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Module directory 2020-21

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2020-21. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • A Queen Mary student looking for information on QMUL Model modules and their availability.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

Please go to myQMUL for further information on the QMUL Model.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.
  • For the QMUL Model, we cannot always guarantee your first choice of module selection.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesQMUL ModelDescriptionThemeAvailable to
The Law of Registered Trade MarksLawSOLM083Semester 27NoNo

The Law of Registered Trade Marks

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module covers all legal issues that might arise from the very moment someone decides to apply to register a sign as a trade mark. Following topics will be discussed in class: what may constitute subject matter eligible for trade mark protection?; absolute grounds for refusal and invalidity; relative grounds for refusal and invalidity; distinctiveness acquired through use; trade mark infringement; invalidity; revocation; defenses; the concept of the trade mark functions; economic justifications for trade mark protection; trade mark protection against dilution; the free-riding theory of trade mark protection; the particularities of the EUTM system; common law rights in the US; the federal US registration system; the US functionality doctrine

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Refugee LawLawSOLM171Semester 17YesNo

International Refugee Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

Description: This module examines the international law dimensions of protecting refugees and other categories of forced migrants. It provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts and workings of international law, in general, and international refugee and human rights law, in particular, as they relate to the phenomenon of forced displacement. While international refugee law forms the backbone of the course, the module will also cover aspects of international criminal law, international humanitarian law, and the law of the sea as these apply to refugees and other forced migrants. The module will start by studying the historical origins and development of refugee law up to its codification in the 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol. The institutions tasked with overseeing the implementation of these instruments will also be examined, with particular focus on UNHCR and its evolving role through time. The study of substantive law, including State practice and case law of national and international courts and Treaty bodies, will follow thereafter, following ten thematic blocs: 1) the refugee definition (inclusion, exclusion, and cessation of refugee status); 2) the status of Palestinian refugees; 3) non-refoulement and complementary forms of protection; 4) status determination procedures; 5) the content of international protection and other 'durable solutions'; 6) access to asylum; 7) war and displacement; 8) 'climate refugees'; 9) poverty, destitution and 'survival migration'; 10) and the ethical roots of refugeehood, to be taught in 3-hour blocs from Week 2 to 11.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
EU Competition Law and PracticeLawSOLM051Full year7NoNo

EU Competition Law and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SOLM248

Description: This module (along with the prerequisite module 'EU Competition Law') aims at a comprehensive study of the basic provisions of European Union (EU) competition law. The Module will provide participants with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EU competition law, especially Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and EU Merger Regulation 139/2004 are applied. The Module will aim to consider an important business phenomena in the market namely abusive dominance and mergers. It is hoped that by the end of the Module participants will gain a solid understanding of the relevant competition rules of the EU whilst developing a good business and market perspective and practical approach in order to help them identify situations in which such phenomena may arise and how should these phenomena be addressed.EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Article 102 TFEU and Regulation 139/2004. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 101 TFEU. EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Article 102 TFEU and Regulation 139/2004. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 101 TFEU. EU competition rules are applied by the Directorate General (DG COMPETITION (COMP)) of the European Commission, the Directorate in charge of competition matters; there is also shared competence with designated national competition authorities (NCAs) in relation to the application of Articles 102 (and 101) TFEU. Decisions of the Commission are the principal means of enforcement in competition cases. The Commission¿s decisions are subject to review by the General Court of the EU (GCEU) (formerly the Court of First Instance (CFI)) and the Court of Justice of the EU/European Court of Justice (CJEU/ECJ). This has created an extensive case-law in competition law matters and reference will be made to this case law. In addition to considering substantive issues, the Module will also deal with relevant procedural mechanisms, sanctions etc. Particular attention will be given to questions of practice under Regulation 1/2003.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
UK Tax AvoidanceLawSOLM126Full year7NoNo

UK Tax Avoidance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The module is designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of tax avoidance from a UK perspective. The module approaches tax avoidance firstly from a historical viewpoint and distinguishes it from both evasion and mitigation. The responses of both courts and the UK Parliament to the perceived problem are examined from the viewpoint of both individuals and businesses. Apart from judicial approaches, the General Anti-Abuse Rule will be examined as will other anti-avoidance measures, including the Disclosure of Tax Avoidance Schemes rules. The international perspective will be explored, including the use of transfer pricing, controlled foreign companies and tax havens. The penalties that tax authorities wish to impose will also be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
EU Tax LawLawSOLM127Semester 17YesNo

EU Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christiana Hjipanayi

Description: This module provides students with an understanding of EU tax law, with an emphasis on EU corporate tax law. Sources of EU corporate tax law (legislative instruments, soft law and case law) are examined. A number of corporate topics are covered, including parent-subsidiary relationships, permanent establishments, passive income, reorganisations, anti-abuse provisions, proposed directives (CCCTB, FTT) etc. The module also examines recent developments and high-profile debates in the intersection of international tax law and European tax law. Topics such as international tax avoidance, corporate social responsibility, good tax governance, harmful tax competition, state aid and tax treaty abuse are considered from the angle of EU tax law and international tax law. The interaction of the OECD/G20's BEPS project with the European Commission's measures to fight tax fraud and tax evasion is also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Intellectual Property and the Creative IndustriesLawSOLM090Semester 27YesNo

Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov

Description: This module addresses the major creative industries, the way they operate and their impact on the national global economy, with a particular focus on the interplay between intellectual property protection and the industries' business environment. This module will analyze various contentious issues in the law surrounding the creative industries with a focus on intellectual property. A number of specific creative industries will be examined as well as famous' persons rights over their name and image and the commercialization of such rights. The module is international in scope, looking at a variety of jurisdictions according to significance and relevance to particular industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International and Comparative Law of Unfair CompetitionLawSOLM082Semester 17NoNo

International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: "The module aims at providing the students with a thorough account of the main legal theories of unfair competition in various jurisdictions with a particular focus on US, EU, UK, French and German law in light of the binding European and international legal frameworks. Legal problems are approached from a comparative perspective. At the same time, emphasis is placed on the practical problems that arise in the context of disputes that involve claims of unfair competition."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Competition LawLawSOLM054Semester 17YesNo

International Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: Competition law has witnessed an impressive increase in significance and geographical scope during the last two decades or so. From the situation which existed in the 1980s - when there were only a few systems of competition law in the world ¿ we have moved to a new one where currently there are about 120 jurisdictions in which some form of competition law has been introduced and 30 others seeking to develop the process. It is anticipated that this remarkable geographical expansion of the law will increase in the future. With this unprecedented increase in significance and remarkable geographical expansion of the law (as well as other significant developments such as the process of globalisation), it has become important to examine the role and place of competition law and policy in a globalised economy. The course will aim at such an examination. The course is designed to include 'international' elements (comparative elements will then be addressed in the Comparative Competition Law course in semester 2), looking at, among other things, issues such as, the process of internationalisation of competition law and policy; the role of international organisations and multinational enterprises (MNEs) in this process; the extraterritorial reach of the competition rules of the EU, the USA and those of other jurisdictions; and the relationship between competition and trade policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Comparative Competition LawLawSOLM055Semester 27YesNo

Comparative Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: The course is designed to include `comparative¿ elements, covering, among other things, developed competition law systems (EU competition law and US antitrust law), BRICS, Japan and other developing jurisdictions. In the light of the globalisation of markets, this module will focus on the different elements of various competition law systems. Starting with an introduction to competition law and economics, we will then proceed with discussing different regimes in a comparative perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Terrorism, Migration and Human RightsLawSOLM175Semester 27YesNo

Terrorism, Migration and Human Rights

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Elspeth Guild

Description: "This module looks at the relationship of terrorism, human rights and migration. Among the key questions will be the relationship of foreigners to threat, the treatment of suspected terrorists through immigration laws, the entitlement of foreigners to protection against return to persecution and torture (as refugees) and the transformation of the technologies around movement of people across international borders which are driven by terrorism related concerns. The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the law around terrorism and how it intersects with migration and border crossing issues. The module will include: an introduction to the course from citizens to foreigners including Human Rights, Political Violence, Terrorism and Extradition. We will examine the issues around refugees, political violence/terrorism and the principle of non-refoulement and how they interact with the prohibition on torture in the context of terrorism allegations. The question of the political issue of diplomatic assurances and legal obligations of protection will be examined as well as the convergence of terrorism, criminal law and refugee protection. The use of digital means by state authorities to counter terrorism and the use of the personal data of foreigners will also be part of the reflections of this course. Students will have an opportunity to present in class their research."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
General Principles of Insurance LawLawSOLM138Semester 17NoNo

General Principles of Insurance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: This module provides students with an overview of the general principles of law involved in the formation of the insurance contract, the terms of policies and the claims process, as well as the role of brokers and the conduct of business at Lloyd's of London. Insurance is fundamental to a modern economy, allowing businesses and individuals to transfer the risk of loss, thereby facilitating investment and protecting wealth, and London is a world centre of the insurance industry. Students require no prior knowledge of insurance or English law. They will learn all they need to know as the module progresses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Climate Change LawLawSOLM136Full year7NoNo

Climate Change Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Angeliki Papantoniou

Description: Climate Change Law and Policy Application focuses on specific aspects of international, regional and national law in relation to climate change: Human Rights, international and national litigation, state responsibility, non-state actors and participation, capacity building and trade and climate change. There is also an overview of the core principles of the UNFCCC regime , including the Paris agreement and principles of international environmental law applicable to climate change, both of which are examined in depth in Climate Change Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Water LawLawSOLM137Semester 27YesNo

Water Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebecca Bates

Description: Water Law is a module examining the ecology and legal management of water. The legal area forms part of the wider body of environmental, international and economic law. It consider topics including the transboundary management of water resources, the human right to water, initiatives improve water service, privatisation, the role of water in energy production and the trade of water as a good or service.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Merger Control: Special TopicsLawSOLM053Semester 27NoNo

International Merger Control: Special Topics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SOLM249

Description: Within the field of competition law, merger control has attracted special attention. The reason for this attention can be found in the special nature of mergers as a business phenomenon, especially when compared with other business phenomena, such as abuse of dominance by firms or cartel activities. The process of relentless globalisation which has been developing since the 1990s has meant that merger operations can produce an effect on the conditions of competition in more than one jurisdiction. This means that, quite inevitably, regulatory approval in more than one jurisdiction may need to be sought. Such a consequence - as is widely accepted ¿ can give rise to uncertainty for the firms concerned and cause huge expense and significant delay. Those who are involved in advising business firms in a merger situation are also not immune from the uncertainty when merger operations have to be notified to more than one competition authority. Often legal advisors have to answer extremely difficult questions in merger cases, such as whether notification of the merger to the competition authorities in one or more jurisdictions is necessary or mandatory or even desirable; which authorities need to be notified; what is required for this purpose and how to go about notifying the authorities concerned; and how will the authorities assess the merger, including any relevant time framework within which they will operate and ultimately reach a decision in a given case. The Module will aim at a thorough examination of the highly important phenomena of international mergers and their regulation worldwide. The focus of the Module will be on special topics including: government intervention and national champions; the treatment of conglomerate effects from practical perspective, merger remedies among others. The Module will be taught in a very practical manner, to reflect the very nature of the topic. A highly interesting range of case studies and the knowledge and expertise of practitioners in the field will be a key aspect of the course. The Module should prove to be attractive for students attending other competition law courses and those with an `international¿ dimension in other areas of commercial orientation on the LLM.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Law of Geographical IndicationsLawSOLM088Semester 27NoNo

Law of Geographical Indications

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans

Description: Geographical indications (GIs) recognise the provenance and heritage of products, especially food and drink. The GI provides registered products with protection against imitation; and protects consumers from being misled about the geographical origin or quality of goods. They are important to the economy and environment of rural regions. GIs, such as Scotch Whisky, Parmigiano Reggiano or Darjeeling Tea, have become a valuable form of collective intellectual property. This module is intended for those involved in the drafting of specifications for the registration of GIs; or the formulation of regulations governing GIs; or the complementary administration of trade mark systems; or more generally, in the devising socio-economic policy for rural regions. The module will focus on EU law for the regulation of GIs; while having due regard to the comparative relationship other influential jurisdictions, including those of India and China; and by way of contrast, to the means by which GIs are protected as trade marks in the United States (US). The module will examine the substantive and procedural law relating to the EU regulation of GIs including the definition and eligibility of geographical names for registration; control or inspection obligations; enforcement and; the inter-relationship of GIs with trade marks. The module will consider the international enforcement of GIs, especially the way in which the competing models of EU and US regulation might be further harmonised within trade agreements; as well as possible approaches to future agreement between the UK and the EU concerning the recognition and protection of GIs following the withdrawal of the UK from the EU.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Environmental LawLawSOLM134Semester 17YesNo

International Environmental Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Description: This course focuses on international legal and institutional arrangements concerning the management of the environment. It examines both theoretical and practical dimensions of these arrangements. This course explores some of the most salient aspects of the expanding area of international environmental law. It examines, in particular, global environmental issues that have risen to the top of the international law and policy agenda in the wake of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Rio Conference) and the 2002 Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development and 2015 UN Goals . It deals with the fundamental questions of IEL : the precautionary principles ; polluter pays principle, environmental impact assessment. The notion of sustainable development occupies an important place in this course. It provides an acknowledgment that environmental law needs to be considered at the same time as social and economic dimensions of development The module is linked with human rights law and economic law (WTO).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Ethics of Migration and AsylumLawSOLM173Full year7NoNo

Ethics of Migration and Asylum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Ashcroft

Description: "This module introduces the main philosophical and ethical debates concerning border control, citizenship, migration and refugee/asylum-seeker status. It sets out the arguments for and against ¿open borders¿, the political theory of citizenship and the nation state, and the relationships between citizens¿ rights and universal human rights. As well as matters of general philosophical principle, we will look at the ethics of border control practices, from identity cards and entry controls to surveillance and access to public services, detention and repatriation. We will also consider the cultural dimensions of migration control, in particular the relationship between discourses of security, citizenship, and race/ethnicity/cultural difference."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Comparative Immigration LawLawSOLM174Full year7NoNo

Comparative Immigration Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module relates developments in migration law to wider socio-political developments including decolonisation, nationalism, and economic demands; race and ethnicity in immigration laws; marriage and families in immigration law; gender and spouses in migration laws; international and comparative refugee law; how states compete for skilled migrants; immigration law as an aspect of Europeanisation; how states create and deal with irregular migration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Interactive Entertainment LawLawSOLM085Semester 27YesNo

Interactive Entertainment Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Interactive Entertainment Law analyses some of the legal, commercial, contractual and regulatory issues that the Games and Interactive Entertainment industry faces in. It delineates and analyses the legal parameters within which developers and publishers operate and in which players create and consume content, providing students with an in-depth analysis of the industry from the development to the commercialisation of interactive entertainment products.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Business of FilmLawSOLM087Full year7NoNo

The Business of Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module deals with intellectual property and the international film industries, including the transformative environment of digital technology and user-generated content, through a consideration of protection and commercialisation in key jurisdictions and markets. Topics include the development of a film prospectus, ancillary rights, financing and alternative funding (including crowdfunding models and fan-based theories), development and production, distribution, merchandising and co-branding, film franchises and adaptations, censorship, titles and credits, cast and performers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Transfer PricingLawSOLM129Semester 27YesNo

Transfer Pricing

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christiana Hjipanayi

Description: The module will provide students with knowledge of transfer pricing and the various principles and standards developed to deal with it. There will be a historical overview of the issues followed by an analysis of the evolution of principles leading to the BEPS Action Plan and the updated 2017 Transfer Pricing Guidelines. The module will consider major current transfer pricing issues around intangibles, business restructuring, the digital economy, services and financing. It also examines issues such as transfer pricing documentation and dispute resolution (both arbitration and litigation). The intersection of transfer pricing with EU law will also be considered and the case law on state aid and APAs will be reviewed in detail. The course is not jurisdiction specific; rather it offers a holistic approach to the topic with cameos of the different approaches of countries to it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Migration LawLawSOLM172Semester 27NoNo

International Migration Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

Description: "The module will start by studying the historical origins and development of international legal tools to regulate human mobility across borders, with a discussion of the available regulatory options and their ethical/philosophical underpinnings (ranging from the 'open borders' formula to 'communitarian' perspectives). The different regimes, actors and institutions playing a role in the legal administration of international migration will be examined next, with particular focus on key inter-governmental institutions (such as the ILO and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants) and non-governmental actors (such as IOM and ICMPD) as norms entrepreneurs in this area. The study of substantive law, including relevant State practice and case law of national and international courts and Treaty bodies, will follow thereafter, following four thematic blocs: 1) labour migration, with particular focus on ILO conventions and the UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families; 2) family migration and children on the move; 3) terrorism and the securitisation of migration post 9/11; and 4) irregular migration, human trafficking and migrant smuggling, with special reference to the 2000 Palermo Protocols to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Cartels, Collusion and Competition LawLawSOLM057Semester 27YesNo

Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The Directorate General for Competition of the European Commission states that a cartel is a group of similar, independent companies which join together to fix prices, to limit production or to share markets or customers between them. Instead of competing with each other, cartel members rely on each others' agreed course of action, which reduces their incentives to provide new or better products and services at competitive prices. As a consequence, their clients (consumers or other businesses) end up paying more for less quality. This is why cartels are illegal under the competition legislations of a vast number of jurisdictions and why competition authorities impose heavy fines on companies involved in a cartel. Since cartels are illegal, they are generally highly secretive and evidence of their existence is not easy to find. The 'leniency policy' encourages companies to hand over inside evidence of cartels to competition authorities. This results in the cartel being destabilised. In recent years, most cartels have been detected by competition authorities around the world after one cartel member confessed and asked for leniency, though the authorities also successfully continue to carry out its own investigations to detect cartels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Intellectual Property LawLawSOLM084Semester 27NoNo

Global Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: What is intellectual property? Who benefits from these laws? What types of subject matter are protected in the global perspective under patent, copyright, trade mark, etc. laws? What are the main I.P. treaties and conventions? What is the connection between trade (WTO-TRIPS) and intellectual property law? What are the main justifications and criticisms in relation to IP law? By looking at national and global IP laws, the course gives a fundamental grounding in patents, copyright, trade marks, as well as international hybrid rights such as geographical indications, plant and seed protection, utility model, design, and unfair competition protection. The module also examines the global nature of intellectual property law and policy as it is affected arising from emerging technologies, and the consequential impact on the rights and obligations of peoples and corporations. Concentrating on the jurisprudence of major countries, including the EU and US, the course also examines the conflicting positions adopted as to the propertisation of (i) drugs, biological organisms and gene technologies; and (ii) traditional knowledge and cultural heritage. The module further examines the controversial clashes which have emerged between IPRs and international norms in various fora including competition law, human rights, development and environmental agendas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Natural Resources LawLawSOLM254Semester 27YesNo

International Natural Resources Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rebecca Bates

Description: The international legal regime relating to natural resources is complex and multi-dimensional. It is found in many places, based on doctrines of public international law, regional and local laws as well specific treaty obligations. It is also a dynamic area of international law as changes in technology and environmental awareness of the impact of such developments have led to further changes in legal regime. Concepts in Natural Resources Law: Climate, Energy and Water intersects and supports the study of other disciplines including international environmental law, energy law, as well as international investment law and international economic law. Concepts in Natural Resources Law: Climate, Energy and Water examines the area of International Natural Resources Law from a multi-dimensional perspective with a particular emphasis on climate, energy and water resources. The impact of globalisation and international legal rules on activities in the natural resources sector will be explored throughout the unit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Physical DynamicsPhysics and AstronomySPA5304Semester 25YesNo

Physical Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA5218

Description: Introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian mechanics. Origin of Conservation Laws and their relation to symmetry properties. Rotational motion of rigid bodies, Euler's equations, principal axes and stability of rotation, precession. Small vibration approximation, normal modes

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International and Comparative Petroleum Law and ContractsLawSOLM161Semester 17YesNo

International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Carlos Bellorin Nunez

Description: Petroleum laws and contracts are the ultimate manifestation of policy and are the result of lengthy negotiation processes and have an unusual dynamic. According to the World Bank, between 1999 and 2010 more than 30 countries revised their petroleum contracts and made major amendments or completely changed their petroleum legal and fiscal framework. Several more countries have done the same since the 2014 oil price downturn in order to adapt themselves to the changes in the industry. This module will examine the main type of contracts used in the upstream petroleum industry (Production Sharing Agreements, Concessions and Service Agreements) and their most important legal and fiscal mechanisms and the reasons why these are so frequently changed. This course will also focus on the study of these contracts dynamics within the so-called energy transition, risk mitigation strategies in order to avoid the most common forms of legal and political risks: expropriations and contract renegotiation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Energy Decommissioning and Waste Management in International LawLawSOLM252Semester 27YesNo

Energy Decommissioning and Waste Management in International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The module on Energy Decommissioning and Waste Management in International Law examines the legal issues arising in connection with the decommissioning of energy infrastructure and the management of waste in the energy sector, both from a theoretical and practical perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Migration and Asylum Law through PracticeLawSOLM177Semester 17YesNo

Migration and Asylum Law through Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

Description: This module examines the international (and regional, especially European) law dimensions of protecting refugees and other categories of migrants through practice. It provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts and workings of international law, in general, and international (and European) refugee, migration, and human rights law, in particular, as they relate to trans-broder movement, covering aspects of border control, maritime migration, transnational crime, torture, terrorism, and humanitarian governance. Tuition will be delivered in mixed fashion, through a placement with one of the industry partners offering QM-exclusive internships (including: REDRESS - Justice for Torture Victims; The European Council on Refugees & Exiles (ECRE); the UN Office for Drugs and Crime (UNODC); AMERA International; Kingsley Napley LLP; and The AIRE Centre: Advice on Individual Rights in Europe) in combination with fortnightly group reflection and consultation sessions with the module convener. Candidates will be selected during Term 1, after a "Meet & Greet"" event with partner organisations, and be given a training session before the start of the internship. A choice between on-site and on-line placement options will be available. Regardless of the type of experience, candidates will keep a internship diary, where they will record key milestones of their learning experience. A self-evaluation and guided reflection session will gather the whole group to assess the practical work against set readings and debate key issues in light of current academic, policy, and media debates every other week of Term 2. An oral presentation and a final internship report will complete the assessment portfolio for the module."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
WTO Law: Fundamental PrinciplesLawSOLM192Semester 27NoNo

WTO Law: Fundamental Principles

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: The module examines the fundamental principles of the law of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Topics covered include sources of WTO law, the relationship between WTO law and international and domestic law, the WTO dispute settlement system, and substantive rules on market access (tariffs and non-tariff barriers), non-discrimination (national treatment and most-favoured nation treatment) and rules aimed at balancing free trade and non-trade concerns. The module provides students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the regulatory framework underpinning the multilateral trading system. On completion of the module, students should be able to advice public authorities, private companies or civil society organisations on the consistency of market access restrictions and discriminatory measures affecting international trade with WTO Law and on the remedies available for breaches of WTO Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Energy and Climate ChangeLawSOLM160Semester 27YesNo

Energy and Climate Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module will look at the international legal regime relating to climate change and consider how this will directly impact the energy sector. There is a fundamental shift in the energy industry away from fossil fuels (non renewable sources) to clean energy (renewable sources). This transition and how it will take place over the coming years will be discussed. This module will also consider emissions trading (ETS) and its effectiveness, the NDC (nationally determined commitments) of states to achieve climate change goals. In addition it will consider the polluter pays principle as well as the growing number of climate change disputes and assess how these might impact future energy regulation, international and national. The focus is climate change exclusively from the perspective of the energy sector.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysics and AstronomySPA7009PSemester 27YesNo

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Exploitation of Energy Resources in Disputed AreasLawSOLM251Semester 17YesNo

Exploitation of Energy Resources in Disputed Areas

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The module on Exploitation of Energy Resources in Disputed Areas examines the international legal issues arising in connection with exploration and exploitation of energy resources in disputed areas (both onshore and offshore, eg the South China Sea) from both a theoretical and practical perspective. It examines international rules and practices relating to disputed areas and how exploitation can proceed even when agreement on a boundary delimitation cannot be reached.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Principles of TaxationLawSOLM118Semester 17YesNo

Principles of Taxation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module covers the structure, principles, rules and application of a selection of taxes from a multi-jurisdictional and comparative perspective. In particular, the module looks at the taxation of individual income and wealth, the taxation of corporations and indirect taxation, as well as taxation at the sub-national level and tax administration. This is crucial not only for an understanding of specific domestic tax systems and the options available in designing domestic tax systems, but also to an understanding of the international tax system, which is determined by the interaction of national tax systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Public International & European Air Transport LawLawSOLM151Semester 17YesNo

Public International & European Air Transport Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Antigoni-Aikaterini Lykotrafiti

Description: Air transport is one of the most heavily regulated sectors of the economy. For passengers and goods to be transported safely, regularly, economically and efficiently, a dense web of rules is governing aspects such as the use of airspace, safety, security, air navigation, airports and the environment. This module examines the international, supranational and national rules that make aviation pride itself on being the safest and most innovative mode of transport, as well as the industry that has globalised the world, contributing to peace and economic growth. It also examines critically the lack of uniformity in the international regulatory framework and its implications for the industry and the economy at large.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Insurance RegulationLawSOLM139Semester 17NoNo

Insurance Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: This module deals with the regulation of insurance. It will look at the nature of risk in insurance business, the international standards on regulation and their influence on the shape of EU law and UK law, and in detail at the UK's approach to regulation, covering the structure of the regulator and the rules that are applied to regulation of insurance business (both those companies that provide insurance and intermediaries who facilitate insurance contracts) focusing inter alia on macro and micro prudential requirements & solvency rules, conduct of business rules and the resolution of systemically important insurers (financial resolution).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
AdmiraltyLawSOLM150Semester 17NoNo

Admiralty

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hilton Staniland

Description: No aspiring maritime (or shipping) lawyer can claim to be educated without at least some knowledge of the law relating to maritime claims. Indeed, such knowledge is invaluable to anyone who aspires eventually to work in shipping or international trade, whether as a lawyer in a law firm, as a legal advisor in-house, or in a P & I Club. While the emphasis will be the admiralty practice and procedure in England, the jurisprudence of other jurisdictions, namely Australia and South Africa, as well as international conventions on arrests of ships and on maritime liens and mortgages. No account will be taken of the special difficulties which fall within the ambit of the conflict of laws (or private international law), significant to a practitioner though these are. The module will cover the Admiralty jurisdiction and its nature; Maritime, statutory and possessory liens: legal characteristics; transferability; assignment; extinction; accrual of statutory liens; The exercise of Admiralty jurisdiction: limitations on the exercise of jurisdiction; time of invocation; residual matters; arrest scenarios; Priorities: generally; non-admiralty principles; admiralty principles; priorities and maritime liens; priorities and possessory liens; statutory liens; execution creditors; alteration of the prima facie order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Nuclear Physics and AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA5302Semester 15YesNo

Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Clarkson

Description: "A module describing sub-atomic phenomena and explaining them in terms of the theories of quantum physics and relativity: nuclear properties, reactions and decays; Nuclear astrophysics and its cosmological consequences."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Planetary SystemsPhysics and AstronomySPA5241Semester 25YesNo

Planetary Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilisation human beings have charted the paths of the planets across the night sky and speculated about their nature. Indeed the word planet has its origin in the ancient Greek term `planete' meaning wanderer. Used in its modern scientific context the word planet refers to an object which orbits about a star, but which itself is not a star. Planets have a special philosophical significance since they are the bodies on which life itself is expected to come into existence. This course provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of the planets in our Solar System, and of the planetary systems now known to orbit around stars other than the Sun and the extrasolar planets. The properties of individual planets and their satellites will be described and contrasted, and basic physical principles will be used to explain their orbits and physical features. Our understanding of how planetary systems form will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Intellectual Property Law in ChinaLawSOLM095Semester 17YesNo

Intellectual Property Law in China

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: Reflecting the growing importance of Chinese developments in IP, and its vital role in the current and future global market economy, this module is designed to provide an insightful study of Chinese IP law and its relevance to the international community. The seminar based module looks into China's current copyright, trademark and patent, the law, policy and enforcement in the context of trade, and identifies the diverse approaches to effective management for IP in China.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare MarketsLawSOLM106Semester 27YesNo

Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard

Description: "This module examines how EU competition rules and regulatory principles and processes affect healthcare markets. We will look at internal market rules primarily from the perspective of corporate actors (whether public or private) rather than individual patients and healthcare professionals. We will consider the legal regime for the placing of medicines and medical products on the market, market surveillance and product liability regimes as well as the application of competition law rules in this sector. Indicative list of topics that might be covered include: free movement of health goods and services in the European Union: general principles and intellectual property issues; pharmaceutical products: clinical trials and marketing authorisations; medical devices and human tissues; post market policies (vigilance, advertising and product liability); applicability of competition rules to the healthcare sector; cartels and abuses of dominant position; use of intellectual property rights and competition law; Services of General Economic Interest and competition law; state aids and public procurement in the healthcare sector."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Intellectual Property and the Life SciencesLawSOLM093Full year7NoNo

Intellectual Property and the Life Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: The life sciences can be defined as the use of living organisms (biotechnology) and the protection or treatment of living organisms (medicine, veterinary medicine and plant protection). It comprises the science behind medicine, pharmacy and agriculture and their corresponding industries. The module will provide detailed knowledge of the role that intellectual property plays in providing investments for investment and incentives in the life sciences. It will also focus on the question of how to distribute the benefits of life sciences research fairly so that it benefits society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Design and Intellectual Property: EU and United StatesLawSOLM081Full year7NoNo

Design and Intellectual Property: EU and United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: The importance of design within competitive economies has been underestimated academically. Designs increase the visual, ergonomic, aesthetic and branding appeal of a product, and has the potential to increase the impact and competitiveness of the product within different market sectors. This option will teach students the key ways to protect the investment in graphic, environmental and product designs, with an emphasis on design patents, trade mark/trade dress and copyright laws. While the focus of the course will be on EU and US laws, the course will also cover the international design registration system, as well as specific design-related issues in major industries such as competition and consumable markets (coffee pods, spare parts, cartridges), 3D printing, and counterfeiting within furniture & fashion lifestyle industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Information Security and the LawLawSOLM210Full year7NoNo

Information Security and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: The security of important data, including personal, is of considerable concern to governments around the world as is the safety of critical infrastructure assets, systems, and networks (both public and private) that are considered so vital that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety. Concerns about former have led to growing legal obligations to ensure the security of information and the systems that transmit and store it. Whether as part of personal data protection regimes, sector-specific regulations (e.g., healthcare, banking and finance) private law or company law obligations, these present a growing source of potential corporate liability. Concerns about the latter have produced frameworks to enable oversight and cooperation needed to manage and mitigate risks to critical infrastructure. This course examines various EU and US legal frameworks

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Cyberspace: Jurisdiction and Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM211Full year7NoNo

Cyberspace: Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: The module analyses the concept and theories of jurisdiction under International Law (Public International Law), from the perspective of international criminal law, especially in the context of transnational crimes such as cybercrime, from the perspective of regulation (eg data protection and transborder data flows; online gambling; online content regulation) and from the perspective of private international law/conflicts of law (jurisdiction and applicable law in civil and commercial disputes such as contract, torts generally, defamation & privacy infringements, IP infringements). It therefore takes a novel approach by looking both at private law and public law- but this approach is necessary as internet communications are not restricted to private law and private international law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Policing in Local and Global ContextsLawSOLM202Semester 17YesNo

Policing in Local and Global Contexts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saskia Hufnagel

Description: This module examines law enforcement in different cultural contexts (i.e. Europe, Asia, North America) and addresses possible conflicts of interests when different jurisdictions have to work together internationally and trans-nationally. It traces the evolution of international, transnational and EU legal frameworks on law enforcement cooperation, eg the development of Interpol and Europol, from their early beginnings in the 20th century to todays more sophisticated models of information transfer between policing and judicial agencies. The first half of the module will provide an overview of law enforcement models and procedural requirements in different jurisdictions around the globe. The second half of the module will consider international, EU and regional police cooperation strategies and underlying legal frameworks and how the specific jurisdictional requirements discussed in the first half of the module might foster or hamper cooperation in practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Commercialisation of IPLawSOLM092Semester 27YesNo

Commercialisation of IP

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr John Hull

Description: Getting intellectual property rights is relatively easy. It's what you do with them that's difficult. And since 80% or more of a business's value is made up of IP (sometimes called 'Intellectual Assets'), understanding how a business, a research charity or a university puts its IP to profitable use is fundamental to understanding how modern commercial life works. This module, which is unique in UK universities, is focused on how IP is created, owned and commercialised (or "monetised""). It is taught by a practising lawyer with extensive experience in all aspects of IP. Guest speakers with front-line experience of IP commercialisation are a key part of this module, allowing students to understand how commercial transactions take place in real life."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Law of Economic Crime: CorruptionLawSOLM200Semester 27NoNo

Law of Economic Crime: Corruption

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Peter Alldridge

Description: "The treatment of tax evasion in the UK, including the alternatives to prosecution and the developing regime for dealing with evasion. It will then turn to the national and international law of corruption, dealing with misconduct in public office. The treatment of bribery will include its history and theory, the developing international régime and the trend towards greater negotiation with persons suspected1 of bribery and placing greater duties in respect of enforcement and reporting on the private sector. There will be detailed case studies of corruption in sports and of the Trump Presidency. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dissertation in European LawLawSOLM908Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in European Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Human Rights LawLawSOLM909Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Human Rights Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM906Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Competition LawLawSOLM907Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Renewable Energy LawLawSOLM167Semester 27YesNo

Renewable Energy Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Malik Dahlan

Description: This module will cover all of the legal and policy issues relating to renewable power generation. There are a range of renewable energy sources available from solar to wind, biomass to geothermal. Students will learn how the energy transition will impact the renewable sector as the world moves towards low-carbon energy. This module will consider this move towards reducing Green House Gas emissions and the growing international, regional and national laws that require States to encourage green investment. China, Denmark, Germany and the Middle East will be used as case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate LawLawSOLM905Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
United States Energy Law, Regulation and PolicyLawSOLM158Semester 17NoNo

United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This course covers US energy regulation and policy including the impact of pending climate change legislation and proposed Environmental Protection Agency climate change rules and regulations. The US has been a market leader in energy regulation and privatization since World War II. This module looks at how this was achieved in the electricity markets, oil a& gas including unconventional resources and more recently the renewables market. The work of the FERC (Federal Energy Regulaiton Commission) and the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) are also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Mining and Natural Resources LawLawSOLM166Semester 17YesNo

Mining and Natural Resources Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Lauren Downes

Description: This module covers the legal aspects of the mining industry. Mining companies also have to be aware of political considerations and the impact of the nationalisation cycle. The different stages of the mining industry will be reviewed from development, production and remediation at the closure of the mine. Each phase requires certain licences and permits to proceed to the next stage. Some of the newer innovations of underwater mining will be looked at and the impact of the relevant provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Of particular interest, is the work of the International Seabed Authority and the regulations and recommendations it is making on prospecting in the sea. Environmental considerations and corporate social responsibility standards will also be discussed. Finally, there will be a review of mining disputes, how they are resolved and their impact on the mining sector and the contracts negotiated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Investment LawLawSOLM189Semester 17YesNo

International Investment Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Angelos Dimopoulos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM048

Description: This module offers a comprehensive treatment of international law governing foreign investments. It identifies and analyses the sources, scope and content of the substantive international law rules that determine investor-State relationships, and discusses their application in practice. It examines the international law context within which investment law rules emerge and the substantive principles and standards that apply to investor-state relationships. It highlights the overlaps, similarities and differences divergent investment legal instruments enabling students to give advice about the application of investment law in specific cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Energy Law and EthicsLawSOLM157Full year7NoNo

International Energy Law and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The International Energy Law and Ethics module is concerned with legal and ethical issues arising in the energy sector. It aims to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to the analysis of these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
UK Tax LawLawSOLM124Semester 27NoNo

UK Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The module will provide an introduction to the UK system of taxation, both personal and business. It will also allow students to gain an understanding of the key concepts of tax law from a UK perspective. It will cover the basic principles of the taxation of individuals in the UK on their earnings, gains and wealth. The rationale for various types of taxes will be explored, in particular the UK inheritance and capital gains taxes. Much discussed issues such as tax avoidance, sin taxes and zero hour employment contracts will also be considered. The international perspective will be included and comparisons will be made with taxes in other jurisdictions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Media Law: Reputation ManagementLawSOLM216Semester 27YesNo

Media Law: Reputation Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: Media Law: Reputation Management covers the key areas of law used by those who seek to build and protect a media 'brand' for commercial gain. The module will open with a detailed consideration of libel law and how that protects the public image of an individual (or, indeed, an entity with legal personhood). Whereas perhaps three decades ago the law in this area seemed well settled, the challenges of the internet combined with much of the Defamation Act 2013 remaining to be refined through interpretation by the courts makes this an important and ongoing focus for study by the commercial media lawyer. The second aspect of law which the module will look at is the developing area of privacy. While traditionally English law has not offered direct protection for privacy, a wide range of las have been used in effect to prevent or at least compensate individuals aggrieved by private elements of their lives being published to the masses. Sometimes this has simply been about the privacy of an individual, while in other circumstances it has been about the protection of a direct commercial relationship (such as that between the Douglases and OK Magazine in Douglas v Hello). The development of the tort of Misuse of Private Information, a result of the application of the Human Rights Act 1998, has arguably created a de facto common law privacy protection which continues to explore new nuances at the discretion of the courts. The continued existence of the tabloid press, the fallout from the phone-hacking scandal, and the apparently unending appetite on the part of the general public for 'celebrity' gossip indicates that this is an area of law which will continue to see development for some time to come. The final area of law to be covered in this module focuses on intellectual property in a media context, in particular the use of IP in personality rights and, more broadly, as a means of controlling an individual's brand. As of yet, English law does not recognise personality rights, instead protecting only those who choose to actively merchandise themselves via a form of passing off ('false endorsement'). The course will open up the debate on this issue and consider the potential for this to be expanded, as well as other ways in which IP may be used to protect personal reputation (or not - see, for instance, application of HUbbard v Vosper in this regard). Although English law will be the primary context in which this module will be taught, it is intended that this will provide more a 'case study' context in which the issues raised will be debated rather than a course solely about English law per se. Laws in other jurisdictions (such as, for example, the ongoing debate on defamation reform in Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be raised and discussed where appropriate.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Fundamental Questions in the Law of TreatiesLawSOLM116Semester 17YesNo

Fundamental Questions in the Law of Treaties

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Description: This module focuses on the most fundamental elements of the law of treaties. It is based on the analysis of the text of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the law of Treaties. It relies on the case law of international courts and tribunals and the theory of international law. Anyone who wants to study or practice international law should take this module, as giving an invariable analysis of the law of treaties, which is the pillar of international law. This module deals with such important issues as the definition of the treaty in international law; consent to be bound; interpretation of treaties; reservation s to treaties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Wet Shipping LawLawSOLM147Semester 27NoNo

Wet Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Hilton Staniland

Description: The module will cover all areas of the so-called 'wet' shipping law; i.e., all legal issues that might arise while a vessel and its cargo are at sea arising from various unfortunate incidents. The module will cover in detail collisions at sea, the law of salvage, the problematic area of wreck removal, the complex area of marine pollution, incidents of piracy at sea including the modern employment of armed guards; and the importance and computation of general average adjustments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Principles of International Criminal LawLawSOLM114Semester 17YesNo

Principles of International Criminal Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: This module explores the evolution of International Criminal Law in a historical perspective. It examines the sources of international criminal law in both treaty and custom, as well as the main principles of interpretation. It seeks to provide students with an understanding of the concept of international crime, and the distinction maintained in international law between regimes of individual and state responsibility. It is especially concerned with the substantive crimes within the jurisdiction of international tribunals such as genocide, war crimes, aggression, torture, and crimes against humanity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Regulation of ShippingLawSOLM146Full year7NoNo

International Regulation of Shipping

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexandros Ntovas

Description: Since time immemorial, ships and their activities were the subject of customs and laws that inexorably transcended authorities anchored in a single land jurisdiction. It is historically recorder that shipping is the oldest economic activity that engendered the legal concept of, what today we refer to in contemporary terms as, international regulation. In particular the module covers: The international regulatory framework of shipping; Registration of ships; Access to ports and the evolving port-State control; Safety and security (including cyber-security) ship requirements; Ship-source pollution; Rescue of distressed persons at sea (including matters relating to refugees and irregular migration; covering also the issue of stowaways); Maritime labour; Construction and Recycling of ships.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and LawLawSOLM080Full year7NoNo

Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: In this module, students will engage directly with industry and commercial fashion practice through workshops and enterprise development, gaining specific insight into design practice, fashion media, merchandising, branding, and retail curation. Seminars will cover a range of topics in commercial fashion enterprise and will consider in detail practical examples in management and innovation, allowing students to gain a comprehensive insight into building a fashion brand identity and an understanding of commercial and artistic practice in fashion and design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Physics Investigative ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7015UFull year7NoNo

Physics Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor

Description: A student will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. S/he will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation and placing them in a physics context. The project will run through both semesters and will involve keeping a research log (see 'Engagement Log' elsewhere on this page), interim coursework, a final written report and oral assessment at the end of semester B.
The aim of the investigative project is to give the student the opportunity to work independently on a chosen project towards specified goals. These goals will vary from project to project and may include: writing software to achieve a specified computational task, e.g., simulation of a physical process; carrying out a series of measurements to establish or disprove a working hypothesis; building a piece of equipment, e.g., to interface an experiment to a PC; analytical mathematical analysis applied to the study of a theoretical problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Mental Health Law: Capacity to Consent and Best InterestsLawSOLM104Semester 27YesNo

Mental Health Law: Capacity to Consent and Best Interests

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang

Description: This module will analyse the Mental Capacity Act (MCA), the legislation that provides the framework in England and Wales for assessing capacity and making decisions on behalf of those who lack capacity to decide, and its application in the context of medical and social care. This module is recommended for those interested in issues of consent in health and social care. The question that will guide this module is whether the law in England and Wales strikes a good balance between respecting the autonomy of individuals and protecting their welfare. It will also discuss the compatibility between the MCA and human rights law (in particular, the European Convention on Human Rights and the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities). Therefore, even though this course will focus on England and Wales, students interested in comparative and human rights approaches to mental health and the law are strongly encouraged to apply. The cases that students will discuss in this module include, for instance, the force-feeding of anorexia patients, the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from people in a minimally conscious state, deprivation of liberty in hospitals and care homes, and the reproductive choices of people with learning disabilities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Terrorism & Human Rights: Constitutional PerspectivesLawSOLM071Full year7NoNo

Terrorism & Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Elspeth Guild

Description: "This course examines the legal responses to terrorism since 9/11 2001 in the context of international and European human rights obligations. At the start of the course we will consider some overarching questions: how has terrorism been defined in different legal contexts and what is the significance of the language used in describing terrorism and counter-terrorism? From a legal perspective is terrorism different to other criminal activities? Why does our response to terrorism seem to defy legal categorisation (civil/criminal, domestic/international, immigration/national security) and why does terrorism create so many conceptual difficulties for the law? The course will a selection of issues from the following, including: Thinking about terrorism, counter-terrorism and human rights: some of the themes we will be looking at throughout the first half of the course. Terrorism has put significant stress on the rule of law and human rights since 9/11. It has led to a proliferation of new legal regimes and new legal categories (control orders, UN asset freezing, ¿unlawful combatants¿ etc). Defining Terrorism: the difficulty of defining terrorism both in everyday discourse and in the law. We will examine what is at stake when we call an act one of terrorism. Are there forms of political violence that do not constitute terrorism? If so, is terrorism simply the label we use for political violence with which we disagree? If not, can we come up with a neutral definition of terrorism? Torture and Terrorism: why has torture re-appeared as a contentious legal issue since 9/11? Is torture ever acceptable? Are there dangers in attempting to learn from ¿ticking bombs¿ and other catastrophe scenarios? We will examine the national and international legal regime governing torture, in particular the provisions of the ECHR and UNCAT. Extraordinary Rendition and CIA Black Sites at the European Court of Human Rights: although extraordinary rendition, secret detention and torture are all nominally illegal in Europe, the space for legal redress when they have occurred has become highly complex, with governments, non-governmental organisations, media and investigators all playing a role. The session will examine how it was possible to construct the case, and will encourage reflection on the effectiveness and limitations of such legal action in creating accountability. Targeted killings and drone strikes: In recent years we have seen growing prominence given to targeted killings, and in particular drone strikes, as a key, and increasingly public, part in the ¿war on terror¿. We will examine the ethical and legal issues they raise. What is the applicable international and domestic legal regime that applies to targeted killings?"

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
EU Data Protection LawLawSOLM209Semester 17YesNo

EU Data Protection Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: This module examines EU data protection laws and examples of the regulatory frameworks established in the Member States. It explores the key debates surrounding and commercial and other implications under the new regime of the General Data Protection Regulation, the Policing and Criminal Justice Data and the E Privacy framework, including the challenges of particular developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Scientific ComputingPhysics and AstronomySPA5666Semester 25YesYes

Introduction to Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anthony Phillips
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402 and take SPA4210

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: This module provides a general introduction to numerical problem solving with the programming language Python. Scientific computing provides an inherently interdisciplinary approach to problem solving; one that combines aspects of applied mathematics, computer science, and software engineering with concepts and models from the physical sciences.

In this module basic aspects of scientific computation, including computer number representations, machine precision, discretisation of equations, error and uncertainty, will be discussed. The mathematical underpinnings of numerical methods of problem solving will be developed, including numerical integration and differentiation, searching, data fitting, interpolation, matrix computing, and solving differential equations.

These theoretical topics will be put into practice during weekly computational laboratory exercises where computer programs will be written that utilise a variety of numerical techniques to solve problems. Authentic examples from the physical sciences and industry and will be explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
International and Comparative Social RightsLawSOLM065Semester 27YesNo

International and Comparative Social Rights

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: International and Comparative Social Rights examines the contribution of law to making poverty history. The course critically examines the role of international and comparative law in constructing and maintaining historic and current social, political and economic inequalities. The course will analyse the law¿s potential and limitations as an instrument of redistributive and egalitarian social, economic, cultural and political change. New legal tools such as human rights budgets and the minimum core will be critically analysed together with legal and political philosophies focusing on the separation of powers, justiciability and institutional conversations

The history of the different systems of implementation will be studied together with new developments both procedural and substantive within the United Nations human rights machinery. The implementation of positive obligations on governments within the African Union, the Organisation of American States as well as within Europe are also analysed.

International and Comparative Social Rights will also include comparative jurisprudence from Argentina, India, Philippines, South Africa and Venezuela as well as other relevant jurisdictions and will explore the potential of these different approaches for other democracies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 13: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 14: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 15: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 16: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 17: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 18: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 19: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 20: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 21: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Crimes of the Powerful: State CrimeLawSOLM198Full year7NoNo

Crimes of the Powerful: State Crime

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by governments and it explores the definition and nature of state crime in criminological and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the state and the scale and type of crimes committed by governments and their agents. The definitional processes involved in labeling states acts as criminal are explored, as are the forces which explain why and how states enter into deviant or criminal practices. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative of the subjects that will be covered: Torture, State-corporate crime, counter-terrorism and human rights, Natural Disasters, Asylum Policy as state crime, War Crimes, Genocide, Resisting State Crime: the power of civil society, corruption, state crime denial, comparative genocides, and forced evictions. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
DissertationLawSOLM903Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM923 or take SOLM904 or take SOLM905 or take SOLM906 or take SOLM910 or take SOLM911 or take SOLM921

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Banking and Finance LawLawSOLM904Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
DissertationLawSOLM902Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
EU Energy LawLawSOLM164Full year7NoNo

EU Energy Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: "This module provides students with an understanding of the EU regime relating to energy. It will examine specifically energy regulation models and the regulation and governance of specific markets such electricity and gas. It will encourage students to recognize the relevant issues impacting regulation of the specific energy markets, understand and contribute to the debates surrounding the regulation of such markets, to critically analyse the issues impacting regulation and to apply their knowledge and critical abilities to factual problems encountered by regulators and non-state actors. It examines central themes and debates in energy regulation and their impact on legal developments and policy reform as it relates to the European energy sector. The module covers energy regulation models and the regulation and governance of specific markets such as oil and gas, electricity and alternate energy sources. It will explore issues such as the role of ACER as a transnational regulator, the European Target Model for the electricity and gas markets, market coupling and the likely shape of future energy markets as the Energy Union continues to take shape. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Cybercrime: Forensic InvestigationsLawSOLM208Full year7NoNo

Cybercrime: Forensic Investigations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Internet technologies have enabled new ways of committing crimes and have moved "old"" crimes such as fraud online- this has created interesting challenges to the investigation, prosecution and enforcement of the criminal law. Internet technologies are borderless and have enabled an increase in transnational crime. This Module will examine the legal procedural issues arising from transborder online crime: international co-operation, mutual assistance, extradition; the role played by private actors/industry in the enforcement of cybercrime (payment intermediaries; hosting providers (eg cloud computing); internet access providers; domain name registries and registrars etc); the relationship between public and private enforcement; the national and international powers of collecting intelligence & evidence (including surveillance); the law of evidence and admissibility; computer, device and network forensics."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Energy Law PrinciplesLawSOLM155Semester 27YesNo

Energy Law Principles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module provides students with an overview of the energy sector. It identifies the sources of energy law from international treaties to soft law guidelines for example the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Energy is the largest sector globally and is one of the most heavily regulated. Students will learn about the evolution of the energy sector and the difficulties for the future as the sector adapts to the energy transition. There are many interested parties in the energy sector from hosts states, international oil companies, national oil companies, NGOs, IGOs as well as service providers. The different interests of the main actors can be addressed in contracts, national laws or international obligations for example the Nationally Determine Contributions of each State under the Paris Agreement 2015.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate CrimeLawSOLM197Semester 27YesNo

Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate Crime

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by corporates and it explores the definition and nature of corporate crime in criminological, legal and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the corporation and the scale and type of crimes committed by companies and their agents. The definitional processes involved in labeling corporates acts as criminal are explored, as are the forces which explain why and how corporates enter into deviant or criminal practices. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative of the subjects that will be covered: corporate manslaughter, State-corporate crime, business and human rights, the power of civil society, corruption, corporate crime denial, and land grabbing. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Comparative Law MethodologyLawSOLM186Semester 27YesNo

Comparative Law Methodology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ralf Michaels

Description: For a long time, comparative law was both marginalized as a discipline and thoroughly undertheorized. Today, both have changed: comparative law has received more attention, and there has been a healthy, if at times disorganized, debate on questions of method and theory. The course provides a systematic introduction into this debate through a combination of seminal texts, overview articles, and brief examples of selected positions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Law and Authority in a Global ContextLawSOLM187Semester 27YesNo

Law and Authority in a Global Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hans Lindahl

Description: The course offers a theory of law and authority in a context marked by the globalisation of inclusion and exclusion. It analyses this issue in five lectures/seminars: (1) the passage from state-centric law to global legal pluralism; (2) (global) legal ordering as a process of including and excluding ; (3) the contestation of emergent global legal orders by alter- and anti-globalisation movements; (4) authority and struggles for recognition; (5) Global constitutionalism and its limits. Drawing on insights from legal and political theory, it proposes a model of legal order that explains how globalisation transforms law and how law gives shape to globalisation processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
DissertationLawSOLM901Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in LawsLawSOLM900Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Laws

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
US International TaxationLawSOLM123Semester 17YesNo

US International Taxation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module is designed to cover the structure, principles, rules and application of the US international tax system. In particular, it will cover the US tax principles and rules that apply to US and foreign entities and individuals engaged in cross-border operations and transactions. Coverage will include jurisdictional principles, the inbound and outbound regimes, income tax treaties and the treatment of corporations and shareholders. The module will also cover the taxation of trusts, estates and gifts, reporting requirements and tax administration and procedure, all with a focus on the cross-border context. The module will examine how the system operates in practice and also consider US tax policy in these areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Arbitration and EnergyLawSOLM163Semester 27YesNo

International Arbitration and Energy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International arbitration proceedings in the energy sector have seen an important increase in recent years, both in terms of their numbers and their economic and political importance. This module provides students with the basis for understanding the particular issues of disputes in the energy sector, both in international investment and commercial arbitration. It gives students aiming to work in the arbitration area an important qualification in a very competitive market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Tax System Design and Policy in Emerging and Developing EconomiesLawSOLM121Semester 17YesNo

Tax System Design and Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module considers tax system design and tax policy issues relevant to emerging and developing economies. It examines tax policy and design issues regarding the choice of taxes, expanding the tax base, expanding the tax net, encouraging taxpayer compliance and strengthening administrative capacity. In this context it considers the political economy of direct and indirect taxes, the incidence of taxation, fiscal federalism and the impact of tax treaties. It will also look at options for reform of existing systems and for improving tax administration and collection in emerging and developing economies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Protection and Indemnity (P&I) ClubsLawSOLM153Semester 27NoNo

Protection and Indemnity (P&I) Clubs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: The module will examine the operation of P&I Clubs as mutual insurance associations vital to the existence and running of the international shipping community and trade. The module will cover their history, development and structure, their basic rules of cover and the provision of security, as well as the basic (and sui generis) concepts underlying their operation. The module will additionally examine the various risks P&I Clubs insure against, their financial operation, the International Group of P&I Clubs (including its structure, cover and importance), and how these associations relate to other forms of insurance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Entrepreneurship Law ClinicLawSOLM213Semester 27YesNo

Entrepreneurship Law Clinic

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Karen Watton

Description: Entrepreneurship Law Clinic is a unique opportunity to learn and reflect on the legal issues that face entrepreneurs. In this module you will have the opportunity to (i) develop a number of professional skills and your professional identity; (ii) understand the practical legal issues that are faced by entrepreneurs and how to respond to those issues; (iii) interview and draft advice for a client; (iv) develop and practice public speaking and presentation skills; (v) work within a team and network closely with legal experts and entrepreneurship specialists in London's Tech City. Students must adhere to the Legal Advice Centre's practices and procedures including the signing of a confidentiality agreement and student contract.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Professional Capability
  • Item 3: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Maritime ArbitrationLawSOLM145Semester 27NoNo

Maritime Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: Specialist dispute resolution mechanisms catering to specific industry needs are popular in international commerce, and arbitration has emerged as the dominant industry choice for resolving shipping disputes, in particular charterparty disputes. Indeed important maritime arbitration centres have long been established in London and New York, and more recently others have started to emerge in countries such as Russia, China and Singapore. London remains a leader in this field with a large number of disputes being decided each year through arbitration in accordance with the terms of the London Maritime Arbitrators Association. The module will tackle questions such as: What is special about maritime arbitration and what distinguishes it from general commercial arbitration? What are the features of maritime arbitration that make it particularly popular? Is arbitration by its nature more suited to the resolution of disputes arising in connection with certain types of shipping contracts (e.g. charterparties) rather than others (e.g. contracts of carriage contained in bills of lading)? Why? What are the implications of widespread use of arbitration for the continued development of shipping law?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
MSc Physics Research ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7012PFull year7NoNo

MSc Physics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo

Description: The MSc Research Project is at the heart of the MSc programme. It is an independent project undertaken by the student within a working research group in the School. The project runs over three semesters in order to allow for the student to both design their project (using available literature etc.), be trained in the relevant techniques and carry out a reasonably substantial piece of research based on an actual (real) research problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
The GalaxyPhysics and AstronomySPA7010USemester 27YesNo

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA6305

Description: "The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Law of Patents and Related RightsLawSOLM077Semester 27YesNo

International Law of Patents and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents provide, for a limited time, the right to exclude others from acts of making, using, selling, keeping or importing products containing the patented invention. Under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) WTO Members, in particular developing countries, face challenges in meeting their obligations to provide patent protection and related rights. The module will assess the extent to which these obligations derived from international law impact on access to medicines, traditional knowledge, biological diversity, farmers' rights, food security and human rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Licensing Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM078Semester 17NoNo

Licensing Intellectual Property

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans

Description: The module begins with an explanation of the principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing contracts. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution. The module will discuss current issues in the field of licensing including trade marks and selective distribution agreements; standard essential patents and FRAND (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory) licensing; as well as copyright licensing, news aggregation; and technological self-help measures including blockchain technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Marine Insurance LawLawSOLM144Semester 27NoNo

Marine Insurance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: Marine insurance is a fascinating and important area of international shipping law. Shipping has always been perilous - adverse sea conditions, piracy, accidents and pollution at sea, deterioration of goods during transportation - and both owners of vessels and cargo have increasingly sought, over the years, to protect themselves in the event of loss. This module deals with the law of marine insurance. This module will examine, among other issues, the definition and formation of a marine insurance contract (including the duty of disclosure and insurable interest), the parties to the contract and the various risks covered (as well as those excluded), what constitutes evidence of the contract and its terms, claims under the contract, assignment, subrogation and contribution, the rule of proximate cause, and the diverse forms of loss that a vessel or cargo owner might suffer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Use of Force in International LawLawSOLM112Semester 17YesNo

Use of Force in International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the legal framework regulating the use of force in international affairs. It examines in detail the content of the prohibition on use force in a historical context , as well as the self-defence and collective security exceptions that were explicitly provided for. The course will also examine in detail the effect of threats from terrorists and rogue states on the development of the law. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of human rights norms on the law on use of force and whether international law recognises a distinct right of humanitarian intervention. It is will also consider arguments advanced in support of a general responsibility on States to intervene militarily in support of those facing mass atrocity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 7: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 8: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 9: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 10: 1.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 11: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 12: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 13: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 14: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 15: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 16: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 17: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 18: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 19: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 20: 1.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 21: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The GalaxyPhysics and AstronomySPA7010PSemester 27YesNo

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA6305P

Description: "The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Law's Relations: Autonomy, Consent and ConfidentialityLawSOLM103Semester 17YesNo

Law's Relations: Autonomy, Consent and Confidentiality

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ruth Fletcher

Description: "This module considers the different aspects of consent to treatment for capacitous adults and mature 'Gillick competent' children, from perspectives which respect autonomy and seek to support relationships which foster autonomy. We will examine current legal standards for information disclosure and voluntariness as aspects of consent and ask how such legal standards could be improved in order to support autonomy as one of law's relations. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Quantum Mechanics APhysics and AstronomySPA5319Semester 15YesNo

Quantum Mechanics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: "This course aims to introduce the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics from the beginning. By studying applications of the principles of quantum mechanics to simple systems the course will provide a foundation for understanding concepts such as energy quantisation, the uncertainty principle and quantum tunnelling, illustrating these with experimental demonstrations and other phenomena found in nature. These concepts are introduced and applied to systems of increasing (mathematical) complexity: (i)Infinite 1-D quantum wells. (ii)Finite 1-D quantum wells (introducing graphical solutions of transcendental equations). (iii)LCAO methods for modelling ions. (iv)Simple Harmonic oscillators (introducing Hermite polynomials and applying energy solutions to molecular vibrational spectra). (v)Beams of free particles, probability flux and reflection/transmission in stepwise varying potentials. (vi)Finite potential barriers and tunnelling, Tunnelling through arbitrary potential barriers (the Gamow factor), field emission and Alpha decay and tunnelling. The Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). (vii)The solution to the Hydrogen atom, including separation of variables, spherical harmonics, the radial equation and electronic energy levels and the quantum numbers n, l, ml and ms and resulting degeneracy. (viii)The treatment of angular momentum in quantum mechanics, its magnitude and projection along an axis. (ix)Introduction to first order, time independent, perturbation theory."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International Economic LawLawSOLM194Semester 27YesNo

International Economic Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: The module examines the law that governs international economic relations between states and between states and non-state actors. It provides an overview of international agreements and organizations concerned with state conduct affecting trade, foreign investment, finance and monetary stability. It also considers less formal means of international economic governance such as standards, principles and guidelines. The study of the relevant law is informed by pressing development, environmental and financial stability concerns arising from the globalisation of the world economy and shifts in global economic power. The module aims to provide the foundation and context for further exploration of specific areas of international economic law covered by other modules offered by this programme. The knowledge and skills gained on this course are suitable for careers in government, international organizations, law firms and NGOs concerned with international trade, investment, finance and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Cybercrime: Substantive OffencesLawSOLM207Semester 27NoNo

Cybercrime: Substantive Offences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Internet technologies have enabled new ways of committing crimes and have moved 'old' crimes such as fraud online - this has created interesting challenges to substantive criminal law. These challenges concern both the interpretation of traditional criminal law (common law and statute based) and potential new crimes where there is a need to develop the law to close legal gaps. This Module examines substantive criminal law(s) of different jurisdictions (using the UK and the US as the main comparators) from a comparative and international perspective. It also looks at international harmonization efforts such as the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime and the EU framework for the harmonization of the law in the fields of cybercrime. The Module looks at definitions and categorisation of cybercrime; the relationships between cyberterrorims, cyberwarfare and cybercrime; content related cybercrime (such as child sex abuse images; pornography; IP infringement; terrorism propaganda (glorification and encouragement); hate speech); communication offences and harassment; online fraud and forgery; computer misuse (hacking; malicious code; interception) and illegal devices and malicious marketplaces. It will also examine the jurisdictional aspects of such criminality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Commercial ArbitrationLawSOLM256Semester 27NoNo

International Commercial Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Behn

Description: This is an introductory module on the law and practice of international commercial arbitration. This one-semester module is aimed at students who do not specialise in dispute resolution and therefore does not require prior knowledge of the subject. However, the module may still be suitable for those not specialising in dispute resolution, but have some knowledge of the topic and would like to explore it in some further detail. This module will consider most of the key themes covered in the specialist arbitration modules but in less detail.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Economics of Competition LawLawSOLM058Full year7NoNo

Economics of Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The aim of this module is to ensure that students have an appreciation of the underlying economics employed in antitrust and merger enforcement. This module seeks to give students a thorough grounding in the essentials of economic analysis in competition law and to prepare students for issues likely to arise in the enforcement of competition legislation. Although this is an advanced module, no previous knowledge of the subject is required. In addition, the module does not require prior knowledge of economics or advanced mathematics. The module takes a very practical approach with a number of case studies and always with an eye to the real world implications of the use of economics in competition enforcement. Guest lecturers will provide their practical experience and the challenges they face in the use of economics in competition enforcement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Private International & European Air Transport LawLawSOLM152Semester 27YesNo

Private International & European Air Transport Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Antigoni-Aikaterini Lykotrafiti

Description: Who is liable if a flight is cancelled? Are air passengers compensated if their flight is delayed? Do air passengers need to take special insurance against loss or damage to their baggage? Can pilots deviate from the instructions given by air traffic controllers? How do airlines pay for their glamorous, but also costly aircraft? Is it legal to fly a drone? This module will set out to explore the regime of domestic and international liability in aviation, namely the liability of air carriers towards passengers and shippers (Warsaw and Montreal Conventions), as well as for surface damage (Rome Convention), the liability of air traffic controllers, airports, aircraft manufacturers and government bodies; the regime governing aircraft financing and aircraft nationality (Geneva and Cape Town Conventions); EU consumer protection law (Regulation (EC) No 261/2004 on compensation for denied boarding, cancellation and delay of flights and relevant jurisprudence), and last, the nascent law on unmanned aircraft systems (drones).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Energy TransactionsLawSOLM162Semester 27NoNo

International Energy Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: International energy transactions are complex, large, incredibly high risk and very expensive. They involve many parties from hosts states, international oil companies, national oil companies, NGOs, IGOs as well as service providers. The course focuses on the applicable laws and contract provisions for each type of transaction including upstream contacts including JOA's. The module also looks at the project finance structure used in large energy transactions, for example, a power plant or LNG liquefaction plant as well as reserve base lending in upstream explorations. The unconventional market and LNG value chain and their impact on the global market are considered in the context of the energy transition and the future role of gas as a lower CO2 option. Nuclear power remains part of the energy matrix of many states being a low carbon process, highly efficient and thus ensuring energy security.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Reinsurance Law and International Risk TransferLawSOLM255Semester 27NoNo

Reinsurance Law and International Risk Transfer

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: Reinsurance involves insurance (and reinsurance) companies insuring all or part of the risks they write with other (re)insurance companies. Reinsurance is required by regulators but also makes business sense since it allows insurance companies to increase their capacity to write insurance. In this module we are looking at traditional reinsurance and innovative reinsurance solutions. We consider how reinsurance contracts are formed and how they can be structured. By reference to typical reinsurance market wordings, we will consider the interaction between the underlying insurance contract and the reinsurance contract and how their relationships impacts on the reinsurance terms and claims. We will also examine the structure and regulation of insurance-linked securities which are a means of risk transfer to, and of financing insurance risk in, the capital markets. London is one of the world centres of the reinsurance industry and the London reinsurance market is amongst the leaders in developing innovative reinsurance solutions. This module will provide a thorough understanding of this important and rapidly developing area of law and practice. English law is the governing law applied to Lloyd¿s and London market insurance and reinsurance policies, and is frequently chosen as governing law for international reinsurance transactions. The LLM in Insurance Law, of which this module forms part, opens up lucrative career opportunities in the global insurance and reinsurance industry, the legal sector, management consultancies and the financial services industry generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Critical JurisprudenceLawSOLM181Semester 27YesNo

Critical Jurisprudence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nobles

Description: This module introduces students to a broad range of theoretical critiques of conventional (doctrinal) legal scholarship. The course begins with liberal political theory (Aristotle, Locke and Hobbes). It then considers more specific liberal critiques of law (Economic analysis, Rule of Law critique, and Mill¿s harm principle). The last section of the course looks at Foucault, Feminist legal theory, and Critical Legal Theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Tax Law in PracticeLawSOLM120Full year7NoNo

International Tax Law in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SOLM119

Description: The module focus is on how multinational enterprises are structured and operate. In particular, the module will cover how groups finance their business, structure their operations and own and protect their intellectual property. There will also be some consideration of the impact of mergers, acquisitions, disposals and reorganisations. The module will also look at the challenges created by new forms of technology and new ways of doing business. The module will discuss these issues from the viewpoint of the enterprise and of the relevant revenue authorities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Carriage of GoodsLawSOLM143Full year7NoNo

Carriage of Goods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: The module will cover essential aspects of the law relating to carriage of goods by sea (mandatory international law regulating carriage of goods contracts, international standard terms, functions of documents such as bills of lading, waybills and delivery orders, as well as electronic alternatives to these documents, detailed discussion of logistics services and multimodal transport).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Tax LawLawSOLM119Semester 27YesNo

International Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee

Description: The module is designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of the key concepts of international tax law and of how multinational enterprises are taxed on their profits. It is also designed to equip students to participate in International Tax Law in Practice, for which it is a prerequisite. The module covers the basic principles of jurisdiction to tax, the factors used by countries in imposing taxes and the issues governing major types of income. It looks at how conflicts lead to international double taxation, the problems this creates for international trade and solutions provided for in double taxation treaties. The taxation of multinational enterprises has become a political issue, with the G20 and the OECD undertaking substantial work to address Base Erosion and Profit Shifting. This work has progressed rapidly and features prominently in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Illegal Speech, Censorship and Digital Rights: Social Media vs 'Old' MediaLawSOLM212Semester 17NoNo

Illegal Speech, Censorship and Digital Rights: Social Media vs 'Old' Media

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: This digital revolution has had an enormous impact on fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and privacy (and personality rights more widely), and on concepts such as identity, autonomy and agency online. The Module will analyse (1) how the law protects these rights and balances them with the rights of others; (2) whether new fundamental rights should be recognized online and (3) how the law balances potential harms online with these rights. The Module will examine the relationship between law, technology and behaviour. It has a practical dimension by looking at liability relating to online communication and the management of that risk and by examining how these existing and emerging rights can be enforced (including for example the disclosure of a pseudonymous identity). It has a theoretical, law & policy dimension by examining concepts such as identity, privacy and autonomy and how these concepts relate to the law. It will compare traditional approaches to (offline) media regulation and how they relate to new phenomena on social media. The Module therefore examines traditional approaches to content regulation on 'old' media and how these censorship regime(s) is challenged by new media, reflecting on how the law needs to adapt to 'cope' with new (and ever evolving) technologies and business practices. As in traditional media regulation, this encapsulates administrative, civil and criminal law approaches to content regulation and censorship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Carriage of GoodsLawSOLM143Semester 17NoNo

Carriage of Goods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: The module will cover essential aspects of the law relating to carriage of goods by sea (mandatory international law regulating carriage of goods contracts, international standard terms, functions of documents such as bills of lading, waybills and delivery orders, as well as electronic alternatives to these documents, detailed discussion of logistics services and multimodal transport).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International and Comparative Copyright LawLawSOLM075Semester 27NoNo

International and Comparative Copyright Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: "Copyright, the legal foundation of the creative industries, is by its modern nature international and comparative This module will offer students a solid basis for understanding the essential elements of copyright law ,its philosophical and legal basis, the international Copyright Treaties, and the different approaches adopted in major civil and common law countries, including the United Kingdom, France, Germany and the United States. We further focus on the growth of EU copyright law with its distinctive flavour, which incorporates civil law doctrines in a pragmatically common law precedent-based approach. Where relevant, reference is also made to well-known decisions on certain topics in Australia, Canada and India. This interactive course will explore copyright principles by considering and discussing crucial topics, namely, the types of protected works, copyright ownership, beneficiaries, term, nature of rights, exceptions and limitations, collective management, enforcement and user rights - from national and international perspectives. The course also looks at current international copyright policy discussions such as new Treaties and Trade Agreements. The module will enable students to embark on more specialised and in-depth courses. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
European and US Law of PatentsLawSOLM076Semester 27YesNo

European and US Law of Patents

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Patents are exclusive rights granted for the protection of an invention that offers a new and inventive technical solution or way of doing something. This module compares the process of obtaining and enforcing a patent under the provisions of the European Patent Convention (EPC) with the equivalent legal arrangements under Title 35 of the Code of Laws of the United States of America (USC).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Human Rights Law: Law, Practice and InstitutionsLawSOLM070Semester 27NoNo

International Human Rights Law: Law, Practice and Institutions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos

Description: "This course explores the institutional and legal foundations of the post-WW2 framework for international human rights law protection, as well as a number of key rights and topics in contemporary international human rights law and practice. The first part examines the core institutions and legal regimes that together constitute the core of international human rights law. The second part of the course 'samples' a number of substantive rights, such as the right to life, the prohibition on torture and inhuman and degrading treatment, and the right to housing. It also explores the international human rights regimes from the perspective of different subjects or groups, such as women and labour, paying particular regard to the possibilities and limitations of human rights as a truly universal and emancipatory project. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Human Rights Law: History, Theory and PoliticsLawSOLM069Semester 17YesNo

International Human Rights Law: History, Theory and Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos

Description: "This module explores the history, theory and politics of international human rights. It will explore both traditional and revisionist accounts of the philosophical and historical foundations of international human rights. It introduces the students to the main critiques of rights, from the early critiques of natural rights, including the Marxist critiques of rights, to feminist and post-colonial critiques, exploring the different strands within each of these schools of thought, all of which have generated considerable debates. Through these different lenses, it aims to engage the students with the ambivalence of international human rights, both as a concept, and as a contemporary praxis and ideology. The course closes by putting these theoretical insights and foundations into practice by looking at two contemporary phenomena that illustrate the ambivalence of the human rights project, namely the war on terror and the advent of neoliberalism. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Trade SecretsLawSOLM096Semester 17YesNo

Trade Secrets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Hull

Description: Every intellectual property right starts life as a trade secret. Trade secrets and related intellectual assets are viewed as critical to the success of many businesses. But they are also uniquely fragile rights and so their protection under different legal systems requires close assessment. This module complements other IP modules by providing an opportunity to study the economic and legal foundations of these important rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Digital Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM097Full year7NoNo

Digital Intellectual Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The module introduces students to fundamental problems and concepts pertaining to intellectual property rights, with an emphasis on copyright law, in digital environments. The module focuses on the divergent interests of various stakeholders, such as authors, exploiters, consumers and creators that challenge law making today, and addresses topics ranging from the protection of software and databases, exclsuive rights and limitations, technological protection measures, the relationship between IP and fundamental rights, and online enforcement amongst others. A further emphasis will be placed on the role of the European Court of Justice and the interface between international norms and market integration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Charterparties: Law and PracticeLawSOLM142Semester 17NoNo

Charterparties: Law and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: The module will examine all aspects of charterparties, being contracts of vessel hire between the relevant parties. More specifically, the module will cover the stage of negotiating a charterparty, the basic principles underlying all such contracts, different types of charterparties (including voyage, time, hybrid and demise charters), various charterparty forms and their practical application, the effect of charterers' orders on the operation of charterparties, and the charters' discharge (including issues of breach, frustration and damages).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
StarsPhysics and AstronomySPA5307Semester 15YesNo

Stars

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Tsiklauri

Description: "Stars are a vital building block in the Universe: forming out of interstellar gas and dust, and themselves being a major component of galaxies. They are also vital for providing the nuclear reactions that create the elements from which planets and even ourselves are formed. This course describes how the fundamental properties of stars are related to observations. Temperatures and densities in the centre of stars reach values that are unattainable in the laboratory. Yet the application of basic physical principles can help us determine much about the internal structure and evolution of stars, from their formation to their ultimate end states in such exotic and spectacular objects as white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysics and AstronomySPA7009USemester 27YesNo

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Justice in the Global CityPolitics and International RelationsPOL393Semester 26NoNo

Justice in the Global City

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Hoover

Description: This module considers the contemporary global city as a site of both injustice and movements for justice. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates about justice, as well as how the injustices experienced in contemporary urban life challenge and disrupt conventional thinking about justice. The module will then introduce students to diverse political movements fighting for justice within contemporary cities (in both the global north and the global south) by looking at discourses of the just city and the right to the city, as well as movements addressing issues such as housing, racial discrimination, police violence, and inequality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
EU Criminal LawLawSOLM205Semester 17YesNo

EU Criminal Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Valsamis Mitsilegas

Description: The module will examine the constitutional evolution and key legal issues underpinning EU Criminal Law as a distinct field of law. The module will examine all forms of governance of EU criminal law, including the harmonisation of substantive criminal law, judicial co-operation in criminal matters under mutual recognition (and in particular the operation of the European Arrest Warrant), harmonisation of criminal procedure and the rights of the defendant, the evolution and powers of EU criminal justice agencies (Europol, Eurojust and the European Public Prosecutor's Office), EU criminal justice databases and the evolution of the EU as a global security actor. The constitutional and human rights implication of European integration in criminal matters will be fully explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Parliamentary StudiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL373Semester 16NoNo

Parliamentary Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover

Description: Every democracy has a legislature which performs a number of key functions, most obviously representation, scrutiny, and of course law-making. This module focuses on how ¿ and how effectively ¿ the UK parliament performs these functions. With input from parliamentary staff, it is designed to combine rigorous academic analysis of parliament with a solid practical understanding of how the legislature works. It will look, among other things, at how laws are made, executive-legislative relations, executive scrutiny, representation and composition, constituency representation, select committees, and the House of Lords. It is intended to be a highly practical, hands-on module that may serve as a springboard for those considering a professional career in or around politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Parliamentary Studies - InternshipsPolitics and International RelationsPOL392Semester 26NoNo

Parliamentary Studies - Internships

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover

Description: This module is designed to give those who take it a view of British parliamentary politics from the inside out. Students will spend three days per week between January and April working for a parliamentarian, either at Westminster or in constituency offices, or both. The module will be assessed by students completing a reflective journal of their day-to-day experiences. An internship is an intensive and demanding exercise, but should provide a formative experience and useful skills for those interested a career in politics or politics-related fields.

The module is assessed through written work directly related to the placement. However, the possibility of changes within such organisations or the wider political environment means we need to have contingency plans should placements fall through due to factors beyond our control. In such cases, the module will be assessed through alternative arrangements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
MSc Astrophysics Research ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7000PFull year7NoNo

MSc Astrophysics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: The MSc project involves a critical review of a chosen topic in modern astrophysics, and may include some original research. Students write a dissertation summarising current research in that chosen field and the extent of their own investigations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7001PSemester 27YesNo

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: This module gives a broad exposition of the modern framework for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory - relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Modern Political Thought 1Politics and International RelationsPOL263Semester 15YesNo

Modern Political Thought 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elke Schwarz

Description: This module builds on the analysis of concepts and ideologies begun in POL110. It enables students to follow through key ideas and debates about equality, power, revolution, democracy, identity and politics in modern political thought. It covers a range of thinkers from exemplars of Liberalism and Marxism to their anarchist, feminist, and anti-racist critics. The module focuses on thinkers from the latter part of the C19th to the early C20th, such as Marx, Dewey, Du Bois, Goldmann, Luxemburg and Sorel (the thinkers covered may change from year to year).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Statistical Data AnalysisPhysics and AstronomySPA6328Semester 16YesNo

Statistical Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Seth Zenz

Description: "This course will review basic metrics and techniques used to describe ensembles of data such as averages, variances, standard deviation, errors and error propagation. These will be extended to treat multi-dimensional problems and circumstances where observables are correlated with one another. The Binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions will be discussed, with emphasis on physical interpretation in terms of events. Concepts of probability, confidence intervals, limits, hypothesis testing will be developed. Optimization techniques will be introduced including chi^2 minimisation and maximum-likelihood techniques. A number of multivariate analysers (sample discriminants) will be discussed in the context of data mining. These will include Fisher discriminants, multi-layer perceptron based artificial neural networks, decision trees and genetic algorithms."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Power and Legitimacy in British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL260Semester 15YesNo

Power and Legitimacy in British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Strong

Description: The module offers students deeper conceptual insights into the fundamental forces underpinning contemporary British politics. It explores the power structures that support everyday practices, including ethnic, gender and class inequalities. It considers how different forces - from the conventional constitution through the electoral system - legitimize those power structures. It asks a big question - how does British politics work, and who does it work for?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Power in Global GovernancePolitics and International RelationsPOL261Semester 25YesNo

Power in Global Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowan Lubbock

Description: Much of the fabric of multilateralism and international organisation appears to be threatened by 'populism'. Powerful political forces are re-asserting the national sovereignty principle. For some theorists this development is inevitable given the lack of a global hegemon willing and able to enforce international co-operation. Others, however, point to the continued globalisation of certain ways of governing state and society. On this module we will examine this debate using case studies such as Ebola, tobacco, logistics, tax evasion, drugs and sport.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Quantum Mechanics and SymmetryPhysics and AstronomySPA6325Semester 26YesNo

Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steven Thomas
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA6413

Description: The module will give you a grounding in the more formal and axiomatic approach to quantum mechanics and introduce you to the application of these tools in the quantum mechanical description of symmetries in particle physics. Topics include: Dirac notation; Hilbert space; linear operators; formal axioms of quantum mechanics; Schoedinger and Heisenberg pictures; harmonic oscillator; raising and lowering operators; time independent perturbation theory; transformation operators; translations and rotations of coordinates; conservation laws and good quantum numbers; rotation operators; angular momentum operators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Classical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA4401Semester 14YesNo

Classical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Berman

Description: This module reviews the classical understanding of space, time and motion: the fundamental physical principles that underpin modern physics. We begin with an overview of classical mechanics, where we will study kinematics and dynamics; rotational motion; dynamics of a rigid body and the gyroscope; and gravity and planetary orbits. In the second part of the module, we focus on oscillatory phenomena and wave motion, which occur throughout nature in fields from biology to quantum mechanics. Topics will include the 1D wave equation; free, damped, forced and coupled oscillations; resonance and driven simple harmonic motion; calculations of normal modes for coupled oscillators; waves in linear media including gases and solids; dispersion, phase and group velocity; interference, beats and standing waves; simple diffraction phenomena; and the Doppler effect in sound and light.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Modern PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA4402Semester 14YesNo

Modern Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baxendale

Description: This module covers the dramatic developments in physics that occurred in the early twentieth century, introducing special and general relativity and quantum theory. In relativistic mechanics we will study special relativity; the Lorentz transformation; length contraction and time dilation; the clock paradox; relativistic kinematics and dynamics; general relativity and its tests and consequences; and black holes and galactic lenses. In quantum theory, we will study descriptions of the evidence for particle-like properties of waves, and wave-like properties of particles, followed by their consequences and their formal expression in physical law: topics include Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's equation and elementary quantum mechanics. We will also introduce the fundamental particles and the forces of the standard model of particle physics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Independent Research EssayLawSOLM927Semester 17NoNo

Independent Research Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: Independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Regulation and ComplianceLawSOLM926Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Regulation and Compliance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant specialisation within the academic fields of Regulations and Compliance.
The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor.
It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Developmental PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY223Semester 25YesNo

Developmental Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Pluess
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY109 and take PSY121 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: This module surveys developmental psychology, covering human development across the whole life span but with a more detailed focus on development in the early years (infancy/childhood). The aim of the module is to introduce the key questions, theories, concepts, methodology, studies and research findings within developmental psychology, regarding different domains of psychological functioning including social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioural development. The module will also cover the prenatal period, physical, motor, and sensory development, learning theory, moral development, and development of the self (identity).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Individual DifferencesBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY233Semester 25YesNo

Individual Differences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY100 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a central area of psychology known variously as "individual differences" or "differential psychology". We will build on several key areas of psychology introduced in previous modules that show substantial individual differences including personality, psychopathology, intelligence and cognition. We will then explore the proposed causes and effects of these individual differences drawing from research using approaches from psycho-dynamics to behavioral genetics. Finally, we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in individual differences including the continuum between personality and mental heath, the nature vs nurture debate, race differences in intelligence and genetic determinism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Brain and BehaviourBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY121Semester 24YesNo

Brain and Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lars Chittka

Description: This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module builds on the theme of psychology as a biological science in parallel with the 'Exploring Psychology' module by specifying the proximate biological mechanisms involved in psychological phenomena. The module will focus on basic principles of biological psychology predominantly, and then introduce psychological processes to illustrate these.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Art and MoneyLawSOLM230Semester 27YesNo

Art and Money

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This module will examine the function of art and other cultural objects as financial assets. This involves seeing historic and artistic chattels from the point of view of wealth management (via investment, capital appreciation and leasing potential) and as collateral for transactions that are otherwise unrelated (art pledges, mortgages and charges). Since the investment in and taking of security over such assets necessarily involves questions of title, title warranties and title retention terms will also be examined. The module will also consider the treatment of art and cultural property in times of financial turmoil and insolvency. The main question here will be whether such cultural objects can be protected during corporate restructuring or insolvency, or indeed governmental/state financial difficulties. The module will end by considering the new area of art financing and alternative funding models for the acquisition of art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Compliance Systems in PracticeLawSOLM224Semester 27YesNo

Compliance Systems in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur

Description: This module seeks to give students a thorough grounding in the essentials of regulatory and compliance environment. To prepare students for issues likely to arise in the application of regulatory framework in various economic and business environments . No previous knowledge of the subject is required. In addition, the module does not require prior knowledge of regulatory framework . The module takes a very practical approach with a number of case studies and always with an eye to the real world implications. Guest lecturers will provide their practical experience and the challenges they face.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
DissertationLawSOLM925Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
International and Comparative Data Protection LawLawSOLM222Semester 27YesNo

International and Comparative Data Protection Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: "Over 100 jurisdictions have adopted frameworks protecting personal data, many in response to the EU data protection framework that precludes international transfers unless equivalent protection applies. This module examines a number of these data protection legal frameworks, particularly in key jurisdictions such as Russia, China, APEC, Canada, Australia and the US. In addition to examining their particular implementation of the fair information processing principles that have emerged as best practice, the module will explore the key policy implications and debates around trade, commercial and human rights implications and, enforcement, including the challenges of particular technological developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Compliance in Global MarketsLawSOLM223Semester 27YesNo

Compliance in Global Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: The module will have four general sessions in which all the students will study together advanced cases in Compliance. The course covers advanced topics in compliance. Then the students will be split into specialist groups as specified above for another four sessions. For the final sessions the students will get together for a conclusion of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development (Paris)Politics and International RelationsPOLM973Semester 17NoNo

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development (Paris)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Musab Younis

Description: The course provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context (Paris)Politics and International RelationsPOLM974Semester 17NoNo

International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context (Paris)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Engin Isin

Description: Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, as well as forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states. This module will engage with these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Positive PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY119Semester 14YesNo

Positive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Pluess
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take PSY100

Description: This module introduces themes at Level 4 in psychology and considers a unique area of psychological research: Positive Psychology which focuses on psychological well-being and optimal functioning as well as the individual and social determinants thereof. The aim is to introduce this field of psychology and explore its relationship to other areas of psychology. Key studies, and their ethical dimensions, from both classic and modern biological, experimental and intervention perspectives are provided throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Introduction to BiopsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY117Semester 14YesNo

Introduction to Biopsychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Brennan

Description: The topics covered include basic cell biology, principles of communication, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and human neuroanatomy. The involvement of these and other cell biological processes in control of behaviour will be illustrated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Advanced CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA7028USemester 27YesNo

Advanced Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6311 and take SPA6308

Description: This module covers advanced concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular will introduce the student to cosmological perturbation theory. It discusses the observed structure of the universe, how these structures formed, and how they can be used to test our theories and models of the universe. The module will also discuss recent and upcoming experiments and large scale structure surveys and their relevance for cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM087Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Public Policy

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Richard Saull

Description: The Masters Dissertation: Project in International Public Policy is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of International Public Policy. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of International Public Policy which is of particular interest to them. The topic will draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue in international public policy associated with one of the modules that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme. The format of the project can differ according to the topic, ranging from traditional research dissertation to an applied public policy implementation or evaluation report. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Advanced CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA7028PSemester 27YesNo

Advanced Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik

Description: This module covers advanced concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular will introduce the student to cosmological perturbation theory. It discusses the observed structure of the universe, how these structures formed, and how they can be used to test our theories and models of the universe. The module will also discuss recent and upcoming experiments and large scale structure surveys and their relevance for cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysics and AstronomySPA7023PSemester 17YesNo

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: "Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
The Political Life of Security MethodsPolitics and International RelationsPOL389Semester 26YesNo

The Political Life of Security Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans

Description: This module examines contemporary security practice through the methods they use. It introduces students to (a) the security life of methods -- how methods shape contemporary security situations -- and (b) the political controversies about their use -- the political life of methods. The module will cover a range of controversial methods, for example: the deployment of anthropological knowledge and methods in counter-insurgency, the role of algorithms in surveillance, the rise of big data in security governance, the use of visual methods in security practice and their political contestation, the rise of forensic methods in criminal investigations of war, and scenario planning and foresight in anticipating catastrophes. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of security methods and their limits, and evaluate their political and social effects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Solar SystemPhysics and AstronomySPA7022USemester 17YesNo

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Donnison

Description: "As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Global EthicsPolitics and International RelationsPOL385Semester 16YesNo

Global Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kimberly Hutchings

Description: This module examines debates across the field of Global Ethics. It introduces students to frameworks for thinking about global moral questions concerning for example: the global distribution of wealth, the appropriate meaning of human rights in a multi-cultural world, environmental sustainability, migration, development aid, conflict-resolution and transitional justice. Students will be expected to evaluate different approaches to ethical judgment and to apply them to real world dilemmas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International Merger Control: The JurisdictionsLawSOLM249Semester 17NoNo

International Merger Control: The Jurisdictions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SOLM053

Description: Within the field of competition law, merger control has attracted special attention. The reason for this attention can be found in the special nature of mergers as a business phenomenon, especially when compared with other business phenomena, such as abuse of dominance by firms or cartel activities. The process of relentless globalisation which has been developing since the 1990s has meant that merger operations can produce an effect on the conditions of competition in more than one jurisdiction. This means that, quite inevitably, regulatory approval in more than one jurisdiction may need to be sought. Such a consequence ¿ as is widely accepted ¿ can give rise to uncertainty for the firms concerned and cause huge expense and significant delay. Those who are involved in advising business firms in a merger situation are also not immune from the uncertainty when merger operations have to be notified to more than one competition authority. Often legal advisors have to answer extremely difficult questions in merger cases, such as whether notification of the merger to the competition authorities in one or more jurisdictions is necessary or mandatory or even desirable; which authorities need to be notified; what is required for this purpose and how to go about notifying the authorities concerned; and how will the authorities assess the merger, including any relevant time framework within which they will operate and ultimately reach a decision in a given case.

The Module will aim at a thorough examination of the highly important phenomena of international mergers and their regulation worldwide. Different merger control regimes worldwide and their operation will be an important part of the focus in the Module.

The Module will be taught in a very practical manner, to reflect the very nature of the topic. A highly interesting range of case studies and the knowledge and expertise of practitioners in the field will be a key aspect of the course. The Module should prove to be attractive for students attending other competition law courses and those with an `international¿ dimension in other areas of commercial orientation on the LLM.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Mathematical Techniques 4Physics and AstronomySPA6324Semester 16YesNo

Mathematical Techniques 4

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218. Before taking this module you are advised to take SPA5304

Description: "The module will cover advanced techniques in mathematical physics and will consist of three parts. The first part will cover topics in the general area of analysis such as Fourier Transforms, differential equations, special functions, asymptotic series, complex analysis. The second will cover groups, algebra and representations. The third will cover elements of gepmetry, differential forms, homology, topological invariants."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Physics Review ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA6913Full year6NoYes

Physics Review Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kostya Trachencko

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Physics and Astronomy at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: You will examine a specialised area of physics by directed reading and independent study. You will learn to use scientific research literature databases. You will develop the skill of writing a scientific review summarising current knowledge in a field of physics. You may enrol for this project only with the permission of the Module Organiser for MSci projects. Open only to 3rd year MSci students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
NetworkingSPA_6_S
Politics of International LawPolitics and International RelationsPOL259Semester 15YesNo

Politics of International Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andreas Papamichail

Description: States spend a great deal of time and effort justifying their actions with law. Yet international relations scholars have often doubted international law's ability to shape state behaviour. This course examines this by paradox by introducing students to the major debates about the politics of international law. These perspectives will be applied to the history of international organisations and (legal) order since 1919, including the development of collective security and humanitarianism at the League of Nations and United Nations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Electromagnetic Radiation in AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7006USemester 27YesNo

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas James Haworth

Description: "This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
The International Politics of SecurityPolitics and International RelationsPOL258Semester 15YesNo

The International Politics of Security

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans

Description: This module examines the study of security in world politics, investigating the development of the study of the international politics of security and the key concerns surrounding security today. The module broadly surveys different kinds of security practice and their contemporary significance. It also introduces political questions and contestations that both shape and are resulting from developments in security practice. Overall, the module gives a wide-ranging perspective on the politics of security in contemporary international politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Electric and Magnetic FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA4210Semester 24YesNo

Electric and Magnetic Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher White

Description: An introduction to the basic laws of electromagnetism: electric force and field; electric potential and energy; capacitance; electromotive force; magnetic force and field; the Lorentz force; electromagnetic induction; mutual and self inductance; magnetic energy; LC circuits; Maxwell's equations; introduction to electromagnetic waves; applications in science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Extended Independent ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA6776Full year6NoYes

Extended Independent Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kostya Trachencko

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Physics and Astronomy at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: "You will initially register for the extended project PHY776. This module provides you with the experience of working, independently, on a problem within physics (often using the resources found within a research group of the department). These may be problems in experimental, computational or theoretical physics or a project in astronomy. A list of projects is available on the extensive projects homepage containing a brief description of the projects on offer and the supervisors of those projects. You shall arrange a project by reading these pages and meeting with potential supervisors. Associated with the project is a weekly mandatory seminar to which you will occasionally be expected to contribute. In the light of adequate progress during the first semester you may, after producing a report, be relegated to a 15 credits Independent Project following careful consideration by a panel of staff (Supervisor, CO and DCO)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
NetworkingSPA_6_S
Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications LawLawSOLM923Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Art, Business and LawLawSOLM924Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Art, Business and Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Criminal JusticeLawSOLM922Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Criminal Justice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Economic LawLawSOLM921Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Economic Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
The International Politics of the Developing WorldPolitics and International RelationsPOL257Semester 25YesNo

The International Politics of the Developing World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Clive Gabay

Description: Cartel violence in Central America, rapid urbanisation in West Africa, and huge wealth disparities in the 'rising powers' of India and China. What connects these issues? How useful and accurate is it to talk about 'the developing world' in these contexts? This module introduces students to a number of case studies across what is referred to as the developing world, in order to explore the historical and ongoing relationships between wealth and poverty, the 'international' and the 'domestic'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Social PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY215Semester 15YesNo

Social Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janelle Jones
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY109 and take PSY121 and take PSY124 and take PSY125

Description: Have you ever wondered what influences our perceptions, emotions, thoughts, and behaviours? This module in Social Psychology will provide an overview of the classic and contemporary scientific theories and methods used to address how other people and different contexts can shape these processes. Topics covered will include the self, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, social influence, group processes, and stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Health PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY216Semester 15NoNo

Health Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit

Description: This module introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists ¿ namely, psychology as applied to health behaviour. The course covers the central models and evidence bases concerning the relationship between psychological processes and health and illness. Topics covered by this module will include health promotion and public health; health behaviour models; illness maintenance and treatment adherence; chronic illness; and health through the lifespan.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Condensed Matter APhysics and AstronomySPA5228Semester 25YesNo

Condensed Matter A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Terence John Dennis

Description: "This module provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts in modern condensed matter physics. The atomic structures of both crystalline and non-crystalline substances will be discussed. We will see how these structures can arise from surprisingly simple potential models, and how in turn they influence the interesting and useful properties of materials."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Mathematical Techniques 2Physics and AstronomySPA4122Semester 24YesNo

Mathematical Techniques 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcella Bona

Description: Further techniques of mathematics needed in the physical sciences. Complex numbers and hyperbolic functions. Polar and spherical coordinates and coordinate transformations. Multiple integrals. Line and surface integrals. Vector calculus. The theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. Matrices. Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Fourier series and transforms including the convolution theorem. Differential equations. Exercise classes enable the students to learn practical approaches to problem solving while applying the concepts and techniques introduced in lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Electromagnetic Waves and OpticsPhysics and AstronomySPA5222Semester 25YesNo

Electromagnetic Waves and Optics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Sutherland
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4210

Description: The course is aimed at giving a coverage of electromagnetic wave theory and of optics. It will act as a bridge between a first year course of introductory electromagnetism and a course on vibrations and waves to give an understanding of optics in terms of electromagnetic waves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Art and Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM229Semester 27YesNo

Art and Intellectual Property

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: This module will examine the interplay between art and intellectual property, in particular copyright, including digital issues. The module will involve a comparative approach, looking in depth at the protection of intangible rights in the UK, before comparing this with the regimes of other countries (namely France and the United States). the module will focus on the related intellectual property rights that impact the art trade: moral rights and the artists' resale right. The module will then look specifically at museum and gallery practice to see the effect of the 2014 UK copyright changes. This will cover the two 'orphan works' schemes, extended collective licensing and the new copyright exceptions, many of which are aimed specifically at the museum and heritage sector

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Art Disputes and their ResolutionsLawSOLM228Semester 27NoNo

Art Disputes and their Resolutions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: This module will explore the many ways in which art disputes can be resolved including litigation and alternative processes to litigation. It will examine specifically the public processes of litigation in national courts, administrative tribunals and international tribunals, and also private processes such as arbitration, mediation and other alternative processes. In so doing, it will consider the nature of the art dispute, the appropriate methods to resolve the disputes, and the remedies and solutions available. This will be led in seminar style, with lecture and interactive participation from students through exercises and dialogue.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
AI, Robotics and the LawLawSOLM221Semester 27YesNo

AI, Robotics and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: The evolving area of AI and Robotics gives rise to many ethical and legal questions over the status of robots, the rights and responsibilities arising from their use and liability for any harm caused. The module will explore the issues of legal personhood, the protection of robots through IP, the responsibilities arising from data use and the various approaches to allocating responsibility and liability. The module covers both embodied artificial intelligent systems (robots) and non-embodied ones (intelligent agents). Distinction is also made between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as independent agents in the legal arena and its legal ramifications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Legal TheoryLawSOLM920Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Legal Theory

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY211Semester 15NoNo

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paraskevi Argyriou

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the C1C8 programme. This module builds upon themes developed in level 4 psychology modules and considers specific cognitive functions and properties of the human mind. The material covered will include traditional cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neuropsychology (the understanding of normal cognitive processes through unique case studies of human brain damage). Cognitive functions examined will include visual, object and spatial perception, psychophysics, memory processes, complex reasoning, language, face processing and the relationship between emotion and these processes. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 45.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
International OrganisationsPolitics and International RelationsPOLM099Semester 27NoNo

International Organisations

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Yao

Description: This module will provide an advanced examination of International Organisations (IOs) as a transnational political workspace for both cooperation and contestation between global actors. The module will be grounded in a historical and critical examination of the development of IOs in the 19th century as a tool to manage European international order, and it will emphasize the ways in which IOs developed in conjunction with the modern state. Building upon this critical grounding, the module will examine today's IOs, with a particular focus on the UN system, and their effectiveness in confronting global challenges in the 21st century. The module will conclude with a capstone day-long Model UN simulation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
From Blitz to Brexit: Britain and the EUPolitics and International RelationsPOLM097Semester 27NoNo

From Blitz to Brexit: Britain and the EU

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland

Description: This module critically analyses the UK's relationship with the process of European integration to explore the drivers behind the UK's reluctance to embrace the European Project and why, in June 2016, the UK took the decision to leave the European Union. Students will gain a historical and analytical insight into one of Europe's most difficult challenges: the potential fragmentation of the European Union.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
ThermodynamicsPhysics and AstronomySPA5219Semester 15YesNo

Thermodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jan Mol
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121

Description: Thermal and Kinetic Physics is a course designed as an introduction to the notion of energy and its transformations. The thermodynamic methodology that is constructed, largely through the paradigm of the ideal gas, is widely applicable throughout the realm of physics. We begin by developing a language capable of dealing with the thermodynamic method and this requires that concepts of equilibrium and temperature are disentangled before work and heat are described in detail en route to the First Law of Thermodynamics. With the First Law many things become readily accessible to an analytic approach previously unavailable including; engines, refrigerators and heat pumps. Entropy will then make a natural appearance as a macroscopic thermodynamic variable in the build up to the Second Law of Thermodynamics with a brief look at its microscopic origins. New thermodynamic potentials including the Gibbs potential and the Helmholtz free energy, and their applications, are discussed in order to generalise further the thermodynamic method. Phase changes for simple systems are briefly covered and the Third law of Thermodynamics described. Finally an introduction to the kinetic description of gases in equilibrium and of phenomena such as diffusion and heat conduction will complete the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International Migration PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM095Semester 27NoNo

International Migration Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Wolff

Description: Students will get a comprehensive understanding of how migration policy works at European and International levels and of the cutting-edge debates surrounding the so-called 'migration crisis'. Students will explore and critically analyse the causes and consequences of the migration crises from a public policy perspective. The module is divided in four parts. First, migration as a phenomenon of globalisation is introduced as well as the way states and the supranational level (EU and UN) have developed policies to `manage' and `control¿ migration. Second, the module offer a theoretical and empirical explanation of security and border policies and practices developed to control migration as well as of policies of integration. Third, the course spends some time discuss the so-called 2015 migration and refugee `crisis¿, the policies adopted by the EU, the divergent policies adopted by European member states and the role of European cities and regions. Fourth, the course studies the migration policies that are in place in North Africa, with a specific focus on the Moroccan immigration reform, and in West Africa, with a focus on ECOWAS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
EU Competition LawLawSOLM248Semester 27NoNo

EU Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SOLM051

Description: The Module EU Competition Law (along with the co-requisite Module EU Competition Law and Practice) aims at a comprehensive study of the basic provisions of European Union (EU) competition law. The Module will provide participants with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EU competition law, especially Article 101 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) is applied. The Module will aim to consider an important business phenomenon in the market namely anti-competitive agreements. It is hoped that by the end of the Module participants will gain a solid understanding of the relevant competition rules of the EU whilst developing a good business and market perspective and practical approach in order to help them identify situations in which such phenomenon may arise and how should this phenomenon be addressed.

EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Articles 101 TFEU; as well as a number of block exemption Regulations, notably those dealing with: Vertical Restraints; Technology Transfer; and Horizontal Research and Development and Specialisation Agreements. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 102 TFEU.

EU competition rules are applied by the Directorate General (DG COMPETITION (COMP)) of the European Commission, the Directorate in charge of competition matters; there is also shared competence with designated national competition authorities (NCAs) in relation to the application of Articles 101 (and 102) TFEU. Decisions of the Commission are the principal means of enforcement in competition cases. The Commission¿s decisions are subject to review by the General Court of the EU (GCEU) (formerly the Court of First Instance (CFI)) and the Court of Justice of the EU/European Court of Justice (CJEU/ECJ). This has created an extensive case-law in competition law matters and reference will be made to this case law.

In addition to considering substantive issues, the Module will also deal with relevant procedural mechanisms, such as cartel leniency and settlement mechanism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Differential Geometry in Theoretical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7027USemester 17NoNo

Differential Geometry in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6324 and take SPA6308
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The aim of this course is to complement the core Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields (RWQF) module by providing the student with some advanced tools essential for research in modern Theoretical Physics. Using the same starting point as RWQF, Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, we will focus on the Lagrangian formulation of the two most prominent theories of our time: Yang-Mills (gauge) theory and gravity. The alternative notation of differential forms will be explored and the geometric aspects of gauge theory emphasised. Building on this, and introducing elements from group theory and fibre bundles we will introduce classical solitons as localised, finite energy solutions to the classical field equations in various dimensions (kinks in 2d, vortices in 3d, monopoles in 4d, instantons in Euclidean 4d) and discuss their properties, including the existence of zero-modes, associated collective coordinates and moduli spaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Financial RegulationLawSOLM246Semester 27NoNo

International Financial Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The purpose of this module is to examine the regulation of non-bank financial institutions and markets, in particular securities firms, insurance companies, fund managers, financial derivatives, financial infrastructures, clearing and settlement. The module also considers the sources and evolution of international financial regulation and the competing demands between prudential regulation and financial services liberalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Solar SystemPhysics and AstronomySPA7022PSemester 17YesNo

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Donnison

Description: "As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
E-Commerce RegulationLawSOLM220Semester 17YesNo

E-Commerce Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: "This module examines the theoretical basis of the legal and regulatory framework within which online commercial transactions have to be undertaken (bearing in mind that there is much commercial activity which is, ostensibly, 'free' ¿ Facebook and Google are prime examples). It does this through the lens of legitimate authority, asking the fundamental question: 'Why should an e-commerce business accept this particular law and comply with it?' This question arises because of the regulatory and legal difficulties involved in e-commerce as a cross-border activity. The proposition that an e-commerce business must obey all the laws of the world is, simply, both unrealistic in practice and unsustainable in theory. The first part of the module examines jurisprudential theory in some depth, and the second part applies this theory to particular areas of e-commerce activity to explain how law and regulation there works (or, often, doesn¿t work). Because e-commerce is a global activity it doesn't examine the law of one country alone, but focuses on the underlying principles for regulation, how they differ between jurisdictions, the justifications for and limits on national lawmaking, and how e-commerce businesses respond to regulation. This module uses elements of lawmaking and regulatory theory to illuminate how e-commerce regulation operates in practice."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Political Violence and Liberal ModernityPolitics and International RelationsPOL383Semester 26YesNo

Political Violence and Liberal Modernity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jean-Francois Drolet

Description: "This module will introduce students to some of the most important intellectual debates concerning political violence and late modernity as a principle of socio-historical formation. More specifically, the course will draw on literature from various fields such as political theory, philosophy, sociology and international relations to consider the relationship between political violence and the changing nature and consequences of structural phenomena associated with the process of 'liberal modernisation' since the end of the nineteenth century (e.g. secularisation, societal rationalisation, technology, the transnationalisation of production and exchange, decolonisation, the constitutionalisation of the global order, the criminalisation of war etc.). The themes covered include state violence, civil war, revolution, imperialism, genocide, ethnic cleansing, humanitarian warfare and terrorism/counter-terrorism. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
EU Financial and Monetary LawLawSOLM245Semester 27NoNo

EU Financial and Monetary Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Millard

Description: The purpose of this module is to analyse the institutions of EMU (Economic and Monetary Union), in particular the law of the ECB and the law of the euro, and the pillars of banking union (single supervision, single resolution, single deposit insurance). The module also examines the law relating to economic governance in the EU and Eurozone, and the road to economic union, and provides an introduction to Capital Markets Union. The relationship between the single market and the European financial architecture on the one hand and banking union on the other hand are also critically considered, in the light of the challenges that Europe faces in its process of integration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Contemporary Russian PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL382Semester 16NoNo

Contemporary Russian Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ksenia Northmore-Ball

Description: "Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Russia has experienced a number of dramatic political, social and economic changes which are by no means at an end. Its role as an international actor has also changed over time and frequently defied the expectations of its international allies and adversaries, as the Ukraine crisis of 2014 has demonstrated. This module aims to introduce students to the politics, government and foreign policy of Russia as they have developed since 1991 in order to allow students to analyse and assess the challenges Russia faces today and its complex role in contemporary geopolitics."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Astrophysical PlasmasPhysics and AstronomySPA7004USemester 27YesNo

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: "A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Electromagnetic Radiation in AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7006PSemester 27YesNo

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas James Haworth

Description: "This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Differential Geometry in Theoretical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7027PSemester 17NoNo

Differential Geometry in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The aim of this course is to complement the core Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields (RWQF) module by providing the student with some advanced tools essential for research in modern Theoretical Physics. Using the same starting point as RWQF, Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, we will focus on the Lagrangian formulation of the two most prominent theories of our time: Yang-Mills (gauge) theory and gravity. The alternative notation of differential forms will be explored and the geometric aspects of gauge theory emphasised. Building on this, and introducing elements from group theory and fibre bundles we will introduce classical solitons as localised, finite energy solutions to the classical field equations in various dimensions (kinks in 2d, vortices in 3d, monopoles in 4d, instantons in Euclidean 4d) and discuss their properties, including the existence of zero-modes, associated collective coordinates and moduli spaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Physical CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA6311PSemester 16YesNo

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005P

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Research Methods for AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7020PSemester 17NoNo

Research Methods for Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: "Research in astrophysics builds on a vast body of literature and archived data. This module is an introduction to research methods which exploit existing information sources in astrophysics. The module serves as preparation for the research project which forms a major part of the MSc programme. In this module students will learn how to review and evaluate with critical insight, the current state of research of a chosen area in astrophysics. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style, and will learn how to convey research material in a presentation. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These can include specific exercises in using astronomical data archives, scientific word processing, mathematical skills, using mathematical and data analysis packages, project planning, etc."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
War in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL256Semester 25YesNo

War in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katharine Hall

Description: This module examines the study of war in world politics, investigating the practices of war in the modern international system and the key concerns surrounding them today. The module surveys three interrelated issues: the connections between war, violence and politics; war and socio-political change; and war as normative problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Physical CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA6311Semester 16YesNo

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005U

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Colonialism, Capitalism and DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOL255Semester 15YesNo

Colonialism, Capitalism and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowan Lubbock

Description: This module covers both the origin and trajectory of colonialism, capitalism, and development. It simultaneously surveys competing theoretical explanations for the emergence and reproduction of a structural inequalities in the world system over the last 500 years. The module analyses a range of theoretical approaches to development - modernization, dependency, uneven and combined development, post-colonialism, and Marxism. It also connects historical inquiry to more recent processes, such as decolonization, Third World Revolutions, global commodity chains, ecological crisis, and the fate of the world's peasantry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Mathematical Techniques 3Physics and AstronomySPA5218Semester 15YesNo

Mathematical Techniques 3

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alston Misquitta
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4122

Description: In this module some advanced mathematical techniques are developed in the context of solving real physical problems. Computer algebra (MAPLE) is used in the practical classes to enable you to learn a professional physicists approach to real problem-solving.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Independent ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA6709Semester 16NoYes

Independent Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Physics and Astronomy at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: "This module provides you with the experience of working, independently, on a problem within physics (often using the resources found within a research group of the department). These may be problems in experimental, computational or theoretical physics or a project in astronomy. A list of projects is available on the extensive projects homepage and this contains brief descriptions of the projects on offer, and the supervisors of those projects. You shall arrange a project by reading these pages and meeting with potential supervisors. Associated with the project is a weekly seminar to which you will contribute."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 6
NetworkingSPA_6_S
Mathematical Techniques IPhysics and AstronomySPA4121Semester 14YesNo

Mathematical Techniques I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Clarkson

Description: Techniques of mathematics, mostly calculus, required in the study of the physical sciences. Topics will include vectors and scalars, vector components, addition and multiplication, complex numbers and functions, differentiation, partial differentiation, series, integration, polar coordinates and multiple integration. The course structure includes both lectures and self-paced programmed learning, with assessment by coursework and an end of year examination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Spacetime and GravityPhysics and AstronomySPA6308Semester 16YesNo

Spacetime and Gravity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Monteiro

Description: "This course presents the essential concepts of both special and general relativity. The emphasis is on the physical understanding of the theory and the mathematical development is kept simple, although more detailed treatments are included for those who wish to follow them; space-time diagrams being are used extensively. The course includes discussion of the big bang and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Dissertation in Immigration LawLawSOLM919Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Immigration Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources LawLawSOLM918Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Insurance LawLawSOLM916Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Insurance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Shipping LawLawSOLM917Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Environmental LawLawSOLM915Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Environmental Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Physics LaboratoryPhysics and AstronomySPA5201Semester 25YesNo

Physics Laboratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alan Drew
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4103

Description: This course aims to illustrate some important aspects of physics through experimental measurements. The course will be marked by continuous assessment of student laboratory notebooks, which will not be allowed to be removed from the laboratory. Students will perform a number of experiments over the term and will then have to write a scientific paper on one of the experiments that they have performed. The experiments are: Alpha particle spectroscopy; Thermal equation of state and critical point of ethane, Hall effect measurement of germanium; Building a Helium Neon Laser; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Building a Michelson Interferometer and measuring the magnetostriction of metals and the refractive index of air; X-ray diffraction spectroscopy; The Zeeman effect.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IIBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY209Full year5NoNo

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valdas Noreika
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY109 and take PSY100

Description: This module builds introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists, and one where the College has research strengths; health psychology or psychology as applied to health and medicine. The module covers the central models and evidence base concerning the relationship of psychological processes to health maintenance, treatment adherence, professional-patient interactions, stress and immune system function. Topics covered by this module include models and theories of health behaviour and their explanatory power; psychology & health promotion; adherence to treatment, health professional and patient interactions; research methods in health psychology; psychological issues in clinical trial design; personality, health and lifestyle; psychoneuroimmunology; cardiovascular disease; sexual health behaviours; and coping with chronic & terminal conditions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 16.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 4.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
EU Immigration LawLawSOLM242Semester 17YesNo

EU Immigration Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Valsamis Mitsilegas

Description: The module will examine the key legal issues underpinning EU Immigration Law as a distinct field of law. The module will examine a number of central themes in law and governance of EU Immigration policy in Europe's Area of Freedom, Security and Justice. These include the development of the Common European Asylum System through an examination of the operation of the Dublin Regulation; EU law on irregular migration and the criminalisation and securitisation of migration; border control and border management in EU law (including the law of the external border and the Schengen area); the role of EU agencies in the field of immigration law (including FRONTEX and the European Asylum Support Agency-EASO); and relations with third countries and the external dimension of EU immigration law. The constitutional and human rights implication of European integration in the field will be fully explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International PerspectivesLawSOLM243Full year7NoNo

Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rafael Leal-Arcas
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM195

Description: This course examines the interface of climate change, international trade, and energy law, with a view to addressing the question: How can we increase economic well-being and expand trade, while promoting the optimal use of the world¿s energy resources and protecting and preserving our shared environment? It will seek policy solutions linking climate change, trade, and energy law in the context of the World Trade Organization (WTO) by drawing upon findings in three interlinked sections: 1) the nexus between energy and international trade law/WTO law; 2) the interface between climate change and WTO law; and 3) the link between energy and climate change in the context of WTO law/international trade law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Our UniversePhysics and AstronomySPA4101Semester 24YesNo

Our Universe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: The module is a broad survey of Astronomy aiming to acquaint you with evolution of the universe and its constituents. A particular theme is the role played by the known laws of physics in understanding astronomical observation. You will: (i) gain a familiarity with the constituents of the observed universe; (ii) appreciate, and be able to explain, the important part played by the laws of physics in designing observations, and in interpreting and understanding them; (iii) be able to explain the different types of information obtainable from observations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio waves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Scientific MeasurementPhysics and AstronomySPA4103Semester 14YesNo

Scientific Measurement

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bill Gillin

Description: Practical work in the laboratory serves to illustrate basic concepts in physics, and the processes of carrying out experiments and interpreting their results. You will be taught techniques of measurement and the use of instruments and computers. There are some lectures on statistics and data analysis, which are applied to the laboratory measurements. There is no final examination. All assessment is by coursework and laboratory reports.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Art and Cultural ValuesLawSOLM227Semester 17YesNo

Art and Cultural Values

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will examine the cultural values and ethical considerations that guide both the public and private treatment and management of art and cultural property. This extends down from the values accepted in widely followed internationals conventions like the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, into national law, and finally into the ethical guidelines and codes of museums and other cultural institutions. The approach will also be sensitive to non-Western approaches to 'cultural property' and will consider the alternative conceptions of cultural dominion, guardianship and responsibility. Finally, the module will address the issues stemming from requests and claims for restitution and repatriation of cultural objects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
E-Commerce TransactionsLawSOLM219Semester 27YesNo

E-Commerce Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: This module examines the law relating to online commercial transactions (bearing in mind that there is much commercial activity which is, ostensibly, 'free' - Facebook and Google are prime examples). It focuses on the law which governs a range of online transactions, including contracting, signatures and online marketplaces. Because e-commerce is a global activity we don¿t examine the law of one country alone (though we will inevitably look at more UK and EU law than that of anywhere else). Our focus is on the underlying principles which are common to all jurisdictions, and the differences in some areas - the theory is that if you understand these, you will be able to analyse any particular national law and apply it to the particular e-commerce activity in question.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Theories and Concepts in Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM092Semester 17NoNo

Theories and Concepts in Public Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Wolff

Description: This module will provide a structured introduction to key issues and concepts in policy analysis. The module will give students a solid grounding in theories of the policy-making process while enabling students to apply those insights to practical case-studies of policy formulation and implementation in the real world. The module will also provide students with background on the key traditions and approaches to public administration and policy-making in countries around the world, both developing and developed countries. Issues to be covered on the module will include the nature of public policies; the policy context: institutions and actors; theoretical approaches to the policy process; policy problems and agenda-setting; decision-making; implementation/new public management; evaluation; governance; public policy beyond the nation-state; policy change and policy convergence; future challenges for policy-makers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Strings and BranesPhysics and AstronomySPA7032USemester 27YesNo

Introduction to Strings and Branes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Congkao Wen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6413 and take SPA6324
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The module will cover the basics of string theory including the classical relativistic physics of the string, its quantisation and the resulting spectrum. This will then be extended to examine so called p-branes and the basics of M-theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Artificial Intelligence, Human Rights and MigrationLawSOLM240Semester 27YesNo

Artificial Intelligence, Human Rights and Migration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Elspeth Guild

Description: Artificial Intelligence is constantly in the media, both praised and vilified. But what is AI and how do public-authorities use it? This course examines public authorities' use of AI in border, immigration and asylum decision making in the UK and worldwide. Taking a case study approach using recent and pending court cases we will analyse the issues from a human rights perspective: fair procedures, non-discrimination and protection of privacy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Strings and BranesPhysics and AstronomySPA7032PSemester 27YesNo

Introduction to Strings and Branes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Congkao Wen
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The module will cover the basics of string theory including the classical relativistic physics of the string, its quantisation and the resulting spectrum. This will then be extended to examine so called p-branes and the basics of M-theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Art and GovernanceLawSOLM226Semester 17YesNo

Art and Governance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will enable students to learn about state regulation of art, art transactions and transfers of art. In particular, it will examine four areas of state regulation of art: criminal law provisions related to art, import and export controls on art, the impact of competition law on art acquisitions and transactions and the taxation of art. Coverage of criminal law issues will include the handling of stolen art, art fraud and forgery, the treatment of obscene artworks, trade in artefacts from war zones and treasure offences. The module will also cover how states control the cross-border movement of cultural treasures, competition law as it relates to agreements prevalent in the art industry and the direct and indirect tax regimes governing art and dispositions of art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Euromasters Project/DissertationPhysics and AstronomySPA7026PFull year7NoNo

Euromasters Project/Dissertation

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo

Description: Students will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. They will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation, placing them in a physics context, and detailing the methods used and the results obtained. The project will run through both semesters and will involve a report and an oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Relativity and GravitationPhysics and AstronomySPA7019PSemester 17YesNo

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzschild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Relativity and GravitationPhysics and AstronomySPA7019USemester 17YesNo

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6308

Description: "This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzchild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Politics of Southeast AsiaPolitics and International RelationsPOL381Semester 16NoNo

The Politics of Southeast Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lee Jones

Description: "This module provides a critical introduction to the political economy, domestic politics and international relations of post-colonial Southeast Asia. It begins with a broad survey of the region's development and state-making strategies and the domestic power relations generated by rapid capitalist development. A thematic section then explores how these power relations condition political outcomes domestically and internationally. Topics may include: democratisation, human rights, gender, labour and emancipatory politics, development, the environment, and regional economic and security governance."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International Security: War and Peace in a Global ContextPolitics and International RelationsPOLM091Semester 27NoNo

International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Katharine Hall

Description: Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, as well as forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states. This module will engage with these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Utopia and Dystopia: Political, Economic and Literary DreamworldsPolitics and International RelationsPOL380Semester 26YesNo

Utopia and Dystopia: Political, Economic and Literary Dreamworlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Dunkerley

Description: This module introduces students to a wide range of approaches to Utopian and Dystopian thought and literature. It concentrates on political, economic, and literary dreamworlds since the 16th century. Imagination means 'image making', and in this sense, we look at utopias as images, snapshots of political desire that reproduce, in the negative, darkness as light, light as darkness, a set geometry of oppression, the contours of a present frustrated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Astrophysical PlasmasPhysics and AstronomySPA7004PSemester 27YesNo

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: "A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7001USemester 27YesNo

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: "This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Quantum Mechanics BPhysics and AstronomySPA6413Semester 16YesNo

Quantum Mechanics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218

Description: "This module is both an introduction and revision, followed by an extended exposition of the basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include: Operators and the general structure of quantum mechanics, observables, orthonormality of eigenstates, expansion theorem, commuting operators, theory of measurement; The harmonic oscillator; Angular momentum theory, the rigid rotator and applications to rotation-vibration spectra of diatomic molecules; Spin in quantum mechanics illustrated with spin1/2: matrix representations, Stern-Gerlach experiments and measurement theory exemplified; Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics: Bosons and Fermions; Spherically symmetric potentials and the Hydrogen atom."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Functional Methods in Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7024USemester 17YesNo

Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5304
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The module will introduce Feynman's path integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics and apply it to study of Quantum Field Theory (QFT). Emphasis will be given to the role of symmetries (Ward identities), the renormalisation group and the idea of effective action. The concept of Wilson's effective action and the different nature of (ir)relevant/marginal terms will be discussed. Simple scalar theories will provide the example where to apply the concepts and the techniques introduced. The course will also touch on some more advanced topics, such as quantum anomalies and conformal field theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Elementary Particle PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA6306Semester 26YesNo

Elementary Particle Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ulla Blumenschein

Description: "An introduction to the standard model of particle physics - the strong and electroweak interactions between the basic constituents of the world, quarks and leptons, via the exchange of gluons, photons and W and Z particles. Recent results on CP violation and neutrino mixing. The search for the Higgs particle. Beyond the standard model - Grand unified theories and supersymmetry."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
The Physics of GalaxiesPhysics and AstronomySPA6305Semester 26YesNo

The Physics of Galaxies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Tsiklauri
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7010U

Description: "Galaxies are the building blocks of the universe and deserve the extensive study they now enjoy. This course applies basic physical ideas to astronomical observations, exploring the properties of galaxies themselves and the evolution of structure in the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
The Physics of GalaxiesPhysics and AstronomySPA6305PSemester 26YesNo

The Physics of Galaxies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Tsiklauri
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7010P

Description: "Galaxies are the building blocks of the universe and deserve the extensive study they now enjoy. This course applies basic physical ideas to astronomical observations, exploring the properties of galaxies themselves and the evolution of structure in the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Race and Racism in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL377Semester 16YesNo

Race and Racism in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Laleh Khalili

Description: This module will introduce students to the theoretical and practical importance of race and racism in the historical construction of modern world order. The module will also enable students to assess the continued - and possibly transformed - significance of race and racism for contemporary world politics. Tackling the various topics in the module, students will re-examine a number of concepts and issue areas all of which hold contemporary importance for the International Relations discipline (IR). Although the focus of the course is on political issues, adequately analysing "race" nevertheless requires an inter-disciplinary approach that combines work undertaken in anthropology, history, sociology and literature. Students will therefore also benefit from an inter-disciplinary approach to key issue areas in IR.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
US PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL254Semester 15YesNo

US Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Johnson

Description: The United States remains an important actor in the world and understanding its politics is vital both in comparison to other political systems and in terms of how its own political outcomes emerge. The module provides a comprehensive overview of US politics, starting from its foundations in the Constitution, through the core institutions of US government, and the political process itself. The module covers rival perspectives on understanding US politics and government, as well as core thematic areas such as political culture, informal actors in the political system, the influence of ideas, foreign policy, and an understanding of race, class and gender in US politics and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Accountability and Complexity in British GovernmentPolitics and International RelationsPOL253Semester 25YesNo

Accountability and Complexity in British Government

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Gover

Description: This module offers students deeper conceptual insights into the fundamental structures underpinning contemporary British government. It considers the nature and complexity of government in contemporary Britain, as well as examining the main ways for holding those in power accountable. The module considers both central government and the wider sets of actors responsible for governing, including the civil service,
arms-length agencies, and other service providers. It also examines various mechanisms that exist to hold those in government to account ¿ including through parliament, the voters, and other institutions - considering how effective they are in achieving this goal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Statistical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA6403Semester 26YesNo

Statistical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5219

Description: Starting from the atomic and quantum descriptions of matter the module uses statistical principles to explain the behaviour of material in bulk. It thus relates microscopic to macroscopic quantities and provides a microscopic explanation of thermodynamics. It provides the bridge between microscopic quantum physics and the behaviour of matter as we know it daily.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Professional Skills for ScientistsPhysics and AstronomySPA4601Semester 24YesNo

Professional Skills for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ulla Blumenschein

Description: This module develops professional and computational skills that are fundamental to the discipline, enable student engagement with employers, and expand student networks. Students develop introductory computational skills including using and writing computer programs to model physical systems, analyse quantitative data, and solve problems. These computational skills are applicable to any role that requires quantitative analysis and evidence-based decision making. Students will become proficient in preparing professional quality documents including scientific project reports, presentations and job application materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Dissertation in Insurance Law (30 credits)LawSOLM930Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Insurance Law (30 credits)

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Research EssayLawSOLM951Semester 27NoNo

Research Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: The research paper will examine a particular area of law. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Tax LawLawSOLM914Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Medical LawLawSOLM912Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Medical Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Public International LawLawSOLM913Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Public International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Intellectual Property LawLawSOLM910Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawSOLM911Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
EmotionBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY127Semester 24YesNo

Emotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Di Bernardi Luft

Description: The module will allow students to learn about the different conceptualisations of emotion both in terms of historical developments as well as contemporary theoretical models of emotions. The module will also consider the biological basis of emotions in the brain and the body, how emotions are expressed and perceived in faces, bodies, voice and music. The relationship between emotions and cognitions will be considered, including emotion regulation and individual differences in emotions. Finally, cultural differences and disorders of emotion will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Exploring Psychology IIBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY125Semester 24YesNo

Exploring Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take PSY124

Description: This module builds upon PSY124 Exploring Psychology I by extending the introduction of basic concepts, theories, methods and research findings in psychology. The areas introduced include the core and interdisciplinary fields in psychology. Lectures for exploring psychology II will include an introductory lecture followed by lectures on specific topics in psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Exploring Psychology IBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY124Semester 14YesNo

Exploring Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka

Description: This module introduces and develops basic concepts in the philosophy of science and its relevance to psychology as a discipline. A biological framework for psychological science is also provided. It then introduces basic cognitive science/psychology, social psychology, differential psychology and an introduction to brain and behaviour relationships.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Esports LawLawSOLM238Full year7NoNo

Esports Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Esports law focuses on the legal, contractual, commercial and regulatory issues that affect competitive video gaming. The module recognises the magnitude of the phenomenon and delineates the legal and commercial parameters under which esports industries operates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources Law (30 credits)LawSOLM929Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources Law (30 credits)

Credits: 30.0
Contact:

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Law and Finance in PracticeLawSOLM237Full year7NoNo

Law and Finance in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This course introduces concepts in Financial Law at a level that is appropriate for students with various backgrounds . The first part of the course introduces the student with historical perspectives of law and finance. The focus quickly turns to specific fields in Financial Theory and its application to different legal situations. The course will illustrate how legal argumentation can be informed by financial analysis in a range of contexts including IPOs, M&As, bankruptcy, etc. Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the interaction among economic agents and entities. Specific case studies are used to analyse actual situations and explore different possible solutions using both legal and financial analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Art TransactionsLawSOLM225Semester 17NoNo

Art Transactions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: This module will examine the various rules of domestic and international private law that can impact the art trade, from the sale and purchase of artworks by private individuals, to acquisitions by other private law means, such as gift and exchange, and loans and other bailments involving museums, galleries and other cultural institutions. Beyond this, the module will also consider the impact of statute: one notable example being the statutory immunity of certain loaned cultural objects from seizure. Owing to the high value and irreplaceable nature of the art being traded, the issue of insurance is an important one. This section will consider both private cover and public insurance. Finally, the module will look at the law of auctions. Auctions are of course a favoured forum to buy and sell art, and the law that applies to the auction is different from the law of the open market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Arbitration Award WritingLawSOLM928Semester 27NoNo

International Arbitration Award Writing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: The course consists of self-study, a residential course for students and further self-study. Students will be sent a reading list as well as a set of reading materials focusing on arbitration awards, their characteristics, functions and drafting. The residential course will consist of one full day of teaching and learning by way of a seminar.
At the residential course students will be given the first set of materials relating to a fictional arbitration case; these will normally cover all information but the hearing. Candidates will be required to start working on the awards by drafting summary of facts, summary of parties' positions, claims, etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Media RegulationLawSOLM217Semester 17YesNo

Media Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: "Within the field of media law, there are a range of sector-specific regulatory systems, each of which raises complex practical and ethical questions. This course will examine each of these using English law as a case-study (international comparisons may be raised as and where appropriate, in particular in the context of discussion with students commenting on the approaches taken in their home jurisdictions)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, ThemesPolitics and International RelationsPOLM090Full year7NoNo

Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, Themes

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Diego De Merich

Description: The module is designed to give students a good command and understanding of key concepts and theoretical traditions in International Relations and their relevance for understanding contemporary themes in world politics.

The module seeks to provide students with a more nuanced understanding of the various social forces and processes shaping world politics including the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations. The module also aims at developing the students' capacity to reflect critically about the main claims, strengths and weaknesses of theories in international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7031USemester 27YesNo

Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Buican
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6413 and take SPA6324
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: This course introduces core concepts in supersymmetry that can be applied to quantitatively understand a broad variety of physical systems and is a complement to the AQFT and FMQFT modules. Starting with supersymmetric quantum mechanics as a toy model, the course covers the supersymmetry algebra, its representations, the Witten Index, and the resulting constraints on quantum dynamics. We then move on to introduce supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions consisting of scalars and fermions while giving a basic introduction to symmetry currents, the classical and quantum Wilsonian renormalization group flow, moduli spaces, spurions, and non-renormalization arguments. The course culminates in a study of simple dualities in three-dimensional supersymmetric abelian gauge theories. We conclude with a discussion of supersymmetry in four space-time dimensions and, time permitting, the embedding of our constructions in string theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, ThemesPolitics and International RelationsPOLM090Semester 17NoNo

Contemporary World Politics: Theories, Concepts, Themes

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Diego De Merich

Description: The module is designed to give students a good command and understanding of key concepts and theoretical traditions in International Relations and their relevance for understanding contemporary themes in world politics.

The module seeks to provide students with a more nuanced understanding of the various social forces and processes shaping world politics including the co-constitutive relationship between the theory and practice of international relations. The module also aims at developing the students' capacity to reflect critically about the main claims, strengths and weaknesses of theories in international relations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7031PSemester 27YesNo

Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Buican
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: This course introduces core concepts in supersymmetry that can be applied to quantitatively understand a broad variety of physical systems and is a complement to the AQFT and FMQFT modules. Starting with supersymmetric quantum mechanics as a toy model, the course covers the supersymmetry algebra, its representations, the Witten Index, and the resulting constraints on quantum dynamics. We then move on to introduce supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions consisting of scalars and fermions while giving a basic introduction to symmetry currents, the classical and quantum Wilsonian renormalization group flow, moduli spaces, spurions, and non-renormalization arguments. The course culminates in a study of simple dualities in three-dimensional supersymmetric abelian gauge theories. We conclude with a discussion of supersymmetry in four space-time dimensions and, time permitting, the embedding of our constructions in string theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Functional Methods in Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7024PSemester 17YesNo

Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The module will introduce Feynman's path integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics and apply it to the study of Quantum Field Theory (QFT). Emphasis will be given to the role of symmetries (Ward identities), the renormalisation group and the idea of effective action. The concept of Wilson's effective action and the different nature of (ir)relevant/marginal terms will be discussed. Simple scalar theories will provide the example where to apply the concepts and the techniques introduced. The course will also touch on some more advanced topics, such as quantum anomalies and conformal field theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA7018USemester 17YesNo

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5304 and take SPA6325 and take SPA5218. Before taking this module you are advised to take SPA7027U

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysics and AstronomySPA7023USemester 17YesNo

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: "Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA7018PSemester 17YesNo

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200Full year6YesYes

Russian III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS6201
Prerequisite: RUS211, RUS5200 or equivalent

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Experimental LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5039Semester 25YesNo

Experimental Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Linnaea Stockall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module provides students with introductory training in theoretical and practical elements of experimental linguistics. The module will include hands-on training in statistics and hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection (including training in ethical human subjects research protocols), and data analysis. The module will also engage students in considering strengths and limitations of various kinds of linguistics data, and how multiple sources of data and methods of data collection can be combined to enhance understanding. Students will develop their critical reading skills and gain practice in presenting primary source literature to their peers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202Full year4YesNo

Russian I N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4202A, RUS4202B
Prerequisite: Native or near native proficiency in Russian

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 5: 45.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Law and Ethics in Business and FinanceLawSOLM011Semester 27YesNo

Law and Ethics in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: The module provides students with a broad understanding of the importance of conducting business activities (both financial and non-financial) with fairness and integrity and how this is reflected in EU and UK law and supervisory powers. By making reference to real case studies, the module investigates the legal framework pertaining to bribes, market manipulation, and other malpractices and critically analyses its effectiveness taking also into account the deterrence effect, or lack thereof, of the sanctioning and prosecution regime. It then covers corporate social responsibility and sustainable/responsible investment to analyse if and how this can nudge change. The module will also touch upon the efficacy of the organizational requirements companies are obliged to have in place to prevent unethical conduct from happening and/or spreading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 7
Mergers and AcquisitionsLawSOLM010Semester 27YesNo

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This module is a corporate law and financial regulation module analyzing transactions using sophisticated methodologies. The module will focus on issues such as: due diligence, purchase sale agreements and contractual governance; the role of the board of directors in an acquisition/financing transaction; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, the US and the EU; the protection of minority shareholders in common law and civil law jurisdictions; the protection of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions; and financial assistance regulation in the UK, US and the EU. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201BSemester 24YesNo

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4201
Prerequisite: A level or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201Full year4YesYes

Russian I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4201A, RUS4201B
Prerequisite: A level or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL_SLF
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201ASemester 14YesNo

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4201
Prerequisite: A level or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS060N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Calculus IMathematical SciencesMTH4200Semester 14NoNo

Calculus I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Oscar Bandtlow
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take MTH4100
Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

Description: This is the first of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques and background from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module develops the concepts and techniques of differentiating and integrating with supporting work on algebra, coordinate transformations and curve sketching.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Calculus IIMathematical SciencesMTH4201Semester 24YesNo

Calculus II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rainer Klages
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take SPA4122 or take MTH4101
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4100 or take MTH4200

Description: This module is the second of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module introduces complex numbers, infinite series including power series, and develops techniques of differential and integral calculus in the multivariate setting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 13NoNo

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
Level: 3
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 23NoNo

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
Level: 3
Essential Foundation Mathematical SkillsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF026Semester 13NoNo

Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad

Description: This module is designed to strengthen manipulative skills in elementary arithmetic and algebra; includes consideration of integers, fractions, decimal representations, estimation, polynomials, rational functions, square roots, inequalities, linear and quadratic equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 3
EU Trade LawLawSOLM035Full year7NoNo

EU Trade Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard

Description: "This module is concerned with the legal framework for cross-border trade in the European Union. The module provides an in-depth study of the economic and commercial aspects of the 'four freedoms' (free movement of goods, services, establishment and capital) in the EU single market and discusses the various approaches to regulating the single market adopted by EU institutions. Indicative list of topics that might be covered would include: the concept of the Single Market - market integration in the EU vs other forms of international trade liberalisation; non-tariff barriers: non-discrimination and market access; locating and relocating in another EU Member State - freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services for companies ¿ regulatory competition; tariff and fiscal barriers to free movement - free movement of capital; regulating the Single Market: harmonisation policy - governance of the Single Market"

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Transnational Law and Governance in PracticeLawSOLM027Full year7NoNo

Transnational Law and Governance in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Christou

Description: The central question this module discusses is the application and implication of Transnational law, its formation, supervision, and enforcement process in the context of the transnational business community and globalised markets. This module will take a series of case studies from different areas of law to provide examples of how governance can be conducted in a globalised world. The focus will be on the role and functioning of transnational law in a globalised world. Guest lecturers will be invited to talk about the impact of globalisation on their specialism and a Transnational Law solution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Regulation of Financial MarketsLawSOLM003Semester 17NoNo

Regulation of Financial Markets

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The module provides an overview of monetary and financial regulation drawing on a comparative study of the law in relevant financial centres in the US, UK, EU and Japan as well as on the increasing corpus of international financial `soft law¿ (such as the Basel capital rules) and considers the dynamics of financial regulation in emerging economies. The module goes beyond the description of the black letter law and explains the underlying economic and political forces which bring that law into being, analysing the interaction between law and finance. Focus is on regulatory issues, and not on contractual or transactional aspects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Animal Law, Media and CultureLawSOLM026Full year7NoNo

Animal Law, Media and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module brings together an interdisciplinary perspective on behaviour science, welfare, economics, and law in order to introduce students to a range of legal and welfare issues arising through the use of animals in media, culture and entertainment. The module will deal with both domesticated and wild animals, considering animals in film and television, advertising, fashion, zoos and conservation, circuses, and sport. Students will also explore a range of critical questions and specific episodes on animals and creativity, including the animal as performer and the animal as author, analysing the significance for sentience and welfare, and gaining important insight into creativity and intentionality in other areas of the law (including intellectual property).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7006Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Linguistics

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: During this module, students (in coordination with a supervisor) will select a topic for advanced study; collect and analyze data to adequately address the chosen topic; and write a 15,000 word dissertation. Through the dissertation, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Actuarial Financial EngineeringMathematical SciencesMTH6112Semester 26NoNo

Actuarial Financial Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6155
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced techniques in financial mathematics for actuaries, building on the foundational material in Financial Mathematics 1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuous time models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Russian Vocabulary and Word-formationLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5031Semester 25YesNo

Russian Vocabulary and Word-formation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Makarova
Overlap: RUS6030, FLM5030, FLM6030
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module looks into the major word groups of the Russian vocabulary: nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Students will master the basic Russian word elements, prefixes and suffixes, which will enable them to recognise and identify new Russian words and to understand their meaning. Students will also develop an ability to construct words from a given Russian root. By the end of this module, students will develop a rich vocabulary faster than in any other way and will get more confident in translation, composition and conversation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors SchemeMathematical SciencesMTH6110Semester 26NoYes

Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shabnam Beheshti
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: This module allows undergraduates to gain valuable transferable skills whilst exploring the teaching profession first hand by working with a teacher in a local school. The key skills gained include communication and presentation of mathematics, team-working, active listening, time management and prioritisation. The module will be supported by regular classes and assessed by a combination of written reports and an oral presentation. Registration for this module requires validation; places will be limited and interviews to assess suitability will be held during Semester A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
Short Stories and Important People: The Nineteenth CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5029Semester 15YesNo

Short Stories and Important People: The Nineteenth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: COM5029, RUS4029
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines the Russian short story as a genre that articulates the relationship between the self and society. We shall analyse the intrinsic narrative and thematic complexity of works by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and, in an afterword, Nabokov. Topics to discuss include self-fashioning and fate, grotesque visions of self-loss, social and sexual otherness, history and individuality, love and adultery, time and memory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian Documentary FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5030Semester 25YesNo

Russian Documentary Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: RUS6030, FLM5030, FLM6030
Prerequisite: None

Description: You will examine the ways in which documentary film has been used in Russia both to record life and to shape it. You will trace the use of documentary film to trace and interpret revolution and industrialisation in the 1920s and 1930s, World War Two, the disintegration of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet life, paying particular attention to how filmmakers from Vertov to Sokurov have exploited the genre's formal possibilities: framing, editing, various aspects of sound, including music, voice-over commentary, noises, and the interview.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Dissertation ProseminarLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7005Semester 27NoNo

Dissertation Proseminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Research at postgraduate level places special demands on the developing researcher, for which appropriate training is needed. The two primary goals of this module are to prepare students for the practical challenges of postgraduate research (including the development of a research question/agenda, advanced library research, ethics and practical dimensions of research collection, outlining and writing a dissertation, abstract-writing, oral presentation, and other related skills) and to initiate students into specialised research in their chosen dissertation area. The first part of the module (before reading week) will cover core, generic postgraduate training for all students on the MA, taught through group sessions. The second part of the module (after reading week) will require students to apply this knowledge (as well as knowledge from core modules in Semester 1) to their chosen area of research by pursuing independent reading and research towards their potential dissertation topics (to be completed during the summer term), taught through individual meetings with supervisors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Securities RegulationLawSOLM001Semester 27YesNo

Securities Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: This module examines the law and regulation of conduct of business/market conduct aspects of financial intermediation seeing from the angle of investor protection in primary and secondary capital markets. It covers a wide range of issues including the reform of the regulation of financial intermediation in the aftermath of the 2008 credit crisis, mandatory disclosure and transparency requirements for securities trading, conduct of business rules, financial mis-selling, market abuse, the regulation of credit rating agencies, hedge funds regulation, and the regulation of financial resilience. The module covers policy issues, statutory materials and case law. UK regulation is examined within the context of EU law and regulation. Where appropriate specific themes are discussed with reference to international harmonization initiatives and/or comparative analysis with parallel developments in the US. The module also places emphasis on the practical problems, which arise in capital markets and consider ways in which these may be addressed in the future.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected IssuesLawSOLM041Full year7NoNo

Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: This module seeks to explore specialised issues arising in dispute resolution processes that are alternative to conventional forms of adjudication. The module will examine selected issues in ADR and may include issues dealing with confidentiality and enforcement, issues of globalization and transplantation of ADR systems, ethics and morality in ADR, special areas of ADR application (for example, on-line dispute resolution), role of lawyers, the professionalisation of ADR, system design, for example. ADR is a vibrant area of scholarship; it is impossible to give 'yes' or 'no' answers to most of the issues arising in scholarship. Therefore the module will employ a critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students will be willing to share the results of their analysis, research and supported opinions, and be involved in active discussion of all issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Construction Contracts and Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM042Semester 27NoNo

International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: International construction contracts have by their nature special features, which affect the methods of resolving disputes arising from them. The module, conducted through series of seminars, examines in detail the nature of international construction contracts, the typical clauses included in the standard form of FIDIC conditions, the parties to construction contract (and in particular the role of the Engineer and the Contractor), their structure, and the types of disputes that arise under them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Language and the MediaLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5210Semester 15YesNo

Language and the Media

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Agnieszka Lyons
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN4208

Description: In this module, we will investigate the social and structural factors of language standardisation and the position of media in relation to it, as well as look at journalism's collective role in influencing language style and language policy. Both print and broadcast media will be examined, and you are encouraged to consider language production practices in web-based domains. You will analyse style standardisation efforts, processes, and data from a variety of micro and macro linguistic perspectives.

It will be available to students registered on single or joint honours English Language or Linguistics degree programmes only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204Full year4YesYes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4203, RUS4203A, RUS4203B, RUS4202A, RUS4202B
Prerequisite: GCSE or equivalent in Russian

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is aimed at students who hold GCSE or equivalent in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
International perspectives
Corporate Rescue and Cross-border InsolvencyLawSOLM017Semester 27YesNo

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: The module covers the various procedures available in cases of reorganization and insolvency of corporations; the relationship between the general law of property, obligations and insolvency; and, the law of credit and security issues in the context of distress scenarios. The module will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Principles of RegulationLawSOLM018Semester 27YesNo

Principles of Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: Regulation covers virtually all significant aspects of modern life. It is here to stay but it remains as controversial as ever. This is an advanced foundational course on regulation. The module examines problems that are common to the regulation of a wide range of industries and fields and considers how these problems are (or fail to be) treated. In particular, the module considers the nature of regulation and its relationship with law, economics and politics, the regulation of risk, standard setting, compliance and enforcement strategies, the issues of accountability and legitimacy and the rise of multi-level governance and transnational regulation. Being `problem-solving sensitive¿ but 'industry neutral', this module is an ideal complement to more narrowly-focused modules irrespective of choice of LLM Specialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Corporate Finance LawLawSOLM009Semester 17YesNo

Corporate Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in international corporate finance. The module will focus on providing an introduction to the different corporate financing options, methods and techniques, with special emphasis on the use of debt and equity. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and international trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mathematics BScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF041Full year3NoNo

Mathematics B

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anna Pachol

Description: This module covers mathematical topics such as algebra, functions, geometry and trigonometry, and aims to provide students with a more extensive knowledge of calculus (especially in techniques of integration) and an introduction to complex numbers, numerical methods, differential equations, vector analysis and power series. It is appropriate for those students progressing onto degree programmes in mathematical sciences, and those degree programmes in physical science and engineering which require a more thorough and comprehensive grounding in mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 3
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203BSemester 24YesYes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
Overlap: RUS4203, RUS4204B
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed the equivalent of one semester of Russian language at their home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
International perspectives
Introduction to EngineeringScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF024Semester 23NoNo

Introduction to Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF005

Description: This module aims to introduce students to the application of scientific principles to solve practical engineering problems; it includes discussion of the development of the engineering field and standards, as well as basic engineering principles, mechanical applications and stress analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 3
Introduction to Computer ProgrammingMathematical SciencesMTH5001Semester 25NoYes

Introduction to Computer Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Prellberg
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4116 or take MTH4216 ) and ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take ECN115 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

QMUL Model themes supported:

    QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      Description: This module develops computer programming skills that are fundamental to applying theoretical results from Mathematics and Statistics in business and industry. Students will learn to write programs in a widely used programming language to solve problems coming from real world situations using theoretical results from the mathematics and statistics modules they took previously. These computational skills are applicable to any role that requires quantitative analysis and evidence-based decision making.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      US State Law and PracticeLawSOLM034Semester 27NoNo

      US State Law and Practice

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

      Description: Contract and tort are the two areas of law that are considered the cornerstones of commercial relationships. These as well as real property law are US state law subject matters with commercial significance. This module examines the United States law of commercial contracts, the US Uniform Commercial Code, which serves as the basis for most state law of commercial transactions, including state jurisdictions such as New York or California that are often the choice of law in commercial contracts. It also examines the general US principles of intentional torts, including harms to property interests, negligence, employer responsibility, products liability, nuisance, defamation and interference with business relationships, all with import for commercial legal practice. Finally, the module explores ownership and rights in real property, easements, mortgages and security interests in real property, deeds and titles, real estate contracts and brokerage.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Discrete Mathematics (Foundation)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF015Semester 23NoNo

      Discrete Mathematics (Foundation)

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed

      Description: This module introduces students to arithmetic beyond the integers and rational numbers: modulo arithmetic, and the arithmetic of polynomials, matrices, logical propositions and sets. Applications of these concepts in prepositional logic, relational algebra and graph theory will also be covered. Prerequisite: SEF026 Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Mathematics AScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF040Full year3NoNo

      Mathematics A

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Anna Pachol

      Description: This module reviews mathematical notation, basic principles of arithmetic and algebra, logarithms and powers, functions and graphs, coordinate geometry and trigonometry, an introduction to the techniques of calculus; and demonstrates how these principles may be applied to solve problems in science and mathematics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 3
      English Language IScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF009Semester 13NoNo

      English Language I

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Ms Sharon Turner

      Description: Reading and study skills, lecture comprehension and seminar skills, and an introduction to academic writing in English. This module is intended for students, primarily from overseas, whose first language is not English and who do not already have IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 50.00% Practical
      Level: 3
      Failure of SolidsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT501Semester 26NoNo

      Failure of Solids

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Wei Tan

      Description: The physics of fracture and fracture mechanics. Application of fracture mechanics to engineering applications. Influence of temperature on the mechanical properties of materials. High temperature deformation by dislocation movement and by diffusion. Practical aspects of creep deformation. Failure of materials under cyclic loading. Theories of fatigue. Practical aspects of fatigue in engineering materials.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Physics (Electricity and Atomic Physics)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF007Semester 23NoNo

      Physics (Electricity and Atomic Physics)

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof David Dunstan
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF005

      Description: Aspects of electrical theory (current and charge, resistance, capacitors, circuits and meters); atomic structure and properties of the electron; the nucleus, radioactive decay and nuclear energy; introduction to quantum physics. Prerequisite - SEF005

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200BSemester 25YesYes

      Russian II

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS5200
      Prerequisite: RUS4201 or knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL level B1+

      QMUL Model Available to: All students

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
      • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.
      • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.Students will be able to analyse the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts upon aspects of their discipline.

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
      Chemistry for MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT5002Semester 15YesNo

      Chemistry for Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Petra Szilagyi

      Description: The role of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics in materials science. The module will begin wilth derivation and description of some fundamental kinematics and thermodynamic phenomena such as Gibbs free energy, rate equations, equilibria etc. The effect of variables such as temperature and pressure will be examined. The module will go and to demonstrate with examples how these can be applied to solve problems for gas, solution, and solid phase scenarios with a particular emphasis on polymer synthesis.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Investment Treaty Arbitration: Foundations, Jurisdiction and ProcedureLawSOLM047Semester 17YesNo

      Investment Treaty Arbitration: Foundations, Jurisdiction and Procedure

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Crina Baltag

      Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international investment arbitration at the juncture of dispute resolution and public international law and policy. The course is divided into three main topics: (1) International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution; (2) ICSID - Jurisdiction and Procedure; and (3) Bilateral Investment Treaties - Jurisdiction and Procedure. The classes will explore, first by way of integration, international trade and investment disputes out of court and the evolutionary process of their institutionalisation. Then, we discuss the related regulatory and institutional framework, and the basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to investment with focus on sovereign immunity, arbitrability and applicable laws (domestic and international). The following lectures will address ICSID Jurisdiction (ratione materiae, ratione personae, temporal) and consent to jurisdiction. These classes will be followed by classes on ICSID Procedure, including annulment of awards and enforcement of awards. The next set of classes will explore jurisdiction based on Bilateral Investment Treaties (with focus on umbrella clauses, parallel proceedings and MFN clauses)."

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Russian Novel: Dysfunctional FamiliesLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5019Semester 25YesNo

      Russian Novel: Dysfunctional Families

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
      Overlap: COM5019, COM6019 and RUS6019
      Prerequisite: RUS4012 or equivalent

      Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1917. We will focus on novels about the disintegration of the family under the pressure of raging ideological and moral debates in Russia following the Great Reforms of the 1860s. The core readings will be Turgenev's Fathers and Sons, Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov and Bely¿s Petersburg (one of the greatest Modernist novels). Themes include the relation between fiction and ideology, religion and modernity, social models and revolutionary ferment, Russia and the West, and the distinctiveness of the Russian novel.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers BLanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM037BSemester 27NoNo

      Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers B

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: The conception 'cultural transfer' includes aspects of inter- and intra-cultural relations between (national) cultures that represent essentially hybrids. Research on cultural transfers began in the mid1980s and focused initially on France and Germany integrating research on reception studies, intertextuality, translation studies and language teaching, This module endeavours to apply findings in this field to Anglo-German cultural relations and to engage students in describing these relations in terms of "transfer models" (Michel Espagne). It analyses the theory and history of Anglo-German cultural transfers from the late 18th century to the present day. The second part will bring students into contact with practitioners in this field and will introduce them to the reality of such transfers between cultures.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Contemporary Russian FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5017Semester 15YesNo

      Contemporary Russian Film

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed
      Overlap: RUS6017, FLM6017
      Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Russian

      Description: Through the analysis of films produced since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union and creation of Russia, this course aims to equip students to be able to comment on contemporary Russian films as they are released. Teaching and assessment focuses on identifying key industrial, thematic and genre trends and issues in contemporary Russian cinema, with a focus on the intersection of the national and transnational. Those without Russian will be able to participate fully in this course, although a reading knowledge can be useful for working on less well-known films. The secondary reading is in English, and all key films are subtitled.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201BSemester 26YesYes

      Russian III N

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS6201
      Prerequisite: RUS212, RUS5201 or equivalent

      QMUL Model Available to: All students

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
      PolymersEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT313Semester 15YesNo

      Polymers

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti

      Description: A comparative study of polymers as engineering materials. Mechanical properties of polymers and polymers reinforced with fibres and particles. Micro-mechanics and property prediction.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Commercial Conflict of LawsLawSOLM046Semester 17NoNo

      Commercial Conflict of Laws

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

      Description: This module introduces students to the fundamental questions of applicable law that arise in a globalised society. The course gives a broad theoretical underpinning to the concepts of conflicts of laws as well as examining from a practical standpoint the challenges faced by litigators dealing with cross-border disputes. The substance of the module provides an overview of choice of law principles in the main areas of civil and commercial practice (contracts, torts, property, and company matters) and takes a closer look at developing and problematic areas as well as the challenges posed to these traditional principles by new technologies and an increasingly interconnected global marketplace. The starting point of the course is to address these issues of applicable law as they arise before the English courts. In this context, aspects of both the English common law rules as well as the European regulations, which now govern substantial aspects of English private international law in civil and commercial matters, are covered in depth. Where appropriate, the course also considers from a comparative perspective the approaches taken in other major jurisdictions (for example the USA, Switzerland and South America).

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Sociolinguistic TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7002Semester 17NoNo

      Sociolinguistic Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None
      Corequisite: None

      Description: The field of sociolinguistics has seen the parallel development of a number of theories of how language relates to, and is embedded in, society. Some of these developments have been mutually reinforcing or complementary, while others have raised questions and debates over the nature of social variation in language. This course reviews the major 'lineages' of thinking in sociolinguistics, covering theories that have formed the foundation of both quantitative and qualitative approaches sociolinguistics. With a focus on the former, the course will require students to read classic texts from early sociolinguistic theory (developed in William Labov's early work and parallel strands of thought from the same period) and then trace the development of distinct 'waves' of thinking and analysis in subsequent decades. On the qualitative side, the course will cover selected classic works from social theory, and literary and cultural theory that have been influential in sociolinguists' thinking about social structure and variation (e.g. Bourdieu, Bakhtin). Overall, the course will provide students with an advanced foundational knowledge of major developments in sociolinguistic thought over the past half century.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and ContextLawSOLM040Semester 27NoNo

      Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

      Description: The module will seek to provide an understanding of the various dispute resolution processes available to parties in dispute, and to understand the necessity of considering the process which best suits the dispute. The module will cover such topics as the nature of conflict, the emergence of disputes, the history of the ADR movement with its attendant debate between informalism and formalism, the adjudication process, the nature of negotiation and their strategies, the mediation process and approaches, the continuum of dispute resolution processes, the relationship between ADR and institutes such as courts, the English Courts and within the EU. ADR is a vibrant area of scholarship; it is impossible to give 'yes' or 'no' answers to most of the issues arising in scholarship. Therefore the module will employ a critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students will be willing to share the results of their analysis, research and supported opinions,and be involved in active discussion of all issues.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201ASemester 16YesYes

      Russian III N

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS6201
      Prerequisite: RUS212, RUS5201 or equivalent

      QMUL Model Available to: All students

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
      Negotiation Theory and PracticeLawSOLM039Semester 27YesNo

      Negotiation Theory and Practice

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

      Description: The course will explore negotiation through various theoretical approaches including strategic bargaining, cognitive theories, processual analysis, for example. The focus will be on the lawyer as negotiator and the intent is to blend theoretical analysis with practical application. Lectures will be delivered in combination with role-play simulations and exercises. Students will be expected to participate in exercises and simulated roleplays each class. This module is very well suited to a three hour weekly lecture due to the experiential nature of its delivery.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Interaction and DiscourseLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5204Semester 25YesNo

      Interaction and Discourse

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Colleen Cotter
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: Language is central to spoken and written interaction. In this module, students will learn about the major theoretical frameworks that have been developed to analyze how spoken interaction is structured, how different kinds of texts communicate social and pragmatic meaning, and the ways in which larger social and cultural structures are reflected in patterns of language use. The module will introduce students to such frameworks as Politeness and Interpersonal Pragmatics, Conversation Analysis, Narrative Analysis, and (Critical) Discourse Analysis. Students will have the opportunity to conduct qualitative analyses on a variety of different spoken and written texts, and will develop the basic skills necessary for future research in qualitative sociolinguistics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203ASemester 14YesYes

      Introductory Russian

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS4203, RUS4204A
      Prerequisite: None

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: The module is aimed at associate students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
      Level: 4
      International perspectives
      Introduction to Business Information SystemsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF036Semester 23NoNo

      Introduction to Business Information Systems

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mr Jorge Del Bosque Trevino
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take SEF034

      Description: The module balances business and technical aspects but adopts a high-level view, aiming for example to explain the purpose and use of databases rather than develop specific skills in database query or design. Alongside learning the basic ideas of programming, this module provides an introduction to the context of much IT.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 3
      Sovereign Debt RestructuringLawSOLM014Full year7NoNo

      Sovereign Debt Restructuring

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

      Description: The module covers the various procedures available in financial distress scenarios aiming at restoring viability and overcoming the excessive burden of debt. The module will address these issues from the perspective of sovereign states. The course will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Banking Law InternationalLawSOLM007Semester 17NoNo

      Banking Law International

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof George Walker

      Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the nature and content of banking law and regulation at the international, European and UK levels with reference to US law as well. Banking markets are key drivers in any national, regional or global economy with banks carrying out a number of essential services without which no economy could operate. Banking markets are nevertheless unstable and prone to significant crisis and collapse which was confirmed by the severity and damaging impact of the recent financial crises in global, European and national financial markets. Many difficult problems still arise with regard to the causes of the crises and most appropriate responses going forward. All of the relevant issues that arise in this exciting area are examined in this course.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Banking and FinTech LawLawSOLM008Semester 27NoNo

      Banking and FinTech Law

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof George Walker

      Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the nature and content of private banking law at the UK, European and international levels. Banking Law is concerned with the private law aspects of banks and banking including both Commercial Banking and Investment Banking. Banks are among the most important financial institutions within any economy, nationally and internationally, and the City of London is one of the foremost financial centres of the world. This module examines all aspects of the law governing the structure, operation and function of banks and banking markets from a UK as well as European and international perspective. The course is essentially private law based although it also examines recent areas of significant law reform especially following the recent financial crises in banking markets.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Probability and Statistics IMathematical SciencesMTH4216Semester 24YesNo

      Probability and Statistics I

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Wolfram Just
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4116
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

      Description: This module develops the theory of probability from the module `Introduction to Probability' and then introduces the fundamental ideas of classical statistics. It covers descriptive statistics, the estimation of population moments using data and the basic ideas of statistical inference, hypothesis testing and interval estimation. These methods will be applied to data from a range of applications, including business, economics, science and medicine. A simple statistics package will be used to perform the calculations.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Multinational Enterprises: Business and Legal OrganisationLawSOLM030Semester 17NoNo

      Multinational Enterprises: Business and Legal Organisation

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Janet Dine

      Description: "This module will provide a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the business and legal organisation of MNEs and of the regulation of their activities. Throughout the module we will aim to examine the regulatory environment for international business by dealing with sub-national, national, regional and multilateral policies and rules for the regulation of MNEs."

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Digital Electronics and Computer SystemsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF035Semester 23NoNo

      Digital Electronics and Computer Systems

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mr Robert Paul Whittaker

      Description: This module will introduce SEFP students to basic electronics, with a focus on digital and programmable systems. This module follows on from SEF034 Computing, which introduces basic programming skills and seeks to look below the abstract level at which most computers are programmed and ask 'how are computers created?'.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 3
      Vectors and MatricesMathematical SciencesMTH4215Semester 24NoNo

      Vectors and Matrices

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Vito Latora
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4115
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

      Description: Properties of two- and three-dimensional space turn up almost everywhere in mathematics. For example, vectors represent points in space, equations describe shapes in space and transformations move shapes around in spaces; a fruitful idea is to classify transformations by the points and shapes that they leave fixed. Most mathematicians like to be able to 'see' in special terms why something is true, rather than simply relying on formulas. This model ties together the most useful notions from geometry - which give the meaning of the formulas - with the algebra that gives the methods of calculation. It is an introductory module assuming nothing beyond the common core of A-level Mathematics or equivalent.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      ComputingScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF034Semester 13NoNo

      Computing

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mrs Dharini Krishnamoorthy

      Description: The Computing module will provide SEFP students with an understanding and practical experience of core areas of computer science: programming and algorithms; underlying theory; software development; computer systems; and networks. It will include hands-on programming experience during supervised lab sessions. The module is designed principally to prepare students for pursuing study in the areas of computer science or electronics; however, it will also provide a basic introduction for students not intending to pursue study in these areas.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 3
      Physics (Mechanics and Materials)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF005Semester 13NoNo

      Physics (Mechanics and Materials)

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Miss Elise Stacey Agra

      Description: This is one of three modules providing a detailed introduction to concepts of physics. This module covers the following topics: Newtonian mechanics, including statics, linear and rotational dynamics; forces and energy, and their role in the molecular structure of matter, properties of liquids and gases; basic concepts of thermodynamics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Physics (Fields and Waves)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF006Semester 23NoNo

      Physics (Fields and Waves)

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Andrei Sapelkin

      Description: The role and characteristics of fields, in particular gravitational and electromagnetic fields. The description of natural phenomena and the widespread occurrence of oscillations and wave motion, with examples taken from the physics of sound and light. Prerequisite - SEF005

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      A Closer Look at ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF004Semester 23NoNo

      A Closer Look at Chemistry

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Yao Lu

      Description: This module expands upon topics covered in SEF003 and provides a further introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry; including topics such as thermochemistry, reaction kinetics and equilibria, molecular structure, aspects of organic chemistry, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: SEF003 Introductory Chemistry

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Chinese Business LawLawSOLM029Semester 17NoNo

      Chinese Business Law

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

      Description: The module will introduce the structure of the Chinese legal system, its cultural and political background and historical development. With these in mind, it will then cover major business and commercial law areas, including company, contract and trade law; taxation; financial regulation; and dispute resolution and litigation, with a particular focus on their application to foreign businesses, investors and individuals. The module will provide students with an understanding of the principles and rules of the Chinese business and commercial law regimes. It will also provide them with the knowledge and skills to study the Chinese business and commercial legal system in greater depth. No knowledge of Chinese is required to take the module, but students will be expected to become familiar with the relevant Chinese business and legal terms.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
      Level: 7
      Renewable Energy MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT427Semester 27YesNo

      Renewable Energy Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

      Description: A module designed to develop the tools required to apply a fundamental understanding of the application of new energy and renewable energy systems to the problems faced by climate change and global energy security. Particular focus is on the application of materials for the development of novel and new energy recovery systems such as nanostructured surfaces for solar harvesting and ultra tough composites for wind turbines.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers ALanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM037ASemester 17NoNo

      Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers A

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: The conception 'cultural transfer' includes aspects of inter- and intra-cultural relations between (national) cultures that represent essentially hybrids. Research on cultural transfers began in the mid1980s and focused initially on France and Germany integrating research on reception studies, intertextuality, translation studies and language teaching, This module endeavours to apply findings in this field to Anglo-German cultural relations and to engage students in describing these relations in terms of "transfer models" (Michel Espagne). It analyses the theory and history of Anglo-German cultural transfers from the late 18th century to the present day. The second part will bring students into contact with practitioners in this field and will introduce them to the reality of such transfers between cultures.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Clinical Problems in Biomedical Engineering and MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT4003Semester 14YesNo

      Clinical Problems in Biomedical Engineering and Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Martin Knight

      Description: The module is to provide a platform for the students in various disciplines of Medical Engineering, Medical Materials and Dental Materials to give them an insight to the range of disciplines at a fundamental level. These topics include understanding the range of clinical problems and the anatomy/structure and physiology/function of biological systems . The students will be expected to carry out group presentations assessed by SEMS academic staff, a PBL exercise and In-class short tests.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Clinical Solutions in Biomedical Engineering and MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT4004Semester 24YesNo

      Clinical Solutions in Biomedical Engineering and Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta

      Description: The module is to provide a platform for the students in various disciplines of Medical Engineering, Medical Materials and Dental Materials to give them an insight to those disciplines at a fundamental level. The topics covered include the use of materials in the body, the design of implants and their performance, and the analysis of solutions. The students will be expected to carry out group presentations, a PBL exercise and perform in-class short tests.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Reading Contemporary RussiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4205Semester 24YesNo

      Reading Contemporary Russia

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None
      Corequisite: RUS4203 / RUS4204

      Description: Reading Contemporary Russia consists of reading comprehension and content analysis of simple texts on contemporary Russia. The main focus of the class is to introduce students to current cultural, social, and political issues, using books, newspaper articles,journals, TV and radio broadcasts, and web sources from Russia. Selected readings and films will familiarize students with culture and features of everyday life.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 25.00% Practical
      Level: 4
      Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200ASemester 15YesYes

      Russian II

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS5200
      Prerequisite: RUS4201 or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1+

      QMUL Model Available to: All students

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
      • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.
      • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.Students will be able to analyse the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts upon aspects of their discipline.

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS5201A.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
      Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204BSemester 24YesYes

      Russian I Intensive

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS4203, RUS4203B, RUS4202
      Prerequisite: GCSE or equivalent in Russian

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed at least one semester of Russian language at home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      International perspectives
      Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201Full year6YesYes

      Russian III N

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS6200
      Prerequisite: RUS212, RUS5201 or equivalent

      QMUL Model Available to: All students

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 5: 45.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
      English Dialect SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6208PSemester 17NoNo

      English Dialect Syntax

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr David Hall
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: English dialects display many non-standard syntactic features which challenge many of the analyses that have been proposed for standard English. In this module you'll encounter these features, have a chance to build analyses for them, and to evaluate alternative analyses from the primary literature. You must have taken at least Explaining Grammatical Structures or have an equivalent level of expertise in syntax.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Coding for LinguistsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6209PSemester 17NoNo

      Coding for Linguists

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mr Adib Mehrabi
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides students with an introduction to computer programming and computational modelling for applied linguistics. Students will learn how to write code in a widely used programming language (Python), and gain experience in using tools that are suited to solving a range of computational problems in linguistics using machine learning approaches. There will be a focus on developing practical skills. The module is suitable for final year BA students and MA students without any prior experience in computer programming or machine learning.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      English Dialect SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6208Semester 16YesNo

      English Dialect Syntax

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr David Hall
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN037/LIN5213

      Description: English dialects display many non-standard syntactic features which challenge many of the analyses that have been proposed for standard English. In this module you'll encounter these features, have a chance to build analyses for them, and to evaluate alternative analyses from the primary literature. You must have taken at least Explaining Grammatical Structures or have an equivalent level of expertise in syntax.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Developmental Disorders of Language and CognitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6205PSemester 17NoNo

      Developmental Disorders of Language and Cognition

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module will explore current theoretical approaches and research in the area of developmental disorders of language and cognition. The following topics will be included: Theoretical and methodological issues in the study of developmental disorders; Specific Language Impairment; Dyslexia; Reading Comprehension Impairment; Autism Spectrum Disorders; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Hearing Impairment; Assessment and Intervention for Developmental Disorders.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Transnational Problems of Commercial LawLawSOLM036Semester 27NoNo

      Transnational Problems of Commercial Law

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prosir Bernard Rix

      Description: In an era of globalisation English contract law governs many international transactions between commercial parties and is essential to energy, shipping, commodities and the construction industry. This course will introduce students to the making, breaking, interpreting and disputing of contracts. It covers a range of subjects including contract interpretation, frustration, breach, termination, misrepresentation and fraud, and some of the special problems of insurance, shipping, and sale of goods law. It will also provide them with insights into the procedural aspects of commercial law; and into the different ways in which good faith may be approached in the common and civil law. In doing so, we consider typical problems concerning contract law, private and public international law, and procedure, which are encountered by commercial lawyers in negotiation, litigation, arbitration and mediation. Do you interpret contracts as a literalist goat or as a purposive sheep? When does a breach of contract destroy a contract? What are the modes and dangers of terminating a significant contract? What is the role of an ¿international commercial court¿? What is the role of private and public international law in commercial law? How does ¿good faith¿ differ in the common and civil law? Would you advise a client to arbitrate or litigate or mediate? It will give students and practitioners the ability to answer these questions and apply contract law to complex commercial disputes. It will teach them to be lawyers in business and pragmatists in law.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      International Arbitration Law and Practice: Applicable Laws and ProceduresLawSOLM044Semester 27NoNo

      International Arbitration Law and Practice: Applicable Laws and Procedures

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

      Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented. The focus is on selected issues of applicable law(s) and procedures. In particular, in the first section the classes will explore the role of arbitral institutions as regulators of arbitration and classes will also discuss issues of legitimacy and how concerns users may have can be best addressed. In the second section of the course the focus will shift to applicable law issues. In particular, classes will discuss how applicable laws are being determined (and by whom) before looking at specific applicable substantive laws and rules as well as the role of lex mercatoria and transnational commercial rules. There will also be specific discussion of the impact of mandatory rules or law as an issue of methodology and practice. In the third section of the courses the classes will discuss they key (f)actor of arbitration: the arbitration tribunal. In particular, classes will cover the selections, status, rights and duties of arbitrators, how arbitrators are being appointed and the main duties of independence and impartiality. In this context the classes will also address liability and/or immunity of arbitrators. In the penultimate and longer section the classes will explore issues of procedure and evidence in international arbitration, ranging from the law governing the procedure (`lex arbitri¿), the classification of procedural issues, the organisation and management of procedure. Then the classes will look at provisional and interim measure as well as emergency arbitration and will also cover multi-party, multi-contract and multi-action arbitration. Issues of evidence, such as evidentiary means (witnesses, documents and document production, experts) and regulation of evidence will also receive specific attention. Finally, we will discuss efficiency as a driver of arbitration micro-regulation. Depending on the class size we may also endeavour a simulation of an arbitration process."

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200BSemester 26YesNo

      Russian III

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS6201
      Prerequisite: RUS5200, RUS5202 or equivalent
      Corequisite: RUS6201

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203Full year4YesYes

      Introductory Russian

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS4203A, RUS4203B, RUS4204, RUS4204A, RUS4204B
      Prerequisite: None

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: This module is aimed at students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      International perspectives
      Research Methods in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5202Semester 25NoNo

      Research Methods in Linguistics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Devyani Sharma
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: This module focuses on how to conduct original empirical research in Linguistics. Students will get hands-on experience in conducting original research, including designing a project, collecting different types of linguistic data, doing qualitative and quantitative analysis, and presenting research findings. Since the best way to learn research methods is to practice them, students will do regular practical field assignments. They will also learn about the theoretical underpinnings of various research methods. The module will help prepare students for conducting independent research, but will also provide general transferrable skills such as how best to collect data to answer a specific question, how to understand and conduct statistical and other analysis, and how to interpret data patterns. The module is conducted as a seminar: active participation is expected and encouraged.

      As a module it will be available to students registered on a single or joint honours programme involving English Language or Linguistics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Semantics of African American EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5203Semester 25YesNo

      Semantics of African American English

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Sophie Moracchini
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN402/LIN4209 and LIN5209/LIN5217

      Description: With an estimated 30 million speakers, African American English is a major dialect of English. At the same time, it continues to suffer from the stigma of being considered 'bad English'. Yet just like with any other language, the surface variety that we see in AAE belies a complex, rule-governed system. We will study the grammar of AAE with a particular emphasis on those properties that determine how meaning is conveyed. An array of distinctive semantic features will be investigated, for example in the domains of tense, aspect, pronouns, quotatives and negation.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Corporate Governance and Responsibility in FinanceLawSOLM012Semester 27YesNo

      Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

      Description: The module aims at providing students with a thorough understanding of the main corporate governance problems pertaining to the financial sector. This is necessary as the governance of financial institutions is profoundly different from that of non financial institutions. The module will investigate how banks, investment funds and insurance companies are governed and controlled, the link between compensation, performance and risk, and whether structural separation in banking (also called ring fencing) will contribute to simplify banks' governance. The responsibility aspects will cover both managers' liability and corporate responsibilities towards society (CSR). The module will also consider the overall spectrum of duties owed by financial companies towards investors as included in the Mifid and in other EU Directives, and the legal consequences in case of breach. The legal systems analyzed will mostly be the UK and the EU ones with reference to international standards where applicable.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Bank Insolvency and ResolutionLawSOLM013Full year7NoNo

      Bank Insolvency and Resolution

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

      Description: The module covers the various procedures available in financial distress scenarios aiming at restoring viability and overcoming the excessive burden of debt. The module will address these issues from the perspective of banks/financial conglomerates. The course will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      International Finance LawLawSOLM005Semester 27NoNo

      International Finance Law

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof George Walker

      Description: The purpose of the module is to examine the principal markets and main professional documentation used in the international finance and capital markets. International finance markets are key drivers in national and international economies and the new global economy. The City of London remains one of the key financial centres in the world for all of these markets and activities. This course examines the nature, function, structure, operation and importance of all of the key financial markets involved. This is essentially a private law, contract or transactional and documentation course which provides professional preparation in designing, structuring and executing all of the principal separate financial contracts involved.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Diversity and EcologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF033Semester 23NoNo

      Diversity and Ecology

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Sally Faulkner
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF031

      Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles of evolution and to develop an appreciation of the dynamic nature of ecological systems. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Ecology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology, Genetics, and Biology.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202BSemester 24YesNo

      Russian I N

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS4202
      Prerequisite: Native or near native proficiency in Russian

      Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202ASemester 14YesNo

      Russian I N

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS4202
      Prerequisite: Native or near native proficiency in Russian

      Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Introduction to ProbabilityMathematical SciencesMTH4207Semester 14NoNo

      Introduction to Probability

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Rosemary Harris
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4107
      Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

      Description: This is the first module in probability, covering events and random variables. It introduces the basic notions of probability theory and develops them to the stage where one can begin to use probabilistic ideas in statistical inference and modelling, and the study of stochastic processes. The first section deals with events, the axioms of probability, conditional probability and independence. The second introduces random variables both discrete and continuous, including distributions, expectation and variance. Joint distributions are covered briefly.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Numbers, Sets and FunctionsMathematical SciencesMTH4213Semester 14NoNo

      Numbers, Sets and Functions

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Robert Johnson
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4113
      Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

      Description: The modules cover the fundamental building blocks of mathematics (sets, sequences, functions, relations and numbers). It introduces the main number systems (natural numbers, integers, rational, real and complex numbers), outlining their construction and main properties. They also introduce the concepts of definition, theorem, proof and counterexample.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Molecules to CellsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF032Semester 23NoNo

      Molecules to Cells

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Viji Draviam Sastry

      Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the study of Biology at the molecular level. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Biological Information Technology. It is also suitable for students wishing to study microbiology or more general biology degree programmes.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Form and Function in BiologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF031Semester 13NoNo

      Form and Function in Biology

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Gail Schofield

      Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the basic biology of microbes, plants and animals. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology and Ecology. It is also suitable for students who wish to study the more microbial and molecular aspects of biology.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Study Abroad Year (English)English and DramaSED004Full year5NoNo

      Study Abroad Year (English)

      Credits: 120.0
      Contact: Dr James Vigus

      Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year English programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
      taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
      Level: 5
      Introductory ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF003Semester 13NoNo

      Introductory Chemistry

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Stoichko Dimitrov

      Description: This module introduces essential principles and concepts in chemistry, including atomic structure, electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, stoichiometry of reactions, measures of concentration, oxidation states and redox chemistry, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 3
      Transnational Law and Governance AppliedLawSOLM028Semester 27YesNo

      Transnational Law and Governance Applied

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Theodora Christou

      Description: The central question which this module will address is how Transnational law impacts on the future of law-making, supervision and enforcement of rules in a globalised world of transnational business and markets. Globalisation and polycentrality are phenomena that influence every aspect of the world society and challenge the efficiency and validity centralized law-making by the states. In a globalised world where business is mostly done at transnational level coupled with the pace that both economic and technology change, traditional national law-making is proving ineffective and as a result we have witnessed alternatives appearing, including from regional and international organisations but also from private transnational market actors too. The law has emerged from its national setting and presents itself as transnational which has important ramifications for policy making. A weekly topical issue related to Transnational Law will be discussed in depth. The discussions are based on readings and will follow a presentation of the readings. Potential issues which could be covered include: Is Transnational Law, Law?; The World Justice Forum Index; the Cape Town Convention; Climate Change as a Transnational Legal Order; private law-making in the diamond trade and financial markets; and Transnational lawyering.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Engineering Design MethodsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT4002Semester 24NoNo

      Engineering Design Methods

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh

      Description: This module provides an introduction to some tools used in engineering design, including the use of engineering drawing, the use of CAD in design and the module will include elements of reverse engineering. It also includes a detailed examination of the functional properties of different materials classes that are relevant to aerospace, mechanical and medical engineering.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 65.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Film StudiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM035Full year7NoNo

      Film Studies

      Credits: 60.0
      Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: The core module is divided into sections offering students the opportunity to explore key issues in film theory, in the classification and development of national cinemas, and in assessing film production practices, such as cinematography, the continuity system of editing and directorial style.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 37.50% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200Full year5YesYes

      Russian II

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS5200A, RUS5200B
      Prerequisite: RUS4201 or a knowledge of Russian equivalent to CEFRL Level B1

      QMUL Model Available to: All students

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
      • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.
      • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.Students will be able to analyse the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts upon aspects of their discipline.

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
      Structural CharacterisationEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT400Semester 25NoNo

      Structural Characterisation

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100

      Description: The theory of X-ray diffraction and analytical electron microscopy. Applications of X-ray techniques, scanning and transmission electron microscopy in materials science and engineering. Other techniques that cans be used to identify materials are introduced.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Study Abroad Year (Drama)English and DramaSED003Full year5NoNo

      Study Abroad Year (Drama)

      Credits: 120.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed

      Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Drama programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
      taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
      Level: 5
      Russian Language PlayLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5046Semester 25YesNo

      Russian Language Play

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
      Overlap: RUS4046
      Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of Russian

      Description: In the second semester of each academic year the Russian department prepares a play for performance in Russian. This is a unique opportunity for shared close analysis, examination, and realisation of a Russian text. The actors and directors are selected from among the students. Numbers will be limited by the size of the cast, but there is no obligation whatsoever for everyone participating to register for the module. In addition to participating in the performance, students registering for the module write a supervised essay-project on a theme associated with the play performed and supported by three formal supervisions. The language of the presentation and essay is English.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      DissertationLanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM005Full year7NoNo

      Dissertation

      Credits: 60.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Dissertation

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
      Level: 7
      Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204ASemester 14YesYes

      Russian I Intensive

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS4203, RUS4203A, RUS4202
      Prerequisite: GCSE or equivalent in Russian

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • International perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

      Description: The module is aimed at associate students who hold the equivalent of GCSE in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
      Level: 4
      International perspectives
      Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200ASemester 16YesNo

      Russian III

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina
      Overlap: RUS6201
      Prerequisite: RUS211, RUS5200 or equivalent

      Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Features of English: Linguistics for English Language TeachersLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5204Semester 25YesNo

      Features of English: Linguistics for English Language Teachers

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
      Overlap: LIN4208

      Description: Students considering a Foreign Language Assistantship, or any other English language teaching activity such as private English lessons or tuition, during their Year Abroad or after graduation, are recommended to choose this module. We would advise you to do this level 5 module in your second year, just before your year abroad. The module is especially recommended if you have little or no knowledge of English Linguistics. The module covers all main areas of English Linguistics which are relevant for the teaching of English: English phonetics; word classes and phrases (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, particles); the role of English in the world; development of English; English usage / prescription and description. Please note that this module is not available for students with prior knowledge of English Linguistics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and ContextLawSOLM043Semester 17NoNo

      International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and Context

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

      Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last four decades by the increasing use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. In the last ten years more than 5,000 arbitration cases have been recorded annually in London alone. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre and the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central importance in international commercial arbitration.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Developmental Disorders of Language and CognitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6205Semester 16YesYes

      Developmental Disorders of Language and Cognition

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.

      Description: This module will explore current theoretical approaches and research in the area of developmental disorders of language and cognition. The following topics will be included: Theoretical and methodological issues in the study of developmental disorders; Specific Language Impairment; Dyslexia; Reading Comprehension Impairment; Autism Spectrum Disorders; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Hearing Impairment; Assessment and Intervention for Developmental Disorders.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      NetworkingSLF_456_S
      In a WordLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5212Semester 25YesNo

      In a Word

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Hagit Borer
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: Words are the most natural, accessible units of our language, but when we attempt to make more explicit our knowledge and use of words, we are faced with many important questions. For instance, the average adult knows approximately 50,000 words but how is it possible for to learn so many words in a relatively short period of time? How do we extract words, with their specific meaning, from the acoustic jumble of speech? How do we know when 'strike' is a noun and when it is a verb? How do we know that 'transformationalize' is probably a word in English, even if we don't know what it means, but that 'transformize' is not? And how do young children learn all this? Based primarily on English, we will learn to assign structure to words; we will look at how their meaning interacts with context; and finally, at how children acquire words.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Syntax II: Explaining Grammatical StructuresLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5213Semester 15YesNo

      Syntax II: Explaining Grammatical Structures

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr David Hall
      Overlap: LIN037
      Prerequisite: LIN4208 and /LIN4209

      Description: This is a course on contemporary syntactic theory and its application to the analysis of English and other languages. We will build on the knowledge of syntax that you have gained in LIN402 Intro to English Syntax/LIN4209 Syntax I, and apply the same system to a more complex set of linguistic phenomena. You will also develop your ability to generate and test hypotheses using the theory of syntax developed in Carnie's Syntax: A Generative Introduction.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 33.33% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 33.33% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 33.33% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH734USemester 17NoNo

      Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
      Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

      Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Sociolinguistic Variation and ChangeLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5211Semester 15YesNo

      Sociolinguistic Variation and Change

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4201/LIN4211

      Description: This module provides an in-depth investigation of linguistic variation as a social phenomenon. Building on the knowledge acquired in LIN404 Introduction to Sociolinguistic Variation, we identify the major theoretical principles that govern language variation and change, and develop a variety of both quantitative and qualitative methodologies for their investigation. In addition to being exposed to classic pieces of research in the field, students also gain first-hand experience in conducting original sociolinguistic research projects of their own.

      As a module it will be available to students registered on degree programmes involving English Language or Linguistics only.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Beyond Language: Multimodality in Theory and PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6202Semester 26YesNo

      Beyond Language: Multimodality in Theory and Practice

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Agnieszka Lyons
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: Comic books, computer games, playground interactions, and emoji-filled instant messages all highlight the fact that communication involves much more than language. Gestures, positioning in space, and forms of embodied communication carry meaning-making potential alongside spoken and written language. This module explores the interplay of language with other semiotic modes and contexts that play a role in meaning-making. Students analyse print media materials, electronic communication, and video-recorded interactions applying social semiotic, discourse analytic and multimodal interaction analytic perspectives. They also use the acquired knowledge creatively to construct effective multimodal material.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      MSci ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH717UFull year7NoNo

      MSci Project

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

      Description: You will write a report that must present the study of some mathematical topic at fourth-year undergraduate level and must be your own work in the sense that it gives an original account of the material, but it need not contain new mathematical results. The list of potential projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted for a specific project only after agreement between the module organiser and the project supervisor.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
      Level: 7
      Multilingualism and BilingualismLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6034Semester 16YesNo

      Multilingualism and Bilingualism

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
      Overlap: LIN7034
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: This course will provide an introduction to the field of bilingualism and multilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspective. Topics to be covered include the definition of bilingualism and multilingualism and types of language contact, code-switching, bilingual and multilingual education and policy, as well as language development in individuals who are proficient in more than one language, and the cognitive effects of speaking more than one language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Multilingualism and BilingualismLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6034PSemester 17NoNo

      Multilingualism and Bilingualism

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
      Overlap: LIN6034, LIN7034
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This course will provide an introduction to the field of bilingualism and multilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspective. Topics to be covered include the definition of bilingualism and multilingualism and types of language contact, code-switching, bilingual and multilingual education and policy, as well as language development in individuals who are proficient in more than one language, and the cognitive effects of speaking more than one language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Convergence and ContinuityMathematical SciencesMTH5104Semester 15NoNo

      Convergence and Continuity

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Mark Jerrum
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4113 or take MTH4213 )

      Description: This module introduces some of the mathematical theory behind Calculus. It answers questions such as: What properties of the real numbers do we rely on in Calculus? What does it mean to say that a series converges to a limit? Are there kinds of function that are guaranteed to have a maximum value? The module is a first introduction, with many examples, to the beautiful and important branch of pure mathematics known as Analysis.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Differential and Integral AnalysisMathematical SciencesMTH5105Semester 25NoNo

      Differential and Integral Analysis

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Huy Nguyen
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

      Description: This module provides a rigorous basis for differential and integral calculus.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251BSemester 25YesNo

      International Relations Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Jean-Francois Drolet

      Description: This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Complex VariablesMathematical SciencesMTH5103Semester 25NoNo

      Complex Variables

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201

      Description: The integral and differential properties of functions of a complex variable. Complex differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions. Sequences and series, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities and residues. Complex integration, Cauchy's theorem and consequences, Cauchy's integral formula and related theorems. The residue theorem and applications to evaluation of integrals and summation of series. Conformal transformations.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105Semester 26YesYes

      Algorithmic Graph Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Felix Fischer
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

      QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

      Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
      International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251ASemester 15YesNo

      International Relations Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Jean-Francois Drolet

      Description: This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Actuarial Professional Development IIMathematical SciencesMTH5127Semester 15NoNo

      Actuarial Professional Development II

      Credits: 0.0
      Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

      Description: This is a compulsory module, counting towards your final degree classification, that is designed to help you build your professional and business skills and knowledge, and prepare for employment in the financial services industry. The module is a continuation of the skills development included in Actuarial Professional Development 1. The focus in this module is applying actuarial skills to business situations, developing a working knowledge of the Actuaries Code and related professional standards, and developing an awareness of key business issues that are relevant to the work of an actuary.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Bayesian Statistical MethodsMathematical SciencesMTH6102Semester 16YesNo

      Bayesian Statistical Methods

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr James Griffin
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

      Description: This module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. You will be shown some of the drawbacks with classical statistical methods and that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction. At the end you will be able to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of situations and know how to use suitable software. Bayesian methods are being increasingly used across many applications and it is important that you know about them.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Introduction to AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH4104Semester 24NoNo

      Introduction to Algebra

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Alexander Fink
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

      Description: This module is an introduction to the basic notions of algebra, such as sets, numbers, matrices, polynomials and permutations. It not only introduces the topics, but shows how they form examples of abstract mathematical structures such as groups, rings and fields, and how algebra can be developed on an axiomatic foundation. Thus, the notions of definition, theorem and proof, example and counterexample are described. The module is an introduction to later modules in algebra.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Composites for Aerospace ApplicationsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT5030Semester 25NoNo

      Composites for Aerospace Applications

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti

      Description: The role of composites in modern engineering, in particular aerospace applications will be described which will enable the effective selection of a fibre-resin system for a range of applications . The module will include the manufacture of glass, carbon, aramid and polyethylene fibres, extending to the manufacturing of polymer composites using processes including for example resin transfer moulding, compression moulding and pultrusion. The module will also consider particulate filled composite materials and high temperature metal matrix composite materials. The module will cover the theory that is used to predict the stiffness and strength of composite components, with emphasis on exploring the roles of the three different components encountered in a composite materials of fibre (filler), matrix and the interface. A framework for understanding the cost of manufacture to enable the selection of an appropriate manufacturing technology for a part. Comparisons will be made compare to more traditional materials such as metals, in particular in aircraft applications. Failure modes in composites will be described, non-destructive testing methods such as ultrasonics and strategies towards repair of composite structures will be covered.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Statistics for InsuranceMathematical SciencesMTH5126Semester 25NoNo

      Statistics for Insurance

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

      Description: This module begins with a study of loss distributions, with and without reinsurance. We then study compound distributions and their applications in risk modelling. The module then introduces the concepts of copulas and extreme value theory. Finally, we study topics related to ruin theory and look at how insurance companies estimate their liabilities using run-off triangles.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Calculus IIMathematical SciencesMTH4101Semester 24NoNo

      Calculus II

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Rainer Klages
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take SPA4122 or take MTH4201
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4100 or take MTH4200

      Description: This module is the second of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module introduces complex numbers, infinite series including power series, and develops techniques of differential and integral calculus in the multivariate setting.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Environmental Properties of MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7040Semester 17NoNo

      Environmental Properties of Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT507

      Description: Recycling - possibilities of recycling schemes for different types of materials like glasses, plastics and metals will be discussed.
      Environmental politics - such as the EU end of life vehicle directive will be discussed as well as other political drivers for creating a sustainable society.
      Ecodesign - the benefits of designing for recycling using a cradle to grave design methodology. Examining in detail designs for single material or reduced number of materials systems that can be easily disassembled.
      Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) - Detail of how the life cycle analysis is undertaken, including instruction in the use of appropriate life cycle analysis software.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Calculus IMathematical SciencesMTH4100Semester 14NoNo

      Calculus I

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Oscar Bandtlow
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4121 or take MTH4200
      Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

      Description: This is the first of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques and background from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module develops the concepts and techniques of differentiating and integrating with supporting work on algebra, coordinate transformations and curve sketching.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      From Morpheme to MeaningLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7007Semester 27NoNo

      From Morpheme to Meaning

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Hagit Borer
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Current generative theory has developed a model of the interaction between structure, morphological form, and meaning which takes the syntax to provide the central system with which morphophonology and semantics interface. This idea has been mainly developed in primary technical literature by Chomsky, Marantz, Borer, Kayne, Cinque, Ramchand, Adger and others. The module systematically develops an understanding of what this architecture for language implies for analyses of crucial phenomena: clause and nominal structure, predication, syntactic dependencies, language variation, through a critical exploration of the relevant literature. It also develops students' skills of syntactic argumentation, and the presentation of these arguments to professional audiences.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Research PracticumLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7014Semester 27NoNo

      Research Practicum

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Students taking this module will work closely with a member of staff on a research project that is connected to the staff member's own research objectives and is related to the intended specialization of the student. Students will receive individualized training in the skills necessary to engage in this research, and regular supervision as they complete their project. Possible research projects include organizing and analyzing an existing data set with a view to publication of the results, designing materials for a future experiment, conducting critical literature reviews preparatory to the launch of a new line of research, collecting data from research participants, formulating new research protocols and research methods, synthesizing existing research results for presentation to non-academic audiences, etc. The skills and experience gained through this practicum will substantially enhance the preparedness of the student to pursue their own research goals.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH781PSemester 17NoNo

      Data Analytics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Adrian Baule

      Description: Data Analytics refers to the use of statistics on data sets to aid in business decision making and in developing business insights. This module introduces concepts associated with business analytics.
      The emphasis of the module will be on realistic business cases. In order to develop the practical aspects of the subject the student will learn about some of the industry standard packages. such as Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) under Excel, Hadoop, R, and SPSS.
      Some of these systems will be described at a high level in order to allow the student gain a global view of the field without having to master every single system.
      The course will include a summary overview of the basic statistical techniques used to describe a data set and explore the implementation.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH781PSemester 27NoNo

      Data Analytics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr James Griffin

      Description: Data Analytics refers to the use of statistics on data sets to aid in business decision making and in developing business insights. This module introduces concepts associated with business analytics.
      The emphasis of the module will be on realistic business cases. In order to develop the practical aspects of the subject the student will learn about some of the industry standard packages. such as Statistical Analysis System (SAS), Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) under Excel, Hadoop, R, and SPSS.
      Some of these systems will be described at a high level in order to allow the student gain a global view of the field without having to master every single system.
      The course will include a summary overview of the basic statistical techniques used to describe a data set and explore the implementation.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Materials Selection and Mechanical ModellingEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT102Semester 24NoNo

      Materials Selection and Mechanical Modelling

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nader Karimi
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN4102

      Description: This module introduces principal modelling techniques in solid mechanics and serves as a macro-mechanical complement to the courses Materials Science 1: Properties of Matter (MAT 100) and Functional Materials (MAT203) focusing on micromechanical aspects of materials science. Fundamental concepts (e.g. Newton's laws, force/movement, stress/strain, energy/work, statics/dynamics, friction/creep/fatigue etc.) will be studied to derive mechanical models for the description of the behaviour of materials. Corresponding applications for real-life design tasks are finally discussed to get insight into basic mechanics-based material selection criteria.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Student Centred Learning 1Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT106Full year4NoNo

      Student Centred Learning 1

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof James Busfield

      Description: SCL aims to develop in the students an awareness of all aspects of the subject and professional life throughout the first two years of the degree programmes offered in materials science. Cognitive and transferable skills are developed in an integrated series of seminars, practical exercises, industrial visits and problem based learning case studies. All of the exercises draw on subject matter being taught within core module units in the relevant semester.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Introduction to PhoneticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7205Semester 17NoNo

      Introduction to Phonetics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module will provide a introduction to phonetics, one of the core sub-fields of Linguistics. This is the study of how speech sounds are produced and perceived, as well as what the acoustic properties of these sounds are. This module will focus on the main processes of phonetic articulation, practice with transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet as well as on the acoustic analysis of speech. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Materials Science I (Properties of Matter)Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT100Semester 14YesNo

      Materials Science I (Properties of Matter)

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Steffi Krause

      Description: Introduction of Atomic structure and inter-atomic bonding; structure of crystalline solids; imperfections in solids; diffusion; mechanical properties of metals; dislocations and strengthening mechanisms; failure; phase diagrams; phase transformations in metals; development of microstructure and alteration of mechanical properties.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Introduction to Experimental LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7039Semester 27NoNo

      Introduction to Experimental Linguistics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Linnaea Stockall
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides students with introductory training in theoretical and practical elements of experimental linguistics. The module will include hands-on training in statistics and hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection (including training in ethical human subjects research protocols), and data analysis. The module will also engage students in considering strengths and limitations of various kinds of linguistics data, and how multiple sources of data and methods of data collection can be combined to enhance understanding. Students will develop their critical reading skills and gain practice in presenting primary source literature to their peers. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Introduction to PhonologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7204Semester 27NoNo

      Introduction to Phonology

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Adam Chong
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. A central part of speakers' knowledge about the language that they speak is that words are not always pronounced in the same way. The variation that we observe is systematic. Phonology is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of the sound patterns, i.e. the ways in which words are pronounced differently across contexts. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of phonological analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Language and Health CommunicationLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6204PSemester 27NoNo

      Language and Health Communication

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Nelya Koteyko
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Health communication is becoming increasingly important in a world faced with new health challenges from obesity to Ebola, anxiety to diabetes. This module considers the role of language in our experience of and beliefs about health and illness. Students will learn how health communication differs among various communities, both monolingual and multilingual, from the grassroots level, such as in families, to broader groups, for example, between health professionals and patients. It also considers the effects of social diversity, such as the age, gender and ethnicity of patients and healthcare professionals. Students will become proficient in analysing a range of relevant uses of language, including narratives about health and illness, the representation of health and illness in the media, computer-mediated communication about illness, and public health information, persuasion and campaigns.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743USemester 27NoNo

      Complex Systems

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Christian Beck

      Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Language and Health CommunicationLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6204Semester 26YesYes

      Language and Health Communication

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film and SMD

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.

      Description: Health communication is becoming increasingly important in a world faced with new health challenges from obesity to Ebola, anxiety to diabetes. This module considers the role of language in our experience of and beliefs about health and illness. Students will learn how health communication differs among various communities, both monolingual and multilingual, from the grassroots level, such as in families, to broader groups, for example, between health professionals and patients. It also considers the effects of social diversity, such as the age, gender and ethnicity of patients and healthcare professionals. Students will become proficient in analysing a range of relevant uses of language, including narratives about health and illness, the representation of health and illness in the media, computer-mediated communication about illness, and public health information, persuasion and campaigns.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      NetworkingSLF_SMD_456_S
      Describing and Measuring ProsodyLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6200PSemester 27NoNo

      Describing and Measuring Prosody

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Miss Elisa Passoni
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Prosody can be viewed as "language glue" as the sounds, i.e. segments, and constituents of language can be seen to be "glued" together by prosody. In this module, students will be introduced to the different ways in which components of language are "glued" together through learning how to describe and measure tempo, tone, stress, intonation, and rhythm. In doing so, students will build on their previously acquired knowledge of frequency, duration and intensity in segmental elements of the acoustic signal. Much of the module will involve lab work and students will be given the opportunity to work both with guidance and independently on assignments related to current questions in research on prosody, such as (1) Does speech tempo encode sociolinguistic variation? (2) Why do some languages have tones and others don't? (3) Why is stress placement crucial in second language acquisition? (4) How does intonation disambiguate syntactic ambiguity? (5) What role does rhythm play in the process of first language acquisition? In doing so, a range of languages (including but not limited to English) will be examined more closely. For the final assignment students will develop a research project related to prosody. This module builds on the second year module Acoustic Analysis of Speech LINtbc

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Describing and Measuring ProsodyLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6200Semester 26YesNo

      Describing and Measuring Prosody

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Miss Elisa Passoni
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Prosody can be viewed as "language glue" as the sounds, i.e. segments, and constituents of language can be seen to be "glued" together by prosody. In this module, students will be introduced to the different ways in which components of language are "glued" together through learning how to describe and measure tempo, tone, stress, intonation, and rhythm. In doing so, students will build on their previously acquired knowledge of frequency, duration and intensity in segmental elements of the acoustic signal. Much of the module will involve lab work and students will be given the opportunity to work both with guidance and independently on assignments related to current questions in research on prosody, such as (1) Does speech tempo encode sociolinguistic variation? (2) Why do some languages have tones and others don't? (3) Why is stress placement crucial in second language acquisition? (4) How does intonation disambiguate syntactic ambiguity? (5) What role does rhythm play in the process of first language acquisition? In doing so, a range of languages (including but not limited to English) will be examined more closely. For the final assignment students will develop a research project related to prosody. This module builds on the second year module Acoustic Analysis of Speech LINtbc

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and FieldworkLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6020Semester 26NoNo

      Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and Fieldwork

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Colleen Cotter
      Overlap: LIN620, LIN7020
      Prerequisite: LIN4208 or permission of convenor

      Description: This module provides an overview of ethnography of communication, a theoretical and methodological approach to analyzing and understanding a wide range of communicative patterns and language uses as they occur within social and cultural contexts. Students will also apply ethnographic insights and methodologies to fieldwork activities and projects in the local community, investigating the range of practices that constitute ethnographic research, aiming for an integrative and holistic understanding through discussion of class members' fieldwork activities.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and FieldworkLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6020PSemester 27NoNo

      Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and Fieldwork

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Colleen Cotter
      Overlap: LIN620, LIN7020
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides an overview of ethnography of communication, a theoretical and methodological approach to analyzing and understanding a wide range of communicative patterns and language uses as they occur within social and cultural contexts. Students will also apply ethnographic insights and methodologies to fieldwork activities and projects in the local community, investigating the range of practices that constitute ethnographic research, aiming for an integrative and holistic understanding through discussion of class members' fieldwork activities.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139PSemester 26NoNo

      Time Series

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr William Yoo
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH783P

      Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140Semester 16YesNo

      Linear Algebra II

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

      Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107PSemester 16NoNo

      Chaos and Fractals

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Alexander Clark

      Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Coding TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6108Semester 26YesYes

      Coding Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Ian Morris
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

      QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

      Description: The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
      Introduction to Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH6101Semester 26YesYes

      Introduction to Machine Learning

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

      QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

      Description: Machine Learning is a rapidly growing field, at the boundary between Statistics and Computer Science. This course gives an understanding of the theoretical basis for machine learning and a set of concrete algorithms including decision tree learning and classification methods. Moreover, this course will introduce some classical statistical methods for high-dimensional data. The course also includes programming and use of algorithms on concrete data set.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
      Actuarial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5125Semester 25NoNo

      Actuarial Mathematics II

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5124

      Description: This module extends the methods used in Actuarial Mathematics I. We study concepts involved with gross premium reserves, including death strain, mortality profit and Thiele's equation. We show how to calculate life table functions, annuities and assurances involving two lives, assuming independence. We describe and use methods of valuing expected cashflows that are contingent upon multiple decrement events. We investigate projected cashflow techniques for pricing unit-linked contracts. We describe the principal forms of heterogeneity within a population.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH5123Semester 15YesNo

      Differential Equations

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Weini Huang
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201
      Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

      Description: Differential equations frequently arise in application of mathematics to science, engineering , social science and economics. This module provides an introduction to the methods of analysis and solution of simple classes of ordinary differential equations. The topics covered will include first- and second-order differential equations, autonomous systems of differential equations and analysis of stability of their solutions.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Actuarial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH5124Semester 15NoNo

      Actuarial Mathematics I

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Adrian Baule
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

      Description: Mathematics is used extensively to value annuities and assurances. We study compound interest, rates of discount, and interest compounded continuously. We will understand the idea of present value and how present value allows us to appraise investment projects. We cover annuities-certain. We consider life tables and use them to find the expected present value of life annuities and life assurances, premiums if life assurances are paid for by life annuities, and surrender value of life assurances.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Advanced Tissue Engineering and Regenerative MedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM064Semester 17NoNo

      Advanced Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury

      Description: This specialised module covers a range of topics in Tissue Engineering. It will develop the knowledge base of the student with emphasis on the current research directions of this rapidly emerging topic supported by skills developed in the laboratory. The students will understand the multidisciplinary principles underpinning tissue engineering, They will appreciate principles that underlie behind a series of strategies to repair both tissues and organs. They will be able to apply their engineering background to biological systems. They will develop skills to enable them to be fully conversant with current research.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Renewable Energy MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM061Semester 27NoNo

      Renewable Energy Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

      Description: A module designed to develop the tools required to apply a fundamental understanding of the application of new energy and renewable energy systems to the problems faced by climate change and global energy security. Particular focus is on the application of materials for the development of novel and new energy recovery systems such as nanostructured surfaces for solar harvesting and ultra tough composites for wind turbines.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Probability and Statistics IMathematical SciencesMTH4116Semester 24YesNo

      Probability and Statistics I

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Wolfram Just
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4216
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

      Description: This module develops the theory of probability from the module `Introduction to Probability' and then introduces the fundamental ideas of classical statistics. It covers descriptive statistics, the estimation of population moments using data and the basic ideas of statistical inference, hypothesis testing and interval estimation. These methods will be applied to data from a range of applications, including business, economics, science and medicine. A simple statistics package will be used to perform the calculations.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Environmental Properties of MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM040Semester 17NoNo

      Environmental Properties of Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Maria-Magdalena Titirici

      Description: Recycling - possibilities of recycling schemes for different types of materials like glasses, plastics and metals will be discussed.
      Environmental politics - such as the EU end of life vehicle directive will be discussed as well as other political drivers for creating a sustainable society.
      Ecodesign - the benefits of designing for recycling using a cradle to grave design methodology. Examining in detail designs for single material or reduced number of materials systems that can be easily disassembled.
      Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) - Detail of how the life cycle analysis is undertaken, including instruction in the use of appropriate life cycle analysis software.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Vectors and MatricesMathematical SciencesMTH4115Semester 24NoNo

      Vectors and Matrices

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Vito Latora
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4215
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4100 or take MTH4200 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

      Description: Properties of two- and three-dimensional space turn up almost everywhere in mathematics. For example, vectors represent points in space, equations describe shapes in space and transformations move shapes around in spaces; a fruitful idea is to classify transformations by the points and shapes that they leave fixed. Most mathematicians like to be able to 'see' in special terms why something is true, rather than simply relying on formulas. This model ties together the most useful notions from geometry - which give the meaning of the formulas - with the algebra that gives the methods of calculation. It is an introductory module assuming nothing beyond the common core of A-level Mathematics or equivalent.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Data Analytics for Decision MakingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceMIC7001Semester 27NoNo

      Data Analytics for Decision Making

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed

      Description: Data is an integral part of our lives, as it can help us solve everyday problems as well as drive scientific and technological progress that advance society and improve our quality of life. From transport to healthcare to shopping, everyday activities are increasingly leaving digital footprints that are transforming the workplace. As the world becomes ever more data-driven, many employers are increasingly searching for people with the analytical skills who can help them make sense of it by gaining insights and knowledge from the datasets that are generated around us.

      This micro-credential will introduce you to the fundamentals of data analytics, which are the first steps to becoming a highly-skilled data scientist. You will learn how to analyse, interpret and communicate data effectively to make better decisions. This micro-credential is made up of three sub courses, which will cover data analytics fundamentals, data mining techniques and data science ethics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Physiology for Medical EngineersEngineering and Materials ScienceMELM009Semester 27NoNo

      Physiology for Medical Engineers

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Rob Krams

      Description: This module will provide an understanding of the aspects of medical physiology relevant to a wide range of medical engineering related students. In will include the basic principles of physiological feedback and measurement with consideration of excitable tissues, membrane transport and ionic equilibria. The module will cover the structure, function, and monitoring of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, in addition to renal function, nerve function, bone physiology and intestinal function and control.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Data Analytics for Decision MakingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceMIC7001Semester 17NoNo

      Data Analytics for Decision Making

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed

      Description: Data is an integral part of our lives, as it can help us solve everyday problems as well as drive scientific and technological progress that advance society and improve our quality of life. From transport to healthcare to shopping, everyday activities are increasingly leaving digital footprints that are transforming the workplace. As the world becomes ever more data-driven, many employers are increasingly searching for people with the analytical skills who can help them make sense of it by gaining insights and knowledge from the datasets that are generated around us.

      This micro-credential will introduce you to the fundamentals of data analytics, which are the first steps to becoming a highly-skilled data scientist. You will learn how to analyse, interpret and communicate data effectively to make better decisions. This micro-credential is made up of three sub courses, which will cover data analytics fundamentals, data mining techniques and data science ethics.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Materials Industrial ExperienceEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT616Full year6NoNo

      Materials Industrial Experience

      Credits: 120.0
      Contact: Prof James Busfield

      Description: Students will be helped to secure a work placement through a range of new initiatives in a company appropriate to the programme. The work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful students with a placement will each be allocated a tutor, a SEMS academic in a relevant field, who will wherever practical visit the student twice in the year. Where a visit is not possible the tutor will ensure that there is email and telephone contact with the student. SEMS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer. This person is likely to be their line manager and will be expected to support as well as line-manage the student. Students completing the module will be required to work on a project that will allow them to follow a pathway toward CEng registration approximately three years after graduation; maintain a training diary to be reviewed by their tutor during and after the placement is completed; attend at least one Industrial Liaison Forum to share their experience with other SEMS students; deliver one seminar at QMUL to promote future opportunities at their sponsor; complete a final report on the placement.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Science of BiocompatibilityEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT6312Semester 26YesNo

      Science of Biocompatibility

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Karin Hing

      Description: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts related to biocompatibility. It will cover topics including proteins and protein adsorption, cells and tissue interactions (attachment, fluid shear and mechanotransduction), biomaterial blood and cell interactions, Inflammation, wound healing and foreign body response and Toxicity, hypersensitivity and infection.
      The In vitro testing of biomaterials will be considered with respect to
      - chemical exchange and degradation
      - cell response (proliferation vs differentiation)
      - evaluation of material compatibility
      - evaluation of device functionality (biomechanics, remodelling/adaptation)
      Matters related to clinical trials and regulatory approval will be considered including clean manufacturing, microbiology, packaging and sterility assurance.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Coding TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6108PSemester 26NoNo

      Coding Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Shu Sasaki

      Description: The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PSemester 27NoNo

      Optimisation for Business Processes

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

      Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PFull year7NoNo

      Optimisation for Business Processes

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

      Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Directed Study in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7211Semester 17NoNo

      Directed Study in Linguistics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Daniel Harbour
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides an opportunity for students to undertake a course of independent study in a sub-field of Linguistics, tailored to their own interests and needs. You will work closely with a member of staff to design a programme of inquiry into an area of interest, enabling you to delve deeper into your chosen topic. The module is intended to serve as a springboard into higher-level research, by providing specialist training in your chosen area, with close supervision from a member of staff with substantial relevant expertise.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Directed Study in LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7212Semester 27NoNo

      Directed Study in Linguistics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides an opportunity for students to undertake a course of independent study in a sub-field of Linguistics, tailored to their own interests and needs. You will work closely with a member of staff to design a programme of inquiry into an area of interest, enabling you to delve deeper into your chosen topic. The module is intended to serve as a springboard into higher-level research, by providing specialist training in your chosen area, with close supervision from a member of staff with substantial relevant expertise.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Trends in Linguistic ResearchLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7027Semester 17NoNo

      Trends in Linguistic Research

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Linnaea Stockall
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Each week, students in this module will read one paper by a member of staff (along with, optionally, a related text in that subfield) and prepare questions about the research described in those papers. The member of staff will attend that week's class meeting, and engage in discussion of their research goals, results and methods with students. Students will be expected to participate in developing further research questions and novel methodological solutions pertinent to the sub-discipline being focused on in a given week. Students will gain an appreciation for the full range of research topics and methods that staff are expert in, and have a unique opportunity to engage in high level, in-depth discussions of world renowned, cutting edge research with the researchers who have done this research. Students will write several short 500 word response papers and will develop one of these into a longer piece of work.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Multilingualism and BilingualismLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7034Semester 17NoNo

      Multilingualism and Bilingualism

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
      Overlap: LIN6034
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This course will provide an introduction to the field of bilingualism and multilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspective. Topics to be covered include the definition of bilingualism and multilingualism and types of language contact, code-switching, bilingual and multilingual education and policy, as well as language development in individuals who are proficient in more than one language, and the cognitive effects of speaking more than one language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Constructing a LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6203PSemester 27NoNo

      Constructing a Language

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr David Hall
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: From Esperanto to Klingon, from Volapuk to Elvish, from Leibniz's Universal Characteristic to Peterson's Dothraki, humans have made up artificial languages to support political, philosophical, and creative ends. This course examines examples of such artificial languages and their relation to natural language systems, and allows you to create a constructed language of your own, with a strong focus on systematic linguistic structure: phonological, morphological and syntactic systems as well as systems of lexical semantics and historical change. It will require you to bring together all your knowledge of linguistic structures as you make up your own language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743PSemester 27NoNo

      Complex Systems

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Christian Beck

      Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 7
      Sex, Gender and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6019Semester 16YesNo

      Sex, Gender and Language

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott
      Overlap: LIN602, LIN7019
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: This module will be an option for students on the single-honours English Language and Linguistics degree (QQH1) and for students doing joint-honours degrees that include Linguistics. In this module, students will engage in a comprehensive investigation of language as it relates to gender and sexuality. Making use of recent theoretical innovations in the field of gender and sexuality studies, the module will provide students with exposure to the descriptive claims that have been made in the literature regarding the linguistic practices of women and men, as well as the various theoretical frameworks that have been proposed to account for those claims. Students will also be encouraged to link these descriptive facts with more recent analytical accounts of gendered and sexual power relations in society. Building upon the theoretical and methodological foundation students acquire in their first two years of study, this module adds a practical/critical dimension to the study of sociolinguistics, and demonstrates to students the potential political importance of linguistics research.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Sex, Gender and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6019PSemester 17NoNo

      Sex, Gender and Language

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott
      Overlap: LIN602, LIN7019
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module will be an option for students on the single-honours English Language and Linguistics degree (QQH1) and for students doing joint-honours degrees that include Linguistics. In this module, students will engage in a comprehensive investigation of language as it relates to gender and sexuality. Making use of recent theoretical innovations in the field of gender and sexuality studies, the module will provide students with exposure to the descriptive claims that have been made in the literature regarding the linguistic practices of women and men, as well as the various theoretical frameworks that have been proposed to account for those claims. Students will also be encouraged to link these descriptive facts with more recent analytical accounts of gendered and sexual power relations in society. Building upon the theoretical and methodological foundation students acquire in their first two years of study, this module adds a practical/critical dimension to the study of sociolinguistics, and demonstrates to students the potential political importance of linguistics research.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 26NoYes

      Third Year Project

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
      Overlap: Must not take other projects
      Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

      QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Enterprising perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
      • Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

      Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
      Level: 6
      Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEF_6_S
      Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139Semester 26YesNo

      Time Series

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr William Yoo
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

      Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Unfamiliar LanguagesLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6016PSemester 27NoNo

      Unfamiliar Languages

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Coppe Van Urk
      Overlap: LIN312, LIN7016
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Students will work in elicitation sessions with a native speaker of an unfamiliar language, i.e., one not commonly studied in linguistic theory. The language is decided on a year-by-year basis and can come from any part of the world. Previous years have studied Biak, Georgian and Hawaiian. The purpose of the module is to apply knowledge of the parameters of linguistic variation acquired in previous linguistics modules to form and test hypotheses about the grammatical structure of an unknown language. Assessment will emphasize the method of discovery (including elicitation, data organization, and hypothesis formation and testing) as well as the discoveries themselves.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106PSemester 16NoNo

      Group Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers

      Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107Semester 16YesNo

      Chaos and Fractals

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Shabnam Beheshti
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

      Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Applied Linear AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH5212Semester 15YesNo

      Applied Linear Algebra

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5112
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

      Description: This module covers concepts in linear algebra and its applications. The ideas for two- and three-dimensional space covered by the appropriate first year module will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of science and engineering.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Meaning in the Real WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6046PSemester 17YesNo

      Meaning in the Real World

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
      Overlap: LIN7046
      Prerequisite: LIN5209/LIN5217

      Description: The study of linguistic meaning has many real-world applications. In the areas of law, healthcare, politics and other domains of public life, one must grapple with issues such as ambiguity, vagueness, and context-sensitivity. This module will investigate how analytical tools from formal semantics can be applied in order to highlight and address a diverse range of problems in these areas. We will apply the tools from the Level 5 module Aspects of Meaning to a set of real-world cases. Examples might include legal cases involving an ambiguity in the wording of a contract, the expression of pain in healthcare settings, and recent controversies over the use of racial slurs by politicians. By conducting your own investigation of a real-world case study that raises issues about the nature of linguistic meaning, you will learn about the ways in which linguistics can shed light on contemporary societal and political issues.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      SMS Placement TutorialMathematical SciencesMTH5200AFull year5NoNo

      SMS Placement Tutorial

      Credits: 0.0
      Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng

      Description: This module is designed to prepare students to identify and apply for placement as part of their third year of study. It will also support them in being equipped to get maximum benefit from their time out on placement and how to complete the various assessments and reports required.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
      Level: 5
      Mathematical and Actuarial Work ExperienceMathematical SciencesMTH5200Full year5NoNo

      Mathematical and Actuarial Work Experience

      Credits: 120.0
      Contact: To Be Confirmed

      Description: The Work Experience (or Professional Placement) year consists of one year spent working with an employer in a mathematical, actuarial or related role. The year is undertaken between the second and fourth years of your degree programme. The module is assessed, and will contribute towards your final degree title. Assessment will be through a combination of a learning journal, a learning objectives task with employer input and feedback, a report and a short presentation.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
      Level: 5
      Failure of SolidsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM025Semester 27NoNo

      Failure of Solids

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Wei Tan

      Description: The physics of fracture and fracture mechanics. Application of fracture mechanics to engineering applications. Influence of temperature on the mechanical properties of materials. High temperature deformation by dislocation movement and by diffusion. Practical aspects of creep deformation. Failure of materials under cyclic loading. Theories of fatigue. Practical aspects of fatigue in engineering materials.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Linear Programming and GamesMathematical SciencesMTH5114Semester 25NoNo

      Linear Programming and Games

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Justin Ward
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

      Description: This module introduces students to the practical modelling of real-world operational problems, together with the mathematical theory behind the most widespread tools for solving these problems. Students will learn how to model common operational problems as linear programs, will study the basic, underlying theory of linear programming, and gain some familiarity with how widely used software tools for solving such problems work. Building on these concepts, students will also learn basic game theory, including how to model and solve optimisation problems that involve future uncertainty or a competing adversary.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Statistical Modelling IMathematical SciencesMTH5120Semester 25NoNo

      Statistical Modelling I

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Mr Lorenzo Rossi
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129 and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

      Description: This is a first module on linear models and it concentrates on modelling the relationship between a continuous response variable and one or more continuous explanatory variables. Linear models are very widely used in almost every field of business, economics, science and industry where quantitative data are collected. They are also the basis for several more advanced statistical techniques covered in Level 6 modules. This module is concerned with both the theory and applications of linear models and covers problems of estimation, inference and interpretation. Graphical methods for model checking will be discussed and various model selection techniques introduced. Computer practical sessions, in which the Minitab statistical package is used to perform the necessary computations and on which the continuous assessment is based, form an integral part of the module.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 6.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Computing and Data Analysis with ExcelMathematical SciencesMTH4114Semester 14NoNo

      Computing and Data Analysis with Excel

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
      Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

      Description: This module introduces students to many of the key features of the Excel spreadsheet environment, with a focus on using it to solve real-world problems using numerical techniques. Most of the module will be 'hands on' in the computer laboratories, with a series of worksheets, assignments and problems to solve.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Materials Selection in DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM011Semester 17NoNo

      Materials Selection in Design

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof James Busfield

      Description: Introducing material selection concepts including processing constraints in design. An appreciation of the interaction of processing and material related cost considerations and the need to adopt a simultaneous engineering approach. The use of design guides such as Ashby diagrams is a key skill developed in the module.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Surgical Techniques and SafetyEngineering and Materials ScienceMELM003Semester 17NoNo

      Surgical Techniques and Safety

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Lei Su

      Description: This module introduces students to a wide range of equipment for use in surgery. It looks at the importance of electrical safety within the medical environment, and the rules governing equipment. It also aims to cover the principles of operation of a number of important monitoring devices and some of the major electronic equipment used within a surgical environment.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
      Level: 7
      Numbers, Sets and FunctionsMathematical SciencesMTH4113Semester 14NoNo

      Numbers, Sets and Functions

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Robert Johnson
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4213
      Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

      Description: The modules cover the fundamental building blocks of mathematics (sets, sequences, functions, relations and numbers). It introduces the main number systems (natural numbers, integers, rational, real and complex numbers), outlining their construction and main properties. They also introduce the concepts of definition, theorem, proof and counterexample.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 4
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Materials Selection in DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT602Semester 16NoNo

      Materials Selection in Design

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof James Busfield

      Description: Introducing material selection concepts including processing constraints in design. An appreciation of the interaction of processing and material related cost considerations and the need to adopt a simultaneous engineering approach. The use of design guides such as Ashby diagrams is a key skill developed in the module.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Nanotechnology and NanomedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7803Semester 17YesNo

      Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Gleb Sukhorukov

      Description: This module will define and describe nanostructures and nanomaterials. it will include how they are manufactured, appropriate characterisation technologies and a description of their application in a range of fields. In particular the application and challenges in the use of nanotechnology in medicine will be considered, including the regulatory issues to be considered, the use of nanomaterials for drug delivery and the development of lab in a chip technologies.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Time Series Analysis for BusinessMathematical SciencesMTH783PSemester 27NoNo

      Time Series Analysis for Business

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Silvia Liverani
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6139P

      Description: This module will present the basic techniques of Time Series analysis.
      These will allow the student to better understand how to use historical business data series.
      The student will learn how to extract any trend and cyclic component of a data series, calculate the autocorrelation, learn about autoregressive and moving average models, and cointegration.
      The module will develop the notions around realistic business examples and solutions will be provided either in SAS or in Excel/VBA.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      DissertationEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM004Full year7NoNo

      Dissertation

      Credits: 105.0
      Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

      Description: A 105 credit project specific to MRes programmes of study. The project is undertaken over a full calendar year and researches a materials topic in depth and is associated with an academic staff member's research.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
      Level: 7
      Manufacturing ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT601Semester 26YesNo

      Manufacturing Processes

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Haixue Yan
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT7713
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100 and take MAT206

      Description: Review of the processes of casting and shaping metal components, introducing and relating the necessary casting and plasticity theory. Fundamentals of welding processes and defects in welds. Discussion of the defects introduced into the materials by the various processes and the non-destructive tests used to evaluate and monitor such defects.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Innovation StrategyEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT307Semester 16NoNo

      Innovation Strategy

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

      Description: This is an important subject for everyone who has an interest in business and wants to understand how innovation can affect the success and failure of firms. Successful innovation is a very complex process and has to be very carefully managed. There is no 'right way' to manage innovation. Therefore it is important to analyse the innovation process from a range of different perspectives, for example, the role of the state in innovation and the core competencies of the firm.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Student Centred Learning 2Engineering and Materials ScienceMAT308Full year5NoYes

      Student Centred Learning 2

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Oliver Fenwick

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

      Description: SCL aims to develop in the students an awareness of all aspects of the subject and professional life throughout the first two years of the degree programmes offered in materials science. Cognitive and transferable skills are developed in an integrated series of seminars, practical exercises, industrial visits and problem based learning case studies. All of the exercises draw on subject matter being taught within core module units in the relevant semester.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Applied Dental MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT220Semester 16YesNo

      Applied Dental Materials

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Karin Hing

      Description: This module will provide an understanding of the interrelationships that exist between different dental materials and that dictate their usage in clinical practice in order to develop depth and applied knowledge of the key specialist dental materials including the science that underpins their technical usage.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Advanced Polymer SynthesisEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7797Semester 27YesNo

      Advanced Polymer Synthesis

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Julien Gautrot

      Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding and knowledge of polymer synthesis techniques and their main applications. It will focus on key areas for industrial applications: synthesis of high performance polymers, polymeric biomaterials, polymers used for energy production and in the micro-electronics area. At the beginning of the module, basic polymerisation methods and concepts will be reviewed, to enable students with different backgrounds to come to the same level in the field of polymer chemistry. Following lectures will focus on more advanced polymerisation methods and their use to synthesis functional materials with industrial applications.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7209Semester 17NoNo

      Syntax

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Coppe Van Urk
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Empirical results in a broad range of languages have now made the understanding of the basic building blocks of syntactic theory fundamental to any advanced work in linguistics, not only in syntax and semantics, but within any area of linguistics. This module will familiarize students with the basic elements of syntactic construction, serving at the same time as an introduction for students with less background, and as a critical overview, for those more advanced. Emphasis will be put on the development of argumentation skills and the ability to undertake independent analysis of linguistic data, as well as on the development of critical thinking in evaluating competing approaches to the same paradigms.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Formal SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7210Semester 17NoNo

      Formal Semantics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
      Overlap: LIN7028
      Prerequisite: None
      Corequisite: None

      Description: This module trains students in the craft of doing formal semantics. It introduces Frege's hypothesis that functional application is the mechanism by which the meaning of a complex phrase is composed from the meanings of its constituent parts. It applies this method to the analysis of a variety of core semantic phenomena, including argument structure, adjectival modification, definite descriptions, relative clauses, binding and quantification. These phenomena are all extensional, meaning that insightful analyses of them can be developed without recourse to theories of possible worlds, situations, or temporal intervals. Emphasis throughout is on training students to be able to produce explicit detailed analyses of novel data.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 7: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 8: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 9: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 10: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Research Methods in SociolinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7023Semester 27NoNo

      Research Methods in Sociolinguistics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides students with an advanced overview of both qualitative and quantitative research methods in sociolinguistics. Covering all aspects of data collection and analysis, students will learn how to devise appropriate research hypotheses; collect data for subsequent quantitative and qualitative scrutiny; and perform a variety of analytical techniques most commonly used in the humanities and social sciences (including narrative analysis, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, analyses of variance, multiple regression and various non-parametric tests). Methods covered include observation, interview, surveys, questionnaires and corpus-based techniques. Students will also learn how to effectively summarize and present findings to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739USemester 17NoNo

      Topics in Scientific Computing

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

      Description: This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and FieldworkLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7020Semester 27NoNo

      Ethnography of Communication - Foundations and Fieldwork

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Colleen Cotter
      Overlap: LIN620, LIN6020
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: This module provides an overview of Ethnography of Communication, a theoretical and methodological approach to analyzing and understanding communicative patterns and language use in social and cultural contexts. The focus on primary literature includes the seminal figures who established the approach (e.g., Hymes, Gumperz), developed the framework (Baumann, Briggs, Ervin-Tripp, Philipps), and who continue to advance it today (Duranti, Goodwin, Hill, Rampton). Applying ethnographic insights and methodologies to fieldwork activities and projects in the local community will instill understanding of the broad range of practices that constitute doing ethnography as well as illustrate the points raised in the literature.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
      Level: 7
      Tissue Engineering and Regenerative MedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT311Semester 16YesNo

      Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury

      Description: This specialised module covers a range of topics in Tissue Engineering. It will develop the knowledge base of the student with emphasis on the current research directions of this rapidly emerging topic supported by skills developed in the laboratory. The students will understand the multidisciplinary principles underpinning tissue engineering, They will appreciate principles that underlie behind a series of strategies to repair both tissues and organs. They will be able to apply their engineering background to biological systems. They will develop skills to enable them to be fully conversant with current research.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 85.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739PSemester 17NoNo

      Topics in Scientific Computing

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis

      Description: This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Beyond Language: Multimodality in Theory and PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6202PSemester 27NoNo

      Beyond Language: Multimodality in Theory and Practice

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Agnieszka Lyons
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: None

      Description: Comic books, computer games, playground interactions, and emoji-filled instant messages all highlight the fact that communication involves much more than language. Gestures, positioning in space, and forms of embodied communication carry meaning-making potential alongside spoken and written language. This module explores the interplay of language with other semiotic modes and contexts that play a role in meaning-making. Students analyse print media materials, electronic communication, and video-recorded interactions applying social semiotic, discourse analytic and multimodal interaction analytic perspectives. They also use the acquired knowledge creatively to construct effective multimodal material.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Constructing a LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6203Semester 26YesYes

      Constructing a Language

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr David Hall
      Overlap: None
      Prerequisite: LIN4203/LIN4210 or LIN037/LIN5213

      QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      • Enterprising perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.
      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
      • Students will be able to justify approaches they have taken when participating in module based enterprise projects and/or situations.

      Description: From Esperanto to Klingon, from Volapuk to Elvish, from Leibniz's Universal Characteristic to Peterson's Dothraki, humans have made up artificial languages to support political, philosophical, and creative ends. This course examines examples of such artificial languages and their relation to natural language systems, and allows you to create a constructed language of your own, with a strong focus on systematic linguistic structure: phonological, morphological and syntactic systems as well as systems of lexical semantics and historical change. It will require you to bring together all your knowledge of linguistic structures as you make up your own language.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesSLF_456_S
      Unfamiliar LanguagesLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6016Semester 26NoNo

      Unfamiliar Languages

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Coppe Van Urk
      Overlap: LIN312, LIN7016
      Prerequisite: LIN4203/LIN4210 or LIN037/LIN5213

      Description: Students will work in elicitation sessions with a native speaker of an unfamiliar language, i.e., one not commonly studied in linguistic theory. The language is decided on a year-by-year basis and can come from any part of the world. Previous years have studied Biak, Georgian and Hawaiian. The purpose of the module is to apply knowledge of the parameters of linguistic variation acquired in previous linguistics modules to form and test hypotheses about the grammatical structure of an unknown language. Assessment will emphasize the method of discovery (including elicitation, data organization, and hypothesis formation and testing) as well as the discoveries themselves.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Meaning in the Real WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN6046Semester 16YesNo

      Meaning in the Real World

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Hazel Pearson
      Overlap: LIN7046
      Prerequisite: LIN5209/LIN5217

      Description: The study of linguistic meaning has many real-world applications. In the areas of law, healthcare, politics and other domains of public life, one must grapple with issues such as ambiguity, vagueness, and context-sensitivity. This module will investigate how analytical tools from formal semantics can be applied in order to highlight and address a diverse range of problems in these areas. We will apply the tools from the Level 5 module Aspects of Meaning to a set of real-world cases. Examples might include legal cases involving an ambiguity in the wording of a contract, the expression of pain in healthcare settings, and recent controversies over the use of racial slurs by politicians. By conducting your own investigation of a real-world case study that raises issues about the nature of linguistic meaning, you will learn about the ways in which linguistics can shed light on contemporary societal and political issues.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 6
      Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 16NoYes

      Third Year Project

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
      Overlap: Must not take other projects
      Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

      QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Networking
      • Enterprising perspectives

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
      • Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

      Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
      Level: 6
      Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEF_6_S
      Phonology II: Explaining Phonological StructuresLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5214Semester 25YesNo

      Phonology II: Explaining Phonological Structures

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Adam Chong
      Overlap: LIN5208
      Prerequisite: LIN4208 and LIN4203/LIN4210

      Description: This module will build on the skills of phonological analysis, focusing on the learning of constraint-based models of phonology (i.e. Optimality Theory). Students will continue to "learn-by-doing", working on extracting patterns from linguistic data. This will be a further study in phonological theory and analysis, introducing students to autosegmental theory, syllable structure, metrical theory, the interface of phonology and other components of the grammar, as well as experimental approaches to theoretical phonology. A focus of this module will be on theory comparison, comparing rule-based vs. constraint approaches.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Introduction to SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5217Semester 15YesNo

      Introduction to Semantics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez
      Overlap: LIN5209
      Prerequisite: LIN4208

      Description: When you say a sentence, that sentence evokes a new thought in the mind of the person you are talking to. This is because words of human languages have meanings, and the ways that those words combine also has an effect on meaning. This module looks at the different aspects of meaning that contribute to the process of understanding sentences that underlies all communication.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134PSemester 16NoNo

      Statistical Modelling II

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Stephen Coad

      Description: This is the part of linear models often called analysis of variance. It concentrates on models whose explanatory variables are qualitative. These methods are used in almost all areas of business, economics, science and industry where qualitative and quantitative data are collected.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106Semester 16YesNo

      Group Theory

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 5 matching mth

      Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 6
      Actuarial StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH5131Semester 25NoYes

      Actuarial Statistics

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129
      Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5120

      QMUL Model themes supported:

        QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          Description: This module builds on the statistical theory of the Level 5 modules Probability and Statistics II and Statistical Modelling I. It begins with estimation of population parameters and a study of exploratory data analysis, in particular measures of correlation. It then introduces concepts from Bayesian Statistics and uses them to calculate Bayesian estimators. Finally, we study topics on generalised linear models (GLMs), including that of fitting a GLM to a dataset and interpreting its output.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105PSemester 26NoNo

          Algorithmic Graph Theory

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Felix Fischer

          Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
          Number TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH5130Semester 15YesNo

          Number Theory

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Shu Sasaki
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

          Description: This module considers fundamental problems in number theory, related to the distribution of prime numbers and integer solutions to Diophantine equations. Students will learn the core concepts in number theory such as the existence of primitive roots modulo a prime, quadratic reciprocity and solving Pell's equation. Additionally, students will learn how to develop and implement algorithms to efficiently solve computational questions which arise in number theory.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Probability and Statistics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5129Semester 15NoNo

          Probability and Statistics II

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Neofytos Rodosthenous
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take ECN115 ) and ( take MTH4216 or take MTH4116 )

          Description: This module further develops the ideas introduced in the first year probability and statistics modules. It begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions required, such as covariance, correlation and independence of random variables. It then describes different types of statistical tests and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Linear Algebra IMathematical SciencesMTH5112Semester 15NoNo

          Linear Algebra I

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5212
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

          Description: This is a rigorous first module in linear algebra. The ideas introduced in Geometry I for two- and three-dimensional space will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of mathematics. The module contains a fair number of proofs.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Introduction to Differential GeometryMathematical SciencesMTH5113Semester 25NoNo

          Introduction to Differential Geometry

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Arick Shao
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4122
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

          Description: This module provides an introduction to the differential of curves and surfaces. The core of the module deals with developing the language and tools for studying, describing and quantifying the geometry of curved objects. Particular emphasis is placed on connecting geometric questions with ideas from Calculus and Linear Algebra, as well as on extending Calculus to curved settings. The module concludes by studying some landmark results in vector Calculus e.g. Lagrange multipliers, Green's theorem and Stokes' theorem.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Project DissertationMathematical SciencesMTHM038Full year7NoNo

          Project Dissertation

          Credits: 60.0
          Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin

          Description: Each MSc Mathematics student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematics Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematics Exam Board Chair, in consultation with the MSc Mathematics Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted.

          A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in mathematics or statistics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
          Level: 7
          Actuarial Professional Development IMathematical SciencesMTH4112Full year4NoNo

          Actuarial Professional Development I

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
          Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

          Description: This is a compulsory module that is designed to help you identify and develop the professional and business skills and knowledge that are expected of an actuary. The module will help you prepare for working in finance and for sitting the CT9 (Business Awareness) and CA3 (Communication) exams of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. The module will also help you prepare for and apply for jobs in the financial services sector. The module is expected to include a number of guest lectures from actuaries and other professionals working in financial services.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Project DissertationMathematical SciencesMTHM038Full year7NoNo

          Project Dissertation

          Credits: 60.0
          Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin

          Description: Each MSc Mathematics student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematics Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematics Exam Board Chair, in consultation with the MSc Mathematics Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted.

          A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in mathematics or statistics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
          Level: 7
          Manufacturing ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7713Semester 27NoNo

          Manufacturing Processes

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Haixue Yan
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT507

          Description: This module provides a development of both fundamental and technological studies of shaping, fabrication, and product-evaluation processes. It applies phase transformation, microstructure, stress analysis, diffusion, plastic deformation and/or rheology to the manufacture of different products. Examples of current practices in the automobile, aerospace and bio-medical industries are illustrated, where appropriate, to enhance students' technological awareness.
          In more detail, the syllabus will cover the following topics:
          Casting: nucleation, crystal growth, solidification, segregation, ingot microstructure, casting defects, casting processes, temperature and recrystallization, strain rate.
          Forming: element of plasticity and deformation mechanics, selected methods of analysis of simple forming processes, element of transport properties and viscous flow, extrusion, injection moulding.
          Joining and Welding: fusion welding, solid-state welding, effect of welding on materials microstructure, brazing and soldering.
          Additive manufacturing methods: Rapid Prototyping.
          Inspection and testing, non-destructive methods: ultrasonic inspection, magnetic inspection, acoustic emission monitoring.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Introduction to ProbabilityMathematical SciencesMTH4107Semester 14NoNo

          Introduction to Probability

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Rosemary Harris
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4207
          Prerequisite: Must have passed a-level maths or equivalent

          Description: This is the first module in probability, covering events and random variables. It introduces the basic notions of probability theory and develops them to the stage where one can begin to use probabilistic ideas in statistical inference and modelling, and the study of stochastic processes. The first section deals with events, the axioms of probability, conditional probability and independence. The second introduces random variables both discrete and continuous, including distributions, expectation and variance. Joint distributions are covered briefly.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          CeramicsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT522Semester 16YesNo

          Ceramics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Mike Reece

          Description: Review to physical and structural origin of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of ceramics. Relate this knowledge to their applications and commercial importance. Review the processing and characterisation of ceramics. (Particular reference will be made to the following structural ceramics: alumina; silicon nitride; zirconia; and silicon carbide.) Review of functional ceramics: varistors; ferroelectrics; piezoelectrics; pyroelectrics; optoelectronics; and ferrites. Throughout the module the students will develop their knowledge so that they can relate structure, properties and applications.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Medical PhysiologyEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT5222Semester 25NoNo

          Medical Physiology

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Rob Krams

          Description: This module will provide an understanding of aspects of medical physiology relevant to dental and medical materials students. In will include the basic principles of physiological feedback and measurement with consideration of excitable tissues, membrane transport and ionic equilibria. The module will cover the structure, function, and monitoring of the cardiovascular system, a description of renal function and acid base homeostasis, bone physiology and calcium ion regulation, control and gas exchange related to respiratory anatomy and intestinal function and control.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          SAS for Business IntelligenceMathematical SciencesMTH782PSemester 27NoNo

          SAS for Business Intelligence

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

          Description: Quantitative Business Intelligence refers to the general application of quantitative techniques to business insight generation or the business decision process.
          This module builds on the Data Analytics module by increasing the level of sophistication of the techniques employed.
          Students will use SAS to solve business problems related to hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression.
          The module will also present techniques related to cleaning of noisy data, detection of outliers, filling in blanks which are key to any industry implementation.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Environmental Properties of MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT507Semester 16YesNo

          Environmental Properties of Materials

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT7040

          Description: Recycling - possibilities of recycling schemes for different types of materials like glasses, plastics and metals will be discussed.
          Environmental politics - such as the EU end of life vehicle directive will be discussed as well as other political drivers for creating a sustainable society.
          Ecodesign - the benefits of designing for recycling using a cradle to grave design methodology. Examining in detail designs for single material or reduced number of materials systems that can be easily disassembled.
          Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) - Detail of how the life cycle analysis is undertaken, including instruction in the use of appropriate life cycle analysis software.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Materials Science 2: Processing and ApplicationsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT206Semester 24YesNo

          Materials Science 2: Processing and Applications

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Mike Reece
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100

          Description: This module extends what was taught in MAT100 and now covers the properties, processing and applications of materials. In particular the processing and application of metals, polymers and ceramics. This includes their electrical, thermal, magnetic and optical properties.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Surfaces and Interfaces in MaterialsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT210Semester 15YesNo

          Surfaces and Interfaces in Materials

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Gleb Sukhorukov
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MAT211 or take MAT212

          Description: This module gives fundamentals in surface and interface science. It covers definition of surface and interfaces, surface free energy, different types of interfaces, adsorption, capiliarity, molecular basics of surface activity and its application to adhesion, wetting, emulsion and colloids. Main surface characterisation techniques are to be taught in the course. The module includes lab work where the students get some experience in preparation and characterisation of materials surfaces.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Research and Design Team ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT7400Full year7NoNo

          Research and Design Team Project

          Credits: 60.0
          Contact: Mr Raza Shah

          Description: The aim of this module is to provide a group project in accordance with the accreditation requirements as set out by engineering institutions such as the I.Mech.E and the R.Ae.S The project tackles specified engineering problems and tasks of relevance to internal research groups and/or external industry.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 18.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 2.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Introduction to SyntaxLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7207Semester 27NoNo

          Introduction to Syntax

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Coppe Van Urk
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. How is it that the grammar of any given language can produce an infinite array of sentences? Syntax is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of grammatical structure. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of syntactic analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises, working with data from a variety of well-known and unfamiliar languages The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          MetalsEngineering and Materials ScienceMAT321Semester 25YesNo

          Metals

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Haixue Yan
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT100 and take MAT102

          Description: The plastic deformation of metals and other classes of materials. The characterisation and properties of dislocations and their relationships to plastic deformation. The influence of micro-structural defects on the behaviour of dislocations and on the mechanical properties. A study of strengthening mechanisms in specific metal alloys.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Introduction to SemanticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7206Semester 17NoNo

          Introduction to Semantics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: This module provides an introduction to one of the core sub-fields of linguistics. How is it that we can understand sentences that we have never heard before? Semantics is concerned with describing the system that underlies our knowledge of meaning. You will be introduced step-by-step to the tools of semantic analysis, and will learn to apply that knowledge through problem solving exercises. The module is suitable for MA students without substantial prior background in Linguistics, or for those who want to branch out into a new sub-field.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Sex, Gender and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7019Semester 17NoNo

          Sex, Gender and Language

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott
          Overlap: LIN6019, LIN602
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: In this module, we explore the development of feminist and queer theoretic conceptualizations of identity and how these conceptualizations relate to language. Drawing on foundational texts in philosophy, literary theory, sociology and cultural studies in addition to linguistics, we interrogate the position of women and men in society through the prism of linguistic practice, and work to develop a holistic account of the ways in which individual speakers negotiate social and ideological pressures in their construction and presentations of gendered and sexual selves. Students will gain hands-on experience in conducting original research on a sex- and/or gender-related topic, and special emphasis will be placed on linking academic research in this area to finding solutions for the real-world problems that women and men may face.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Understudied Languages and Linguistic TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN7016Semester 27NoNo

          Understudied Languages and Linguistic Theory

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Coppe Van Urk
          Overlap: LIN312, LIN6016
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The diversity of the world's languages is of crucial importance to linguistic theory. Linguistic theory developed primarily with reference to data from major world languages (English, Japanese, French, etc.) nonetheless frequently yields rapid and deep insight into understudied languages from diverse families. In this course, we will work with a speaker of such a language, eliciting data, forming generalisations, and testing and explaining these in light of current linguistic theory. The course is, therefore, a practicum-style approach to formal linguistics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 17NoNo

          Dynamical Systems

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

          Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 17NoNo

          Dynamical Systems

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

          Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and IdeologiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL110ASemester 14YesNo

          Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and Ideologies

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler

          Description: This module combines an introduction to modern and contemporary ideologies with the analysis of key political concepts. It begins by examining conceptions of politics and the political, with particular attention to what it might mean to approach politics normatively/critically and through a range of theoretical perspectives. Next the module introduces modern political ideologies (including liberalism, socialism, conservatism, anarchism), paying attention both to their historical development and contemporary manifestations. The focus then shifts to an analysis of key political concepts (including human nature, liberty, democracy, justice, equality, rights), examining the ways in which these concepts are deployed within and by the different ideological traditions studied earlier. The emphasis throughout is upon relating the theoretical material to contemporary political movements and questions, and the module closes by addressing a series of contemporary issues (these will vary from year to year but may include identity, multiculturalism, property, the environment) that demonstrate the uses of political theory today.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political EconomySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7014Semester 27NoNo

          Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political Economy

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

          Description: In this module we examine trends towards the reform of health systems in the context of globalisation. Particular attention is given to the impact of neoliberal policy and commercialisation; the move towards universal health coverage; policy on integration; and decentralisation. The role of actors in shaping policy will also be covered, as well as the impact of trade and investment related agreements on health systems. The impact of other aspects of globalisation on health systems - such as migration - will also be covered.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7017Semester 17NoNo

          Health Systems Policy and Practice

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

          Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151PSemester 16NoYes

          Partial Differential Equations

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Juan Antonio Valiente Kroon

          QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • Networking
          • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

          Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
          Global HistoriesPolitics and International RelationsPOL109Semester 24YesNo

          Global Histories

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr James Eastwood

          Description: This module provides students with an introduction to the historical background against which contemporary international political developments unfold. It examines how connections have been forged between different societies, economies, cultures, and political practices over time and how this has made it possible to think of our history as global. A particular emphasis is placed on the importance of colonialism for understanding patterns of globalisation. The module is organised around a series of key tipping or turning points in global history.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141Semester 16YesNo

          Random Processes

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

          Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141PSemester 16NoNo

          Random Processes

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin

          Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5010Full year5YesYes

          French Language and Culture II

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN5015
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
          The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140PSemester 16NoNo

          Linear Algebra II

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Shahn Majid

          Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH791PSemester 27NoNo

          Computational Statistics with R

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr James Griffin

          Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH791USemester 27NoNo

          Computational Statistics with R

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr James Griffin
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

          Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5007Semester 15NoNo

          German Language and Culture II (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: LAN5010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in German.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          CeramicsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM068Semester 17NoNo

          Ceramics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Mike Reece

          Description: Review to physical and structural origin of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of ceramics. Relate this knowledge to their applications and commercial importance. Review the processing and characterisation of ceramics. (Particular reference will be made to the following structural ceramics: alumina; silicon nitride; zirconia; and silicon carbide.) Review of functional ceramics: varistors; ferroelectrics; piezoelectrics; pyroelectrics; optoelectronics; and ferrites. Throughout the module the students will develop their knowledge so that they can relate structure, properties and applications.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771USemester 17NoNo

          Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

          Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4057Semester 24YesNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Trading and Risk Systems DevelopmentMathematical SciencesMTH789PSemester 27NoNo

          Trading and Risk Systems Development

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

          Description: A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

          Part I: Programming skills
          - Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
          - Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
          - Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
          - Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
          - Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
          - Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
          - Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
          - Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
          - Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
          - Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
          - Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

          Part II: The development framework
          - Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
          - Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
          - Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
          - Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

          (note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771PSemester 17NoNo

          Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

          Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4015Full year4NoNo

          French Language and Culture I

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN4010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4016Semester 14NoNo

          French Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN4011
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH709USemester 27NoNo

          Bayesian Statistics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6102
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH6134

          Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH712PSemester 17NoNo

          Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Olga Iziumtseva

          Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157Semester 16NoNo

          Survival Models

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5125 and take MTH5129

          Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761PSemester 17NoNo

          Financial Instruments and Markets

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

          Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155PSemester 26NoNo

          Financial Mathematics II

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid

          Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1.
          We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
          expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime
          models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
          solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
          applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
          rate models and credit risk models.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750USemester 27NoNo

          Graphs and Networks

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

          Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Critical Health EconomicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7104Semester 27NoNo

          Critical Health Economics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: The module will introduce core theories and concepts of health economics including: concepts of evidence, scarcity, demand, and need. Using case studies, it will describe the theories of the market, and discuss these in relation to specific characteristics of health and health care. It will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Health Systems Policy and PerformanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7103Semester 27NoNo

          Health Systems Policy and Performance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

          Description: This module will introduce students to various conceptual frameworks and theoretical understandings of health systems; and locate them within a social, economic, historical and global context. Students will learn about the functional components of a health system, including the mechanisms generating health systems resources, financing healthcare delivery, and designing the management-administrative systems of a health system. The module will cover the health systems challenges of low, middle and high income country settings and will look at the application of social and economic theories to health systems policy. It will describe and discuss the distinction between public and private financing, as well as the role of markets and hierarchies, and of private and public providers within health systems. Students will learn about the health system of one country that will be assigned to them at the beginning of term, and compare it to their home country as the basis for developing an in-depth knowledge and understanding of two health systems.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Critical Health EconomicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7104Semester 17NoNo

          Critical Health Economics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: The module will introduce core theories and concepts of health economics including: concepts of evidence, scarcity, demand, and need. Using case studies, it will describe the theories of the market, and discuss these in relation to specific characteristics of health and health care. It will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Health Systems Policy and PerformanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7103Semester 17NoNo

          Health Systems Policy and Performance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Jonathan Filippon

          Description: This module will introduce students to various conceptual frameworks and theoretical understandings of health systems; and locate them within a social, economic, historical and global context. Students will learn about the functional components of a health system, including the mechanisms generating health systems resources, financing healthcare delivery, and designing the management-administrative systems of a health system. The module will cover the health systems challenges of low, middle and high income country settings and will look at the application of social and economic theories to health systems policy. It will describe and discuss the distinction between public and private financing, as well as the role of markets and hierarchies, and of private and public providers within health systems. Students will learn about the health system of one country that will be assigned to them at the beginning of term, and compare it to their home country as the basis for developing an in-depth knowledge and understanding of two health systems.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Foreign Policy AnalysisPolitics and International RelationsPOL249Semester 25YesNo

          Foreign Policy Analysis

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr James Strong

          Description: This module introduces students to the study of how states make foreign policy decisions. It considers the social, material, institutional and political contexts for decision-making, and how individual leaders' cognitive and psychological traits influence the choices they make. It thus forms a bridge between the study of leadership, domestic politics, and international relations.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247ASemester 15YesNo

          Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Richard Saull

          Description: The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247BSemester 25YesNo

          Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

          Description: The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Background to British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL108Semester 24YesNo

          Background to British Politics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Tim Bale

          Description: British Politics isn't just about institutions like cabinet, parliament, parties and pressure groups that you may already have studied and/or go on to study. Nor is it simply about voting and elections. It is also an ongoing attempt by more or less self-interested actors to cope with the issues, conflicts, opportunities and threats thrown up by time and chance, as well as by underlying economic and social developments. Employing a thematic rather than a chronological approach, this module delves back decades and brings things bang-up-to-date in order to provide you with an improved understanding of why, politically, we are as we are today.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151Semester 16YesYes

          Partial Differential Equations

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Juan Antonio Valiente Kroon
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

          QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • Networking
          • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

          Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
          Introduction to International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL106BSemester 24YesNo

          Introduction to International Relations

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Clive Gabay

          Description: This module provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Specifically, we focus on four main themes that will allow you to grasp the complexities of the contemporary global order: capitalism, (post)colonialism, security, and development. You will also become acquainted with the analytical tools that are needed to think critically about international relations through these themes: a historical sensibility (i.e. how situations have elements of both continuity and change), an understanding of political-economy (i.e. why the economy is political), an understanding of the security-development nexus (i.e. how the quest for security - freedom from fear -and development - freedom from want -are contentiously linked), and the importance of resistance and "situated knowledges" (i.e. your understanding of international relations might be different depending on where and how you are situated in the world). Empirically, we will explore the Cold War and the post-Cold War global orders - their similarities and differences.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790USemester 17NoNo

          Programming in C++ for Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6150

          Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5015Full year5NoNo

          French Language and Culture II

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN5010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Nanotechnology and NanomedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM803Semester 17NoNo

          Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Gleb Sukhorukov

          Description: This module will define and describe nanostructures and nanomaterials. it will include how they are manufactured, appropriate characterisation technologies and a description of their application in a range of fields. In particular the application and challenges in the use of nanotechnology in medicine will be considered, including the regulatory issues to be considered, the use of nanomaterials for drug delivery and the development of lab in a chip technologies.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790PSemester 17NoNo

          Programming in C++ for Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

          Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Advanced Polymer SynthesisEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM797Semester 27NoNo

          Advanced Polymer Synthesis

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Julien Gautrot

          Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding and knowledge of polymer synthesis techniques and their main applications. It will focus on key areas for industrial applications: synthesis of high performance polymers, polymeric biomaterials, polymers used for energy production and in the micro-electronics area. At the beginning of the module, basic polymerisation methods and concepts will be reviewed, to enable students with different backgrounds to come to the same level in the field of polymer chemistry. Following lectures will focus on more advanced polymerisation methods and their use to synthesis functional materials with industrial applications.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Polymer PhysicsEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM798Semester 17NoNo

          Polymer Physics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti

          Description: This module presents the physical and mechanical properties of polymers in relation to their molecular structure. The module will provide an understanding of the structures of polymers and how structure affects performance and properties, will introduce and develop an understanding of transitions in polymers, such as phase transition and melt mixing and end with descriptions of functional materials.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH776PSemester 27NoNo

          Bayesian Statistics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit

          Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4112Full year4YesYes

          French Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
          Overlap: LAN4117
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          Neural Networks and Deep LearningMathematical SciencesMTH767PSemester 27NoNo

          Neural Networks and Deep Learning

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Jingwei Liang
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH786P

          Description: This module introduces you to several state-of-the-art methodologies for machine learning with neural networks (NNs). After discussing the basic theory of constructing and calibrating NNs, we consider various types of NN suitable for different purposes, such as convolutional NNs, recurrent NNs, autoencoders and generative adversarial networks. This module includes a wide range of practical applications; you will implement each type of network using Python for your weekly coursework assignments, and will calibrate these networks to real datasets.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Mathematical Finance DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH775PFull year7NoNo

          Mathematical Finance Dissertation

          Credits: 60.0
          Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

          Description: Each MSc Mathematical Finance student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematical Finance Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematical Finance Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in financial mathematics or economics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
          Level: 7
          Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787USemester 27NoNo

          Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Christian Beck

          Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PFull year7NoNo

          Programming in Python

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

          Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700USemester 17NoNo

          Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

          Description: This module is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, which will provide preparation for the MSci project. You will learn how to review critically and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. You will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that you are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork. You will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4012Semester 24YesYes

          French Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN4017
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750PSemester 27NoNo

          Graphs and Networks

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

          Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154PSemester 16NoNo

          Financial Mathematics I

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Dudley Stark

          Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155Semester 26NoNo

          Financial Mathematics II

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6112
          Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

          Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1. We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest rate models and credit risk models.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745USemester 27NoNo

          Further Topics in Algebra

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr John Bray
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH5101 or take MTH5100 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

          Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Understanding Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7102Full year7NoNo

          Understanding Epidemiology and Statistics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: The module will develop skills in critical appraisal, interpreting the results of commonly-used statistical techniques and routine morbidity and mortality measures. Students will be taught to critically interpret data, results and statistical analysis presented in research papers, and obtain the building blocks on which to build evidence-based practice. The course takes a non-mathematical approach to study design and statistical analysis starting with clinical examples and explaining how statistics can help answer real life questions. The module will not teach statistical methods in detail, but students will be expected to calculate percentages and other simple summary measures.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247Full year5YesNo

          Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

          Description: The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Understanding Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7102Semester 17NoNo

          Understanding Epidemiology and Statistics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: The module will develop skills in critical appraisal, interpreting the results of commonly-used statistical techniques and routine morbidity and mortality measures. Students will be taught to critically interpret data, results and statistical analysis presented in research papers, and obtain the building blocks on which to build evidence-based practice. The course takes a non-mathematical approach to study design and statistical analysis starting with clinical examples and explaining how statistics can help answer real life questions. The module will not teach statistical methods in detail, but students will be expected to calculate percentages and other simple summary measures.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Introduction to International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL106ASemester 14YesNo

          Introduction to International Relations

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Clive Gabay

          Description: This module provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Specifically, we focus on four main themes that will allow you to grasp the complexities of the contemporary global order: capitalism, (post)colonialism, security, and development. You will also become acquainted with the analytical tools that are needed to think critically about international relations through these themes: a historical sensibility (i.e. how situations have elements of both continuity and change), an understanding of political-economy (i.e. why the economy is political), an understanding of the security-development nexus (i.e. how the quest for security - freedom from fear -and development - freedom from want -are contentiously linked), and the importance of resistance and "situated knowledges" (i.e. your understanding of international relations might be different depending on where and how you are situated in the world). Empirically, we will explore the Cold War and the post-Cold War global orders - their similarities and differences.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Introduction to International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL106Full year4YesNo

          Introduction to International Relations

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Dr Clive Gabay

          Description: This module provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Specifically, we focus on four main themes that will allow you to grasp the complexities of the contemporary global order: capitalism, (post)colonialism, security, and development. You will also become acquainted with the analytical tools that are needed to think critically about international relations through these themes: a historical sensibility (i.e. how situations have elements of both continuity and change), an understanding of political-economy (i.e. why the economy is political), an understanding of the security-development nexus (i.e. how the quest for security - freedom from fear -and development - freedom from want -are contentiously linked), and the importance of resistance and "situated knowledges" (i.e. your understanding of international relations might be different depending on where and how you are situated in the world). Empirically, we will explore the Cold War and the post-Cold War global orders - their similarities and differences.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5012Semester 25YesYes

          French Language and Culture II (b)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN5017
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture.The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
          The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150Semester 26NoYes

          Numerical Computing with C and C++

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5001

          QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • Networking
          • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

          Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
          Numerical Computing with C and C++Mathematical SciencesMTH6150PSemester 26NoYes

          Numerical Computing with C and C++

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Charalampos Markakis

          QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • Networking
          • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

          Description: This module provides an introduction to programming using C and C++, with examples designed to show how computers can be used to solve practical problems in a wide range of different fields. In particular, we cover the procedural features of these languages, such as variables, arrays, loops, branching statements and functions, before moving on to consider object-oriented programming techniques (classes, objects, encapsulation and inheritance). Examples come from mathematics, the physical sciences, finance, and other fields.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
          Probability and Statistics for Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH794PSemester 27NoNo

          Probability and Statistics for Data Analytics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr William Yoo
          Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

          Description: This module begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions of probability and the distributions of random variables which underpin statistical methods. It then describes different types of statistical tests of hypotheses and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and IdeologiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL199Full year4NoNo

          Thinking Politically: Introduction to Concepts, Theories and Ideologies

          Credits: 45.0
          Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler

          Description: This module explores and develops modern ways of thinking about politics and political issues. It combines the exploration of modern and contemporary ideologies with the analysis of key political theories and concepts. The first part is a series of introductions to the thinking of the major modern political ideological traditions of liberalism, conservatism, socialism & Marxism, paying attention both to their historical development and contemporary manifestations. After looking at the nature of political concepts and theory the focus shifts to controversies about human nature, political order, liberties, equalities and the just distribution of social goods. As we explore debates over these issues, we shall be examining the ways in which these concepts are deployed within and by the different ideological traditions studied earlier. `Thinking Politically¿ introduces students to political thinking: it demonstrates the value of political theory by helping students to use it to better understand and participate in today¿s political debates.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          Trading and Risk Systems DevelopmentMathematical SciencesMTH789USemester 27NoNo

          Trading and Risk Systems Development

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

          Description: A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

          Part I: Programming skills
          - Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
          - Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
          - Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
          - Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
          - Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
          - Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
          - Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
          - Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
          - Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
          - Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
          - Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

          Part II: The development framework
          - Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
          - Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
          - Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
          - Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

          (note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Probability and Statistics for Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH794PSemester 17NoNo

          Probability and Statistics for Data Analytics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Neofytos Rodosthenous
          Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

          Description: This module begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions of probability and the distributions of random variables which underpin statistical methods. It then describes different types of statistical tests of hypotheses and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773USemester 27NoNo

          Advanced Computing in Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

          Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4111Full year4YesYes

          French Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
          Overlap: LAN4116
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          CompositesEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM730Semester 27NoNo

          Composites

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti

          Description: The role of composites in modern engineering. Starting from the manufacture of glass fibres, carbon fibres, aramid fibres, polyethylene fibres and extending to the manufacturing of polymers composites using processes including for example resin transfer moulding, compression moulding and pultrusion. In addition to fibre reinforced polymer composites, the module will also consider particulate filled composite materials and high temperature metal matrix composite materials. The module will cover the theory that is used to predict the stiffness and strength of composite components, with emphasis on exploring the roles of the three different components encountered in a composite materials of fibre (filler), matrix and the interface.
          Inspection and testing, non-destructive methods: ultrasonic inspection, magnetic inspection, acoustic emission monitoring.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PSemester 17NoNo

          Programming in Python

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

          Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 27NoNo

          Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: To Be Confirmed

          Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762USemester 27NoNo

          Continuous-time Models in Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771U

          Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 17NoNo

          Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Primoz Skraba

          Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787PSemester 27NoNo

          Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Christian Beck

          Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4011Semester 14YesYes

          French Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN4016
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786USemester 17NoNo

          Machine Learning with Python

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Martin Benning

          Description: This course aims at providing students with Machine Learning skills based on the Python programming language as it is currently used in industry. Some of the presented methods are regression and classification techniques (linear and logistic regression, least-square); clustering; dimensionality reduction techniques such as PCA, SVD and matrix factorization. More advanced methods such as generalized linear models, neural networks and Bayesian inference using graphical models are also introduced. The course is self-contained in terms of the necessary mathematical tools (mostly probability) and coding techniques. At the end of the course, students will be able to formalize a ML task, choose the appropriate method in order to tackle it while being able to assess its performance, and to implement these algorithms in Python.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154Semester 16YesYes

          Financial Mathematics I

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

          QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • Networking
          • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
          • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

          Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
          Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700PSemester 17NoNo

          Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

          Description: This course is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, and network research in particular. The module will serve as preparation for the research project that students will undertake as a major part of the MSc programme in Mathematics and Mathematics of Networks. The students will learn how to critically review and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork.The students will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Health Inequalities and the State of Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7101Full year7NoNo

          Health Inequalities and the State of Global Health

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: This module will introduce students to the broad topic of global health. It will provide students with an understanding of the current pattern of health status across the world, and how human health indicators have evolved over time. In doing so, students will learn about the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and learn about different frameworks for classifying the different determinants of health and how they relate to each other. Students will critically examine how biological, social, economic and environmental determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. It goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. The module will introduce students to an examination of global health using the multiple lenses of different discourses and disciplines including: epidemiology; politics; human rights; philosophy; economics; and sociology.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745PSemester 27NoNo

          Further Topics in Algebra

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr John Bray

          Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Planetary Health and International Health PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7022Semester 27NoNo

          Planetary Health and International Health Policy

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

          Description: This module will introduce the student to historically grown concepts of ecological global health. It gives an overview of scientific background on planetary boundaries in relation to health and sustainable development, allowing people to comprehend and apply the analysis to case studies. The module will begin with a human rights approach to health and environmental justice as a tool for critical analysis of the complex interrelationship of historically grown political, economic, cultural and social factors that have impacted the planetary system, putting health of people at risk. It will engage with public policy, international relations, health centred global environmental governance and medical anthropological approaches to health and environment to provide students with the necessary tools to engage in current local, national, regional and global affairs.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Global Public Health Dissertation ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7100Full year7NoNo

          Global Public Health Dissertation Project

          Credits: 60.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: The module will consist of a self-directed research project, with some group and one-to-one support provided by online tutors. In general, the research project will not involve any primary data collection - but will rely on desk-based data collection and analysis.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
          Level: 7
          Health Inequalities and the State of Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7101Semester 17NoNo

          Health Inequalities and the State of Global Health

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kevin Deane

          Description: This module will introduce students to the broad topic of global health. It will provide students with an understanding of the current pattern of health status across the world, and how human health indicators have evolved over time. In doing so, students will learn about the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and learn about different frameworks for classifying the different determinants of health and how they relate to each other. Students will critically examine how biological, social, economic and environmental determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. It goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. The module will introduce students to an examination of global health using the multiple lenses of different discourses and disciplines including: epidemiology; politics; human rights; philosophy; economics; and sociology.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Global SociologyPolitics and International RelationsPOL180ASemester 14YesNo

          Global Sociology

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

          Description: This module provides students with an introduction to central themes and concepts in Sociology, and applies them to particular cases such as class, gender, race, identity, religion, social movements, state and nation in an era of globalisation. The aim is to introduce students to particular concepts and introductory theory, and to enhance understanding of these through a focus on particular issues, themes and cases.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH6991Semester 26NoNo

          Computational Statistics with R

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr James Griffin
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

          Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 6
          Global SociologyPolitics and International RelationsPOL180Full year4YesNo

          Global Sociology

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

          Description: This module provides students with an introduction to central themes and concepts in Sociology, and applies them to particular cases such as class, gender, race, identity, religion, social movements, state and nation in an era of globalisation. The aim is to introduce students to particular concepts and introductory theory, and to enhance understanding of these through a focus on particular issues, themes and cases.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          Political AnalysisPolitics and International RelationsPOL105Full year4NoNo

          Political Analysis

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy

          Description: This module serves as an introduction to a politics degree and the ideas, skills, methods and knowledge required to succeed in your studies of politics. You will be trained in a range of study and research skills, from enhancing your ability to write analytically to learning how to interpret a wide variety of political texts. You will also have the opportunity to interact with your personal tutor and conduct a small, independent research project. The module is taught through lectures and seminars, as well as through direct contact with your personal advisor.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5011Semester 15YesYes

          French Language and Culture II (a)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN5016
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142Semester 26YesNo

          Complex Networks

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

          Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142PSemester 26NoNo

          Complex Networks

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi

          Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Financial Data AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH792PSemester 27NoNo

          Financial Data Analytics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

          Description: This module will provide students with a general understanding of current applications of Data Analytics to the Finance and in particular to derivatives and investment banking.
          It will revolve around problems that will be explained as part of the module delivery such as volatility surface management, yield curve evolution and FX volatility/correlation management.
          It will provide students with a overview of some standard tools in the field such as Python, R, Excel/VBA and the Power BI Excel functionality.

          Students are not expected to have any familiarity with coding or any of the topics above as the module will develop these from scratch.

          It will provide students with the understanding of a field necessary to boost their careers in finance in roles such as trading, structuring, management, risk management and quantitative positions in investment banks and hedge funds.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Advanced Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH793PSemester 27NoNo

          Advanced Machine Learning

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Martin Benning
          Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH786P

          Description: This module builds on the earlier module 'Machine Learning with Python', covering a number of advanced techniques in machine learning, such as dimensionality reduction, support vector machines, decision trees, random forests, and clustering. Although the underlying theoretical ideas are clearly explained, this module is very hands-on, and you will implement various applications using Python in the weekly coursework assignments.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Science of BiocompatibilityEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM312Semester 26NoNo

          Science of Biocompatibility

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Karin Hing

          Description: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts related to biocompatibility. It will cover topics including proteins and protein adsorption, cells and tissue interactions (attachment, fluid shear and mechanotransduction), biomaterial blood and cell interactions, Inflammation, wound healing and foreign body response and Toxicity, hypersensitivity and infection.
          The In vitro testing of biomaterials will be considered with respect to
          - chemical exchange and degradation
          - cell response (proliferation vs differentiation)
          - evaluation of material compatibility
          - evaluation of device functionality (biomechanics, remodelling/adaptation)
          Matters related to clinical trials and regulatory approval will be considered including clean manufacturing, microbiology, packaging and sterility assurance.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Manufacturing ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM713Semester 27NoNo

          Manufacturing Processes

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Haixue Yan

          Description: This module provides a development of both fundamental and technological studies of shaping, fabrication, and product-evaluation processes. It applies phase transformation, microstructure, stress analysis, diffusion, plastic deformation and/or rheology to the manufacture of different products. Examples of current practices in the automobile, aerospace and bio-medical industries are illustrated, where appropriate, to enhance students' technological awareness.
          In more detail, the syllabus will cover the following topics:
          Casting: nucleation, crystal growth, solidification, segregation, ingot microstructure, casting defects, casting processes, temperature and recrystallization, strain rate.
          Forming: element of plasticity and deformation mechanics, selected methods of analysis of simple forming processes, element of transport properties and viscous flow, extrusion, injection moulding.
          Joining and Welding: fusion welding, solid-state welding, effect of welding on materials microstructure, brazing and soldering.
          Additive manufacturing methods: Rapid Prototyping.
          Inspection and testing, non-destructive methods: ultrasonic inspection, magnetic inspection, acoustic emission monitoring.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4106Full year4NoNo

          German Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4107Full year4YesNo

          German Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762PSemester 27NoNo

          Continuous-time Models in Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
          Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771P

          Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773PSemester 27NoNo

          Advanced Computing in Finance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

          Description: This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786PSemester 17NoNo

          Machine Learning with Python

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Martin Benning

          Description: This module will introduce you to some of the most widely-used techniques in machine learning (ML). After reviewing the necessary background mathematics, we will investigate various ML methods, such as linear regression, polynomial regression and classification with logistic regression. The module covers a very wide range of practical applications, with an emphasis on hands-on numerical work using Python. At the end of the module, you will be able to formalise a ML task, choose the appropriate method to process it numerically, implement the ML algorithm in Python, and assess the method¿s performance.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Machine Learning with PythonMathematical SciencesMTH786PFull year7NoNo

          Machine Learning with Python

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Lucas Lacasa

          Description: This module will introduce you to some of the most widely-used techniques in machine learning (ML). After reviewing the necessary background mathematics, we will investigate various ML methods, such as linear regression, polynomial regression and classification with logistic regression. The module covers a very wide range of practical applications, with an emphasis on hands-on numerical work using Python. At the end of the module, you will be able to formalise a ML task, choose the appropriate method to process it numerically, implement the ML algorithm in Python, and assess the method¿s performance.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
          Level: 7
          Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761USemester 17NoNo

          Financial Instruments and Markets

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

          Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Programming for Business AnalyticsMathematical SciencesMTH785PSemester 17NoNo

          Programming for Business Analytics

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin

          Description: This module will provide an introduction to programming in a commercial environment including:
          - Advanced use of Microsoft Excel for data analysis
          - Usage of Macros to automate common tasks
          - Introduction of Visual Basic for applications programming language (VBA)
          - Writing custom Excel functions and subroutines using VBA
          - Design of databases in Microsoft Access
          - Querying data with Microsoft Access
          - Externally loading data to Microsoft Access
          - Using ActiveX Data objects
          - The SQL query language

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4010Full year4YesYes

          French Language and Culture I

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN4015
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6934Semester 16NoNo

          Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Olga Iziumtseva
          Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

          Description: This module aims to present some advanced probabilistic concepts and demonstrate their application to stochastic modelling of real-world situations. The topics covered vary from year to year but may include, for example, limit theorems, renewal theory, and continuous-time Markov processes. In addition to exposure to proofs and theoretical material, students develop practical skills through a large number of problems and worked examples.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4007Semester 24NoNo

          German Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: LAN4011
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157PSemester 16NoNo

          Survival Models

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

          Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Spanish Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4020Full year4YesYes

          Spanish Language and Culture I

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: LAN4025
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4047Semester 24NoNo

          Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Experience in Legal PracticeLawLAW5000Full year5NoNo

          Experience in Legal Practice

          Credits: 120.0
          Contact: Mrs Christina Perry

          Description: Students will be selected for a work placement with Reed Smith LLP. The programme will begin with Reed Smith LLP but it is anticipated that it will expand to other employers. It is envisaged that the work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful applicants will each be allocated a tutor, who will visit the student at the placement twice in the year. The employer will also provide a mentor in the workplace at each employer to track performance. It is anticipated that during the work placement the students will undertake a wide range of activities to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students completing the module will be expected to return to college twice in the year: once to review the programme and on the second occasion to provide support to the students who are planning to undertake the year in practice in the following years. Students will also complete a reflective portfolio during the placement and they must present this portfolio at the end of the placement.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4027Semester 24NoNo

          Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: LAN4022
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Planetary HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7106Semester 27NoNo

          Planetary Health

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

          Description: The module gives a scientific overview of the causes of global warming, climate change and the concept of planetary boundaries. It will then use case studies to discuss the complex set of interactions between human activity, global health status and ecological degradation. It considers the concepts of environmental and inter-generational justice as tools for critically analysing the complex interrelationship between political, economic, ecological and social factors.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Planetary HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7106Full year7NoNo

          Planetary Health

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Doreen Montag

          Description: The module gives a scientific overview of the causes of global warming, climate change and the concept of planetary boundaries. It will then use case studies to discuss the complex set of interactions between human activity, global health status and ecological degradation. It considers the concepts of environmental and inter-generational justice as tools for critically analysing the complex interrelationship between political, economic, ecological and social factors.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Global Health Policy and GovernanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7105Full year7NoNo

          Global Health Policy and Governance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Anuj Kapilashrami

          Description: The module will cover the emergence of systems of global governance, particularly as they relate to global, international and national health challenges. It will describe the way in which global and international health policy is constructed, covering the content, process and actors (e.g. the WHO, the Gates Foundation, bilateral aid agencies and the corporate sector). It will examine the challenges and tensions inherent in the development of global policies that are relevant to national and local contingencies.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Global Health Policy and GovernanceSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7105Semester 27NoNo

          Global Health Policy and Governance

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Anuj Kapilashrami

          Description: The module will cover the emergence of systems of global governance, particularly as they relate to global, international and national health challenges. It will describe the way in which global and international health policy is constructed, covering the content, process and actors (e.g. the WHO, the Gates Foundation, bilateral aid agencies and the corporate sector). It will examine the challenges and tensions inherent in the development of global policies that are relevant to national and local contingencies.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6015Full year6NoNo

          French Language and Culture III

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN6010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6016Semester 16NoNo

          French Language and Culture III (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
          Overlap: LAN6011
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 6
          Intellectual Property in the United StatesLawIPLM148Semester 27NoNo

          Intellectual Property in the United States

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: To Be Confirmed

          Description: The course will introduce students to US IP law and will predominantly cover the protection of registered rights in the US such as patents and trade marks, but will also examine other important areas such as copyright law, design patents and publicity rights as well as aspects of IP licensing. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the fundmantal structures and principles applying in US law. It will also enhance the general perception of IP rights from a comparative perspective, and emphasis is placed therefore on those rules and principles that deviate from the law in the UK and the European Union. Please note that there will not be weekly lectures but that the course will be running as an intensive course over a period of two weeks,

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 7
          Trade Mark Law B (IPReg TMs Part B)LawIPLC137Semester 27YesNo

          Trade Mark Law B (IPReg TMs Part B)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

          Description: The module will help the student acquire a more advanced knowledge of trade marks, primarily within the UK but with reference to other jurisdictions. This module aims to cover the more specific areas of trade mark law with reference to those intending to specialise in trade marks specifically.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)LawIPLC135Full year7YesNo

          Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof David Musker

          Description: This module offers an overview of the main copyright and design principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK copyright and design. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Trade Mark Law A (IPReg TMs Part A)LawIPLC136Semester 17YesNo

          Trade Mark Law A (IPReg TMs Part A)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

          Description: This module offers an overview of the main trade mark principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK trade marks. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5016Semester 15NoNo

          French Language and Culture II (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN5011
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 5
          Fundamentals of Law and Professional Ethics (IPReg FL & PE)LawIPLC134Semester 17YesNo

          Fundamentals of Law and Professional Ethics (IPReg FL & PE)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof David Musker

          Description: This module aims to give students general knowledge of the English legal system in order to understand sources of law, the effects on intellectual property and the interaction between intellectual property and other areas of law. Students will obtain knowledge of the legal system and legal language and the ability to apply this understanding to various legal questions.

          Students receive a pre-teaching study pack one month prior to the start of the programme.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Typology I: Languages of the WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4213Semester 24YesNo

          Typology I: Languages of the World

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Linnaea Stockall
          Overlap: LIN4206
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: This module is an introduction to the great diversity in language structure and use around the world. Using indigenous languages from diverse regions, such as Africa, Australia, Asia and North America, we will explore the question of whether universal constraints limit the range of what is possible in human language, and if so, why such universals might exist. We will consider diversity in how social and pragmatic functions are signalled by language use in different speech communities around the world, and the problems associated with language endangerment and death. We will also examine how different language families differ from one another in sounds, word formation, sentence formation, and usage.

          As a module it will be available to students registered on a degree programme involving English Language or Linguistics only.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Writing SystemsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN501Semester 15YesNo

          Writing Systems

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Daniel Harbour
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: LIN4208

          Description: This module will explore the history, form and function of writing systems from around the world: Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, Chinese pictograms, Ancient Greek and modern Japanese syllabaries, the vowelless alphabets of Hebrew/Arabic, the 'fusional' alphabets of Sanskrit/Hindi, the 'separational' alphabets of Modern Europe. We will also look at various attempts to create 'perfect' writing systems, such as that of Korea and the IPA and its rivals. Through the module, you will gain an understanding of the phonological/morphological demands that languages place on their writing systems and how this leads to innovation and development. We will also examine sociological aspects of different systems (particularly in relation to the spread of systems and the role of writing in language preservation/endangerment) and what writing reveals about the organisation of the mind/brain.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5042Semester 25YesYes

          Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
          The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Phonetics I: The Sounds of EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4212Semester 14YesNo

          Phonetics I: The Sounds of English

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Kathleen Mccarthy
          Overlap: LIN4204
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: This module aims to give students knowledge of the main processes of phonetic articulation (mode, manner and place of articulation, airstream mechanisms, voicing, secondary articulations [velarization, palatalization, lip-rounding etc], vowel articulation including backness, height and roundness, plus a basic understanding of tone and pitch). It also aims to provide students with an understanding of how those processes are used in producing speech sounds, and with an ability to represent different sounds using an international standard (the IPA). In addition students will also be able to discriminate sounds aurally, and produce them from IPA script. The module will first focus on the sounds of English before examining sounds that are used in the world's languages. This module is a pre-requisite for the Introduction to Phonology module.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5025Full year5NoNo

          Spanish Language and Culture II

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          French Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4116Full year4NoNo

          French Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: To Be Confirmed
          Overlap: LAN4111
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4117Full year4YesNo

          French Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          Corporate Insolvency LawLawLAW6158Semester 16NoNo

          Corporate Insolvency Law

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Shalini Perera
          Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take LAW6036

          Description: The global financial crisis heightened interest in and increased calls for efficiency with respect to insolvency procedures, the insolvency aspects of the taking of security, rescue mechanisms, the accountability of decision makers in the context of insolvency, and the structuring of transactions involving credit and security. The aim of this course is to analyse from a UK perspective the different aspects of the insolvency and/or debt restructuring of corporations. To achieve this aim, the module covers the various procedures available in cases of insolvency and restructuring, the relationship between the general law of property and obligations and insolvency, the law of credit and security issues in the context of distress scenarios, and corporate rescue mechanisms. The course would enable students to identify common aspects in the dynamics, techniques and mechanisms to deal with distress scenarios and discover innovative trends in a continuously developing area.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Labour Law: Contract Law, Dismissal Rights and Workplace JusticeLawLAW6159Semester 16YesNo

          Labour Law: Contract Law, Dismissal Rights and Workplace Justice

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof Elizabeth Barmes

          Description: Students will learn about the essential building blocks of UK labour law in the law of the contract of employment, the right not to be unfairly dismissed and the employment tribunal system. The evolution in recent decades of law, practice and ideology relevant to the regulation of working life will be studied, with particular emphasis on whether current approaches are working to deliver justice in working lives.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4157Full year4YesNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132PSemester 26NoNo

          Relativity

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Pau Figueras

          Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 6
          Japanese Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4141Full year4YesYes

          Japanese Language and Culture I(a)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 4
          International perspectives
          French Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4017Semester 24NoNo

          French Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Philip France
          Overlap: LAN4012
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Japanese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4045Full year4NoNo

          Japanese Language and Culture I

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Japanese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4046Semester 14NoNo

          Japanese Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Japanese.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Japanese, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          German Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4006Semester 14NoNo

          German Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: LAN4011
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          German Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4005Full year4NoNo

          German Language and Culture I

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: LAN4010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Spanish Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4026Semester 14NoNo

          Spanish Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: LAN4021
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5047Semester 25NoNo

          Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level A2 / B1in Japanese.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5050Full year5YesNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture II

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
          The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          Designs and Copyright Law (IPReg)LawIPLM146Semester 17NoNo

          Designs and Copyright Law (IPReg)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact:

          Description: This module offers an overview of the main copyright and design principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK copyright and design. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Study Project - Business StreamLawIPLM137Full year7NoNo

          Study Project - Business Stream

          Credits: 45.0
          Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

          Description: The module consists of independent research; an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law. The chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

          The study project for business stream students will be a specific element of work relating to the IP field in general.

          This will give the candidate a chance to experience the specific issues regarding research, data analyses and IP specific analysis experienced by IP Professionals on a daily basis within the workplace.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
          Level: 7
          Introduction to Patent LawLawIPLM140Semester 17NoNo

          Introduction to Patent Law

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact:

          Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of patent law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Trade Mark Law (IPReg TMs)LawIPLC131Semester 17YesNo

          Trade Mark Law (IPReg TMs)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

          Description: The module will help the student acquire a solid basis of the law of trade marks, primarily within the UK but with reference to other jurisdictions. The focus will be on the national registration systems based on the European Trade Mark Directive, the Community Trade Mark system, and with reference to other International registration systems and filing strategies will be considered as well. The core underlying purpose of the module is the fundamental teaching of basic trade marks to the trainee IP attorney.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)LawIPLC132Semester 17YesNo

          Designs & Copyright Law (IPReg D&C)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Prof David Musker

          Description: This module offers an overview of the main copyright and design principles established under international, EU and UK law. The main focus is on UK copyright and design. Authorities from other jurisdictions will be used, where relevant, as a means of comparison to afford a cohesive basic knowledge of the subject area.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          Patent Law (IPReg - PATs)LawIPLC133Semester 17YesNo

          Patent Law (IPReg - PATs)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

          Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of patent law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 7
          German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5006Full year5NoNo

          German Language and Culture II

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
          Overlap: LAN5010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German(particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5057Semester 25YesNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1 in Modern Arabic.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Japanese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5040Full year5YesYes

          Japanese Language and Culture II

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5041Semester 15YesYes

          Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: IDesigned for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5021Semester 15YesYes

          Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5022Semester 25YesYes

          Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          QMUL Model Available to: All students

          QMUL Model themes supported:

          • International perspectives

          QMUL Model learning outcomes:

          • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

          Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
          The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          Level: 5
          International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
          Law and PharmacologyLawLAW6170Full year6NoNo

          Law and Pharmacology

          Credits: 30.0
          Contact: Ms Amber Marks

          Description: In the medico-legal field, medicines regulation has, until recently (E.Jackson, Law and the Regulation of Medicines (Hart, 2012)) received relatively little scholarly attention, and drug offences have been largely neglected in undergraduate courses on criminal law. These two areas of law (medicines regulation and recreational drug use ) are rarely considered together despite both being concerned with pharmacology and its impact on consumers, and despite raising similar ethical questions (autonomy, paternalism, the role of the state in public and private health) and facing similar threats from those seeking to maximise profit.
          The purpose of the module will be to identify and critically evaluate normative frameworks in this area, in search of theoretical coherence. The course will identify relevant legal and theoretical frameworks and regulatory agencies. The focus will be on UK law but will also include international treaties and European law. The module will combine domestic and comparative jurisprudence, and will also adopt a law-reform flavour given the evolving nature of science and law in this area . The module may particularly interest those students who are studying medical law, those propose to enter into a practising law career, a law, regulatory or policy-reform role, or who may enter into associated fields such as consumer lobbying and activism, or governmental legal offices.

          Questions to be considered will include: What are the normative implications of a shift in regulatory perspective in relation to recreational drugs from the criminal to the public health model? How tenable is the distinction drawn in law between medicinal drugs and recreational drugs? What are the regulatory implications of a product¿s classification as medicinal? What is the role and nature of the harm/benefit nexus in the design of regulatory measures?

          In the second semester students will explore several case-studies, including novel psychoactive substances, cannabis law reform and nicotine replacement therapy before proceeding to research and make oral presentations on their own chosen topics for the coursework element, for which they will receive supervision.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 6
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4056Semester 14YesNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5005Semester 25NoNo

          German Language and Culture II (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
          Overlap: LAN5010
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 5
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4055Full year4YesNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
          • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
          • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
          Level: 4
          Spanish Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4127Full year4NoNo

          Spanish Language and Culture I (b)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
          Overlap: None
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4156Full year4NoNo

          Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

          Credits: 0.0
          Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
          Overlap: LAN4151
          Prerequisite: None

          Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
          Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
          In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
          The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
          By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

          Assessment:

          • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
          • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
          • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
          Level: 4
          Law of the European UnionLawLAW5105Semester 25NoYes

          Law of the European Union

          Credits: 15.0
          Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard
          Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW4009

          QMUL Model themes supported:

            QMUL Model learning outcomes:

              Description: This module introduces students to some fundamental characteristics of the law of the European Union.
              It is divided into three parts, concerned respectively with how EU law is made, how it is applied and enforced and finally what it is used for. We will consider the historical development of the European Union, its institutional structure and its legal instruments, the interaction between Union and national law and the role of national courts in enforcing Union Law, the rules relating to free movement in the internal market and the legal principles underlying the relationships between the EU and its neighbours.

              Assessment:

              • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
              • Item 2: 25.00% Examination (centrally administered)
              Level: 5
              Spanish Language and Culture I(a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4126Full year4NoNo

              Spanish Language and Culture I(a)

              Credits: 0.0
              Contact: To Be Confirmed
              Overlap: None
              Prerequisite: None

              Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

              Assessment:

              • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
              • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
              • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
              • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
              Level: 4
              Japanese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4042Semester 24YesYes

              Japanese Language and Culture I (b)

              Credits: 15.0
              Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
              Overlap: None
              Prerequisite: None

              QMUL Model themes supported:

              • International perspectives

              QMUL Model learning outcomes:

              • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

              Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a basic user knowledge of the language. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

              Assessment:

              • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
              • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
              • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
              Level: 4
              International perspectives
              German Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4002Semester 24YesYes

              German Language and Culture I (b)

              Credits: 15.0
              Contact: Mr Florian Fischer
              Overlap: LAN4016
              Prerequisite: None

              QMUL Model themes supported:

              • International perspectives

              QMUL Model learning outcomes:

              • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

              Description: The module is suitable for beginners in German. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

              Assessment:

              • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
              • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
              • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
              Level: 4
              International perspectives
              Criminal Law (Level 5)LawLAW5005Full year5NoYes

              Criminal Law (Level 5)

              Credits: 30.0
              Contact: Dr Saskia Hufnagel

              QMUL Model themes supported:

                QMUL Model learning outcomes:

                  Description: This module will cover:

                  Introduction: the scope and character of the criminal law and its objectives; Deconstructing a typical crime - Criminal Damage;
                  The General Principles of Criminal Responsibility: Criminal conduct - the actus reus; principles of causation; crimes of omission; Criminal fault - the mens rea; General defences; capacity and incapacity; insanity and diminished responsibility, intoxication, duress, necessity, self defence.
                  Particular Crimes: Offences against the person: homicide; wounding and assaults, including assaults aggravated by hatred, sexual offences; Offences against property: theft and fraud.
                  Preliminary or inchoate offences: Conspiracy; Attempt.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 3: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  Level: 5
                  Spanish Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN4025Full year4NoNo

                  Spanish Language and Culture I

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
                  Overlap: LAN4020
                  Prerequisite: None

                  Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
                  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
                  Level: 4
                  CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115Semester 16YesYes

                  Cryptography

                  Credits: 15.0
                  Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
                  Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

                  QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and selected students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

                  QMUL Model themes supported:

                  • Networking
                  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

                  QMUL Model learning outcomes:

                  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
                  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

                  Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  Level: 6
                  Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityMAT_SEF_6_S
                  Competition Law OverviewLawIPLM131Full year7NoNo

                  Competition Law Overview

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact:

                  Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of Competition law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
                  Level: 7
                  Competition Law OverviewLawIPLM131Semester 27NoNo

                  Competition Law Overview

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

                  Description: The module will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of Competition law. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of patents, primarily within the UK but with a reference to other jurisdictions. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements; ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
                  Level: 7
                  Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6020Full year6YesYes

                  Spanish Language and Culture III

                  Credits: 30.0
                  Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo
                  Overlap: None
                  Prerequisite: None

                  QMUL Model Available to: All students

                  QMUL Model themes supported:

                  • International perspectives

                  QMUL Model learning outcomes:

                  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

                  Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
                  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  Level: 6
                  International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
                  Effective and Efficient EvaluationSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7112Semester 27NoNo

                  Effective and Efficient Evaluation

                  Credits: 15.0
                  Contact: Prof Sandra Eldridge

                  Description: The module will introduce learners to principles of effective and efficient evaluation, exploring different uses of health data in evaluation, for example in recruitment, or to measure outcomes. It will cover research designs that use health data or can be conducted within health data, including cluster-randomised trials, stepped-wedge designs, trials-within-cohorts/registries, interrupted-time-series. The role of devices such as wearables or mobile phone apps in evaluation, cost-effective analyses, use of qualitative methods, and ethics of evaluation will also be covered.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
                  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
                  Level: 7
                  Study Project - Professional StreamLawIPLM127Full year7NoNo

                  Study Project - Professional Stream

                  Credits: 45.0
                  Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

                  Description: The module is taught over the 1st and 2nd semester by way of intensive small and whole group seminars.

                  The module is an indispensable element of the programme since it allows students to gain, in addition to the more abstract legal content taught, not only exposure to the demands of practice as a patent or trade mark attorney, or indeed other legal professions (including the ability to work in teams) but it is also a distinguishing element of our MSc programme which underpins the entire ethos and philosophy of a programme that is based upon preparation for such careers.

                  The module gives students a 'real life' experience of the role a patent and/or trade mark attorney would experience in their every day role within the IP Field.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 3: 50.00% Dissertation
                  Level: 7
                  Research, Evidence and PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7108Full year7NoNo

                  Research, Evidence and Policy

                  Credits: 15.0
                  Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo

                  Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and applied public health perspective. It will use case studies to demonstrate the limitations of evidence, and to debunk the common misconception that there is a universal hierarchy of evidence. Instead, it will describe how different methods and different types of evidence are required to answer different policy questions.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
                  Level: 7
                  Health Data in PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryIPH7111Semester 17NoNo

                  Health Data in Practice

                  Credits: 15.0
                  Contact: Prof Carol Dezateux

                  Description: The module provides an introduction to health data in practice with a focus on health care delivery challenges and patient and population health outcomes from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will provide students with a grounding in legal and ethical frameworks governing health data access and use, and the role of patient, health professional and public engagement for delivering the full potential of health data sciences for public benefit.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
                  Level: 7
                  Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113Semester 26NoNo

                  Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

                  Credits: 15.0
                  Contact: Dr Kathrin Glau
                  Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6154

                  Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 4: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 5: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 6: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  Level: 6
                  Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5046Semester 15NoNo

                  Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori
                  Overlap: None
                  Prerequisite: None

                  Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Japanese.
                  Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
                  In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
                  The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
                  By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
                  Level: 5
                  Modern Arabic Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5055Full year5YesNo

                  Modern Arabic Language and Culture II

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki
                  Overlap: None
                  Prerequisite: None

                  Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
                  Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
                  In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
                  The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
                  By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
                  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
                  Level: 5
                  Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5056Semester 15YesNo

                  Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact: Ms Rosa Martin
                  Overlap: None
                  Prerequisite: None

                  Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
                  Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
                  In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
                  The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
                  By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 35.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
                  Level: 5
                  Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5020Full year5YesYes

                  Spanish Language and Culture II

                  Credits: 30.0
                  Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
                  Overlap: None
                  Prerequisite: None

                  QMUL Model Available to: All students

                  QMUL Model themes supported:

                  • International perspectives

                  QMUL Model learning outcomes:

                  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

                  Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
                  Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
                  In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
                  The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
                  By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
                  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  • Item 3: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
                  • Item 4: 25.00% Practical
                  • Item 5: 35.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  Level: 5
                  International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
                  Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5027Semester 25NoNo

                  Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

                  Credits: 0.0
                  Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis
                  Overlap: None
                  Prerequisite: None

                  Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
                  Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
                  In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
                  The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
                  By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
                  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
                  Level: 5
                  Advanced Tort LawLawLAW6167Semester 26NoNo

                  Advanced Tort Law

                  Credits: 15.0
                  Contact: Prof Rachael Mulheron

                  Description: Advanced Tort Law is an elective module, available to second year and final year LLB students (and visiting Erasmus students, as applicable). Advanced Tort Law provides a welcome opportunity to cover some of the main torts encountered in practice, viz: Trespasses to the Person; the Rule in Wilkinson v Downton; Privacy; Liability for Animals; Breach of Statutory Duty; the tort of Harassment; Public Nuisance; and the remedies of aggravated damages, exemplary damages, and restitutionary damages in Tort Law. The module will focus primarily on domestic UK jurisprudence, both case law and statutory. However, to provide greater depth, the module will also have regard, from time to time, to some comparative jurisprudence and to various law reform proposals.

                  Assessment:

                  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
                  Level: 6
                  Criminal SentencingLawLAW6169Semester 16NoNo