000 WordsGeographyGEG7139Full year7No

Dissertation 12,000 Words

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash

Description: The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Nature-based Climate SolutionsGeographyGEG6232PSemester 16Yes

Nature-based Climate Solutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea

Description: To what extent can climate change be mitigated by improved stewardship of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? In this module, we examine how conservation, restoration and improved management of ecosystems can increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions. We evaluate a range of ¿natural climate solutions¿ (NCS) for their feasibility, cost-effectiveness, environmental co-benefits and climate mitigation potential. You will take an active approach to learning through participation in lectures, small-group discussions and a non-residential field trip.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Research DesignGeographyGEG5214Full year5No

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5214B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5215

Description: This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Research DesignGeographyGEG5214BSemester 25No

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5214
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5215

Description: This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Geography, Technology and SocietyGeographyGEG6134Semester 26Yes

Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden

Description: This module will develop students' critical engagement with the geographies of knowledge, technology and society. The module will discuss the theoretical and conceptual fabric of geographies of science, paying close attention to its development through studies in the history and sociology of science and Science & Technology Studies (STS). It will then apply these theoretical and conceptual tools to understanding a select number of case study examples of hubs of scientific innovation in the life sciences and Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Project in Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG6212Full year6No

Project in Environmental Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

Description: An independent project based upon field, and/or laboratory, and/or numerical modelling work within the field of Environmental Science. NB This module is compulsory for all final-year students registered for an Environmental Science degree (F850) and is not available to students registered for any geography degree. By the end of the second term in your second year you will have to put forward a proposal for your topic, you will be allocated a supervisor based on this proposal. The main research takes place during the summer vacation between your second and third years. Any laboratory analysis should be completed by the end of the first semester in your third year. The work should be preceded by an exploratory study during the Easter vacation of your second year. Data analysis and writing up of the project takes place during the first and second terms of your third year. You are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss the project. The results of your research are presented in a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. Not open to associate students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesGEG_6_S
Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and FootballLanguages Linguistics and FilmHSP4011Semester 24Yes

Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and Football

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: CAT4011 and COM5011
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Topics covered include: nationalism; the politics of language; the avant--garde art of Salvador Dalí and Miró; literature; football. There is no language requirement for this module; therefore it is suitable for students with no knowledge of Catalan and Spanish.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Global Health DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH6102Full year6No

Global Health Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

Description:

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, EconomyGeographyGEG6130Semester 16Yes

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Shereen Fernandez

Description: Subsequent to the introductory lecture, the module is divided into three sections. The first main section provides an historical and political overview of the 'war on terror' in relation to thinking about other types of wars. It considers how the prosecution of the war on terror has come to shape not only military, but also legal and governmental discourse and practice in the post 9/11 era. The second section invites students to consider ideas and practices of security as a central feature of this. It will consider the rise of private military contracting, immigration, humanitarianism, urban geopolitics, and the overlap between health and security concerns. The third section focuses on the political-economic underpinnings of many of these developments and challenges students to think of conflict as an embedded social phenomenon: as much a part of contemporary discourses on the economy as it is something with merely economic implications. The final, concluding lecture will examine alternatives to the dominant framings of modern conflict that have been put forward and critiqued thus far.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Society and SpaceGeographyGEG5127Semester 15Yes

Society and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May

Description: This module introduces students to the field of social geography, its theoretical perspectives and substantive concerns, centred upon an understanding of societies as products of uneven and always negotiated relationships of power. Drawing on a social constructionist approach, and using mainly UK examples, we consider intersecting constructions of social class, gender, race and sexuality, and how these constructions both shape, and are shaped by space at a variety of scales. The module includes a field walk assignment designed to develop skills of critical observation and interpretation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGeographyGEG5128Semester 25Yes

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza

Description: This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions. These issues will be examined in different regions of the world, enabling students from different disciplinary backgrounds to analyze the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts on development theory and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Earth Surface ScienceGeographyGEG4209Semester 14Yes

Earth Surface Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Taylor

Description: What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 4
Getting Started in Geographical and Environmental ResearchGeographyGEG4210Semester 24No

Getting Started in Geographical and Environmental Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

Description: This compulsory module provides training in key research methods for physical geography and environmental science, complementing knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include practice in laboratory and field techniques, as well as data analysis and interpretation, digital cartography and reporting skills, delivered through lectures and practical work (field, lab, computer) and a non-residential field course. It provides a foundation for level 5 methods modules (GEG5214,GEG5213,GEG5212) and for the level 6 independent research project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in Medieval IberiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmHSP4003Semester 14Yes

Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in Medieval Iberia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval
Overlap: CAT4003
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to medieval literature through the study of poetry in Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, and Spanish. Taking love as a unifying theme, it will explore a series of genres (traditional lyric, song-books), time periods (from the 13th to the 15th century), and themes within medieval literary culture (translation and multilingualism). It will also serve as an introduction to the critical analysis and study of poetry as a literary form more generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Translation into FrenchLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5200Semester 25No

Translation into French

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE4203
Prerequisite: FRE4200 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides an introduction to translation into French. Through weekly translation exercises based both on sentences and on texts, students will learn to think systematically about language structure and language use in French (and English), and acquire a more in-depth understanding of register, style, idioms and cultural specificity, and the ways in which arguments are constructed. The module is not available to Erasmus students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
French IILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5202Full year5Yes

French II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE4200/FRE4202/FRE4204 or a knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL Level B1+
Corequisite: None

Description: This module develops French grammar, comprehension, oral, aural and analytical skills, with an emphasis on the appropriate use of register in both spoken and written French and preparation for the Year Abroad.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
French I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4202ASemester 14Yes

French I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE4200A, FRE4205"
Prerequisite: A-Level or a knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL Level B1
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who hold GCSE in French language (or equivalent). The module entry level is A2 (Common European Framework of Reference for languages) and its exit level is A2+/B1. The module has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential French grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the French language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based tutorials and mixed-skills classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 4
French I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4202Full year4Yes

French I Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE4200, FRE4204"
Prerequisite: GCSE French or knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL level A2
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is aimed at students who hold a GCSE (or the equivalent level) in French language. It is intended primarily for students studying French as part of their degree (whether single honours or joint honours) and for other Queen Mary students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences who want to study French language. The module entry level is A2 (Common European Framework of Reference for languages) and its exit level is B1/B1+. The module has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential French grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the French language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based tutorials and mixed-skills classes.

French I Intensive will be offered as a level 4 core module to 1st year post-GCSE students (or students with the equivalent level in French as assessed by the French language coordinator) taking single or joint Honours programmes in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Nature-based Climate SolutionsGeographyGEG6232Semester 16Yes

Nature-based Climate Solutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea

Description: To what extent can climate change be mitigated by improved stewardship of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? In this module, we examine how conservation, restoration and improved management of ecosystems can increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions. We evaluate a range of ¿natural climate solutions¿ (NCS) for their feasibility, cost-effectiveness, environmental co-benefits and climate mitigation potential. You will take an active approach to learning through participation in lectures, small-group discussions and a non-residential field trip.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
London and its MuseumsHistoryHST5606Semester 25Yes

London and its Museums

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amanda Christina Hui Sciampacone

Description: This module will begin by looking at the historical development of museums from the random gathering of natural and man-made objects found in the cabinet of curiosities of the Renaissance to the institutional role played by modern and contemporary museums. We will have the opportunity to explore London's collections for the purpose of contextualizing and critically evaluating the cultural and historical value, purpose, educational role and key public function of different types of exhibiting space and exhibitions. Along with developing knowledge of the contents of collections, the module will focus on ideas of collecting, curatorial knowledge and theories of display, with the aim of deconstructing the cultural narratives and ideological representations provided by each exhibiting space. The entirety of this module will take place outside of the university campus as each week will see the class visiting a different museum. In weekly visits to museums and galleries in London, students will consider history in a broader perspective, evaluate museum space and exhibition experiences, and demonstrate how historical research can be applied in the environment of museum studies, public engagement, and art analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityHST_456_A
London on Film: Representing the City in British and American CinemaHistoryHST5608Semester 15Yes

London on Film: Representing the City in British and American Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Glancy

Description: This module examines the representation of London in films made from the 1920s to the present. It explores the social and cultural forces that have given rise to changing views of the city over time, as well as the diversity of 'Londons' that may arise within a single time period. Through analysis of a wide range of films, the module investigates how the city has been imagined, and what meanings it has embodied, in a wide variety of genres and time periods. Students develop skills necessary to deconstruct, decode, and interpret filmic imagery, sound, dialogue, and story, and demonstrate how their knowledge and understanding of London's history in the twentieth century can be applied to film analysis with reference to both textual and contextual factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Advanced Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG6230Semester 16No

Advanced Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Grieve
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG5144 or take GEG5223 or take GEG5102

Description: The analysis of geospatial data is the cornerstone of much physical geography and environmental science research. Building upon the knowledge acquired in GEG5223 students will be taught through a range of lectures and computer based practicals. Material covered will highlight recent developments from across the discipline, demonstrating the use of cutting edge Geographical Information Systems to solve problems from a range of physical geography and environmental science sub-disciplines. Time will also be devoted to the effective visualisation of geospatial data and analysis outputs, equipping students with key skills required in the workplace or for further study .

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG6230PSemester 16No

Advanced Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Grieve

Description: The analysis of geospatial data is the cornerstone of much physical geography and environmental science research. Building upon the knowledge acquired in GEG5223 students will be taught through a range of lectures and computer based practicals. Material covered will highlight recent developments from across the discipline, demonstrating the use of cutting edge Geographical Information Systems to solve problems from a range of physical geography and environmental science sub-disciplines. Time will also be devoted to the effective visualisation of geospatial data and analysis outputs, equipping students with key skills required in the workplace or for further study .

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Fragile EnvironmentsGeographyGEG6231Semester 26No

Fragile Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5231 or take GEG6150

Description: Marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments are increasingly subject to changing external stressors, including climate change, pollution, land-use and resource consumption. Examining the impact of multiple stressors, this module integrates physical, chemical, and biological understanding to explore the history and modification of environmental settings, why they are considered to be fragile, and how fragile environments and landscapes can be understood, assessed, managed and restored.
The module will be delivered through a residential overseas or UK field trip to visit fragile environments; the specific field location will be announced in advance each year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6206Semester 16Yes

Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Pate
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the Japanese yakuza-eiga (gangster film) in terms of its narrative form and ideological functions, including socio-political commentary on Japanese society from the 1930s to the present day. We will look at the work of such filmmakers as Ozu, Kurosawa, Suzuki, Fukasaku, Kitano and Miike to explore a range of issues, including the post-war occupation and 'democratisation' of Japan, its rapid industrialisation and the 'economic miracle', the mass migration from rural to urban areas and its social consequences, and the disengagement of large sections of society from the political, bureaucratic and business elite which runs the country. Students will also discuss such concepts as 'giri' (duty), 'ninjo' (honour) and 'jingi' (code) as facets of both the yakuza and national myth, and explore the themes of loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice, and the clash of traditional values with modernity. Finally, the module will consider the relationship between the Japanese and Hollywood gangster traditions through an examination of hybrid films which comment on the clash of codes and cultures.

Students will attend a weekly lecture and seminar; in addition there will be a scheduled screening of each week's main film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Cognitive Film TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6058Semester 26Yes

Cognitive Film Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mario Slugan
Overlap: FLM7048
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Cognitive film theory introduces the students to the main currents in this branch of film studies and outlines its main concepts, debates, and methods. We will be primarily interested in problems of film classification (definitions of fiction, horror, etc.) and audience engagement (narrative comprehension, emotional responses, character engagement, bodily reactions, attitudes/desires/beliefs/behaviors films elicit, etc.). To do so we focus on the relationship of this brand of theorizing to continental philosophy, analytic philosophy, scientific method, dialectical theorizing, naturalism, and embodied cognition. Key theorists discussed include Munsterberg, Bordwell, Carroll, Plantinga, Smith, Tan, and Guerra and Gallese.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
New York: Nature and the CityGeographyGEG5150Semester 25No

New York: Nature and the City

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5231 or take GEG6150

Description: As a world city undergoing a series of dramatic social and biophysical transformations, from a key site in the development of colonial rule to more recent urban design for climate change resilience, New York is a city where major ideas of nature have been negotiated, narrated and practised. Preparatory lectures and a seven-day field course focus on the changing geographies of nature in New York and their connections to the wider geographies of global environmental change, the Anthropocene and urban sustainability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
The American Century: The History of the United States, 1945-2000HistoryHST5350BSemester 25Yes

The American Century: The History of the United States, 1945-2000

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark White

Description: This module examines the major developments in United States history in the twentieth century. The general issues to be explored will include the cycles of conservatism and liberalism in America on the domestic front, and on the world stage, the rise of the United States to superpower status. Specific topics to be covered include World Wars I and II, the Jazz Age, the New Deal, civil rights and Vietnam. The roles played by key individuals, such as Theodore Roosevelt, Martin Luther King and Bill Clinton, will also be evaluated. On this module, students will develop an ability to analyse both broad historical themes as well as specific episodes and issues. The use of documents throughout the module, particularly in the second-semester Detailed Study on the Cuban missile crisis, constitutes preparation for the more concentrated use of primary sources in students' final year, in the Special Subject and Dissertation. This module enhances students' international awareness by fostering their knowledge of and interest in American political history, and developing their understanding of the global impact of American politics and America's changing relationship with the rest of the world throughout the twentieth century.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Film ArchaeologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM604PSemester 27No

Film Archaeology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The origins of cinema, key moments of transformation and recent challenges to its form in the wake of digital technologies are the subjects examined in this module. Far from being simply a conflict between the magical tradition of Méliès and the documentary account of the Lumière brothers, cinema archaeology reveals the connections between various nineteenth century inventions concerned with movement, perception and transmission, and the advent of cinema. The course explores the various cultural influences that have contributed to the idea of 'cinema' at a particular time, such as those from painting, literature and theatre. Perhaps more significant are the moments of crisis brought about by the prospect of adding to film, such as the qualities of sound and colour. Most illuminating of all is film's competitive relation to its 'rivals': television, video, digital production and youtube. The course examines the question of whether film is a specific medium with enduring qualities, or whether its component parts are remade with every decade.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Environmental HazardsGeographyGEG6203Semester 16Yes

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Steele

Description: Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GeographyGEG5144Semester 25Yes

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5223

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic principles of GIS and their application in modelling geographical realities. It is practically based and a requirement of the module is to become proficient in the operation and use of the GIS software - ArcGIS. The main components of the module include defining the key elements of a GIS, basic cartographic principles, elementary database management, error and data quality issues, statistical analysis of spatial data, and presentation and outputs from GIS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
New York: Nature and the CityGeographyGEG6150Semester 26No

New York: Nature and the City

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG6231 or take GEG5150

Description: As a world city undergoing a series of dramatic social and biophysical transformations, from a key site in the development of colonial rule to more recent urban design for climate change resilience, New York is a city where major ideas of nature have been negotiated, narrated and practised. Preparatory lectures and a seven-day field course focus on the changing geographies of nature in New York and their connections to the wider geographies of global environmental change, the Anthropocene and urban sustainability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Urban African EconomiesGeographyGEG6151Semester 26Yes

Urban African Economies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith

Description: Conventional social science has tended to downplay the creativity of urban African societies and economies as well as their `capacity to produce metaphors for their own possible futures¿ (Sarr 2020). Combining approaches from urban, economic and development geography, this module provides students with a critical and historically grounded understanding of urban African economies. It revitalises debates on work, value and exchange through an engagement with local expressions of informality, hustle and solidarity entrepreneurship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Memories of WWII in Literature, Film and ArtLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6050Semester 16Yes

Memories of WWII in Literature, Film and Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: "COM5001, FRE6001"
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or knowledge of French equivalent to at least level C1 of CEFR
Corequisite: None

Description: This course introduces students to French experiences of les années noires and the ways in which these have been remembered, represented and interpreted in post-war France. It examines the reasons for this period¿s uneasy status as `unfinished history¿ and explores some of the creative representations and reinterpretations of events that have been produced from the aftermath of war through to the present day. The course allows students to study works in various media including art, film and literature. It also introduces contemporary theories about cultural memory and draws upon these to interpret the primary works studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
From Louvre to Louvre: Memory, History and 'Patrimoine' in the French MuseumLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6053Semester 26Yes

From Louvre to Louvre: Memory, History and 'Patrimoine' in the French Museum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: COM6053
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the cultural history of France through its museums, from the opening of the Musée central des arts in the Louvre Palace (1793), to the inauguration of the Louvre Abu Dhabi in 2017. It explores the idea of the museum as a space where symbolic value and cultural discourse are built. Students will be introduced to the concept of 'patrimoine' (heritage) through the study of a range of artworks and artifacts in (and outside of) major French collections.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Contemporary India: Politics, Society and the EconomyGeographyGEG6129Semester 16Yes

Contemporary India: Politics, Society and the Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams

Description: he module examines significant shifts in Indian politics, society and the economy. It does so by connecting the big theories and topics, such as democracy, citizenship, violence, development and neoliberalism, with everyday ideas and practices in India today. Throughout the module students will be introduced to different theoretical approaches used by South Asian scholars such as feminist and postcolonial frameworks, and invited to bring these into dialogue with empirical examples in order to respond to wider questions about development and democracy in India.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Cultural GeographiesGeographyGEG5126Semester 15Yes

Cultural Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch

Description: This module provides an introduction to the field of cultural geography. It draws on examples both historical and contemporary, in the UK and beyond, to demonstrate how spaces, places and landscapes are laden with meaning. It shows that culture is not something that is fixed, but rather constructed through relations with different people, places, ideas, objects and practices. The module therefore helps student understand and interpret matters of culture critically, with careful attention to plurality, complexity and power. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: an introduction to cultural geography; landscape: meaning, power and identity; interpreting cultural representations; more-than-representational geographies; geographies of embodiment and mobility; cultural geographies of food; emerging cultural landscapes and politics; tensions and new directions in cultural geography.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, NarrativesLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6020Semester 16Yes

Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, Narratives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Armstrong
Overlap: "COM5020, FRE5020"
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or knowledge of French equivalent to at least level C1 of CEFR
Corequisite: None

Description: Belgium provides an ideal setting for comparative approaches to literature. Uniquely in the UK, this module explores the work of both French- and Dutch-speaking Belgian authors. It focuses on the treatment of identity in novels, short stories, and comics written between the mid-19th and the late 20th centuries. You will study French texts in the original language, and Dutch texts in translation. Topics covered include war and colonialism; space and place; language; Catholicism; and identity as performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Reinventing BritainGeographyGEG4106Semester 14No

Reinventing Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May

Description: This module examines geographical implications of changes across the economic, social, cultural and political landscapes of Britain over the last three decades, focused on a field trip North West England. Key themes include: Britain's long-standing North-South divide; uneven geographies of deindustrialisation; culture, heritage and regeneration; geographies of migration and identity; and health inequalities. The module is delivered through lectures and fieldwork, introducing and make connections between theoretical perspectives including economic, social, cultural, political and urban geographies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Global WorldsGeographyGEG4112Semester 24No

Global Worlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Samuel Halvorsen

Description: This module will introduce students to a range of core issues affecting the world around them from economic, cultural and social perspectives with a particular focus on the importance of global-local relations revolving around inequality and justice. It will explore a range of debates surrounding the interrelationships between globalisation and international development from historical and contemporary viewpoints as well as the nature and politics of identities in relation to nationalism, diaspora, landscape and exclusion . Students will also be introduced to the relationships between health, place and care.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Activist FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7204Semester 27No

Activist Film

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Fedda
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines films that can be considered activist - a body of work that engages issues of social and political significance. These varied films are driven by the activism of their filmmakers, their protagonists and through the films' direct participation in activism. Using artistic, ideological, socio-cultural, historical, technological, and practical frameworks to examine activist filmmaking this course will explore how the cinema and activism interact. This is a theory/practice module and will include the production of a short film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Documentary Production ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7202Semester 27No

Documentary Production Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module challenges some of the key tenets and ideas of documentary film (such as transparency, truth, reality, and representational practices) with a view to pushing the boundaries of the documentary form. We will explore different modes of documentary practice, including the performative documentary, artists' moving image documentary in the gallery, the animated documentary, archival and found footage film and the essay film. These non-traditional modalities of nonfiction are designed to enhance and reconfigure your own documentary practices, and enable you to test out new theoretical, aesthetic and rhetorical strategies in your production work.
To make the most of the module, you are encouraged to read extensively around documentary film theory and practice, thinking through the myriad formal, political and ethical ways the moving image encounters and represents the lived world. To broaden your horizons, please make sure to keep abreast of the extra-curricular suggestions for recommended viewing, and make the most of the artistic, cinematic, and socially engaged events Queen Mary University and the many communities of London have to offer. Please check your email and social media daily for updates.
Sessions will commonly be divided into two parts. In the first part, there will be a screening covering a particular mode of documentary film that challenges traditional approaches to documentary filmmaking, followed by a lecture and discussion of the film and the assigned reading material. The second part of the session will focus on the practical aspects of planning the production of your film - from concept to completion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Relativity and GravitationPhysics and AstronomySPA7019USemester 17Yes

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6308

Description: "This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzchild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research Methods for AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7020PSemester 17No

Research Methods for Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: "Research in astrophysics builds on a vast body of literature and archived data. This module is an introduction to research methods which exploit existing information sources in astrophysics. The module serves as preparation for the research project which forms a major part of the MSc programme. In this module students will learn how to review and evaluate with critical insight, the current state of research of a chosen area in astrophysics. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style, and will learn how to convey research material in a presentation. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These can include specific exercises in using astronomical data archives, scientific word processing, mathematical skills, using mathematical and data analysis packages, project planning, etc."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Relativity and GravitationPhysics and AstronomySPA7019PSemester 17Yes

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzschild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA7018PSemester 17Yes

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA7018USemester 17Yes

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5304 and take SPA6325 and take SPA5218. Before taking this module you are advised to take SPA7027U

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
MSc Physics Research ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7012PFull year7No

MSc Physics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo

Description: The MSc Research Project is at the heart of the MSc programme. It is an independent project undertaken by the student within a working research group in the School. The project runs over three semesters in order to allow for the student to both design their project (using available literature etc.), be trained in the relevant techniques and carry out a reasonably substantial piece of research based on an actual (real) research problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Physics Investigative ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7015UFull year7No

Physics Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kostya Trachencko

Description: A student will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. S/he will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation and placing them in a physics context. The project will run through both semesters and will involve keeping a research log (see 'Engagement Log' elsewhere on this page), interim coursework, a final written report and oral assessment at the end of semester B.
The aim of the investigative project is to give the student the opportunity to work independently on a chosen project towards specified goals. These goals will vary from project to project and may include: writing software to achieve a specified computational task, e.g., simulation of a physical process; carrying out a series of measurements to establish or disprove a working hypothesis; building a piece of equipment, e.g., to interface an experiment to a PC; analytical mathematical analysis applied to the study of a theoretical problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Cours