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Module directory 2022-23

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2022-23. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescriptionSubjectAvailable to
Wet Shipping LawLawSOLM147Semester 17Yes

Wet Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Filip Saranovic

Description: The module will cover all areas of the so-called 'wet' shipping law; i.e., all legal issues that might arise while a vessel and its cargo are at sea arising from various unfortunate incidents. The module will cover in detail collisions at sea, the law of salvage, the problematic area of wreck removal, the complex area of marine pollution, incidents of piracy at sea including the modern employment of armed guards; and the importance and computation of general average adjustments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Energy Law PrinciplesLawSOLM155Semester 17Yes

Energy Law Principles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Dallas

Description: This module provides students with an overview of the energy sector. It identifies the sources of energy law from international treaties to soft law guidelines for example the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Energy is the largest sector globally and is one of the most heavily regulated. Students will learn about the evolution of the energy sector and the difficulties for the future as the sector adapts to the energy transition. There are many interested parties in the energy sector from hosts states, international oil companies, national oil companies, NGOs, IGOs as well as service providers. The different interests of the main actors can be addressed in contracts, national laws or international obligations for example the Nationally Determine Contributions of each State under the Paris Agreement 2015.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Media Law: Reputation ManagementLawSOLM216Semester 27Yes

Media Law: Reputation Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: Media Law: Reputation Management covers the key areas of law used by those who seek to build and protect a media 'brand' for commercial gain. The module will open with a detailed consideration of libel law and how that protects the public image of an individual (or, indeed, an entity with legal personhood). Whereas perhaps three decades ago the law in this area seemed well settled, the challenges of the internet combined with much of the Defamation Act 2013 remaining to be refined through interpretation by the courts makes this an important and ongoing focus for study by the commercial media lawyer. The second aspect of law which the module will look at is the developing area of privacy. While traditionally English law has not offered direct protection for privacy, a wide range of las have been used in effect to prevent or at least compensate individuals aggrieved by private elements of their lives being published to the masses. Sometimes this has simply been about the privacy of an individual, while in other circumstances it has been about the protection of a direct commercial relationship (such as that between the Douglases and OK Magazine in Douglas v Hello). The development of the tort of Misuse of Private Information, a result of the application of the Human Rights Act 1998, has arguably created a de facto common law privacy protection which continues to explore new nuances at the discretion of the courts. The continued existence of the tabloid press, the fallout from the phone-hacking scandal, and the apparently unending appetite on the part of the general public for 'celebrity' gossip indicates that this is an area of law which will continue to see development for some time to come. The final area of law to be covered in this module focuses on intellectual property in a media context, in particular the use of IP in personality rights and, more broadly, as a means of controlling an individual's brand. As of yet, English law does not recognise personality rights, instead protecting only those who choose to actively merchandise themselves via a form of passing off ('false endorsement'). The course will open up the debate on this issue and consider the potential for this to be expanded, as well as other ways in which IP may be used to protect personal reputation (or not - see, for instance, application of HUbbard v Vosper in this regard). Although English law will be the primary context in which this module will be taught, it is intended that this will provide more a 'case study' context in which the issues raised will be debated rather than a course solely about English law per se. Laws in other jurisdictions (such as, for example, the ongoing debate on defamation reform in Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be raised and discussed where appropriate.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Maritime Conflict of LawsLawSOLM154Semester 27Yes

Maritime Conflict of Laws

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Filip Saranovic

Description: International maritime disputes often raise the issue of conflict of laws. A common scenario would be where a ship is owned by a Greek owner, the ship's flag is Panamanian, the ship is carrying cargo loaded in China for discharge in Chile, the ship is involved in a collision in Singapore waters, the ship's liability insurers are English and her cargo insurers are French. Which court will have jurisdiction to determine any contractual disputes arising? Which law will apply? Will any resulting judgment be enforceable?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7031USemester 27Yes

Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Buican
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take INK7090U
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6413 and take SPA6324
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: This course introduces core concepts in supersymmetry that can be applied to quantitatively understand a broad variety of physical systems and is a complement to the AQFT and FMQFT modules. Starting with supersymmetric quantum mechanics as a toy model, the course covers the supersymmetry algebra, its representations, the Witten Index, and the resulting constraints on quantum dynamics. We then move on to introduce supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions consisting of scalars and fermions while giving a basic introduction to symmetry currents, the classical and quantum Wilsonian renormalization group flow, moduli spaces, spurions, and non-renormalization arguments. The course culminates in a study of simple dualities in three-dimensional supersymmetric abelian gauge theories. We conclude with a discussion of supersymmetry in four space-time dimensions and, time permitting, the embedding of our constructions in string theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Weekly homework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Investment LawLawSOLM189Semester 17Yes

International Investment Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Angelos Dimopoulos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM048

Description: This module offers a comprehensive treatment of international law governing foreign investments. It identifies and analyses the sources, scope and content of the substantive international law rules that determine investor-State relationships, and discusses their application in practice. It examines the international law context within which investment law rules emerge and the substantive principles and standards that apply to investor-state relationships. It highlights the overlaps, similarities and differences divergent investment legal instruments enabling students to give advice about the application of investment law in specific cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
EU Competition LawLawSOLM248Semester 17Yes

EU Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: The Module EU Competition Law (along with the co-requisite Module EU Competition Law and Practice) aims at a comprehensive study of the basic provisions of European Union (EU) competition law. The Module will provide participants with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EU competition law, especially Article 101 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) is applied. The Module will aim to consider an important business phenomenon in the market namely anti-competitive agreements. It is hoped that by the end of the Module participants will gain a solid understanding of the relevant competition rules of the EU whilst developing a good business and market perspective and practical approach in order to help them identify situations in which such phenomenon may arise and how should this phenomenon be addressed.

EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Articles 101 TFEU; as well as a number of block exemption Regulations, notably those dealing with: Vertical Restraints; Technology Transfer; and Horizontal Research and Development and Specialisation Agreements. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 102 TFEU.

EU competition rules are applied by the Directorate General (DG COMPETITION (COMP)) of the European Commission, the Directorate in charge of competition matters; there is also shared competence with designated national competition authorities (NCAs) in relation to the application of Articles 101 (and 102) TFEU. Decisions of the Commission are the principal means of enforcement in competition cases. The Commission¿s decisions are subject to review by the General Court of the EU (GCEU) (formerly the Court of First Instance (CFI)) and the Court of Justice of the EU/European Court of Justice (CJEU/ECJ). This has created an extensive case-law in competition law matters and reference will be made to this case law.

In addition to considering substantive issues, the Module will also deal with relevant procedural mechanisms, such as cartel leniency and settlement mechanism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Law and Authority in a Global ContextLawSOLM187Semester 27Yes

Law and Authority in a Global Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hans Lindahl

Description: The course offers a theory of law and authority in a context marked by the globalisation of inclusion and exclusion. It analyses this issue in five lectures/seminars: (1) the passage from state-centric law to global legal pluralism; (2) (global) legal ordering as a process of including and excluding ; (3) the contestation of emergent global legal orders by alter- and anti-globalisation movements; (4) authority and struggles for recognition; (5) Global constitutionalism and its limits. Drawing on insights from legal and political theory, it proposes a model of legal order that explains how globalisation transforms law and how law gives shape to globalisation processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Comparative Law MethodologyLawSOLM186Semester 27Yes

Comparative Law Methodology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ralf Michaels

Description: For a long time, comparative law was both marginalized as a discipline and thoroughly undertheorized. Today, both have changed: comparative law has received more attention, and there has been a healthy, if at times disorganized, debate on questions of method and theory. The course provides a systematic introduction into this debate through a combination of seminal texts, overview articles, and brief examples of selected positions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Public International & European Air Transport LawLawSOLM151Semester 17Yes

Public International & European Air Transport Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Antigoni-Aikaterini Lykotrafiti

Description: Air transport is one of the most heavily regulated sectors of the economy. For passengers and goods to be transported safely, regularly, economically and efficiently, a dense web of rules is governing aspects such as the use of airspace, safety, security, air navigation, airports and the environment. This module examines the international, supranational and national rules that make aviation pride itself on being the safest and most innovative mode of transport, as well as the industry that has globalised the world, contributing to peace and economic growth. It also examines critically the lack of uniformity in the international regulatory framework and its implications for the industry and the economy at large.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
AdmiraltyLawSOLM150Semester 27Yes

Admiralty

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Filip Saranovic

Description: No aspiring maritime (or shipping) lawyer can claim to be educated without at least some knowledge of the law relating to maritime claims. Indeed, such knowledge is invaluable to anyone who aspires eventually to work in shipping or international trade, whether as a lawyer in a law firm, as a legal advisor in-house, or in a P & I Club. While the emphasis will be the admiralty practice and procedure in England, the jurisprudence of other jurisdictions, namely Australia and South Africa, as well as international conventions on arrests of ships and on maritime liens and mortgages. No account will be taken of the special difficulties which fall within the ambit of the conflict of laws (or private international law), significant to a practitioner though these are. The module will cover the Admiralty jurisdiction and its nature; Maritime, statutory and possessory liens: legal characteristics; transferability; assignment; extinction; accrual of statutory liens; The exercise of Admiralty jurisdiction: limitations on the exercise of jurisdiction; time of invocation; residual matters; arrest scenarios; Priorities: generally; non-admiralty principles; admiralty principles; priorities and maritime liens; priorities and possessory liens; statutory liens; execution creditors; alteration of the prima facie order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Financial RegulationLawSOLM246Semester 27No

International Financial Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The purpose of this module is to examine the regulation of non-bank financial institutions and markets, in particular securities firms, insurance companies, fund managers, financial derivatives, financial infrastructures, clearing and settlement. The module also considers the sources and evolution of international financial regulation and the competing demands between prudential regulation and financial services liberalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
EU Financial and Monetary LawLawSOLM245Semester 27No

EU Financial and Monetary Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The purpose of this module is to analyse the institutions of EMU (Economic and Monetary Union), in particular the law of the ECB and the law of the euro, and the pillars of banking union (single supervision, single resolution, single deposit insurance). The module also examines the law relating to economic governance in the EU and Eurozone, and the road to economic union, and provides an introduction to Capital Markets Union. The relationship between the single market and the European financial architecture on the one hand and banking union on the other hand are also critically considered, in the light of the challenges that Europe faces in its process of integration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Practical Machine LearningPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7033USemester 27No

Practical Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Bevan

Description: Machine learning influences modern life through many different avenues and is silently revolutionising the way we live and work. We can see the influence of machine learning algorithms in social media, web search engines, mobile device spell checkers and self-driving cars. This module provides an introduction to machine learning using the Python programming language and the TensorFlow (TM) programming toolkit from Google (TM). Minimal programming background is assumed, however students wishing to take this module should be familiar with using computers, and mathematics at a level commensurate with a BSc in Physics or equivalent degree (calculus and linear algebra).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Quiz/Homework
  • Item 2: 50% Code portfolio
  • Item 3: 25% Briefing note assignment
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International PerspectivesLawSOLM243Full year7No

Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rafael Leal-Arcas

Description: This course examines the interface of climate change, international trade, and energy law, with a view to addressing the question: How can we increase economic well-being and expand trade, while promoting the optimal use of the world¿s energy resources and protecting and preserving our shared environment? It will seek policy solutions linking climate change, trade, and energy law in the context of the World Trade Organization (WTO) by drawing upon findings in three interlinked sections: 1) the nexus between energy and international trade law/WTO law; 2) the interface between climate change and WTO law; and 3) the link between energy and climate change in the context of WTO law/international trade law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Practical Machine LearningPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7033PSemester 27No

Practical Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Bevan

Description: Machine learning influences modern life through many different avenues and is silently revolutionising the way we live and work. We can see the influence of machine learning algorithms in social media, web search engines, mobile device spell checkers and self-driving cars. This module provides an introduction to machine learning using the Python programming language and the TensorFlow (TM) programming toolkit from Google (TM). Minimal programming background is assumed, however students wishing to take this module should be familiar with using computers, and mathematics at a level commensurate with a BSc in Physics or equivalent degree (calculus and linear algebra).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Quiz/Homework
  • Item 2: 50% Code portfolio
  • Item 3: 25% Briefing note assignment
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Introduction to Strings and BranesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7032PSemester 27No

Introduction to Strings and Branes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Congkao Wen
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The module will cover the basics of string theory including the classical relativistic physics of the string, its quantisation and the resulting spectrum. This will then be extended to examine so called p-branes and the basics of M-theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Introduction to Strings and BranesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7032USemester 27Yes

Introduction to Strings and Branes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Congkao Wen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6413 and take SPA6324
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The module will cover the basics of string theory including the classical relativistic physics of the string, its quantisation and the resulting spectrum. This will then be extended to examine so called p-branes and the basics of M-theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Entrepreneurship Law ClinicLawSOLM213Semester 27No

Entrepreneurship Law Clinic

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Karen Watton

Description: Entrepreneurship Law Clinic is a unique opportunity to learn and reflect on the legal issues that face entrepreneurs. In this module you will have the opportunity to (i) develop a number of professional skills and your professional identity; (ii) understand the practical legal issues that are faced by entrepreneurs and how to respond to those issues; (iii) interview and draft advice for a client; (iv) develop and practice public speaking and presentation skills; (v) work within a team and network closely with legal experts and entrepreneurship specialists in London's Tech City. Students must adhere to the Legal Advice Centre's practices and procedures including the signing of a confidentiality agreement and student contract.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Research Essay 1 (1250 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Client File
  • Item 3: 40% Assessed Presentation
  • Item 4: 25% Research Essay 2 (1250 words)
Level: 7
Law
Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesWHR6028Full year6No

Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work, resulting in a piece of original research in the area of pharmacology and therapeutics. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Dissertation (12,000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Practical work
  • Item 3: 20% Oral presentation (15 min)
Level: 6
Radiative Transfer and AstrochemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7036USemester 27No

Radiative Transfer and Astrochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas James Haworth
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7006U

Description: Radiative transfer describes the emission and propagation of light. In this course students will learn how we use radiative transfer to infer the properties and evolution of distant objects from light alone. They will also learn how light influences the temperature and motion of matter. Light also affects the composition of astrophysical systems which naturally links the course to an introduction to astrochemistry. This module provides a key toolkit for most observational and theoretical astrophyiscs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework Problems Set
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Radiative Transfer and AstrochemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7036PSemester 27No

Radiative Transfer and Astrochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas James Haworth
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7006P

Description: Radiative transfer describes the emission and propagation of light. In this course students will learn how we use radiative transfer to infer the properties and evolution of distant objects from light alone. They will also learn how light influences the temperature and motion of matter. Light also affects the composition of astrophysical systems which naturally links the course to an introduction to astrochemistry. This module provides a key toolkit for most observational and theoretical astrophyiscs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework Problems Set
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Radiation SensorsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7035USemester 17Yes

Radiation Sensors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Peter Hobson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6306

Description: This module introduces the principles underlying the detection of ionising radiation and the techniques used in modern particle physics experiments and other radiation environments (nuclear, environmental). The fundamental processes involved in the interaction of charged and neutral particles with matter are described and the implications for sensor design are discussed.
A range of modern radiation sensor technologies, including Gaseous sensors, Semiconductor sensors and Scintillators are described and their performance analysed. A number of examples of complete sensor systems used in particle and nuclear physics for example Calorimeters, Tracking detectors and Neutrino detectors are critically evaluated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Tax LawLawSOLM119Semester 17Yes

International Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee

Description: The module is designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of the key concepts of international tax law and of how multinational enterprises are taxed on their profits. It is also designed to equip students to participate in International Tax Law in Practice, for which it is a prerequisite. The module covers the basic principles of jurisdiction to tax, the factors used by countries in imposing taxes and the issues governing major types of income. It looks at how conflicts lead to international double taxation, the problems this creates for international trade and solutions provided for in double taxation treaties. The taxation of multinational enterprises has become a political issue, with the G20 and the OECD undertaking substantial work to address Base Erosion and Profit Shifting. This work has progressed rapidly and features prominently in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Radiation SensorsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7035PSemester 17No

Radiation Sensors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Peter Hobson

Description: This module introduces the principles underlying the detection of ionising radiation and the techniques used in modern particle physics experiments and other radiation environments (nuclear, environmental). The fundamental processes involved in the interaction of charged and neutral particles with matter are described and the implications for sensor design are discussed.
A range of modern radiation sensor technologies, including Gaseous sensors, Semiconductor sensors and Scintillators are described and their performance analysed. A number of examples of complete sensor systems used in particle and nuclear physics for example Calorimeters, Tracking detectors and Neutrino detectors are critically evaluated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Artificial Intelligence, Human Rights and MigrationLawSOLM240Semester 27Yes

Artificial Intelligence, Human Rights and Migration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Elspeth Guild

Description: Artificial Intelligence is constantly in the media, both praised and vilified. But what is AI and how do public-authorities use it? This course examines public authorities' use of AI in border, immigration and asylum decision making in the UK and worldwide. Taking a case study approach using recent and pending court cases we will analyse the issues from a human rights perspective: fair procedures, non-discrimination and protection of privacy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Illegal Speech, Censorship and Digital Rights: Social Media vs 'Old' MediaLawSOLM212Semester 17Yes

Illegal Speech, Censorship and Digital Rights: Social Media vs 'Old' Media

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: This digital revolution has had an enormous impact on fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and privacy (and personality rights more widely), and on concepts such as identity, autonomy and agency online. The Module will analyse (1) how the law protects these rights and balances them with the rights of others; (2) whether new fundamental rights should be recognized online and (3) how the law balances potential harms online with these rights. The Module will examine the relationship between law, technology and behaviour. It has a practical dimension by looking at liability relating to online communication and the management of that risk and by examining how these existing and emerging rights can be enforced (including for example the disclosure of a pseudonymous identity). It has a theoretical, law & policy dimension by examining concepts such as identity, privacy and autonomy and how these concepts relate to the law. It will compare traditional approaches to (offline) media regulation and how they relate to new phenomena on social media. The Module therefore examines traditional approaches to content regulation on 'old' media and how these censorship regime(s) is challenged by new media, reflecting on how the law needs to adapt to 'cope' with new (and ever evolving) technologies and business practices. As in traditional media regulation, this encapsulates administrative, civil and criminal law approaches to content regulation and censorship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Foreign Investments and Public PolicyLawSOLM190Semester 27Yes

Foreign Investments and Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelos Dimopoulos

Description: This module offers a comprehensive treatment of the different regulatory interests that lie behind regulation of international investments. It explores the role and policy goals of international investment law, as evidenced in theory and in investment rule making. It focuses on the relationship between investment promotion and protection and other regulatory interests, such as human rights and environmental protection, enabling students to critically reflect on the appropriate balance of (conflicting) public policy interests.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Migration and Asylum Law through PracticeLawSOLM177Semester 27No

Migration and Asylum Law through Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Violeta Moreno-Lax
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SOLM174 or take SOLM171 or take SOLM242 or take SOLM173 or take SOLM264 or take SOLM272

Description: This module examines the international (and regional, especially European) law dimensions of protecting refugees and other categories of migrants through practice. It provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts and workings of international law, in general, and international (and European) refugee, migration, and human rights law, in particular, as they relate to trans-broder movement, covering aspects of border control, maritime migration, transnational crime, torture, terrorism, and humanitarian governance. Tuition will be delivered in mixed fashion, through a placement with one of the industry partners offering QM-exclusive internships (including: REDRESS - Justice for Torture Victims; The European Council on Refugees & Exiles (ECRE); the UN Office for Drugs and Crime (UNODC); AMERA International; Kingsley Napley LLP; and The AIRE Centre: Advice on Individual Rights in Europe) in combination with fortnightly group reflection and consultation sessions with the module convener. Candidates will be selected during Term 1, after a "Meet & Greet"" event with partner organisations, and be given a training session before the start of the internship. A choice between on-site and on-line placement options will be available. Regardless of the type of experience, candidates will keep a internship diary, where they will record key milestones of their learning experience. A self-evaluation and guided reflection session will gather the whole group to assess the practical work against set readings and debate key issues in light of current academic, policy, and media debates every other week of Term 2. An oral presentation and a final internship report will complete the assessment portfolio for the module."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 50% Final Internship Report (3,500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Common Law ReasoningLawSOLM179Semester 27No

Common Law Reasoning

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Maksymillan Del Mar

Description: This course is an advanced introduction to common law reasoning. We will examine key issues and debates over the character of common law reasoning, including: is the common law a system of rules? What is the binding content of precedent? What is the place of policies in common law reasoning? What is analogy and how important is it to common law reasoning? And, how is common law reasoning affected by transnational and global forms of legal reasoning?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Time Series with Financial ApplicationsMathematical SciencesMTH7004PSemester 27No

Time Series with Financial Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will present the techniques of Time Series analysis. These will allow the student to better understand how to use historical data series. The student will learn how to extract any trend and cyclic component of a data series, calculate the autocorrelation, learn about autoregressive and moving average models, and cointegration. The module will develop the notions around realistic financial examples and solutions with hands on experience., specifically in understanding the evolution of financial assets and other more complex data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 10% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 50% Final Exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Research MethodsMathematical SciencesMTH7006PFull year7No

Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will cover research methods as well as have a series of independent projects which will build on the skills and techniques learned in the the first year of the programme as well as introducing research methodologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 33% Mini Project 1
  • Item 2: 33% Mini Project 2
  • Item 3: 34% Midterm Exam
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155PSemester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1.
We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional
expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime
models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then
solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced
applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest
rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH7003PSemester 27No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 10% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 50% Final Exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
The Politics of the Post-Colonial Middle EastPolitics and International RelationsPOL365Semester 16Yes

The Politics of the Post-Colonial Middle East

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Phillips

Description: This module will be designed to provide an introduction to the politics of the contemporary Middle East from the end of the First World War until the present day. The course aims to put the politics of the Middle East in the broader perspective of comparative political science and international relations. It will help students to develop a broad understanding of how the contemporary Middle East has evolved since 1918 and to identify and examine the key issues dominating politics in the region. It will deal with major contemporary themes like the rise of political Islam, the political economy of oil and the prevalence of politically motivated violence.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Take-home Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Financial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH6155Semester 26No

Financial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ilya Goldsheid
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6112
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141 and take MTH6154

Description: This module covers advanced ideas in financial mathematics, building on the foundational material in FM1. We revisit the discrete-time binomial model, introducing some more formal concepts such as conditional expectations that allow us to express our earlier results in a more elegant form. Then we look at continuoustime models, and use the tools of stochastic calculus to derive the Black-Scholes equation which we then solve explicitly for the prices of European call and put options. We also consider some more advanced applications, such as models for stock prices involving jumps and stochastic volatility, as well as interest rate models and credit risk models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142PSemester 26No

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucas Lacasa

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Complex NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH6142Semester 26Yes

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucas Lacasa

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139Semester 26Yes

Time Series

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prajamitra Bhuyan
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132PSemester 26No

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 26No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
Overlap: Must not take other projects
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report, Presentation and (possibly) Oral Examination
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
RelativityMathematical SciencesMTH6132Semester 26Yes

Relativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pau Figueras
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5123

Description: This module is an introduction to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. The first part of the module deals with special relativity, and is mainly about the strange dynamics that happen at speeds comparable to the speed of light. The second part develops the mathematical machinery needed to study the curvature of space-time and the subtle effects of gravity; this is the general theory of relativity. The third part deals with various consequences of the theory, and will touch upon topics like black holes and the big bang.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Mathematical Tools for Asset ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH6113PSemester 26No

Mathematical Tools for Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathrin Glau

Description: This module introduces the key ideas in financial economics and risk management. We begin by looking at various models of the long-term behaviour of security prices. Then we consider different measures of risk that are used by market practitioners. We next look at mean-variance portfolio theory, which is one important way of determining the risk and return of a portfolio, given the risk and return of the individual constituents. We now turn to various economics models that actually attempt to explain the returns of the various assets that trade in the market. Finally, you will learn how the theoretical notion of a utility function can be used to explain individual investors' decisions when allocating their wealth between different investment opportunities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105Semester 26Yes

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4113 or take MTH4213

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Mathematical and Actuarial Work ExperienceMathematical SciencesMTH5200Full year5No

Mathematical and Actuarial Work Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng

Description: The Work Experience (or Professional Placement) year consists of one year spent working with an employer in a mathematical, actuarial or related role. The year is undertaken between the second and fourth years of your degree programme. The module is assessed, and will contribute towards your final degree title. Assessment will be through a combination of a learning journal, a learning objectives task with employer input and feedback, a report and a short presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Learning journal
  • Item 2: 20% Learning objectives task
  • Item 3: 60% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Video Presentation
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH5131Semester 25No

Actuarial Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module builds on the statistical theory of the Level 5 modules Probability and Statistics II and Statistical Modelling I. It begins with estimation of population parameters and a study of exploratory data analysis, in particular measures of correlation. It then introduces concepts from Bayesian Statistics and uses them to calculate Bayesian estimators. Finally, we study topics on generalised linear models (GLMs), including that of fitting a GLM to a dataset and interpreting its output.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 60% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4156Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (100-125 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 4
Languages
Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771PSemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips

Description: This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761USemester 17No

Financial Instruments and Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tat Chan

Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Class test
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Gender and PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL361Semester 26Yes

Gender and Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rainbow Murray

Description: This module looks at the theory and practice of politics from a gendered perspective. It considers feminist debates concerning women¿s and men¿s role in the public and private spheres and notes the repercussions of gender imbalances in politics. It then looks at gender differences in involvement in politics and considers a range of explanations as to why women are under-represented, and possible solutions. It considers diversity and difference amongst and between women and men. The course offers new perspectives on the political process, both formal and informal, and sheds light on the way that power is unevenly distributed within society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Literature Review 1 (500 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Literature Review 2 (500 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Report (2000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Financial Instruments and MarketsMathematical SciencesMTH761PSemester 17No

Financial Instruments and Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tat Chan

Description: This module first introduces you to various types of financial instruments, such as bonds and equities, and the markets in which they are traded. We then explain in detail what financial derivatives are, and how they can be used for hedging and speculation. We also look at how investors can construct optimal portfolios of assets by balancing risk and return in an appropriate way. This module will give you the practical knowledge that is essential for a career in investment banking or financial markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Class test
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5146Full year5No

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (250-300 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH712PSemester 17No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin

Description: Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Machine Learning 1Mathematical SciencesMTH7001PSemester 17No

Machine Learning 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Benning

Description: This module aims at providing students with Machine Learning skills which will be primarily based on the Python programming language as it is currently used in industry. Some of the presented methods are regression and classification techniques (linear and logistic regression, least-square); clustering; dimensionality reduction techniques such as PCA, SVD and matrix factorization. More advanced methods will be covered in a follow-up module (Machine Learning 2).

The module is self-contained in terms of the necessary mathematical tools (mostly probability). At the end of the module students will be able to formalize a ML task, choose the appropriate method in order to tackle it while being able to assess its performance, and to implement these algorithms in Python.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 10% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 50% Final Exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Probability and StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH7002PSemester 17No

Probability and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions of probability and the distributions of random variables which underpin statistical methods. It then describes different types of statistical tests of hypotheses and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for the proper use of statistics in applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 10% Coursework 5
  • Item 6: 50% Final Exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH6991Semester 26No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Practical Skills Assessment
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154PSemester 16No

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Modern Arabic Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5055Full year5No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141PSemester 16No

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Johnson

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Random ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6141Semester 16Yes

Random Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Johnson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This is an advanced module in probability, introducing various probability models used in physical and life sciences and economics. It serves as an introduction to stochastic modelling and stochastic processes. It covers discrete time processes including Markov chains and random walks, and continuous time processes such as Poisson processes, birth-death processes and queuing systems. It builds on previous probability modules but needs no background in statistics; some experience of linear algebra is also desirable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Third Year ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6138Semester 16No

Third Year Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: Must not take other projects
Prerequisite: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take one of the 30-credit MSci projects in a simplified form as a 15-credit project, although some MSci projects may not be available as third-year projects. The list of available MSci projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the MSci project coordinator and the project supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report, Presentation and (possibly) Oral Examination
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127PSemester 26No

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mahdi Godazgar

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5020Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107PSemester 16No

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Chaos and FractalsMathematical SciencesMTH6107Semester 16Yes

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Number TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH5130Semester 15Yes

Number Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shu Sasaki
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

Description: This module considers fundamental problems in number theory, related to the distribution of prime numbers and integer solutions to Diophantine equations. Students will learn the core concepts in number theory such as the existence of primitive roots modulo a prime, quadratic reciprocity and solving Pell's equation. Additionally, students will learn how to develop and implement algorithms to efficiently solve computational questions which arise in number theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Bayesian Statistical MethodsMathematical SciencesMTH6102Semester 16Yes

Bayesian Statistical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. You will be shown some of the drawbacks with classical statistical methods and that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction. At the end you will be able to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of situations and know how to use suitable software. Bayesian methods are being increasingly used across many applications and it is important that you know about them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Spanish Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6022Semester 26Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Probability and Statistics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5129Semester 15No

Probability and Statistics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 or take ECN115 ) and ( take MTH4216 or take MTH4116 )

Description: This module further develops the ideas introduced in the first year probability and statistics modules. It begins by covering some of the essential theoretical notions required, such as covariance, correlation and independence of random variables. It then describes different types of statistical tests and addresses the questions of how to use them and when to use them. This material is essential for applications of statistics in psychology, the life or physical sciences, business or economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Programming in PythonMathematical SciencesMTH766PSemester 17No

Programming in Python

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module introduces you to the Python programming language. After learning about data types, variables and expressions, you will explore the most important features of the core language including conditional branching, loops, functions, classes and objects. We will also look at several of the key packages (libraries) that are widely used for numerical programming and data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 10% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 50% Mini-project
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Neural Networks and Deep LearningMathematical SciencesMTH767PSemester 27No

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mx Nina Otter
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH786P

Description: This module introduces you to several state-of-the-art methodologies for machine learning with neural networks (NNs). After discussing the basic theory of constructing and calibrating NNs, we consider various types of NN suitable for different purposes, such as convolutional NNs, recurrent NNs, autoencoders and generative adversarial networks. This module includes a wide range of practical applications; you will implement each type of network using Python for your weekly coursework assignments, and will calibrate these networks to real datasets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Mini-project
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750USemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Arrowsmith

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5142Full year5Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH709USemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6102
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH6134

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700USemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 6 matching mth

Description: This module is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, which will provide preparation for the MSci project. You will learn how to review critically and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. You will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that you are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork. You will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Answer questions and summarize Paper
  • Item 2: 20% Prepare slides
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Presentation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH6934Semester 16No

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH6141

Description: This module aims to present some advanced probabilistic concepts and demonstrate their application to stochastic modelling of real-world situations. The topics covered vary from year to year but may include, for example, limit theorems, renewal theory, and continuous-time Markov processes. In addition to exposure to proofs and theoretical material, students develop practical skills through a large number of problems and worked examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Class test
  • Item 2: 75% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Ring TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6158Semester 26No

Ring Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104

Description: The modern axiomatic approach to mathematics is demonstrated in the study of algebraic structures. This module will focus on ring theory, which includes integral domains, ideals, homomorphisms and isomorphism theorems, polynomial rings, the Euclidean algorithm, and fields of fractions. It will be illustrated by some familiar examples, such as the rings of integers and polynomials in one variable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Actuarial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH5124Semester 15No

Actuarial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Baule
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4107 or take MTH4207 )

Description: Mathematics is used extensively to value annuities and assurances. We study compound interest, rates of discount, and interest compounded continuously. We will understand the idea of present value and how present value allows us to appraise investment projects. We cover annuities-certain. We consider life tables and use them to find the expected present value of life annuities and life assurances, premiums if life assurances are paid for by life annuities, and surrender value of life assurances.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Mid-term Examination
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Financial Mathematics IMathematical SciencesMTH6154Semester 16Yes

Financial Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module introduces you to some of the most important financial instruments, including bonds, shares and derivatives (such as forward contracts and options). By using the assumption that arbitrage opportunities do not exist in the market, we show how it is possible to derive formulas for the fair prices of many types of derivative. Some results can actually be derived in a model-independent way, although more generally we will work within the framework of a discrete-time trading model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140PSemester 16No

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5052Semester 25Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Metric Spaces and TopologyMathematical SciencesMTH6127Semester 26Yes

Metric Spaces and Topology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mahdi Godazgar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

Description: The study of metric spaces provides a link between geometry, which is fairly concrete, and topology, which is more abstract. It generalises to multidimensional spaces the concepts of continuity and other ideas studied in real analysis and explores the foundations of continuous mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134PSemester 16No

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad

Description: This is the part of linear models often called analysis of variance. It concentrates on models whose explanatory variables are qualitative. These methods are used in almost all areas of business, economics, science and industry where qualitative and quantitative data are collected.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5017Semester 25No

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Introduction to Machine LearningMathematical SciencesMTH6101Semester 26Yes

Introduction to Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: Machine Learning is a rapidly growing field, at the boundary between Statistics and Computer Science. This course gives an understanding of the theoretical basis for machine learning and a set of concrete algorithms including decision tree learning and classification methods. Moreover, this course will introduce some classical statistical methods for high-dimensional data. The course also includes programming and use of algorithms on concrete data set.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106PSemester 16No

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Professional Development IIMathematical SciencesMTH5127Semester 15No

Actuarial Professional Development II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng

Description: This is a compulsory module, counting towards your final degree classification, that is designed to help you build your professional and business skills and knowledge, and prepare for employment in the financial services industry. The module is a continuation of the skills development included in Actuarial Professional Development 1. The focus in this module is applying actuarial skills to business situations, developing a working knowledge of the Actuaries Code and related professional standards, and developing an awareness of key business issues that are relevant to the work of an actuary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1: Video presentation (year 2)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2: Report (year 2)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Spanish Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6021Semester 16Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 27No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 20% Mini-project
  • Item 6: 40% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Storing, Manipulating and Visualising DataMathematical SciencesMTH765PSemester 17No

Storing, Manipulating and Visualising Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Primoz Skraba

Description: The ability to store, manipulate and display data in appropriate ways is of great importance to data scientists. This module will introduce you to many of the most widely-used techniques in the field. The emphasis of this module is primarily on the interactive use of various IT tools, rather than on programming as such, although in a number of cases you will learn how to develop short programs (scripts) to automate various tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 20% Mini-project
  • Item 6: 40% Final exam (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750PSemester 27No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743USemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson

Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5141Full year5Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTH700PSemester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: This course is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, and network research in particular. The module will serve as preparation for the research project that students will undertake as a major part of the MSc programme in Mathematics and Mathematics of Networks. The students will learn how to critically review and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork.The students will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Answer questions and summarize Paper
  • Item 2: 20% Prepare slides
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Presentation
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157PSemester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Survival ModelsMathematical SciencesMTH6157Semester 16No

Survival Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5125 and take MTH5129

Description: The lengths of peoples lives is of crucial importance in the Insurance and Pensions industry so models for survival must be studied by trainee Actuaries. This module considers a number of approaches to modelling data for survival and mortality. These include parametric and non-parametric statistical approaches and methods developed by actuaries using age-specific death rates. Tests of the consistency of crude estimates with a standard table using a number of non-parametric methods is also studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial ProjectMathematical SciencesMTH6153Semester 26No

Actuarial Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: Student and SMS staff to contact lecturer. Must not take other projects.

Description: This module allows third-year undergraduates with suitable background to take a project on a topic relevant to Actuarial Science. A list of potential projects and supervisors is available on the School of Mathematical Sciences website. You will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between your adviser, the module organiser and the project supervisor. You will normally be expected to have a second year average of at least 60% to be accepted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation (20 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Dissertation (4000 words)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Partial Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH6151PSemester 16No

Partial Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis

Description: Partial differential equations (PDEs) play a key role in many areas of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, engineering and finance. They can be used to describe many phenomena, such as wave motion, diffusion of gases, electromagnetism, and the evolution of the prices of financial assets, to name just a few. In this module, we will investigate the most important classes of PDE, and look at the various techniques (both analytical and numerical) that can be used to solve them. Whilst we consider some of the underlying theory, the main emphasis of this module will be on applying this theory to realistic, applied problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5051Semester 15Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Time SeriesMathematical SciencesMTH6139PSemester 26No

Time Series

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prajamitra Bhuyan
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH783P

Description: A time series is a collection of observations made sequentially, usually in time. This kind of data arises in a large number of disciplines ranging from economics and business to astrophysics and biology. This module introduces the theory, methods and applications of analysing time series data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Linear Algebra IIMathematical SciencesMTH6140Semester 16Yes

Linear Algebra II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: This module is a mixture of abstract theory, with rigorous proofs, and concrete calculations with matrices. The abstract component builds on the theory of vector spaces and linear maps to construct the theory of bilinear forms (linear functions of two variables), dual spaces (which map the original space to the underlying field) and determinants. The concrete applications involve ways to reduce a matrix of some specific type (such as symmetric or skew-symmetric) to as near diagonal form as possible.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115PSemester 16No

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Statistical Modelling IIMathematical SciencesMTH6134Semester 16Yes

Statistical Modelling II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: The module will develop the general theory of linear models, building on theory taught in Statistical Modelling I. This module will introduce generalised linear models, which can be used for modelling data such as binary data and count data, where a normal distribution would not be appropriate. These developments dramatically extend the range of problems that can be studied. The methods will be implemented using R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
CryptographyMathematical SciencesMTH6115Semester 16Yes

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and ( take MTH5112 or take MTH5212 )

Description: Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical SciencesMAT_SEF_6_S
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5016Semester 15No

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 35% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6106Semester 16Yes

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Sodin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4104 and take at least 1 and no more than 99 modules from level 5 matching mth

Description: This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Algorithmic Graph TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH6105PSemester 26No

Algorithmic Graph Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Fischer

Description: The module will give an introduction to graph theory from an algorithmic perspective. It will develop the theory behind some of the most commonly used network algorithms from operational research, describe these algorithms and derive upper bounds on their running time.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Mathematical Sciences
Applied Linear AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH5212Semester 15Yes

Applied Linear Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5112
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

Description: This module covers concepts in linear algebra and its applications. The ideas for two- and three-dimensional space covered by the appropriate first year module will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
SMS Placement TutorialMathematical SciencesMTH5200AFull year5No

SMS Placement Tutorial

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module is designed to prepare students to identify and apply for placement as part of their third year of study. It will also support them in being equipped to get maximum benefit from their time out on placement and how to complete the various assessments and reports required.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Statistics for InsuranceMathematical SciencesMTH5126Semester 25No

Statistics for Insurance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Gaik Ng
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5129

Description: This module begins with a study of loss distributions, with and without reinsurance. We then study compound distributions and their applications in risk modelling. The module then introduces the concepts of copulas and extreme value theory. Finally, we study topics related to ruin theory and look at how insurance companies estimate their liabilities using run-off triangles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 60% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762USemester 27No

Continuous-time Models in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771U

Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Actuarial Mathematics IIMathematical SciencesMTH5125Semester 25No

Actuarial Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Sutton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5124

Description: This module extends the methods used in Actuarial Mathematics I. We study concepts involved with gross premium reserves, including death strain, mortality profit and Thiele's equation. We show how to calculate life table functions, annuities and assurances involving two lives, assuming independence. We describe and use methods of valuing expected cashflows that are contingent upon multiple decrement events. We investigate projected cashflow techniques for pricing unit-linked contracts. We describe the principal forms of heterogeneity within a population.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Mid-term Examination
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745USemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH5101 or take MTH5100 ) and ( take MTH5212 or take MTH5112 )

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Continuous-time Models in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH762PSemester 27No

Continuous-time Models in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH771P

Description: This module explains how we can price financial derivatives in a consistent manner, in the realistic case where the price of the underlying asset changes continuously in time. To do this, we first introduce the key ideas of stochastic calculus in a mathematically rigorous, but still accessible, way. Then, using the Black-Scholes model, we show how we can price a wide range of derivatives, using both the PDE approach and the alternative martingale approach. Finally we look at several more recent models that attempt to rectify some of the known deficiencies of the Black-Scholes model.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743PSemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson

Description: Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745PSemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray

Description: This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Law StoriesLawLAW6174Semester 26No

Law Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isobel Roele

Description: Law Stories examines the attraction and construction of narratives about the law in popular fiction and non-fiction across a variety of media including film, TV, novels, short stories, memoirs, true crime writing, and journalism. The analysis of these cultural products informs a closer attention to the way legal institutions and processes use story-telling and produce narratives in the form of case reports, reform proposals, and public inquiries. For example, the law reform story of the decriminalisation of homosexuality after the Wolfenden Report of 1954), or the revelation of institutional racism in the police force in the MacPherson Report of 1999.
The module will be taught across 10 seminars. Students will be able to choose at least two of the works we study each year. The total number of works covered will vary from year to year depending on the kind of work studied (e.g. a season of The Wire (HBO: David Simon, 2002-2008) will take longer to study than Orson Welles' film adaptation of The Trial (1962); by the same token, Agatha Christie's The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926) will take more time to read than Lord Denning's judgment in Miller v Jackson [1977] QB 966, or a chapter in Rosemary Hunter's Feminist Judgments (Hart, 2010)
The module is assessed by one 5000-word essay worth 100% of the grade. In order to prepare students for this assessed work, they will have the opportunity to submit and obtain feedback on a formative exercised.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 6
Law
Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and JusticeLawLAW6173Semester 26No

Global Criminology: Global Crime, Punishment and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leila Selena Ullrich

Description: This course situates the study of criminology in a global and inter-disciplinary context to destabilize state- and Euro-centric conceptions of crime, punishment and justice. It starts by proposing different beginnings for criminology that reveal that in some sense the discipline has always been global. We begin with anthropological studies of so-called 'primitive' societies. How are social transgressions conceptualized and dealt with in stateless settings? Is there a concept of 'crime' to begin with? What work does the concept of crime do in organizing society? Who is being protected and who is being disciplined? We then explore two formative contexts for criminal justice: slavery and colonialism. What is the relationship between modern police forces and slave patrols? How has the `colonial encounter¿ shaped penal and policing regimes in postcolonial and metropolitan states?

After examining these `different beginnings¿, students will explore what it means to globalize crime and justice. What are we to make of 'international crimes' such as war crimes, crimes against humanity, crimes of aggression and genocide? Does it make sense to punish individuals for collective violence such as genocide in the same way as for murder? Should we reconcile, restore or transform rather than punish after mass violence?

The final part of the course looks at the global production of new forms, discourses and constituencies of criminalization and how they exclude and include people from society. Criminal justice technologies and discourses, for example, are increasingly applied to exclude refugees and migrants while some LGBTQ+ subjects are provisionally accepted into the category of 'good citizens'. How can we make sense of these new forms of criminalization and the offenders and victims they produce? How do criminal states, multinational corporations, people smugglers, child soldiers, foreign fighters, female terrorists and victims of trafficking confound our categories of victim/perpetrator in a highly racialized and gendered context of global inequality?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 6
Law
French Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6015Full year6No

French Language and Culture III

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (1000 words)
Level: 6
Languages
French Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6010Full year6Yes

French Language and Culture III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5151Full year5Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5147Full year5No

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level A2 / B1in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5127Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5126Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (250-300 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Differential and Integral AnalysisMathematical SciencesMTH5105Semester 25No

Differential and Integral Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Huy Nguyen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5104

Description: This module provides a rigorous basis for differential and integral calculus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5116Full year5No

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (250-300 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5087Semester 25No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Convergence and ContinuityMathematical SciencesMTH5104Semester 15No

Convergence and Continuity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Jerrum
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4113 or take MTH4213 )

Description: This module introduces some of the mathematical theory behind Calculus. It answers questions such as: What properties of the real numbers do we rely on in Calculus? What does it mean to say that a series converges to a limit? Are there kinds of function that are guaranteed to have a maximum value? The module is a first introduction, with many examples, to the beautiful and important branch of pure mathematics known as Analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Complex VariablesMathematical SciencesMTH5103Semester 25No

Complex Variables

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mira Shamis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201

Description: The integral and differential properties of functions of a complex variable. Complex differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions. Sequences and series, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities and residues. Complex integration, Cauchy's theorem and consequences, Cauchy's integral formula and related theorems. The residue theorem and applications to evaluation of integrals and summation of series. Conformal transformations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5056Semester 15No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 35% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Modern Arabic Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5050Full year5Yes

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Arabic Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Arabic language and Arabic speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Arabic language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5047Semester 25No

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level A2 / B1in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Japanese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5042Semester 25Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Statistical Modelling IMathematical SciencesMTH5120Semester 25No

Statistical Modelling I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arthur Guillaumin
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5129 and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: This is a first module on linear models and it concentrates on modelling the relationship between a continuous response variable and one or more continuous explanatory variables. Linear models are very widely used in almost every field of business, economics, science and industry where quantitative data are collected. They are also the basis for several more advanced statistical techniques covered in Level 6 modules. This module is concerned with both the theory and applications of linear models and covers problems of estimation, inference and interpretation. Graphical methods for model checking will be discussed and various model selection techniques introduced. Computer practical sessions, in which the Minitab statistical package is used to perform the necessary computations and on which the continuous assessment is based, form an integral part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5026Semester 15No

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 35% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5021Semester 15Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Linear Programming and GamesMathematical SciencesMTH5114Semester 25No

Linear Programming and Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Justin Ward
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: This module introduces students to the practical modelling of real-world operational problems, together with the mathematical theory behind the most widespread tools for solving these problems. Students will learn how to model common operational problems as linear programs, will study the basic, underlying theory of linear programming, and gain some familiarity with how widely used software tools for solving such problems work. Building on these concepts, students will also learn basic game theory, including how to model and solve optimisation problems that involve future uncertainty or a competing adversary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5010Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Introduction to Differential GeometryMathematical SciencesMTH5113Semester 25No

Introduction to Differential Geometry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arick Shao
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA4122
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take MTH4101 or take MTH4201 ) and ( take MTH4115 or take MTH4215 )

Description: This module provides an introduction to the differential of curves and surfaces. The core of the module deals with developing the language and tools for studying, describing and quantifying the geometry of curved objects. Particular emphasis is placed on connecting geometric questions with ideas from Calculus and Linear Algebra, as well as on extending Calculus to curved settings. The module concludes by studying some landmark results in vector Calculus e.g. Lagrange multipliers, Green's theorem and Stokes' theorem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5001Semester 15Yes

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4157Full year4No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Modern Arabic. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (200-250 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 4
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN6020Full year6Yes

Spanish Language and Culture III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Spanish. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
French Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6012Semester 26Yes

French Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5187Full year5Closed

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN5080 or take LAN5085 or take LAN5182 or take LAN5082 or take LAN5087

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (200-250 characters)
  • Item 2: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related RightsLawLAW6455Semester 16No

Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: The module focuses on the substantive law of copyright and related rights in the United Kingdom. It covers (i) the subsistence, ownership and term of copyright, (ii) exclusive economic rights and infringement (iv) exceptions and limitations to infringement and (v) moral rights. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 6
Law
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5186Full year5Closed

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN5080 or take LAN5085 or take LAN5081 or take LAN5086 or take LAN5181

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A1/A2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2/B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (175-225 characters)
  • Item 2: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5122Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Global Law and GovernanceLawLAW6454Semester 16Yes

Global Law and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: 'Global Law and Governance' analyses from a multidisciplinary perspective the different roles played by regulatory structures and laws in the orchestration of global governance. The module investigates the history of ideas and legal doctrines that have shaped the construction of the global legal order in the last century; presents the plurality of actors, legal instruments, and values that shape an increasingly globalised legal landscape; and applies more conceptual knowledge to the areas of global security, trade, and environmental governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Coursework (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
LawLAW_456_S
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5111Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5112Full year5Yes

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin

Description: This module is available under the 'QMUL Model'. It is designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language and it's highly suitable for students following the QMUL Model. The QMUL Model builds on the existing QMUL Graduate Attributes, which include an aspiration that QM graduates should 'be able to operate in more than one language' alongside the aspiration to optimize the employability of our graduates. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen¿.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
CriminologyLawLAW6045Full year6No

Criminology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison

Description: Sociological and psychological approaches to the aetiology of criminal behaviour; questions of criminal justice policy-making. Topics include: the aims and values of the criminal justice system; the definition of crime both in a theoretical and a practical sense; studies of particular types of crime (eg 'white collar' crime and crimes of the powerful, juvenile crime); penal policy with regard to particular types of crime; crime and public opinion; crime and the mass media; police organisation; prisons and the penal crisis; the role of victims of crime. The module focuses on the contemporary British context but adopts historical and comparative perspectives where relevant.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (24 hours online) (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 35% Essay (4000 words)
  • Item 3: 8% Presentation
  • Item 4: 7% Forum posting
Level: 6
Law
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5086Semester 15No

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% (250-300 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Law of EvidenceLawLAW6037Full year6No

Law of Evidence

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Amber Marks

Description: This module will cover:

Burden and standard of proof; Witnesses; Examination in chief; Cross-examination; Sexual history evidence; Illegality or unfairly obtained evidence; Identification evidence; Confessions; Privilege against self-incrimination and the right to silence; Public interest privilege (PII); Legal professional and legal advice privilege; Hearsay; Evidence of previous bad character and other misconduct; Expert and opinion evidence in criminal trials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (24 hours online) (2 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5046Semester 15No

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 35% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Japanese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5041Semester 15Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: IDesigned for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5025Full year5No

Spanish Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Contemporary Issues in Law and BusinessLawLAW4010Semester 24No

Contemporary Issues in Law and Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shalini Perera

Description: This course is an introduction to the disciplines of law and business studies and aims to develop a critical understanding of both the legal framework of business activity and the economic and global commercial context in which law operates.
We will draw upon law and legal thought to reflect critically on contemporary business issues. The module will commence with an introduction to the English Legal system followed by an examination of contract law, company law and employment law (among others) which are the legal jurisdictions easily relatable to business.
Thereafter, the module will aim to develop an appreciation of current global economic and business issues and the challenges they pose for law and law makers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Video-essay
  • Item 2: 70% Final essay (3000 words)
Level: 4
Law
French Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5015Full year5No

French Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5007Semester 15No

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5000Full year5Yes

German Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Language and EthnicityLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN504Semester 25Yes

Language and Ethnicity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module offers students an introduction to the study of language and ethnicity. Drawing on examples from Britain and around the world, we examine the structural, social and ideological factors that influence language use in minority communities. We also investigate representations of minority speakers in popular broadcast media, and discuss the legal and political ramifications of ethnicity-linked language variation. By the end of this module, students will have a firm grasp of the existing literature on language and ethnicity, and a strong foundation in the frameworks used for understanding language use in society more broadly.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Original data collection
  • Item 3: 50% Analysis of original data collection (2200 words)
Level: 5
Linguistics
Experimental LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN5039Semester 25Yes

Experimental Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vita Kogan

Description: This module provides students with introductory training in theoretical and practical elements of experimental linguistics. The module will include hands-on training in statistics and hypothesis testing, experimental design, data collection (including training in ethical human subjects research protocols), and data analysis. The module will also engage students in considering strengths and limitations of various kinds of linguistics data, and how multiple sources of data and methods of data collection can be combined to enhance understanding. Students will develop their critical reading skills and gain practice in presenting primary source literature to their peers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Lab Book (Equivalent to 2000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Class Discussion Leadership and a Short Synopsis (equivalent to 1000 words)
  • Item 3: 25% Critical Assessment of Experimental Results (1000 words)
Level: 5
Linguistics
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6011Semester 16Yes

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Languages
French Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6017Semester 26No

French Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (1000 words)
Level: 6
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5182Full year5Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN5080 or take LAN5085 or take LAN5082 or take LAN5087 or take LAN5187

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (200-250 characters)
  • Item 2: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Linear Algebra IMathematical SciencesMTH5112Semester 15No

Linear Algebra I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5212
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4115 or take MTH4215

Description: This is a rigorous first module in linear algebra. The ideas introduced in Geometry I for two- and three-dimensional space will be developed and extended in a more general setting with a view to applications in subsequent pure and applied mathematics, probability and statistics modules. There will be a strong geometric emphasis in the presentation of the material and the key concepts will be illustrated by examples from various branches of mathematics. The module contains a fair number of proofs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5181Full year5Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN5080 or take LAN5085 or take LAN5081 or take LAN5086 or take LAN5186

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A1/A2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2/B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (175-225 characters)
  • Item 2: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Chinese Law and InstitutionsLawLAW6453Semester 26No

Chinese Law and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay

Description: This module focuses on the origins, evolutions, and practices of the Chinese legal system. The first part addresses the historical and institutional foundations of the Chinese legal system. The second part provides critical insights into a number of selected aspects of Chinese private and public law with the overall purpose to critically assess the main legal challenges China is facing today. Taking stock of China's central role in the globalisation process, the third part considers the interactions and interdependence between the Chinese legal system and the international legal order.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Introduction to French Public LawLawLAW6201Semester 16No

Introduction to French Public Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the students to the rules that govern the organisation, the functioning and the attributions of the French political and administrative entities, as well as the relationship between citizens and state institutions. Based primarily on an analysis of French constitutional law and administrative law, this module should provide the students with an in depth introduction to the institutions and sources of law that are at the heart of French public law. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (24 hours online) (2 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Introduction to French Private LawLawLAW6202Semester 26No

Introduction to French Private Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module introduces the rules that govern the relationships between individuals, being physical persons or moral persons. It provides an introduction to the sources of French private law, the court system in France, and the basic principles, procedures, and values that govern contractual and non-contractual obligations. The module will be taught in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (24 hours online) (2 hours)
Level: 6
Law
Spanish Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5121Full year5Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5107Full year5No

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (250-300 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5082Semester 25Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5081Semester 15Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for low intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (275-325 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Company LawLawLAW6036Full year6No

Company Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shalini Perera

Description: The principles of modern Company Law including the formation of companies, the corporate constitution, the protection of persons dealing with a company, corporate financing, management, the duties of directors, corporate governance, the protection of minority shareholders and insolvency.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 6
Law
DissertationLawLAW6035Full year6No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze

Description: The content of the dissertation is determined by the student, with limited guidance by a supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15000 words)
Level: 6
Law
International Human Rights LawLawLAW6034Full year6No

International Human Rights Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW6134

Description: The demand for international human rights law is growing and demands far exceeds supply. This Interantiona Human Rights law module aims to provide students with a unique and thorough practical and theoretical understanding of the subject. The module will also examine the effectiveness of the united Nations system of human rights protection as well as the European, Africa and Inter-American systems. International human rights law is challenging and will provide students with practical knowledge of how to use international human rights law and plead human rights cases. The module will also contribute to the development of a comparative and cross-cultural perspective on the basic rights and freedoms. The module will focus on civil and political rights and on economic, social and cultural rights. The protection will be analysed from the perspective of industrialised and developing states.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Assignment (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 85% Dissertation (13000 words)
Level: 6
LawLAW_456_A
Japanese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5040Full year5Yes

Japanese Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Japanese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Japanese language and Japanese speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Japanese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
European Union LawLawLAW4009Semester 24Yes

European Union Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAW5105

Description: This module introduces students to some fundamental characteristics of the law of the European Union.
It is divided into three parts, concerned respectively with how EU law is made, how it is applied and enforced and finally what it is used for. We will consider the historical development of the European Union, its institutional structure and its legal instruments, the interaction between Union and national law and the role of national courts in enforcing Union Law, the rules relating to free movement in the internal market and the legal principles underlying the relationships between the EU and its neighbours.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Multiple-choice Questionnaire (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 75% Problem-oriented Coursework Exercise
Level: 4
Law
Law in ContextLawLAW4008Semester 14No

Law in Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elizabeth Gillow

Description: Law in Context will introduce students to a more concentrated consideration of their future careers, within and outside the Legal Professions. Students will develop their employability skills; and research and meet with prospective employers. In addition, students will learn research and contextualised writing skills needed for all career aspirations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Presentation (5 min)
Level: 4
Law
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5012Semester 25Yes

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture.The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5005Semester 25No

German Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5006Full year5No

German Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German(particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4187Semester 24Closed

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN4080 and take LAN4085 and take LAN4182 and take LAN4082 and take LAN4087

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (150-200 characters)
  • Item 2: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 4
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4186Full year4Closed

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN4080 or take LAN4085 or take LAN4081 or take LAN4086 or take LAN4181 or take LAN4083 or take LAN4088

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (120 characters)
  • Item 2: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 4
Languages
Typology I: Languages of the WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4213Semester 24Yes

Typology I: Languages of the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hagit Borer

Description: This module is an introduction to the great diversity in language structure and use around the world. Using indigenous languages from diverse regions, such as Africa, Australia, Asia and North America, we will explore the question of whether universal constraints limit the range of what is possible in human language, and if so, why such universals might exist. We will consider diversity in how social and pragmatic functions are signalled by language use in different speech communities around the world, and the problems associated with language endangerment and death. We will also examine how different language families differ from one another in sounds, word formation, sentence formation, and usage.

As a module it will be available to students registered on a degree programme involving English Language or Linguistics only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Data Analysis Assignment (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay (1000 words)
Level: 4
Linguistics
Phonetics I: The Sounds of EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4212Semester 14Yes

Phonetics I: The Sounds of English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vita Kogan

Description: This module aims to give students knowledge of the main processes of phonetic articulation (mode, manner and place of articulation, airstream mechanisms, voicing, secondary articulations [velarization, palatalization, lip-rounding etc], vowel articulation including backness, height and roundness, plus a basic understanding of tone and pitch). It also aims to provide students with an understanding of how those processes are used in producing speech sounds, and with an ability to represent different sounds using an international standard (the IPA). In addition students will also be able to discriminate sounds aurally, and produce them from IPA script. The module will first focus on the sounds of English before examining sounds that are used in the world's languages. This module is a pre-requisite for the Introduction to Phonology module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Online Quizzes (500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Assignment 1 (650 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Final Assignment (1500 words)
Level: 4
Linguistics
French Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN6016Semester 16No

French Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Rosa Martin

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in French. Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2+ level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Written Assignment (450-500 words)
  • Item 2: 35% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 6
Languages
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5156Full year5No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Assignment (250-300 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Languages
Climate JusticeLawLAW6179Semester 16Yes

Climate Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Whyte

Description: This module explores the concept of 'climate justice' from a range of legal, social and political perspectives, tracing in detail how the concept has been underpinned by a wide range of traditions in human thinking. The module will introduce students to the growing significance of a concept of climate justice in contemporary political and policy debates, and show how our understanding of the concept varies widely across different historical and cultural contexts. Topics covered will include:
Climate justice in policy and politics (exploring historical development and the uses of the concept in UN, NGO and national government contexts).
Climate justice and racial justice (exploring the concept of climate justice in anti-colonial, post-colonial and anti-racist ideas).
Climate justice and economic production (exploring the concept of climate justice in the critique of industrial capitalism and eco-socialism).
Climate justice and social reproduction (exploring the concept of climate justice in feminist theory and in the critique of androcentric accounts of climate change).
Climate justice and indigenous epistemologies (exploring the contemporary significance of pre-colonial and pre-industrial concepts of climate justice).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Case study (5000 words)
Level: 6
Law
Public Legal Education and Community Street LawLawLAW6176Full year6Yes

Public Legal Education and Community Street Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Frances Ridout

Description: Students will learn about the importance of public legal education in the context of access to justice, the rule of law and human rights. The module encourages students to question the value of laws if the communities they bind cannot actively engage in them.

Street Law is essentially a teaching methodology which is interactive, participant-centered, and grounded in social justice. Recognised throughout the world, Street Law sees Law students facilitate interactive workshops with community groups like school students and prisoners to increase legal literacy and raise awareness of important social justice values. This module will train QMUL Law students in the theory and delivery of public legal education and Street Law, which will enable them to facilitate three public legal education and / Street Law projects to member of the community during the duration of the module.

Additionally, students consider how legal design, professional legal ethics, and open access resources can all be used to support access to justice.

This module is run by the Queen Mary Legal Advice Centre. It will require students to be willing to undertake a criminal record check (DBS) and may count towards Qualifying Work Experience as part of the SQE (TBD).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Reflective Essay
  • Item 2: 50% Lesson plan and presentation
Level: 6
Law
Animal Rights: Law, philosophy and comparative practiceLawLAW6175Semester 16Yes

Animal Rights: Law, philosophy and comparative practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Adenitire

Description: Students will gain an understanding of the history, theory, and current developments in animals rights law. The module will begin with an historical and legal analysis of animal protection laws in several jurisdictions (UK, US, EU, Switzerland) and will help students identify existing gaps in the protection of animals. Much will be made of the distinction between the historic and current paradigm of animal welfarism, where animals can be used for many human purposes subject to some restrictions, and an animal rights paradigm, where strong rights would forbid most exploitation of animals (e.g. animal experimentation and animal husbandry). The module will then introduce students to the theoretical literature making the case for the animals rights paradigm and consider its strengths and weaknesses. Finally, students will consider the expanding series of legal cases worldwide (North and South America, India, and Australia) pushing for an animal rights paradigm based on legal person-hood and individual freedom for animals. Students will consider the prospects for success of such litigation and consider the desirability of alternative animal rights approaches.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Law
French Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5117Full year5No

French Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in French.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in French (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5101Full year5Yes

German Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5080Full year5Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for low intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language .

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Differential EquationsMathematical SciencesMTH5123Semester 15Yes

Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ginestra Bianconi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH4101 or take MTH4201
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MTH5112 or take MTH5212

Description: Differential equations frequently arise in application of mathematics to science, engineering , social science and economics. This module provides an introduction to the methods of analysis and solution of simple classes of ordinary differential equations. The topics covered will include first- and second-order differential equations, autonomous systems of differential equations and analysis of stability of their solutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 4% Coursework 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 4% Coursework 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 4% Coursework 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 4% Coursework 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 4% Coursework 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 80% Written exam (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mathematical Sciences
Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5057Semester 25No

Modern Arabic Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Ali Abdul Hussain Almaleki

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1 in Modern Arabic.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Modern Arabic (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5027Semester 25No

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Martyn Ellis

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Spanish.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Spanish (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Japanese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmLAN5045Full year5No

Japanese Language and Culture II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Hiroko Mori

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2/ B1) in Japanese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Japanese (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Spanish Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5022Semester 25Yes

Spanish Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Noelia Diaz-Vicedo

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Spanish Language and Cultures. The module emphasises the global importance of Spanish language and Spanish speaking cultures and is intended for students with an intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Spanish language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Assignment (300-350 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
Public International Law ALawLAW6032ASemester 16No

Public International Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: This is an introductory module in Public International Law. The broad aim is to introduce students who have not studied international law before to its core principles, including methodology, sources and techniques of legal reasoning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 6
Law
Land LawLawLAW4006Full year4Yes

Land Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Ivor Edmunds

Description: This module will cover:

Fundamental concepts; Contracts relating to land; Adverse Possession; Leases/Licences; Mortgages; Co-ownership and the family home; Freehold covenants; Easements; Protection of interests in land: registered land and unregistered land.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Assessed Coursework (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Assessed Coursework (2750 words)
Level: 4
Law
Public LawLawLAW4001Full year4Yes

Public Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tanzil Chowdhury

Description: This module will cover:

General characteristics of the UK constitution; Institutions of the European Union and Council of Europe; Rule of law; Parliamentary sovereignty; European Union law and the challenge to parliamentary sovereignty; Separation of powers; Accountability; Sources of power: primary and secondary legislation, prerogative powers; Constitutional conventions; European Union law-making process; Constitutional functions of judges; United Kingdom Supreme Court; Appointing, scrutinising and dismissing judges; International courts and tribunals; European Convention on Human Rights; Human Rights Act 1998 and proposals for a British Bill of Rights; Reform of the European Union; Treaty ratification; Proposals for constitutional reform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Law
French Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5011Semester 15Yes

French Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Philip France

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in French Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of French language and French speaking culture and is intended for students with a lower intermediate user level. It develops the ability of students to operate practically and effectively in the target language. The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated `global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in French language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Languages
German Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN5002Semester 25Yes

German Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nadine Buchmann

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in German.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in German (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework (500 words)
Level: 5
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4182Semester 24Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN4080 or take LAN4085 or take LAN4187 or take LAN4082 or take LAN4087

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (150-200 characters)
  • Item 2: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Languages
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4181Full year4Yes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Josef Mueller
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take LAN4080 or take LAN4085 or take LAN4081 or take LAN4086 or take LAN4186 or take LAN4083 or take LAN4088

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin, they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Written Assignment (120 characters)
  • Item 2: 15% Reading/Grammar/Writing Test (90 mins)
  • Item 3: 10% Listening Test (60 mins)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 5: 35% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Languages
Italian Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmLAN4171Full year4Yes

Italian Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Silvia Lodi

Description: The module is suitable for beginners in Italian.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Italian (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Written Assignment (300 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Examination (10 mins)
  • Item 3: 50% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Languages
Sociolinguistics: English in UseLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4211Semester 24Yes

Sociolinguistics: English in Use

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Salina Cuddy

Description: This module concerns the contexts in which English is used, and the fact that the patterns and variations in language used in the everyday are worthy of analysis. The aim is to demonstrate how language-in-use can be studied systematically, and to show how English is used in particular situations and in the module of activities, speech situations, public discourse, and interpersonal interactions that we might otherwise take for granted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 33% Reflective Writing Assignment (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 34% In-Class Test (90 min)
  • Item 3: 33% Literature Review (1500 words)
Level: 4
Linguistics
International Refugee LawLawSOLM171Semester 27Yes

International Refugee Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Violeta Moreno-Lax

Description: This module examines the international law dimensions of protecting refugees and other categories of forced migrants. It provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts and workings of international law, in general, and international refugee and human rights law, in particular, as they relate to the phenomenon of forced displacement. While international refugee law forms the backbone of the course, the module will also cover aspects of international criminal law, international humanitarian law, and the law of the sea as these apply to refugees and other forced migrants. The module will start by studying the historical origins and development of refugee law up to its codification in the 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol. The institutions tasked with overseeing the implementation of these instruments will also be examined, with particular focus on UNHCR and its evolving role through time. The study of substantive law, including State practice and case law of national and international courts and Treaty bodies, will follow thereafter, following ten thematic blocs: 1) the refugee definition (inclusion, exclusion, and cessation of refugee status); 2) the status of Palestinian refugees; 3) non-refoulement and complementary forms of protection; 4) status determination procedures; 5) the content of international protection and other 'durable solutions'; 6) access to asylum; 7) war and displacement; 8) 'climate refugees'; 9) poverty, destitution and 'survival migration'; 10) and the ethical roots of refugeehood, to be taught in 3-hour blocs from Week 2 to 11.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Phonology I: Introduction to Sound SystemsLanguages Linguistics and FilmLIN4210Semester 24Yes

Phonology I: Introduction to Sound Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Chong

Description: The module is an introduction to the theoretical study of sound systems in the world's languages. We focus on the analysis of phonological data within a linguistically principled framework, and much of our learning will be by 'doing' - thus a large portion of the classroom time and assignments will be spent on data analysis from a wide variety of languages. We will work on extracting patterns from linguistic data, characterizing these patterns and representing them formally. Basic concepts to be covered include phonemes and allophones, distinctive features, natural classes, rule formalism, rule ordering and the difference/relation between underlying (abstract) and surface forms. Other concepts include syllable structure; stress; prosodic structure; and optimality theory. This module is a pre-requisite for LIN312 Unfamiliar Languages.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% 5 Take Home Quizzes (Equivalent to 200 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Problem Set 1 (Equivalent to 300 words)
  • Item 3: 25% Problem Set 2 (Equivalent to 750 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Problem Set 2 (Equivalent to 750 words)
  • Item 5: 25% Problem Set 4 (Equivalent to 750 words)
Level: 4
Linguistics
Dissertation in Public International LawLawSOLM913Full year7No

Dissertation in Public International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Business LawLawSOLM911Full year7No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Interactive Entertainment TransactionsLawSOLM239Semester 27Yes

Interactive Entertainment Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Interactive Entertainment Transactions focuses on legal and business issues contained in the complex matrix of agreements used to structure deals in the games and interactive entertainment industry and provide the legal skills needed to analyze, negotiate, and draft agreements representing various parties in the video game industry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Esports LawLawSOLM238Semester 27Yes

Esports Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Esports law focuses on the legal, contractual, commercial and regulatory issues that affect competitive video gaming. The module recognises the magnitude of the phenomenon and delineates the legal and commercial parameters under which esports industries operates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law and Finance in PracticeLawSOLM237Semester 27Yes

Law and Finance in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This course introduces concepts in Financial Law at a level that is appropriate for students with various backgrounds . The first part of the course introduces the student with historical perspectives of law and finance. The focus quickly turns to specific fields in Financial Theory and its application to different legal situations. The course will illustrate how legal argumentation can be informed by financial analysis in a range of contexts including IPOs, M&As, bankruptcy, etc. Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the interaction among economic agents and entities. Specific case studies are used to analyse actual situations and explore different possible solutions using both legal and financial analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Water LawLawSOLM137Semester 17Yes

Water Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Water Law is a module examining the ecology and legal management of water. The legal area forms part of the wider body of environmental, international and economic law. It consider topics including the transboundary management of water resources, the human right to water, initiatives improve water service, privatisation, the role of water in energy production and the trade of water as a good or service.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Climate Change LawLawSOLM136Semester 27Yes

Climate Change Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angeliki Papantoniou

Description: Climate Change Law and Policy Application focuses on specific aspects of international, regional and national law in relation to climate change: Human Rights, international and national litigation, state responsibility, non-state actors and participation, capacity building and trade and climate change. There is also an overview of the core principles of the UNFCCC regime , including the Paris agreement and principles of international environmental law applicable to climate change, both of which are examined in depth in Climate Change Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art Disputes and their ResolutionsLawSOLM228Semester 27No

Art Disputes and their Resolutions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: This module will explore the many ways in which art disputes can be resolved including litigation and alternative processes to litigation. It will examine specifically the public processes of litigation in national courts, administrative tribunals and international tribunals, and also private processes such as arbitration, mediation and other alternative processes. In so doing, it will consider the nature of the art dispute, the appropriate methods to resolve the disputes, and the remedies and solutions available. This will be led in seminar style, with lecture and interactive participation from students through exercises and dialogue.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Oral Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
EU Tax LawLawSOLM127Semester 27No

EU Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christiana Hjipanayi

Description: This module provides students with an understanding of EU tax law, with an emphasis on EU corporate tax law. Sources of EU corporate tax law (legislative instruments, soft law and case law) are examined. A number of corporate topics are covered, including parent-subsidiary relationships, permanent establishments, passive income, reorganisations, anti-abuse provisions, proposed directives (CCCTB, FTT) etc. The module also examines recent developments and high-profile debates in the intersection of international tax law and European tax law. Topics such as international tax avoidance, corporate social responsibility, good tax governance, harmful tax competition, state aid and tax treaty abuse are considered from the angle of EU tax law and international tax law. The interaction of the OECD/G20's BEPS project with the European Commission's measures to fight tax fraud and tax evasion is also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Law
International and Comparative Data Protection LawLawSOLM222Semester 27Yes

International and Comparative Data Protection Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: "Over 100 jurisdictions have adopted frameworks protecting personal data, many in response to the EU data protection framework that precludes international transfers unless equivalent protection applies. This module examines a number of these data protection legal frameworks, particularly in key jurisdictions such as Russia, China, APEC, Canada, Australia and the US. In addition to examining their particular implementation of the fair information processing principles that have emerged as best practice, the module will explore the key policy implications and debates around trade, commercial and human rights implications and, enforcement, including the challenges of particular technological developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Independent Research Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Independent Research Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Intellectual Property LawLawSOLM910Full year7No

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Euromasters Project/DissertationPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7026PFull year7No

Euromasters Project/Dissertation

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo

Description: Students will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. They will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation, placing them in a physics context, and detailing the methods used and the results obtained. The project will run through both semesters and will involve a report and an oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Dissertation (10,000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (45 min)
  • Item 3: 10% Performance
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Art and Cultural ValuesLawSOLM227Semester 17No

Art and Cultural Values

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: This module will examine the cultural values and ethical considerations that guide both the public and private treatment and management of art and cultural property. This extends down from the values accepted in widely followed internationals conventions like the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, into national law, and finally into the ethical guidelines and codes of museums and other cultural institutions. The approach will also be sensitive to non-Western approaches to 'cultural property' and will consider the alternative conceptions of cultural dominion, guardianship and responsibility. Finally, the module will address the issues stemming from requests and claims for restitution and repatriation of cultural objects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
AI, Robotics and the LawLawSOLM221Full year7No

AI, Robotics and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM284

Description: The evolving area of AI and Robotics gives rise to many ethical and legal questions over the status of robots, the rights and responsibilities arising from their use and liability for any harm caused. The module will explore the issues of legal personhood, the protection of robots through IP, the responsibilities arising from data use and the various approaches to allocating responsibility and liability. The module covers both embodied artificial intelligent systems (robots) and non-embodied ones (intelligent agents). Distinction is also made between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as independent agents in the legal arena and its legal ramifications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
AI, Robotics and the LawLawSOLM221Full year7Yes

AI, Robotics and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM284

Description: The evolving area of AI and Robotics gives rise to many ethical and legal questions over the status of robots, the rights and responsibilities arising from their use and liability for any harm caused. The module will explore the issues of legal personhood, the protection of robots through IP, the responsibilities arising from data use and the various approaches to allocating responsibility and liability. The module covers both embodied artificial intelligent systems (robots) and non-embodied ones (intelligent agents). Distinction is also made between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as independent agents in the legal arena and its legal ramifications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7001USemester 27Yes

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: "This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Weekly homework Assignments
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Cyberspace: Jurisdiction and Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM211Semester 17No

Cyberspace: Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: The module analyses the concept and theories of jurisdiction under International Law (Public International Law), from the perspective of international criminal law, especially in the context of transnational crimes such as cybercrime, from the perspective of regulation (eg data protection and transborder data flows; online gambling; online content regulation) and from the perspective of private international law/conflicts of law (jurisdiction and applicable law in civil and commercial disputes such as contract, torts generally, defamation & privacy infringements, IP infringements). It therefore takes a novel approach by looking both at private law and public law- but this approach is necessary as internet communications are not restricted to private law and private international law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7001PSemester 27No

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: This module gives a broad exposition of the modern framework for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory - relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Weekly homework Assignments
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7031PSemester 27No

Supersymmetric Methods in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Buican
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take INK7090P
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: This course introduces core concepts in supersymmetry that can be applied to quantitatively understand a broad variety of physical systems and is a complement to the AQFT and FMQFT modules. Starting with supersymmetric quantum mechanics as a toy model, the course covers the supersymmetry algebra, its representations, the Witten Index, and the resulting constraints on quantum dynamics. We then move on to introduce supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions consisting of scalars and fermions while giving a basic introduction to symmetry currents, the classical and quantum Wilsonian renormalization group flow, moduli spaces, spurions, and non-renormalization arguments. The course culminates in a study of simple dualities in three-dimensional supersymmetric abelian gauge theories. We conclude with a discussion of supersymmetry in four space-time dimensions and, time permitting, the embedding of our constructions in string theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Weekly homework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
IT TransactionsLawSOLM206Semester 17No

IT Transactions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Conor Ward

Description: The module covers information technology transactions, contracts and licences in a variety of areas, such as: system procurement contracts, commercial software licensing, outsourcing, cloud computing and free and open source software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Trade and Investment Law of the EULawSOLM195Semester 27No

International Trade and Investment Law of the EU

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rafael Leal-Arcas

Description: This course will introduce students to the law and governance of the external economic relations of the European Union (EU), the world's largest trading bloc and most successful example of regional integration. The course focuses specifically on international trade and investment law of the EU in the context of unilateral, bilateral, regional, and multilateral arrangements. The course will cover bilateral and multilateral agreements between the EU and non-member states, such as trade agreements and relations with emerging economies and developing countries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
EU Criminal LawLawSOLM205Semester 17Yes

EU Criminal Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Valsamis Mitsilegas

Description: The module will examine the constitutional evolution and key legal issues underpinning EU Criminal Law as a distinct field of law. The module will examine all forms of governance of EU criminal law, including the harmonisation of substantive criminal law, judicial co-operation in criminal matters under mutual recognition (and in particular the operation of the European Arrest Warrant), harmonisation of criminal procedure and the rights of the defendant, the evolution and powers of EU criminal justice agencies (Europol, Eurojust and the European Public Prosecutor's Office), EU criminal justice databases and the evolution of the EU as a global security actor. The constitutional and human rights implication of European integration in criminal matters will be fully explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Planetary SystemsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5241Semester 25Yes

Planetary Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilisation human beings have charted the paths of the planets across the night sky and speculated about their nature. Indeed the word planet has its origin in the ancient Greek term `planete' meaning wanderer. Used in its modern scientific context the word planet refers to an object which orbits about a star, but which itself is not a star. Planets have a special philosophical significance since they are the bodies on which life itself is expected to come into existence. This course provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of the planets in our Solar System, and of the planetary systems now known to orbit around stars other than the Sun and the extrasolar planets. The properties of individual planets and their satellites will be described and contrasted, and basic physical principles will be used to explain their orbits and physical features. Our understanding of how planetary systems form will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Marine Insurance LawLawSOLM144Semester 27Yes

Marine Insurance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: Marine insurance is a fascinating and important area of international shipping law. Shipping has always been perilous - adverse sea conditions, piracy, accidents and pollution at sea, deterioration of goods during transportation - and both owners of vessels and cargo have increasingly sought, over the years, to protect themselves in the event of loss. This module deals with the law of marine insurance. This module will examine, among other issues, the definition and formation of a marine insurance contract (including the duty of disclosure and insurable interest), the parties to the contract and the various risks covered (as well as those excluded), what constitutes evidence of the contract and its terms, claims under the contract, assignment, subrogation and contribution, the rule of proximate cause, and the diverse forms of loss that a vessel or cargo owner might suffer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International and Comparative Petroleum Law and ContractsLawSOLM161Semester 17Yes

International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Carlos Bellorin Nunez

Description: Petroleum laws and contracts are the ultimate manifestation of policy and are the result of lengthy negotiation processes and have an unusual dynamic. According to the World Bank, between 1999 and 2010 more than 30 countries revised their petroleum contracts and made major amendments or completely changed their petroleum legal and fiscal framework. Several more countries have done the same since the 2014 oil price downturn in order to adapt themselves to the changes in the industry. This module will examine the main type of contracts used in the upstream petroleum industry (Production Sharing Agreements, Concessions and Service Agreements) and their most important legal and fiscal mechanisms and the reasons why these are so frequently changed. This course will also focus on the study of these contracts dynamics within the so-called energy transition, risk mitigation strategies in order to avoid the most common forms of legal and political risks: expropriations and contract renegotiation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
UK Tax AvoidanceLawSOLM126Full year7No

UK Tax Avoidance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The module is designed for students who wish to gain an understanding of tax avoidance from a UK perspective. The module approaches tax avoidance firstly from a historical viewpoint and distinguishes it from both evasion and mitigation. The responses of both courts and the UK Parliament to the perceived problem are examined from the viewpoint of both individuals and businesses. Apart from judicial approaches, the General Anti-Abuse Rule will be examined as will other anti-avoidance measures, including the Disclosure of Tax Avoidance Schemes rules. The international perspective will be explored, including the use of transfer pricing, controlled foreign companies and tax havens. The penalties that tax authorities wish to impose will also be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Condensed Matter APhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5228Semester 25Yes

Condensed Matter A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anthony Phillips

Description: "This module provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts in modern condensed matter physics. The atomic structures of both crystalline and non-crystalline substances will be discussed. We will see how these structures can arise from surprisingly simple potential models, and how in turn they influence the interesting and useful properties of materials."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in Human Rights LawLawSOLM909Full year7No

Dissertation in Human Rights Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in European LawLawSOLM908Full year7No

Dissertation in European Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Competition LawLawSOLM907Full year7No

Dissertation in Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Risk Management in LawLawSOLM236Full year7No

Risk Management in Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module introduces complex concepts in finance at a level that is appropriate for law students to master them . The focus of this course is on the analysis of valuation models, their application in different economic situations, and the benefits/consequences when investing or conducting business, both locally and globally. Tools and basic models that help in understanding the appropriate usage of different valuation models as used in different situations will be introduced and examined in order to assess risk and be able to manage it appropriately. Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the relationships between risk and return when evaluating assets. Legal cases are used to analyze actual situations and explore different possible solutions when dealing with risk and other financial concepts, facilitating an acceptable legal determination as to the best selection for various risk exposure. The module will be taught on the assumption that the students have no prior knowledge of finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Environmental LawLawSOLM134Semester 27Yes

International Environmental Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Description: This course focuses on international legal and institutional arrangements concerning the management of the environment. It examines both theoretical and practical dimensions of these arrangements. This course explores some of the most salient aspects of the expanding area of international environmental law. It examines, in particular, global environmental issues that have risen to the top of the international law and policy agenda in the wake of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Rio Conference) and the 2002 Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development and 2015 UN Goals . It deals with the fundamental questions of IEL : the precautionary principles ; polluter pays principle, environmental impact assessment. The notion of sustainable development occupies an important place in this course. It provides an acknowledgment that environmental law needs to be considered at the same time as social and economic dimensions of development The module is linked with human rights law and economic law (WTO).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Functional Methods in Quantum Field TheoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7024USemester 17Yes

Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5304
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The module will introduce Feynman's path integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics and apply it to study of Quantum Field Theory (QFT). Emphasis will be given to the role of symmetries (Ward identities), the renormalisation group and the idea of effective action. The concept of Wilson's effective action and the different nature of (ir)relevant/marginal terms will be discussed. Simple scalar theories will provide the example where to apply the concepts and the techniques introduced. The course will also touch on some more advanced topics, such as quantum anomalies and conformal field theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
UK Tax LawLawSOLM124Semester 27Yes

UK Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Richard Walters

Description: The module will provide an introduction to the UK system of taxation, both personal and business. It will also allow students to gain an understanding of the key concepts of tax law from a UK perspective. It will cover the basic principles of the taxation of individuals in the UK on their earnings, gains and wealth. The rationale for various types of taxes will be explored, in particular the UK inheritance and capital gains taxes. Much discussed issues such as tax avoidance, sin taxes and zero hour employment contracts will also be considered. The international perspective will be included and comparisons will be made with taxes in other jurisdictions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Functional Methods in Quantum Field TheoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7024PSemester 17No

Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The module will introduce Feynman's path integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics and apply it to the study of Quantum Field Theory (QFT). Emphasis will be given to the role of symmetries (Ward identities), the renormalisation group and the idea of effective action. The concept of Wilson's effective action and the different nature of (ir)relevant/marginal terms will be discussed. Simple scalar theories will provide the example where to apply the concepts and the techniques introduced. The course will also touch on some more advanced topics, such as quantum anomalies and conformal field theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Derivatives in a Legal ContextLawSOLM235Full year7No

Derivatives in a Legal Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module introduces complex concepts in finance at a level that is appropriate for law students to master them . The first part of the course introduces the student to basic understanding of financial models and concepts as it relates to valuation in a legal context. This knowledge forms the basis of analysis for the more complex and broader concept of derivatives. The focus eventually turns to the analysis of ¿derivative¿ instruments, their application in different economic situations, and the benefits/consequences of helping clients set up contracts employing them when investing or conducting business, both locally and globally. Derivative instruments will be analyzed from two separate points of view: speculative and hedging. Tools and basic models that help in understanding the appropriate usage of different derivatives in different situations will also be introduced and examined. Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the relationships among different derivative instruments. Legal cases are used to analyze actual situations and explore different possible solutions using financial models and derivatives, facilitating an acceptable legal determination as to the best selection for every particular exposure. The course will be taught on the assumption that the students have no prior knowledge of these financial instruments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Information Security and the LawLawSOLM210Semester 27Yes

Information Security and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: The security of important data, including personal, is of considerable concern to governments around the world as is the safety of critical infrastructure assets, systems, and networks (both public and private) that are considered so vital that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety. Concerns about former have led to growing legal obligations to ensure the security of information and the systems that transmit and store it. Whether as part of personal data protection regimes, sector-specific regulations (e.g., healthcare, banking and finance) private law or company law obligations, these present a growing source of potential corporate liability. Concerns about the latter have produced frameworks to enable oversight and cooperation needed to manage and mitigate risks to critical infrastructure. This course examines various EU and US legal frameworks

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class assignment (1200 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Independent Research Essay (2200-2500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art and GovernanceLawSOLM226Semester 17No

Art and Governance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will enable students to learn about state regulation of art, art transactions and transfers of art. In particular, it will examine four areas of state regulation of art: criminal law provisions related to art, import and export controls on art, the impact of competition law on art acquisitions and transactions and the taxation of art. Coverage of criminal law issues will include the handling of stolen art, art fraud and forgery, the treatment of obscene artworks, trade in artefacts from war zones and treasure offences. The module will also cover how states control the cross-border movement of cultural treasures, competition law as it relates to agreements prevalent in the art industry and the direct and indirect tax regimes governing art and dispositions of art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
E-Commerce RegulationLawSOLM220Semester 27No

E-Commerce Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: "This module examines the theoretical basis of the legal and regulatory framework within which online commercial transactions have to be undertaken (bearing in mind that there is much commercial activity which is, ostensibly, 'free' ¿ Facebook and Google are prime examples). It does this through the lens of legitimate authority, asking the fundamental question: 'Why should an e-commerce business accept this particular law and comply with it?' This question arises because of the regulatory and legal difficulties involved in e-commerce as a cross-border activity. The proposition that an e-commerce business must obey all the laws of the world is, simply, both unrealistic in practice and unsustainable in theory. The first part of the module examines jurisprudential theory in some depth, and the second part applies this theory to particular areas of e-commerce activity to explain how law and regulation there works (or, often, doesn¿t work). Because e-commerce is a global activity it doesn't examine the law of one country alone, but focuses on the underlying principles for regulation, how they differ between jurisdictions, the justifications for and limits on national lawmaking, and how e-commerce businesses respond to regulation. This module uses elements of lawmaking and regulatory theory to illuminate how e-commerce regulation operates in practice."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Independent Research Essay 1 (3000-4000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Independent Research Essay 2 (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
MSc Astrophysics Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7000PFull year7No

MSc Astrophysics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr William Sutherland

Description: The MSc project involves a critical review of a chosen topic in modern astrophysics, and may include some original research. Students write a dissertation summarising current research in that chosen field and the extent of their own investigations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Terrorism, Migration and Human RightsLawSOLM175Semester 17Yes

Terrorism, Migration and Human Rights

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Elspeth Guild

Description: "This module looks at the relationship of terrorism, human rights and migration. Among the key questions will be the relationship of foreigners to threat, the treatment of suspected terrorists through immigration laws, the entitlement of foreigners to protection against return to persecution and torture (as refugees) and the transformation of the technologies around movement of people across international borders which are driven by terrorism related concerns. The module is designed to provide students with an overview of the law around terrorism and how it intersects with migration and border crossing issues. The module will include: an introduction to the course from citizens to foreigners including Human Rights, Political Violence, Terrorism and Extradition. We will examine the issues around refugees, political violence/terrorism and the principle of non-refoulement and how they interact with the prohibition on torture in the context of terrorism allegations. The question of the political issue of diplomatic assurances and legal obligations of protection will be examined as well as the convergence of terrorism, criminal law and refugee protection. The use of digital means by state authorities to counter terrorism and the use of the personal data of foreigners will also be part of the reflections of this course. Students will have an opportunity to present in class their research."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Comparative Criminal JusticeLawSOLM203Semester 27Yes

Comparative Criminal Justice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Saskia Hufnagel

Description: This module examines civil and common law jurisdictions in the area of criminal justice in different cultural contexts (i.e. Europe, Asia, Australasia, North America) and addresses possible conflicts of interests when having to work together internationally and trans-nationally. It traces the evolution of civil and common law criminal justice systems, assesses similarities of legal doctrines, theories and application of punishment, prison systems and legal aid provision. The first half of the module will provide an overview of different types of criminal justice systems around the globe, including the assessment of similarities and differences in substantive criminal law. The second half of the module will consider criminal procedure, the trial process, legal aid, penalties, prison systems and rehabilitation programs in different cultural contexts and how judicial cooperation between the systems can by hampered by differences in criminal procedure requirements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Economic LawLawSOLM194Semester 17Yes

International Economic Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: The module examines the law that governs international economic relations between states and between states and non-state actors. It provides an overview of international agreements and organizations concerned with state conduct affecting trade, foreign investment, finance and monetary stability. It also considers less formal means of international economic governance such as standards, principles and guidelines. The study of the relevant law is informed by pressing development, environmental and financial stability concerns arising from the globalisation of the world economy and shifts in global economic power. The module aims to provide the foundation and context for further exploration of specific areas of international economic law covered by other modules offered by this programme. The knowledge and skills gained on this course are suitable for careers in government, international organizations, law firms and NGOs concerned with international trade, investment, finance and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Electromagnetic Waves and OpticsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5222Semester 25Yes

Electromagnetic Waves and Optics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Sutherland
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4210

Description: The course is aimed at giving a coverage of electromagnetic wave theory and of optics. It will act as a bridge between a first year course of introductory electromagnetism and a course on vibrations and waves to give an understanding of optics in terms of electromagnetic waves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Carriage of GoodsLawSOLM143Semester 17Yes

Carriage of Goods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: The module will cover essential aspects of the law relating to carriage of goods by sea (mandatory international law regulating carriage of goods contracts, international standard terms, functions of documents such as bills of lading, waybills and delivery orders, as well as electronic alternatives to these documents, detailed discussion of logistics services and multimodal transport).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
ThermodynamicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5219Semester 15Yes

Thermodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jan Mol
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121

Description: Thermal and Kinetic Physics is a course designed as an introduction to the notion of energy and its transformations. The thermodynamic methodology that is constructed, largely through the paradigm of the ideal gas, is widely applicable throughout the realm of physics. We begin by developing a language capable of dealing with the thermodynamic method and this requires that concepts of equilibrium and temperature are disentangled before work and heat are described in detail en route to the First Law of Thermodynamics. With the First Law many things become readily accessible to an analytic approach previously unavailable including; engines, refrigerators and heat pumps. Entropy will then make a natural appearance as a macroscopic thermodynamic variable in the build up to the Second Law of Thermodynamics with a brief look at its microscopic origins. New thermodynamic potentials including the Gibbs potential and the Helmholtz free energy, and their applications, are discussed in order to generalise further the thermodynamic method. Phase changes for simple systems are briefly covered and the Third law of Thermodynamics described. Finally an introduction to the kinetic description of gases in equilibrium and of phenomena such as diffusion and heat conduction will complete the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Nuclear Energy LawLawSOLM168Full year7No

Nuclear Energy Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module will cover all of the legal and policy issues relating to nuclear power generation. It is one of the most heavily regulated sectors of the energy industry. The course will consider the policy aims of Governments in building nuclear power plants to comply with their obligations to transition to clean energy. Nuclear power provides a stable, secure and efficient clean base load of power. The course will also review of all of the international treaties and standards applicable to the nuclear industry from safety and liability to transportation of highly active waste material. Nuclear power is not without its challenges including time and expense of contruction, security concerns post Fukishima, wast management and decommissioning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute ResolutionLawSOLM906Full year7No

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate LawLawSOLM905Full year7No

Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Banking and Finance LawLawSOLM904Full year7No

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
DissertationLawSOLM903Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM923 or take SOLM904 or take SOLM905 or take SOLM906 or take SOLM910 or take SOLM911 or take SOLM921

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Charterparties: Law and PracticeLawSOLM142Semester 17Yes

Charterparties: Law and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Filip Saranovic

Description: The module will examine all aspects of charterparties, being contracts of vessel hire between the relevant parties. More specifically, the module will cover the stage of negotiating a charterparty, the basic principles underlying all such contracts, different types of charterparties (including voyage, time, hybrid and demise charters), various charterparty forms and their practical application, the effect of charterers' orders on the operation of charterparties, and the charters' discharge (including issues of breach, frustration and damages).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Law of the SeaLawSOLM131Semester 27Yes

International Law of the Sea

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Angeliki Papantoniou

Description: The module provides a critical analysis of the international law of the sea. It examines the codification of the law of the sea that led to the adoption of the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, the main sources of the law of the sea, including treaties and custom, the institutional arrangements and international legal framework for governance of the world¿s oceans, and the zonal regime of maritime zones that constitutes the foundation of the international law of the sea. The module will also focus on the delimitation methodologies and the compulsory system of dispute settlement under the law of the sea.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
United States Energy Law, Regulation and PolicyLawSOLM158Semester 17Yes

United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This course covers US energy regulation and policy including the impact of pending climate change legislation and proposed Environmental Protection Agency climate change rules and regulations. The US has been a market leader in energy regulation and privatization since World War II. This module looks at how this was achieved in the electricity markets, oil a& gas including unconventional resources and more recently the renewables market. The work of the FERC (Federal Energy Regulaiton Commission) and the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) are also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
US International TaxationLawSOLM123Semester 17Yes

US International Taxation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module is designed to cover the structure, principles, rules and application of the US international tax system. In particular, it will cover the US tax principles and rules that apply to US and foreign entities and individuals engaged in cross-border operations and transactions. Coverage will include jurisdictional principles, the inbound and outbound regimes, income tax treaties and the treatment of corporations and shareholders. The module will also cover the taxation of trusts, estates and gifts, reporting requirements and tax administration and procedure, all with a focus on the cross-border context. The module will examine how the system operates in practice and also consider US tax policy in these areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7023USemester 17Yes

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: "Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
EU Data Protection LawLawSOLM209Semester 17Yes

EU Data Protection Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: This module examines EU data protection laws and examples of the regulatory frameworks established in the Member States. It explores the key debates surrounding and commercial and other implications under the new regime of the General Data Protection Regulation, the Policing and Criminal Justice Data and the E Privacy framework, including the challenges of particular developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% In-class assignment 1
  • Item 3: 20% In-class assignment 2
  • Item 4: 20% In-class assignment 3
Level: 7
Law
Art and MoneyLawSOLM230Semester 27No

Art and Money

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Katrien Morbee

Description: This module will examine the function of art and other cultural objects as financial assets. This involves seeing historic and artistic chattels from the point of view of wealth management (via investment, capital appreciation and leasing potential) and as collateral for transactions that are otherwise unrelated (art pledges, mortgages and charges). Since the investment in and taking of security over such assets necessarily involves questions of title, title warranties and title retention terms will also be examined. The module will also consider the treatment of art and cultural property in times of financial turmoil and insolvency. The main question here will be whether such cultural objects can be protected during corporate restructuring or insolvency, or indeed governmental/state financial difficulties. The module will end by considering the new area of art financing and alternative funding models for the acquisition of art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art TransactionsLawSOLM225Semester 17No

Art Transactions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: This module will examine the various rules of domestic and international private law that can impact the art trade, from the sale and purchase of artworks by private individuals, to acquisitions by other private law means, such as gift and exchange, and loans and other bailments involving museums, galleries and other cultural institutions. Beyond this, the module will also consider the impact of statute: one notable example being the statutory immunity of certain loaned cultural objects from seizure. Owing to the high value and irreplaceable nature of the art being traded, the issue of insurance is an important one. This section will consider both private cover and public insurance. Finally, the module will look at the law of auctions. Auctions are of course a favoured forum to buy and sell art, and the law that applies to the auction is different from the law of the open market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Policing in Local and Global ContextsLawSOLM202Semester 17Yes

Policing in Local and Global Contexts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saskia Hufnagel

Description: This module examines law enforcement in different cultural contexts (i.e. Europe, Asia, North America) and addresses possible conflicts of interests when different jurisdictions have to work together internationally and trans-nationally. It traces the evolution of international, transnational and EU legal frameworks on law enforcement cooperation, eg the development of Interpol and Europol, from their early beginnings in the 20th century to todays more sophisticated models of information transfer between policing and judicial agencies. The first half of the module will provide an overview of law enforcement models and procedural requirements in different jurisdictions around the globe. The second half of the module will consider international, EU and regional police cooperation strategies and underlying legal frameworks and how the specific jurisdictional requirements discussed in the first half of the module might foster or hamper cooperation in practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Extended Independent ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6776Full year6No

Extended Independent Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kostya Trachencko

Description: "You will initially register for the extended project PHY776. This module provides you with the experience of working, independently, on a problem within physics (often using the resources found within a research group of the department). These may be problems in experimental, computational or theoretical physics or a project in astronomy. A list of projects is available on the extensive projects homepage containing a brief description of the projects on offer and the supervisors of those projects. You shall arrange a project by reading these pages and meeting with potential supervisors. Associated with the project is a weekly mandatory seminar to which you will occasionally be expected to contribute. In the light of adequate progress during the first semester you may, after producing a report, be relegated to a 15 credits Independent Project following careful consideration by a panel of staff (Supervisor, CO and DCO)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Performance during Project
  • Item 2: 50% Written Report
  • Item 3: 30% Final Oral Presentation
Level: 6
Physics and AstronomySPA_6_S
Physics Review ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6913Full year6No

Physics Review Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kostya Trachencko

Description: You will examine a specialised area of physics by directed reading and independent study. You will learn to use scientific research literature databases. You will develop the skill of writing a scientific review summarising current knowledge in a field of physics. You may enrol for this project only with the permission of the Module Organiser for MSci projects. Open only to 3rd year MSci students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Performance during Project
  • Item 2: 50% Written Report
  • Item 3: 30% Final Oral Presentation
Level: 6
Physics and AstronomySPA_6_S
Comparative Immigration LawLawSOLM174Semester 17Yes

Comparative Immigration Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah

Description: This module relates developments in migration law to wider socio-political developments including decolonisation, nationalism, and economic demands; race and ethnicity in immigration laws; marriage and families in immigration law; gender and spouses in migration laws; international and comparative refugee law; how states compete for skilled migrants; immigration law as an aspect of Europeanisation; how states create and deal with irregular migration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Punishment in England 1750-1950LawSOLM201Semester 27Yes

Punishment in England 1750-1950

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sean Mcconville

Description: The study of punishment in the period 1750 -1950 provides a number of fruitful encounters with political and social theory, evolving legal doctrine and concurrent economic and social developments. It requires and imparts versatility and flexibility in the identification of core issues. Handling this and related material can supplement and enrich broader legal studies. Full of human interest and controversy, it is challenging, engrossing and illuminating. Debates range from theories such as moral agency and culpability, to varieties of determinism to consideration of the powers, prerogatives and duties of the state.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Ethics of Migration and AsylumLawSOLM173Semester 17Yes

Ethics of Migration and Asylum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Niovi Vavoula

Description: "This module introduces the main philosophical and ethical debates concerning border control, citizenship, migration and refugee/asylum-seeker status. It sets out the arguments for and against ¿open borders¿, the political theory of citizenship and the nation state, and the relationships between citizens¿ rights and universal human rights. As well as matters of general philosophical principle, we will look at the ethics of border control practices, from identity cards and entry controls to surveillance and access to public services, detention and repatriation. We will also consider the cultural dimensions of migration control, in particular the relationship between discourses of security, citizenship, and race/ethnicity/cultural difference."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
E-Commerce TransactionsLawSOLM219Semester 17Yes

E-Commerce Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: This module examines the law relating to online commercial transactions (bearing in mind that there is much commercial activity which is, ostensibly, 'free' - Facebook and Google are prime examples). It focuses on the law which governs a range of online transactions, including contracting, signatures and online marketplaces. Because e-commerce is a global activity we don¿t examine the law of one country alone (though we will inevitably look at more UK and EU law than that of anywhere else). Our focus is on the underlying principles which are common to all jurisdictions, and the differences in some areas - the theory is that if you understand these, you will be able to analyse any particular national law and apply it to the particular e-commerce activity in question.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
WTO Law Domestic Regulations and Trade RemediesLawSOLM193Semester 27Yes

WTO Law Domestic Regulations and Trade Remedies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: The module covers WTO rules and principles on domestic regulations (technical standards, rules on services, intellectual property protection) and on trade remedies to protect domestic industries against both fair and unfair trade (safeguards, anti-dumping duties and countervailing duties). It examines how WTO rules, as interpreted by adjudicators, seek to balance the tensions between free trade obligations and the right to regulate in pursuance of national policy objectives and free trade and unfair trade. On completion of the module, students should be able to advice public authorities, private companies or civil society organisations on the consistency of trade defence measures and domestic regulations affecting international trade with WTO Law and on the remedies available for breaches of WTO Law. Students which are not familiar with WTO law are strongly advised to take SOLM192 WTO Law: Fundamental Principles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Insurance RegulationLawSOLM139Semester 17Yes

Insurance Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: This module deals with the regulation of insurance. It will look at the nature of risk in insurance business, the international standards on regulation and their influence on the shape of EU law and UK law, and in detail at the UK's approach to regulation, covering the structure of the regulator and the rules that are applied to regulation of insurance business (both those companies that provide insurance and intermediaries who facilitate insurance contracts) focusing inter alia on macro and micro prudential requirements & solvency rules, conduct of business rules and the resolution of systemically important insurers (financial resolution).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Tax and TechnologyLawSOLM130Full year7No

Tax and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee

Description: The module will focus on tax and technology. It will provide an introduction to domestic and international tax provisions that are important to owners of intellectual property, with a particular focus on domestic incentives to encourage investment and to attract foreign direct investment, as well as the international perspectives around harmful tax competition by countries. The module will also consider the current debates regarding a digital services tax.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
WTO Law: Fundamental PrinciplesLawSOLM192Semester 17Yes

WTO Law: Fundamental Principles

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: The module examines the fundamental principles of the law of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Topics covered include sources of WTO law, the relationship between WTO law and international and domestic law, the WTO dispute settlement system, and substantive rules on market access (tariffs and non-tariff barriers), non-discrimination (national treatment and most-favoured nation treatment) and rules aimed at balancing free trade and non-trade concerns. The module provides students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the regulatory framework underpinning the multilateral trading system. On completion of the module, students should be able to advice public authorities, private companies or civil society organisations on the consistency of market access restrictions and discriminatory measures affecting international trade with WTO Law and on the remedies available for breaches of WTO Law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Energy Law and EthicsLawSOLM157Semester 17No

International Energy Law and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The International Energy Law and Ethics module is concerned with legal and ethical issues arising in the energy sector. It aims to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to the analysis of these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Mathematical Techniques 3Physical and Chemical SciencesSPA5218Semester 15Yes

Mathematical Techniques 3

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alston Misquitta
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4122

Description: In this module some advanced mathematical techniques are developed in the context of solving real physical problems. Computer algebra (MAPLE) is used in the practical classes to enable you to learn a professional physicists approach to real problem-solving.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 10% Mid-term exam
  • Item 3: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in LawsLawSOLM900Full year7No

Dissertation in Laws

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
DissertationLawSOLM901Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Art and Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM229Semester 27No

Art and Intellectual Property

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: This module will examine the interplay between art and intellectual property, in particular copyright, including digital issues. The module will involve a comparative approach, looking in depth at the protection of intangible rights in the UK, before comparing this with the regimes of other countries (namely France and the United States). the module will focus on the related intellectual property rights that impact the art trade: moral rights and the artists' resale right. The module will then look specifically at museum and gallery practice to see the effect of the 2014 UK copyright changes. This will cover the two 'orphan works' schemes, extended collective licensing and the new copyright exceptions, many of which are aimed specifically at the museum and heritage sector

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
General Principles of Insurance LawLawSOLM138Semester 17Yes

General Principles of Insurance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: This module provides students with an overview of the general principles of law involved in the formation of the insurance contract, the terms of policies and the claims process, as well as the role of brokers and the conduct of business at Lloyd's of London. Insurance is fundamental to a modern economy, allowing businesses and individuals to transfer the risk of loss, thereby facilitating investment and protecting wealth, and London is a world centre of the insurance industry. Students require no prior knowledge of insurance or English law. They will learn all they need to know as the module progresses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Transfer PricingLawSOLM129Semester 17Yes

Transfer Pricing

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christiana Hjipanayi

Description: The module will provide students with knowledge of transfer pricing and the various principles and standards developed to deal with it. There will be a historical overview of the issues followed by an analysis of the evolution of principles leading to the BEPS Action Plan and the updated 2017 Transfer Pricing Guidelines. The module will consider major current transfer pricing issues around intangibles, business restructuring, the digital economy, services and financing. It also examines issues such as transfer pricing documentation and dispute resolution (both arbitration and litigation). The intersection of transfer pricing with EU law will also be considered and the case law on state aid and APAs will be reviewed in detail. The course is not jurisdiction specific; rather it offers a holistic approach to the topic with cameos of the different approaches of countries to it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Compliance Systems in PracticeLawSOLM224Semester 17Yes

Compliance Systems in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Sucheen Patel

Description: This module seeks to give students a thorough grounding in the essentials of regulatory and compliance environment. To prepare students for issues likely to arise in the application of regulatory framework in various economic and business environments . No previous knowledge of the subject is required. In addition, the module does not require prior knowledge of regulatory framework . The module takes a very practical approach with a number of case studies and always with an eye to the real world implications. Guest lecturers will provide their practical experience and the challenges they face.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Tax Administration and ProcedureLawSOLM286Semester 27Yes

Tax Administration and Procedure

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module is designed to enable students to understand a range of legal issues that arise in connection with the organisation and operation of tax administrations and the design and implementation of tax procedures. In particular, it will consider organisational models for and core functions of tax administrations, legal design of tax procedures, tax procedure and taxpayer rights, and tax dispute resolution and prevention mechanisms. It will also examine case studies of tax administration and tax procedure reform.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000) words)
Level: 7
Law
Tax System Design and Policy in Emerging and Developing EconomiesLawSOLM121Semester 27Yes

Tax System Design and Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module considers tax system design and tax policy issues relevant to emerging and developing economies. It examines tax policy and design issues regarding the choice of taxes, expanding the tax base, expanding the tax net, encouraging taxpayer compliance and strengthening administrative capacity. In this context it considers the political economy of direct and indirect taxes, the incidence of taxation, fiscal federalism and the impact of tax treaties. It will also look at options for reform of existing systems and for improving tax administration and collection in emerging and developing economies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7023PSemester 17No

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: "Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Solar SystemPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7022USemester 17Yes

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesco Volponi

Description: "As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Cybercrime: Substantive OffencesLawSOLM207Semester 27Yes

Cybercrime: Substantive Offences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Internet technologies have enabled new ways of committing crimes and have moved 'old' crimes such as fraud online - this has created interesting challenges to substantive criminal law. These challenges concern both the interpretation of traditional criminal law (common law and statute based) and potential new crimes where there is a need to develop the law to close legal gaps. This Module examines substantive criminal law(s) of different jurisdictions (using the UK and the US as the main comparators) from a comparative and international perspective. It also looks at international harmonization efforts such as the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime and the EU framework for the harmonization of the law in the fields of cybercrime. The Module looks at definitions and categorisation of cybercrime; the relationships between cyberterrorims, cyberwarfare and cybercrime; content related cybercrime (such as child sex abuse images; pornography; IP infringement; terrorism propaganda (glorification and encouragement); hate speech); communication offences and harassment; online fraud and forgery; computer misuse (hacking; malicious code; interception) and illegal devices and malicious marketplaces. It will also examine the jurisdictional aspects of such criminality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Law of Economic Crime: CorruptionLawSOLM200Semester 27Yes

Law of Economic Crime: Corruption

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: "The treatment of tax evasion in the UK, including the alternatives to prosecution and the developing regime for dealing with evasion. It will then turn to the national and international law of corruption, dealing with misconduct in public office. The treatment of bribery will include its history and theory, the developing international régime and the trend towards greater negotiation with persons suspected1 of bribery and placing greater duties in respect of enforcement and reporting on the private sector. There will be detailed case studies of corruption in sports and of the Trump Presidency. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Compliance in Global MarketsLawSOLM223Semester 27Yes

Compliance in Global Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Sucheen Patel

Description: The module will have four general sessions in which all the students will study together advanced cases in Compliance. The course covers advanced topics in compliance. Then the students will be split into specialist groups as specified above for another four sessions. For the final sessions the students will get together for a conclusion of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Astrophysical PlasmasPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7004PSemester 27No

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Chen

Description: "A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Tax Law in PracticeLawSOLM120Semester 27Yes

International Tax Law in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Joy Svasti-Salee
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SOLM119

Description: The module focus is on how multinational enterprises are structured and operate. In particular, the module will cover how groups finance their business, structure their operations and own and protect their intellectual property. There will also be some consideration of the impact of mergers, acquisitions, disposals and reorganisations. The module will also look at the challenges created by new forms of technology and new ways of doing business. The module will discuss these issues from the viewpoint of the enterprise and of the relevant revenue authorities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Independent ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6709Semester 16No

Independent Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor

Description: "This module provides you with the experience of working, independently, on a problem within physics (often using the resources found within a research group of the department). These may be problems in experimental, computational or theoretical physics or a project in astronomy. A list of projects is available on the extensive projects homepage and this contains brief descriptions of the projects on offer, and the supervisors of those projects. You shall arrange a project by reading these pages and meeting with potential supervisors. Associated with the project is a weekly seminar to which you will contribute."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Performance during Project
  • Item 2: 50% Written Report
  • Item 3: 30% Final Oral Presentation
Level: 6
Physics and AstronomySPA_6_S
International Arbitration and EnergyLawSOLM163Semester 27Yes

International Arbitration and Energy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International arbitration proceedings in the energy sector have seen an important increase in recent years, both in terms of their numbers and their economic and political importance. This module provides students with the basis for understanding the particular issues of disputes in the energy sector, both in international investment and commercial arbitration. It gives students aiming to work in the arbitration area an important qualification in a very competitive market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law of Economic Crime: Proceeds of CrimeLawSOLM199Semester 17Yes

Law of Economic Crime: Proceeds of Crime

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Introductory, History of Financial Crime, Corporate Liability and procedural and evidential issues in financial crme, Criminal vs Regulatory Justice, AML/CTF - the International Framework, UK regulatory framework, The substantive UK criminal offences , Art Crime, Kleptocracy, Confiscation (UK), Civil actions, Non Conviction based Seizure

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Physical DynamicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5304Semester 25Yes

Physical Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Vegh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA5218

Description: Introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian mechanics. Origin of Conservation Laws and their relation to symmetry properties. Rotational motion of rigid bodies, Euler's equations, principal axes and stability of rotation, precession. Small vibration approximation, normal modes

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Corporate Finance LawLawSOLM009Semester 17Yes

Corporate Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in international corporate finance. The module will focus on providing an introduction to the different corporate financing options, methods and techniques, with special emphasis on the use of debt and equity. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and international trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Nuclear Physics and AstrophysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5302Semester 15Yes

Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesco Volponi

Description: "A module describing sub-atomic phenomena and explaining them in terms of the theories of quantum physics and relativity: nuclear properties, reactions and decays; Nuclear astrophysics and its cosmological consequences."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
MSc Physics Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7012PFull year7No

MSc Physics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo

Description: The MSc Research Project is at the heart of the MSc programme. It is an independent project undertaken by the student within a working research group in the School. The project runs over three semesters in order to allow for the student to both design their project (using available literature etc.), be trained in the relevant techniques and carry out a reasonably substantial piece of research based on an actual (real) research problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10% Performance
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7018USemester 17Yes

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5304 and take SPA6325 and take SPA5218. Before taking this module you are advised to take SPA7027U

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Ten homework Assignments
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Culture and Revolution: Russia and ChinaLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5067Semester 15Yes

Culture and Revolution: Russia and China

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5067 or take RUS6067

Description: This module examines the notion of culture as a central instrument in the transformation of society as it was adopted and deployed in the 20th century¿s two most influential Communist revolutions, in Russia and China. The module covers themes including the representation of the revolution, the image of the Communist and debates around Socialist Realism, tracing their evolution and expression in a variety of media including film, prose fiction and art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (1750 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (1750 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Race and Racism in European CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5045Semester 25Closed

Race and Racism in European Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maha El Hissy

Description: This module encourages students to analyse representations of race and racism within European culture from the Middle Ages to the present. It engages with a variety of sources (literary, historical, material, and visual) and draws on evidence from a range of European traditions (such as French, German or Spanish) to explore these representations. It mobilises key critical theories that relate to these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Physics LaboratoryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5201Semester 25Yes

Physics Laboratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alan Drew
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4103

Description: This course aims to illustrate some important aspects of physics through experimental measurements. The course will be marked by continuous assessment of student laboratory notebooks, which will not be allowed to be removed from the laboratory. Students will perform a number of experiments over the term and will then have to write a scientific paper on one of the experiments that they have performed. The experiments are: Alpha particle spectroscopy; Thermal equation of state and critical point of ethane, Hall effect measurement of germanium; Building a Helium Neon Laser; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Building a Michelson Interferometer and measuring the magnetostriction of metals and the refractive index of air; X-ray diffraction spectroscopy; The Zeeman effect.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Experimental Logbooks
  • Item 2: 35% Formal Reports
  • Item 3: 15% Investigation Design
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in the Middle AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML4200Semester 14Closed

Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in the Middle Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval

Description: From boy bands to Valentines, our ways of expressing sexual love were first formulated in the Middle Ages. This module traces the early history of the language of love, through poetry and songs composed between the 12th and 15th centuries. With the help of English translations, you will explore different types of poetry in various languages: Spanish, French, Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, and the Occitan language of southern France. You will develop your ability to analyse complex poems, and to understand and respect cultural differences, through a range of activities including creative rewriting of translations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Text Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay/Creative Rewriting of Translations (2000 words)
Level: 4
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Mathematical Techniques 4Physical and Chemical SciencesSPA6324Semester 16Yes

Mathematical Techniques 4

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218. Before taking this module you are advised to take SPA5304

Description: "The module will cover advanced techniques in mathematical physics and will consist of three parts. The first part will cover topics in the general area of analysis such as Fourier Transforms, differential equations, special functions, asymptotic series, complex analysis. The second will cover groups, algebra and representations. The third will cover elements of gepmetry, differential forms, homology, topological invariants."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Final Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 40% Weekly Exercises
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Electric and Magnetic FieldsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4210Semester 24Yes

Electric and Magnetic Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher White

Description: An introduction to the basic laws of electromagnetism: electric force and field; electric potential and energy; capacitance; electromotive force; magnetic force and field; the Lorentz force; electromagnetic induction; mutual and self inductance; magnetic energy; LC circuits; Maxwell's equations; introduction to electromagnetic waves; applications in science and engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Introduction to Scientific ComputingPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5666Semester 15Yes

Introduction to Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA4121 and take SPA4122 and take SPA4401 and take SPA4402 and take SPA4210

Description: This module provides a general introduction to numerical problem solving with the programming language Python. Scientific computing provides an inherently interdisciplinary approach to problem solving; one that combines aspects of applied mathematics, computer science, and software engineering with concepts and models from the physical sciences.

In this module basic aspects of scientific computation, including computer number representations, machine precision, discretisation of equations, error and uncertainty, will be discussed. The mathematical underpinnings of numerical methods of problem solving will be developed, including numerical integration and differentiation, searching, data fitting, interpolation, matrix computing, and solving differential equations.

These theoretical topics will be put into practice during weekly computational laboratory exercises where computer programs will be written that utilise a variety of numerical techniques to solve problems. Authentic examples from the physical sciences and industry and will be explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Laboratory
  • Item 2: 20% Quizzes
  • Item 3: 50% Projects
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
The Physics of GalaxiesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6305Semester 26Yes

The Physics of Galaxies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesco Volponi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7010U

Description: "Galaxies are the building blocks of the universe and deserve the extensive study they now enjoy. This course applies basic physical ideas to astronomical observations, exploring the properties of galaxies themselves and the evolution of structure in the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
  • Item 3: 10% Mid-semester Test
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201BSemester 26Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 6
Russian
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201ASemester 16Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 6
Russian
Seminar on AI Regulation, Rights and ResponsibilitiesLawSOLM284Semester 27Yes

Seminar on AI Regulation, Rights and Responsibilities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM221

Description: This seminar-based module offers a multidisciplinary study of artificial intelligence (AI). The module examines AI regulations through the lens of AI technology and application and investigates the impact of AI on the economy and regulatory landscape. It discusses rights and responsibilities of AI from a technological, economic and legal perspective, reviews diverse approaches to AI regulatory frameworks in a comparative and competition context. Participants are expected to conduct research in group and to lead weekly issue-based roundtable discussions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (4000) words)
Level: 7
Law
Data Protection Law Compliance and PracticeLawSOLM285Full year7No

Data Protection Law Compliance and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SOLM209 or take SOLM222

Description: This module offers a practical legal learning experience in data protection law compliance. It will be based on various compliance scenarios and activities that a data protection officer or in-house privacy counsel would likely face in assisting the processor or controller for whom they work to meet the requirements of the relevant legal framework in their ongoing personal data processing activities of the data . Although this module will primarily focus on the EU/UK General Data Protection Regulation, the skills and knowledge acquired from the course materials and learning exercises will be relevant to most data protection legal frameworks and data protection compliance practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group Practice Exercise Presentation Evaluation
  • Item 2: 85% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Researching Powerful OrganisationsLawSOLM281Semester 27Yes

Researching Powerful Organisations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will provide a set of skills that will enable participants, through a series of taught activities, to enhance research that focusses upon powerful institutions, namely governmental organisations and profitmaking corporations. It will introduce students to a range of innovative methodological techniques capable of generating novel data. The module will instruct students to uncover hidden aspects of the ways that powerful organisations `talk¿ and `act¿ in order to produce original case study materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Human Rights and Public HealthLawSOLM282Semester 27Yes

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: Students will be introduced to the core concepts and theories of international human rights and humanitarian law and the ethical debates that underpin contemporary local and global healthcare practices. Particular attention will be paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the role of international humanitarian law in protecting health during war or military occupation; the tensions between the health business, healthcare and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Weekly writing assignments
  • Item 2: 10% In Class Assignment
  • Item 3: 75% Independent Research Essay (6000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Energy and Climate ChangeLawSOLM278Semester 27Yes

Energy and Climate Change

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Dallas
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM279

Description: This module looks at the international legal regimes relating to climate change and consider how this will directly impact the energy sector. There is a fundamental shift in the energy industry away from fossil fuels (non renewable sources) to clean energy (renewable sources). This transition and how it will take place over the coming years will be discussed. This module will also consider emissions trading (ETS) and its effectiveness, the NDC (nationally determined contributions) of states to achieve climate change goals. In addition, it will consider the polluter pays principle as well as the growing number of climate change disputes and assess how these might impact future energy regulation, at an international and national level. The focus is climate change exclusively from the perspective of the energy sector. This module will consider new technologies (such as CCUS and hydrogen), renewable projects and emissions trading and its effectiveness.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Climate Change Law, Economics and PolicyLawSOLM279Full year7No

Climate Change Law, Economics and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rafael Leal-Arcas
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM278

Description: This course will examine the economic, legal, political, institutional, regulatory, and historical underpinnings of climate change as an issue and the related policy challenges of creating and sustaining a prosperous decarbonized modern society. Particular attention will be given to analyzing the existing international framework of treaties, laws, regulations, and policies and the incentives they have created to address the build-up of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere

The course will center on a set of critical questions including: What would a 21st-century policy framework that is designed to deliver a successful response to climate change look like? How should issues of (in)equity be addressed? How might incentives be structured to engage the business community in climate change problem-solving?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Introduction to Data SciencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4131Semester 24Yes

Introduction to Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take SPA4121
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA4601

Description: This module aims to introduce you to the field of data science, which concerns the collection, curation, analysis, and statistical interpretation of different kinds of data. You will explore the many different ways that data are collected, stored, used, and abused by organisations, and the consequent impacts on society. You will also learn how to collect and store data in a robust manner, and avoid misleading biases and selection effects that can lead to erroneous conclusions; how to query large collections of different types of data using the SQL query language; how to perform simple statistical tests on the data; and how to visualise the results of your investigations and in a clear and informative way.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Computer lab projects (6 x 3 hrs)
  • Item 2: 20% Essays (2 x 2000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Final examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Mathematical Techniques 2Physical and Chemical SciencesSPA4122Semester 24Yes

Mathematical Techniques 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcella Bona

Description: Further techniques of mathematics needed in the physical sciences. Complex numbers and hyperbolic functions. Polar and spherical coordinates and coordinate transformations. Multiple integrals. Line and surface integrals. Vector calculus. The theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. Matrices. Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Fourier series and transforms including the convolution theorem. Differential equations. Exercise classes enable the students to learn practical approaches to problem solving while applying the concepts and techniques introduced in lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
The GalaxyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7010USemester 27Yes

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA6305 or take INU7071U

Description: "The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in Regulation and ComplianceLawSOLM926Full year7No

Dissertation in Regulation and Compliance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant specialisation within the academic fields of Regulations and Compliance.
The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor.
It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Case Study (5000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Independent Research Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Independent Research EssayLawSOLM927Semester 17No

Independent Research Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: Independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204ASemester 14Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who hold the equivalent of GCSE in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Practical Skills Assessment
Level: 4
Russian
Research SeminarLawSOLM266Full year7No

Research Seminar

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The module will cover advanced and topical issues in law based on respective developments in law and policy and in academic debate. Students are expected to produce a research paper as coursework and to present their findings in class for discussion. The specific content will therefore change from year to year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Oral Presentation (15-20 minutes)
  • Item 2: 80% Research Paper (10000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Solar SystemPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7022PSemester 17No

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Donnison

Description: "As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Media RegulationLawSOLM265Semester 27Yes

Media Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: The content of the proposed module will cover the content of both current modules SOLM217 and SOLM218. This includes:
- Ownership & Control of the Media
- Press Regulation
- EU Broadcasting Law & the shift to regulation of online, streaming content
- UK Broadcasting Law & the shift to regulation of online, streaming content
- Advertising Regulation
- Article 10, Freedom of Speech and the reasonable limits thereon with a view to protecting the Article 6 right to a fair trial, in the context of media reporting the courts
- Contempt of Court and the media - filming and livestreaming the courts, contempt by publication
- Reporting restrictions and the media - including identification of victims of serious crimes, statutory restrictions on reporting proceedings involving children and vulnerable adults, discretionary judicial orders, the media's right to representation and to appeal orders.
- Protection of journalists sources & materials, including digital resources and communications, from undue state / police interference.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Reinsurance Law and International Risk TransferLawSOLM255Semester 27Yes

Reinsurance Law and International Risk Transfer

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Franziska Arnold-Dwyer

Description: Reinsurance involves insurance (and reinsurance) companies insuring all or part of the risks they write with other (re)insurance companies. Reinsurance is required by regulators but also makes business sense since it allows insurance companies to increase their capacity to write insurance. In this module we are looking at traditional reinsurance and innovative reinsurance solutions. We consider how reinsurance contracts are formed and how they can be structured. By reference to typical reinsurance market wordings, we will consider the interaction between the underlying insurance contract and the reinsurance contract and how their relationships impacts on the reinsurance terms and claims. We will also examine the structure and regulation of insurance-linked securities which are a means of risk transfer to, and of financing insurance risk in, the capital markets. London is one of the world centres of the reinsurance industry and the London reinsurance market is amongst the leaders in developing innovative reinsurance solutions. This module will provide a thorough understanding of this important and rapidly developing area of law and practice. English law is the governing law applied to Lloyd¿s and London market insurance and reinsurance policies, and is frequently chosen as governing law for international reinsurance transactions. The LLM in Insurance Law, of which this module forms part, opens up lucrative career opportunities in the global insurance and reinsurance industry, the legal sector, management consultancies and the financial services industry generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Commercial ArbitrationLawSOLM256Semester 17Yes

International Commercial Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Behn

Description: This is an introductory module on the law and practice of international commercial arbitration. This one-semester module is aimed at students who do not specialise in dispute resolution and therefore does not require prior knowledge of the subject. However, the module may still be suitable for those not specialising in dispute resolution, but have some knowledge of the topic and would like to explore it in some further detail. This module will consider most of the key themes covered in the specialist arbitration modules but in less detail.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7018PSemester 17No

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini

Description: Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins will be derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions will be analysed. After an introduction to classical field theory, and the role of symmetries in field theory (including the beautiful Noether's theorem) students will learn the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, including the quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. We will also compute some explicit tree-level scattering amplitudes in a number of simple examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Ten homework Assignments
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204Full year4Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The module is aimed at students who hold GCSE or equivalent in Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Practical Skills Assessment
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Assessment and Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Online Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Sovereign Debt RestructuringLawSOLM014Full year7No

Sovereign Debt Restructuring

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: The module covers the various procedures available in financial distress scenarios aiming at restoring viability and overcoming the excessive burden of debt. The module will address these issues from the perspective of sovereign states. The course will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7009PSemester 27No

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Culture and Language (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML4006ASemester 14Closed

Culture and Language (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into two 5-week blocks, roughly divided between Literature Visual Cultures. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Literature Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Creative Response and Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Revised Creative Response and Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Meme and Commentary (500 words)
  • Item 5: 40% Guided Film Analysis (1500 words)
Level: 4
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Culture and Language (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML4006BSemester 24Yes

Culture and Language (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze

Description: The course will introduce students to a wide range of texts, concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into two 5-week blocks. The precise content of these may change from year to year, but they will be broadly concerned with culture, language, and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Phonetic Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Short Answer Exercise (1500 words)
Level: 4
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Practical Techniques for Data SciencePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5131Semester 25No

Practical Techniques for Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA5666

Description: In this module, you will develop a broad range of skills in the practical analysis of real-world data. This will cover all of the major steps of data analysis, including the cleaning and pre-processing of datasets, initial analysis and visualisation techniques, the selection of appropriate methods to perform in-depth analyses and make statistical inferences from them, the fitting of meaningful physical models in the presence of imperfections and noise in the data, and the estimation of uncertainties and how they affect the conclusions that can be drawn. This module has an emphasis on the hands-on application of data analysis techniques using the Python and R programming languages, and is taught partly through lectures and partly through computer-based lab projects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Computer lab projects (8 x 3 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Lab reports (2 x 5000 words)
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Quantum Mechanics BPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6413PSemester 16No

Quantum Mechanics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber

Description: This module is both an introduction and revision, followed by an extended exposition of the basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include: Operators and the general structure of quantum mechanics, observables, orthonormality of eigenstates, expansion theorem, commuting operators, theory of measurement; The harmonic oscillator; Angular momentum theory, the rigid rotator and applications to rotation-vibration spectra of diatomic molecules; Spin in quantum mechanics illustrated with spin1/2: matrix representations, Stern-Gerlach experiments and measurement theory exemplified; Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics: Bosons and Fermions; Spherically symmetric potentials and the Hydrogen atom.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Physical CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6311PSemester 16No

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005P

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 4: 20% Mid-semester test
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Professional Skills for ScientistsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4601Semester 24Yes

Professional Skills for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Bevan

Description: This module develops professional and computational skills that are fundamental to the discipline, enable student engagement with employers, and expand student networks. Students develop introductory computational skills including using and writing computer programs to model physical systems, analyse quantitative data, and solve problems. These computational skills are applicable to any role that requires quantitative analysis and evidence-based decision making. Students will become proficient in preparing professional quality documents including scientific project reports, presentations and job application materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Coursework CV preparation, mock job-application materials and related
  • Item 2: 35% Continuous Assessment in Lab
  • Item 3: 50% Coursework - Written computer code submission, data Analysis write-up
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Culture and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML4006Full year4No

Culture and Language

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take COM4006

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts (literary and visual), concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into four 5-week blocks, devoted to topics such as, for example, Reading Literary Texts, Visual Cultures, Culture and Society, Linguistics. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Literature Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Creative Response and Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Revised Creative Response and Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 5% Meme and Commentary (500 words)
  • Item 5: 20% Guided Film Analysis (1500 words)
  • Item 6: 5% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 7: 20% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 8: 5% Phonetic Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 9: 20% Short Answer Exercise (1500 words)
Level: 4
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Physical CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6311Semester 16Yes

Physical Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philip Bull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7005U

Description: "This module covers the essential concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular introduces the student to what has become known as the ""cosmological standard model"". It discusses the structure and properties of the universe as we observe it today, its evolution and the the underlying physical concepts, and the observations that formed our understanding of the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 4: 20% Mid-semester test
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Comparative Law and Practice of International Courts and TribunalsLawSOLM277Semester 17Yes

Comparative Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Behn

Description: Comparative Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals (ICTs) provides a systemic empirical overview of international adjudication and introduces students to the comparative method through the critical appraisal and comparative analysis of the laws, decisions, processes, and policies of ICTs (defined as international institutions capable of resolving disputes through binding decisions and where at least one party to the dispute is a state). The module is organized around a series of 10 cross-cutting legal and/or practical themes common to all or most ICTs (e.g., appointment of international judges and arbitrators, sources of law and applicable law rules, jurisdiction and admissibility requirements, non-disputing party interventions, compliance with judgments/awards, legitimacy challenges, etc.). The module will not dedicate classes to the description of individual ICTs and students will be expected to familiarize themselves with ICTs and their basic features prior to the start of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian III NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6201Full year6Yes

Russian III N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% English-Russian Translation (Equivalent to 1300 words)
  • Item 2: 8% Russian-English Translation (Equivalent to 1200 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Cultural Research Project (3000 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 5: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Russian
Taxation and TradeLawSOLM275Full year7No

Taxation and Trade

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christiana Hjipanayi

Description: The module will consider the history of the interaction between trade and tax agreements and will analyse the impact on tax of multilateral WTO agreements (eg GATT 1994) since the WTO¿s creation in 1994. It will also examine the effects of bilateral trade agreements on taxation. Dispute resolution under trade agreements of matters concerning taxation will be addressed. Finally, the legitimate limits of the influence of international trade law on tax law will be interrogated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Advocacy in Commercial DisputesLawSOLM276Full year7No

Advocacy in Commercial Disputes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: This module offers the opportunity to learn about advocacy from an experienced English commercial barrister. The module begins by examining the role and nature of advocacy in commercial disputes. It then considers the theory of persuasion, a subject that is - surprisingly - rarely taught to law students. The rest of the module investigates the key skills of professional advocates, including oral and written submissions, and cross-examination. The module draws on a range of materials, from the rhetoric handbooks of classical antiquity to videos of recent hearings in the UK Supreme Court.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
DissertationLawSOLM925Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Mathematical Techniques IPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4121Semester 14Yes

Mathematical Techniques I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Clarkson

Description: Techniques of mathematics, mostly calculus, required in the study of the physical sciences. Topics will include vectors and scalars, vector components, addition and multiplication, complex numbers and functions, differentiation, partial differentiation, series, integration, polar coordinates and multiple integration. The course structure includes both lectures and self-paced programmed learning, with assessment by coursework and an end of year examination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Coursework
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Dissertation in Art, Business and LawLawSOLM924Full year7No

Dissertation in Art, Business and Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200BSemester 26Yes

Russian III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 6
Russian
Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications LawLawSOLM923Full year7No

Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Legal TechLawSOLM273Full year7No

Legal Tech

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: A course will be taught by leading practitioners in legal engineering and design, combining both academic and hands-on practical experience using some of the latest legal tech. This module will examine the theory and application of technology to legal practice and procedures It will consider how machine learning and AI has been, and could be, deployed within the legal sector to provide substantive legal advice, procedural risk analysis, the provision of legal services and contract and practice management. The interaction of technology and legal design will be examined, as well as the practical, legal and ethical issues that legal tech raise.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Migration LawLawSOLM264Semester 27Yes

International Migration Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Violeta Moreno-Lax

Description: This module examines the regulation in international law of human mobility for economic and other purposes (excluding for asylum under the international refuge law regime, which is studied in depth in SOLM171).

It provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts and workings of several specialized branches of international law in relation to migration in a global context. The module will look at international labour law; international human rights law; international security and anti-terrorism instruments; the maritime conventions and the law of the sea; nationality, borders and criminal law measures; as well as to disaster law, international environmental law, and development aid law to provide a comprehensive overview of the different regimes concerned with the regulation of the phenomenon.

The module will start by exploring the historical origins and development of international legal tools to regulate human mobility across borders, with a discussion of the available regulatory options and their ethical/philosophical underpinnings (ranging from the 'open borders' paradigm and the cosmopolitan approach to 'communitarian' perspectives on 'otherness' and belonging). The different regimes, actors and institutions playing a role in the legal administration of international migration will be examined next, with a particular focus on key inter-governmental institutions (such as the ILO and the IOM) and non-governmental actors (such as ICMPD and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants) as norms entrepreneurs in this area contributing to current regulatory processes worldwide (like the UN Global Compact on Migration). The study of substantive law, including relevant State practice and case law of national and international courts and Treaty bodies, will follow thereafter in thematic blocs: 1) labour migration, with a focus on the ILO conventions and the UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families; 2) family migration and children on the move, paying attention to the specific situation of unaccompanied minors and their protection under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child; 3) terrorism and the securitisation of migration after the 9/11 attacks, including the 'crimmigraton' paradigm; 4) irregular migration, human trafficking and migrant smuggling, with special reference to the 2000 Palermo Protocols to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the situation of 'boat migrants' at sea; and 5) the limits of international regulation with regard to emerging and highly polarizing issues, including climate change, natural disasters, famine, endemic poverty and under-development and their relation to "survival migration".

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Exam (3 hours 15 minutes) (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Research Methods for AstrophysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7020PSemester 17No

Research Methods for Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess

Description: "Research in astrophysics builds on a vast body of literature and archived data. This module is an introduction to research methods which exploit existing information sources in astrophysics. The module serves as preparation for the research project which forms a major part of the MSc programme. In this module students will learn how to review and evaluate with critical insight, the current state of research of a chosen area in astrophysics. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style, and will learn how to convey research material in a presentation. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These can include specific exercises in using astronomical data archives, scientific word processing, mathematical skills, using mathematical and data analysis packages, project planning, etc."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Poster or equivalent
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Research Review (1000 words)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Natural Resources LawLawSOLM254Semester 17Yes

International Natural Resources Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The international legal regime relating to natural resources is complex and multi-dimensional. It is found in many places, based on doctrines of public international law, regional and local laws as well specific treaty obligations. It is also a dynamic area of international law as changes in technology and environmental awareness of the impact of such developments have led to further changes in legal regime. Concepts in Natural Resources Law: Climate, Energy and Water intersects and supports the study of other disciplines including international environmental law, energy law, as well as international investment law and international economic law. Concepts in Natural Resources Law: Climate, Energy and Water examines the area of International Natural Resources Law from a multi-dimensional perspective with a particular emphasis on climate, energy and water resources. The impact of globalisation and international legal rules on activities in the natural resources sector will be explored throughout the unit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Criminal JusticeLawSOLM922Full year7No

Dissertation in Criminal Justice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Bank Insolvency and ResolutionLawSOLM013Full year7No

Bank Insolvency and Resolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: The module covers the various procedures available in financial distress scenarios aiming at restoring viability and overcoming the excessive burden of debt. The module will address these issues from the perspective of banks/financial conglomerates. The course will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203BSemester 24Yes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed the equivalent of one semester of Russian language at their home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 4
Russian
Quantum Mechanics BPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6413Semester 16Yes

Quantum Mechanics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218

Description: This module is both an introduction and revision, followed by an extended exposition of the basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include: Operators and the general structure of quantum mechanics, observables, orthonormality of eigenstates, expansion theorem, commuting operators, theory of measurement; The harmonic oscillator; Angular momentum theory, the rigid rotator and applications to rotation-vibration spectra of diatomic molecules; Spin in quantum mechanics illustrated with spin1/2: matrix representations, Stern-Gerlach experiments and measurement theory exemplified; Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics: Bosons and Fermions; Spherically symmetric potentials and the Hydrogen atom.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Physics Investigative ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7015UFull year7No

Physics Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kostya Trachencko

Description: A student will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. S/he will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation and placing them in a physics context. The project will run through both semesters and will involve keeping a research log (see 'Engagement Log' elsewhere on this page), interim coursework, a final written report and oral assessment at the end of semester B.
The aim of the investigative project is to give the student the opportunity to work independently on a chosen project towards specified goals. These goals will vary from project to project and may include: writing software to achieve a specified computational task, e.g., simulation of a physical process; carrying out a series of measurements to establish or disprove a working hypothesis; building a piece of equipment, e.g., to interface an experiment to a PC; analytical mathematical analysis applied to the study of a theoretical problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Performance during Project
  • Item 2: 50% Written Report
  • Item 3: 30% Final Oral Presentation
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Energy Decommissioning and Waste Management in International LawLawSOLM252Semester 17Yes

Energy Decommissioning and Waste Management in International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: The module on Energy Decommissioning and Waste Management in International Law examines the legal issues arising in connection with the decommissioning of energy infrastructure and the management of waste in the energy sector, both from a theoretical and practical perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hrs) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Spacetime and GravityPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6308PSemester 16No

Spacetime and Gravity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Monteiro

Description: This course presents the essential concepts of both special and general relativity. The emphasis is on the physical understanding of the theory and the mathematical development is kept simple, although more detailed treatments are included for those who wish to follow them; space-time diagrams being are used extensively. The course includes discussion of the big bang and black holes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Modern PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4402Semester 14Yes

Modern Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Elise Stacey Agra

Description: This module covers the dramatic developments in physics that occurred in the early twentieth century, introducing special and general relativity and quantum theory. In relativistic mechanics we will study special relativity; the Lorentz transformation; length contraction and time dilation; the clock paradox; relativistic kinematics and dynamics; general relativity and its tests and consequences; and black holes and galactic lenses. In quantum theory, we will study descriptions of the evidence for particle-like properties of waves, and wave-like properties of particles, followed by their consequences and their formal expression in physical law: topics include Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's equation and elementary quantum mechanics. We will also introduce the fundamental particles and the forces of the standard model of particle physics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Assessed problem sets and Tests
  • Item 2: 80% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Statistical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6403Semester 26Yes

Statistical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodore Kreouzis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5219

Description: Starting from the atomic and quantum descriptions of matter the module uses statistical principles to explain the behaviour of material in bulk. It thus relates microscopic to macroscopic quantities and provides a microscopic explanation of thermodynamics. It provides the bridge between microscopic quantum physics and the behaviour of matter as we know it daily.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Quantum Mechanics APhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5319Semester 15Yes

Quantum Mechanics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: "This course aims to introduce the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics from the beginning. By studying applications of the principles of quantum mechanics to simple systems the course will provide a foundation for understanding concepts such as energy quantisation, the uncertainty principle and quantum tunnelling, illustrating these with experimental demonstrations and other phenomena found in nature. These concepts are introduced and applied to systems of increasing (mathematical) complexity: (i)Infinite 1-D quantum wells. (ii)Finite 1-D quantum wells (introducing graphical solutions of transcendental equations). (iii)LCAO methods for modelling ions. (iv)Simple Harmonic oscillators (introducing Hermite polynomials and applying energy solutions to molecular vibrational spectra). (v)Beams of free particles, probability flux and reflection/transmission in stepwise varying potentials. (vi)Finite potential barriers and tunnelling, Tunnelling through arbitrary potential barriers (the Gamow factor), field emission and Alpha decay and tunnelling. The Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). (vii)The solution to the Hydrogen atom, including separation of variables, spherical harmonics, the radial equation and electronic energy levels and the quantum numbers n, l, ml and ms and resulting degeneracy. (viii)The treatment of angular momentum in quantum mechanics, its magnitude and projection along an axis. (ix)Introduction to first order, time independent, perturbation theory."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Spacetime and GravityPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6308Semester 16Yes

Spacetime and Gravity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Monteiro

Description: "This course presents the essential concepts of both special and general relativity. The emphasis is on the physical understanding of the theory and the mathematical development is kept simple, although more detailed treatments are included for those who wish to follow them; space-time diagrams being are used extensively. The course includes discussion of the big bang and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Coursework
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200Full year6Yes

Russian III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Online Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 4: 20% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Russian
Russian IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6200ASemester 16Yes

Russian III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Achievement of a high level of competence in the language. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS084N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 6
Russian
Scientific MeasurementPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4103Semester 14Yes

Scientific Measurement

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Peter Hobson

Description: Practical work in the laboratory serves to illustrate basic concepts in physics, and the processes of carrying out experiments and interpreting their results. You will be taught techniques of measurement and the use of instruments and computers. There are some lectures on statistics and data analysis, which are applied to the laboratory measurements. There is no final examination. All assessment is by coursework and laboratory reports.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
Children, Law, and SocietyLawSOLM271Semester 27Yes

Children, Law, and Society

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hedi Viterbo

Description: This module engages with legal and moral debates relating to children, at both the international and national levels. It examines a wide range of child-focused issues, such as those concerning colonialism, racialisation, sexuality, state regulation of the family, and children¿s voices. Students are introduced to relevant theories and studies, among which are theories of children's rights, postcolonial and anti-racist scholarship, queer theory, criticisms of child development theories, and writing about risk and 'moral panic'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 72% Independent Research Essay (5000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Presentation (10-15 min)
  • Item 3: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 1 (600-700 words)
  • Item 4: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 2 (600-700 words)
  • Item 5: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 3 (600-700 words)
  • Item 6: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 4 (600-700 words)
  • Item 7: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 5 (600-700 words)
  • Item 8: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 6 (600-700 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Economic LawLawSOLM921Full year7No

Dissertation in International Economic Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Our UniversePhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4101Semester 24Yes

Our Universe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson

Description: The module is a broad survey of Astronomy aiming to acquaint you with evolution of the universe and its constituents. A particular theme is the role played by the known laws of physics in understanding astronomical observation. You will: (i) gain a familiarity with the constituents of the observed universe; (ii) appreciate, and be able to explain, the important part played by the laws of physics in designing observations, and in interpreting and understanding them; (iii) be able to explain the different types of information obtainable from observations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio waves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Quizzes
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
International Child LawLawSOLM270Semester 17Yes

International Child Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hedi Viterbo

Description: This module examines the broad and ever-expanding field of international child law. It looks at how international child law relates to various contexts, such as armed conflict, migration, criminal justice, education, and labour. Discussions in the module draw on a rich array of theoretical sources, including historical and anthropological studies of childhood, critical scholarship on international law and human rights, and criticisms of international children¿s rights law in particular.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 72% Independent Research Essay (5000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Presentation (10-15 min)
  • Item 3: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 1 (600-700 words)
  • Item 4: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 2 (600-700 words)
  • Item 5: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 3 (600-700 words)
  • Item 6: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 4 (600-700 words)
  • Item 7: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 5 (600-700 words)
  • Item 8: 3% Weekly Writing Assignments 6 (600-700 words)
Level: 7
Law
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203ASemester 14Yes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The module is aimed at associate students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Praktikal Skills Assessment
Level: 4
Russian
Dissertation in Immigration LawLawSOLM919Full year7No

Dissertation in Immigration Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Sustainability and the CorporationLawSOLM269Semester 27Yes

Sustainability and the Corporation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Katrien Morbee

Description: This course examines how we should design, finance, and regulate corporations in order to align their incentives with sustainability issues in general and climate change in particular. The course will focus on issues such as the concept of sustainability, the relationship between sustainability and the corporation, the design of a sustainable corporation, the role of asset managers and the financial industry in general as stewards of sustainability, and the recent policy initiatives and regulation. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of sustainable business and finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Exam (2 hours 15 minutes) (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Relativity and GravitationPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7019USemester 17Yes

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6308

Description: "This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzchild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International Economic Law ClinicLawSOLM263Semester 17No

International Economic Law Clinic

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: This module offers the unique opportunity to work on a real legal project on international economic law of practical importance to a beneficiary. The module is conducted as a legal clinic running over semesters 2 and 3. Students will be grouped in project teams each consisting of a maximum of four students and assigned a project to work on specific questions posed by real beneficiaries who are seeking legal advice on specific problems in international economic law. Under the supervision of an academic supervisor and with the support of professional mentors, each team will prepare written legal memoranda on the assigned problem and present it to the beneficiaries at the end of semester 3. The bulk of the module consists on students' independent work on the project along with meetings with academic supervisors, mentors and beneficiaries as well as workshops on professional skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Individual Oral Assessment (10 minutes with 10 minutes for questions and answers)
  • Item 2: 65% Written Report (Group Grade, 10000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Economic Law ClinicLawSOLM263Full year7No

International Economic Law Clinic

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari

Description: This module offers the unique opportunity to work on a real legal project on international economic law of practical importance to a beneficiary. The module is conducted as a legal clinic running over semesters 2 and 3. Students will be grouped in project teams each consisting of a maximum of four students and assigned a project to work on specific questions posed by real beneficiaries who are seeking legal advice on specific problems in international economic law. Under the supervision of an academic supervisor and with the support of professional mentors, each team will prepare written legal memoranda on the assigned problem and present it to the beneficiaries at the end of semester 3. The bulk of the module consists on students' independent work on the project along with meetings with academic supervisors, mentors and beneficiaries as well as workshops on professional skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Individual Oral Assessment (10 minutes with 10 minutes for questions and answers)
  • Item 2: 65% Written Report (Group Grade, 10000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Merger Control: The JurisdictionsLawSOLM249Semester 17Yes

International Merger Control: The Jurisdictions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: Within the field of competition law, merger control has attracted special attention. The reason for this attention can be found in the special nature of mergers as a business phenomenon, especially when compared with other business phenomena, such as abuse of dominance by firms or cartel activities. The process of relentless globalisation which has been developing since the 1990s has meant that merger operations can produce an effect on the conditions of competition in more than one jurisdiction. This means that, quite inevitably, regulatory approval in more than one jurisdiction may need to be sought. Such a consequence ¿ as is widely accepted ¿ can give rise to uncertainty for the firms concerned and cause huge expense and significant delay. Those who are involved in advising business firms in a merger situation are also not immune from the uncertainty when merger operations have to be notified to more than one competition authority. Often legal advisors have to answer extremely difficult questions in merger cases, such as whether notification of the merger to the competition authorities in one or more jurisdictions is necessary or mandatory or even desirable; which authorities need to be notified; what is required for this purpose and how to go about notifying the authorities concerned; and how will the authorities assess the merger, including any relevant time framework within which they will operate and ultimately reach a decision in a given case.

The Module will aim at a thorough examination of the highly important phenomena of international mergers and their regulation worldwide. Different merger control regimes worldwide and their operation will be an important part of the focus in the Module.

The Module will be taught in a very practical manner, to reflect the very nature of the topic. A highly interesting range of case studies and the knowledge and expertise of practitioners in the field will be a key aspect of the course. The Module should prove to be attractive for students attending other competition law courses and those with an `international¿ dimension in other areas of commercial orientation on the LLM.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Climate JusticeLawSOLM262Semester 17Yes

Climate Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by corporates and states and it explores the definition and nature of crime that causes harm to the environment in criminological, legal and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature and the scale and type of crimes committed by companies, states and their agents that damage the environment and ecosystems. There will also be an exploration of resistance tactics, from law-fare to civil society censure of environmental harm. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative (but not exhaustive) of the subjects that will be covered: corporate environmental crime, food insecurity, state and state-corporate environmental crime, CSR and 'green' business practice, the economy of environmental protection, the power of civil society to resist planet degradation, the genocide-ecocide nexus, corruption, agribusiness, toxic waste dumping and land grabbing. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The GalaxyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7010PSemester 27No

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA6305P or take INU7071P

Description: "The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Statistical Data AnalysisPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6328Semester 16Yes

Statistical Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Seth Zenz

Description: Statistical Data Analysis teaches the fundamentals of probability and statistics, data analysis, and machine learning, as applied to discovering, classifying, and measuring new phenomena. It draws on examples from a wide range of applications, within physics and far beyond. Students will learn to perform statistical calculations, to understand statistical usage in scientific research papers, and to apply practical programming techniques for more advanced analyses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Written problem sheet 1
  • Item 2: 5% Written problem sheet 2
  • Item 3: 10% Essay on scientific paper
  • Item 4: 5% Written problem sheet 3
  • Item 5: 15% Coding assignment
  • Item 6: 60% Final exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Law and Ethics in Business and FinanceLawSOLM011Semester 17Yes

Law and Ethics in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: The module provides students with a broad understanding of the importance of conducting business activities (both financial and non-financial) with fairness and integrity and how this is reflected in EU and UK law and supervisory powers. By making reference to real case studies, the module investigates the legal framework pertaining to bribes, market manipulation, and other malpractices and critically analyses its effectiveness taking also into account the deterrence effect, or lack thereof, of the sanctioning and prosecution regime. It then covers corporate social responsibility and sustainable/responsible investment to analyse if and how this can nudge change. The module will also touch upon the efficacy of the organizational requirements companies are obliged to have in place to prevent unethical conduct from happening and/or spreading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Individual Student Report (1500-2500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Group video
Level: 7
Law
Astrophysical PlasmasPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7004USemester 27Yes

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Chen

Description: "A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7009USemester 27Yes

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper

Description: "Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Coursework
  • Item 2: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Modern Languages Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML005Full year6No

Modern Languages Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Hannah Scott Deuchar

Description: Entry to this module will not be automatic. All students wishing to take this module must meet the entry requirements, present an approved topic and have an agreed supervisor. It is designed to enable suitably qualified final-year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual or group research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. Introductory group sessions on research methods will be followed by individual supervision. You should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Project Progress Exercise (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 90% Research Project (8000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Mergers and AcquisitionsLawSOLM010Semester 27Yes

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This module is a corporate law and financial regulation module analyzing transactions using sophisticated methodologies. The module will focus on issues such as: due diligence, purchase sale agreements and contractual governance; the role of the board of directors in an acquisition/financing transaction; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, the US and the EU; the protection of minority shareholders in common law and civil law jurisdictions; the protection of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions; and financial assistance regulation in the UK, US and the EU. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Quantum Mechanics and SymmetryPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6325Semester 26Yes

Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steven Thomas
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take INK7002U
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA5218
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA6413

Description: The module will give you a grounding in the more formal and axiomatic approach to quantum mechanics and introduce you to the application of these tools in the quantum mechanical description of symmetries in particle physics. Topics include: Dirac notation; Hilbert space; linear operators; formal axioms of quantum mechanics; Schoedinger and Heisenberg pictures; harmonic oscillator; raising and lowering operators; time independent perturbation theory; transformation operators; translations and rotations of coordinates; conservation laws and good quantum numbers; rotation operators; angular momentum operators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Weekly homework Exercises
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Elementary Particle PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6306Semester 26Yes

Elementary Particle Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ulla Blumenschein

Description: "An introduction to the standard model of particle physics - the strong and electroweak interactions between the basic constituents of the world, quarks and leptons, via the exchange of gluons, photons and W and Z particles. Recent results on CP violation and neutrino mixing. The search for the Higgs particle. Beyond the standard model - Grand unified theories and supersymmetry."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
  • Item 3: 20% Mid-semester test
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Classical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA4401Semester 14Yes

Classical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Berman

Description: This module reviews the classical understanding of space, time and motion: the fundamental physical principles that underpin modern physics. We begin with an overview of classical mechanics, where we will study kinematics and dynamics; rotational motion; dynamics of a rigid body and the gyroscope; and gravity and planetary orbits. In the second part of the module, we focus on oscillatory phenomena and wave motion, which occur throughout nature in fields from biology to quantum mechanics. Topics will include the 1D wave equation; free, damped, forced and coupled oscillations; resonance and driven simple harmonic motion; calculations of normal modes for coupled oscillators; waves in linear media including gases and solids; dispersion, phase and group velocity; interference, beats and standing waves; simple diffraction phenomena; and the Doppler effect in sound and light.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Assessed problem sets and Tests
  • Item 2: 80% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Physics and Astronomy
The Physics of GalaxiesPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA6305PSemester 26No

The Physics of Galaxies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesco Volponi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SPA7010P

Description: "Galaxies are the building blocks of the universe and deserve the extensive study they now enjoy. This course applies basic physical ideas to astronomical observations, exploring the properties of galaxies themselves and the evolution of structure in the universe."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
  • Item 3: 10% Mid-semester Test
Level: 6
Physics and Astronomy
Differential Geometry in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7027PSemester 17No

Differential Geometry in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018P

Description: The aim of this course is to complement the core Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields (RWQF) module by providing the student with some advanced tools essential for research in modern Theoretical Physics. Using the same starting point as RWQF, Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, we will focus on the Lagrangian formulation of the two most prominent theories of our time: Yang-Mills (gauge) theory and gravity. The alternative notation of differential forms will be explored and the geometric aspects of gauge theory emphasised. Building on this, and introducing elements from group theory and fibre bundles we will introduce classical solitons as localised, finite energy solutions to the classical field equations in various dimensions (kinks in 2d, vortices in 3d, monopoles in 4d, instantons in Euclidean 4d) and discuss their properties, including the existence of zero-modes, associated collective coordinates and moduli spaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Philosophical Foundations of Private International LawLawSOLM268Semester 17Yes

Philosophical Foundations of Private International Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Roxana Banu

Description: This course is offered as part of the LL.M. in Legal Theory. It is intended for students who are interested in both jurisprudence and private international law. It is also aimed at students who want to explore and challenge the role played by core jurisprudential concepts and theories in the context of inter-personal legal relations spanning across multiple jurisdictions. This seminar fills an important curricular void. On the one hand, courses in legal theory often adopt the traditional focus in jurisprudence on law as a singular (either the law of a state or law as an abstract category), rather than on relations between legal systems. On the other hand, courses in private international law generally focus on doctrinal material and broad theoretical principles, rather than the philosophical underpinnings of the field. Furthermore, even courses at the intersection of philosophy and international law focus primarily on the jurisprudential dimension of public, rather than private international law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Culture and Revolution: Russia and ChinaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6067Semester 16Yes

Culture and Revolution: Russia and China

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take RUS5067 or take SML5067

Description: This module examines the notion of culture as a central instrument in the transformation of society as it was adopted and deployed in the 20th century¿s two most influential Communist revolutions, in Russia and China. The module covers themes including the representation of the revolution, the image of the Communist and debates around Socialist Realism, tracing their evolution and expression in a variety of media including film, prose fiction and art. This module is offered at level 5 and level 6 and students' performance will be considered against the relevant level benchmark as outlined in the SLLF UG Handbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 6
Russian
StarsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA5307Semester 25Yes

Stars

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Tsiklauri

Description: "Stars are a vital building block in the Universe: forming out of interstellar gas and dust, and themselves being a major component of galaxies. They are also vital for providing the nuclear reactions that create the elements from which planets and even ourselves are formed. This course describes how the fundamental properties of stars are related to observations. Temperatures and densities in the centre of stars reach values that are unattainable in the laboratory. Yet the application of basic physical principles can help us determine much about the internal structure and evolution of stars, from their formation to their ultimate end states in such exotic and spectacular objects as white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
  • Item 3: 10% Mid-semester Test
Level: 5
Physics and Astronomy
Research EssayLawSOLM950Semester 17No

Research Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: The research paper will examine a particular area of law. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Research EssayLawSOLM951Semester 27No

Research Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: The research paper will examine a particular area of law. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Insurance Law (30 credits)LawSOLM930Full year7No

Dissertation in Insurance Law (30 credits)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Energy and Climate Change LawLawSOLM931Full year7No

Dissertation in Energy and Climate Change Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Arbitration Award WritingLawSOLM928Semester 27No

International Arbitration Award Writing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: The course consists of self-study, a residential course for students and further self-study. Students will be sent a reading list as well as a set of reading materials focusing on arbitration awards, their characteristics, functions and drafting. The residential course will consist of one full day of teaching and learning by way of a seminar.
At the residential course students will be given the first set of materials relating to a fictional arbitration case; these will normally cover all information but the hearing. Candidates will be required to start working on the awards by drafting summary of facts, summary of parties' positions, claims, etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources Law (30 credits)LawSOLM929Full year7No

Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources Law (30 credits)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Environmental LawLawSOLM915Full year7No

Dissertation in Environmental Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in International Shipping LawLawSOLM917Full year7No

Dissertation in International Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Tax LawLawSOLM914Full year7No

Dissertation in Tax Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Introductory RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4203Full year4Yes

Introductory Russian

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This module is aimed at students with either no or very little previous knowledge of the Russian language. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including the alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes. The module is intended primarily for Russian language specialists and for other students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Practical Skills Assessment
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Assessment and Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Online Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central AsiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6057Semester 16Yes

Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze

Description: Once part of the ancient Silk Road, the countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia have a roller-coaster history which includes subjection to Russian imperial and Soviet rule. Through the prism of award-winning literature and film by a new post-Soviet generation of women (e.g. Mariam Petrosyan¿s The Gray House, 2009; Nana Ekvtimishvili¿s In Bloom, 2013), this module explores the cultural and socio-political developments in the now independent Georgia, Armenia, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Themes to discuss will include childhood, youth, migration, post-Soviet identity, the effects of colonialism, and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
Russian
Trade, Environment and IPRSLawSOLM267Semester 27Yes

Trade, Environment and IPRS

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: The tragedy of the commons doctrine argues that humans are locked into a system whereby our pursuit of self-interest erodes the commons. But according to a different view, human society is fully capable of managing the commons in ways that protect the commons and benefits us all. Continuous trade and economic growth may eventually lead to an exhaustion of environmental resources. But this is not inevitable and trade relations can be managed in sustainable and mutually beneficial ways. One means to combat this is to accept that institutional intervention and technical progress should be focused so that resources are continuously directed towards environmental improvement. Moreover, the regulation of the environment (as in food, traditional genetic resources, green technologies) affects the trading patterns of both large and small producer countries.

This module explores these concerns by studying the interrelation between : (i) the environment (as in food, agriculture, climate, bio-prospecting, and other ancillary rights such as human rights, Nagoya Protocols on climate and biodiversity rules, access and benefit sharing); (ii) trade (as in regulations within the EU, US and WTO, and other UN organisations), and (iii) IPRs (as in patents, plant variety rights, utility models, trade marks, geographical indications and technology transfer).

Our environment is of fundamental importance. Activities that derive from our environment (including agriculture, fishing, consuming natural resources) matters more than almost any other productive human activity. Our environment supplies our most basic human needs, and it employs vast numbers of people. Human activities have a transformative effect on the biosphere. Indeed, it has arguably done more than any other activity to give rise to a new era in the Earth¿s history: the Anthropocene. One example is the commercial agricultural sector where farmers are supplied with inputs such as seeds and agrochemicals and advanced new technologies produced by high-tech corporations like Monsanto and Syngenta. The processing of food and other products that are grown or reared by farmers and pastoralists is carried out by transnational corporations. These products are delivered to customers by retailers that may be small and local or are massive operations. The vital role of small-scale farmers especially in the developing countries needs to be acknowledged but all too rarely is. Along all parts of the value chain there is much pressure to innovate and intellectual property rights are an essential feature of the way businesses and markets operate, how investment choices are made and where innovative activities do (and do not) take place.

Thus, this module will analyse the legal regulation of such resources from national and international levels, with reference to technology, intellectual property, agricultural and climate policies, and human rights vis-a-vis the global industries.

The module is intended to complement substantive modules on the protection of intellectual property. Therefore, students are assumed to have a basic understanding of intellectual property rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation of Research Topic (30 minutes)
  • Item 2: 80% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Relativity and GravitationPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7019PSemester 17No

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton

Description: This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzschild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Corporate ViolenceLawSOLM260Semester 17Yes

Corporate Violence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by corporates and it explores the definition and nature of corporate crime in criminological, legal and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the corporation and the scale and type of crimes committed by companies and their agents. The definitional processes involved in labeling corporates acts as criminal are explored, as are the forces which explain why and how corporates enter into deviant or criminal practices. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative of the subjects that will be covered: corporate manslaughter, State-corporate crime, business and human rights, the power of civil society, corruption, corporate crime denial, and land grabbing. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
State CrimeLawSOLM261Semester 27Yes

State Crime

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Macmanus

Description: This module is about crime committed by governments and it explores the definition and nature of state crime in criminological and political discourse. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the state and the scale and type of crimes committed by governments and their agents. The definitional processes involved in labeling states acts as criminal are explored, as are the forces which explain why and how states enter into deviant or criminal practices. Consisting of lectures, seminars and film, the following list is indicative of the subjects that will be covered: Torture, State-corporate crime, counter-terrorism and human rights, Natural Disasters, Asylum Policy as state crime, War Crimes, Genocide, Resisting State Crime: the power of civil society, corruption, state crime denial, comparative genocides, and forced evictions. The course will also feature visiting leading scholars, and representatives from key NGOs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Regulation and Compliance ClinicLawSOLM258Semester 27No

Regulation and Compliance Clinic

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: The Regulation and Compliance Clinic is the opportunity for students to apply the skills and knowledge they acquire about regulation and compliance to a real life setting. In this this module, students will work with partners to (1) develop and hone their oral presentation skills; (2) develop and hone their written professional skills; and (3) understand and replicate how entities deal with regulatory issue. The Clinic blends problem based approach with hands-on experience.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Reflective Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Law and Economics of Regulation and ComplianceLawSOLM259Semester 17No

Law and Economics of Regulation and Compliance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This course covers different topics of economic analysis of regulation and compliance. The first part of the course focuses on the economic theory of regulations. The second part of the course investigates different regulated industries: environment, energy, telecom, and financial sector. Finally, the course discusses the economics of compliance and what happens when industries are deregulated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Multiple choice
  • Item 2: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Essay 2 (1000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202BSemester 24Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Russian
Extended Essay in PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY606Full year6No

Extended Essay in Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shirley Wang

Description: The extended essay is intended to give students an opportunity to study in-depth a topic of particular interest to them within the subject of Psychology. The essay will not entail the student conducting empirical research. Students can choose to do the Extended Essay rather than SBC304 Psychology Research Project but will need to take another 15-credit module in their final year. The Extended Essay module is intended to provide an opportunity for the student to write substantively, critically and independently about a selected and approved area of Psychology than is possible in a tutorial essay. The work also involves significant evaluation of theoretical issues relevant to the topic under investigation and the student is expected to use original research articles. The assessment comprises a substantive written dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Extended Essay (5000 words)
Level: 6
PsychologyBIO_PSY_6_S
Psychology MSc Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY700PFull year7No

Psychology MSc Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Caroline Brennan

Description: n this module, students will conduct an in-depth research project focusing on an aspect of psychiatric disorders or psychological wellbeing from a social, cognitive, behavioural, neuroscientific, or genetic perspective. Students will be introduced to potential supervisors and their research areas, develop a project proposal as part of Semester A module: Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences I*. Students will complete their ethics application, begin designing their experiment and collecting data in semester B. In semester C they are expected to focus solely on the analysis, interpretation, and write-up of the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Presentation
  • Item 2: 90% Research project (15000 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
Experimental Design and Practice 1Engineering and Materials ScienceEMS410USemester 14No

Experimental Design and Practice 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jose Castrejon Pita

Description: This module will centre around a problem-based learning framework which focuses on the development and implementation of experiments, with data analysis and reporting guided by examples, supplemented with supporting delivery to build on knowledge and content from the other modules in the first semester of the School of Engineering and Materials first year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Individual experiment video
  • Item 2: 5% Excel spreadsheet
  • Item 3: 10% SOP, errors
  • Item 4: 10% Group video
  • Item 5: 15% Poster
  • Item 6: 10% Regression
  • Item 7: 20% Individual report
  • Item 8: 25% Group presentation
Level: 4
Engineering and Materials Science
Reading, Theory and Interpretation: Approaches to the Study of English LiteratureEnglish and DramaESH102Semester 24Yes

Reading, Theory and Interpretation: Approaches to the Study of English Literature

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Molly Macdonald

Description: 'Reading, Theory and Interpretation' is a foundational module that will introduce you to some of the central problems involved in the interpretation of literature. At the same time, the module will provide you with an introduction to some of the most influential and challenging theories of interpretation itself. Throughout the history of literature, there have arisen various competing interpretations of literary texts and, with that, the need to adjudicate between rival interpretations from interdisciplinary backgrounds.
'Theory' has therefore emerged as a means of justifying particular interpretations over and against others. This module will demonstrate the connections between different theoretical perspectives within English Literature, and aims to help you to understand why these opposing "readings", theoretical perspectives, and interpretations occur, and how to analyse some of the more ambitious and compelling theories through which these readings have been generated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Written Assignment 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Written Assignment 2 (2000 words)
Level: 4
English
MSc Advanced Research ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7500PFull year7No

MSc Advanced Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem

Description: This module draws together the knowledge and skills from the taught component to address a research challenge of significant scope to be undertaken independently, under supervision. It focuses on the technical, project management and communication skills needed to successfully execute academic- and/or industry-oriented research. The project entails to apply research methods to solve original problems of fundamental or applied nature. The module is assessed by oral examination and a thesis produced at the end.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (35000 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceEMS402USemester 14No

Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh

Description: This module will support the learning experience and achievement on other modules and will assist students in achieving their employability potential after graduation through the context of engineering design. Technical content such as CAD training is designed to prepare students for other modules. The module will consist of active learning sessions (lecture-type and webinars), working in small groups to design a component or simple system in accordance with a design brief, CAD training sessions and supervised workshop sessions to develop practical building skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Activity Portfolio
  • Item 2: 20% Design Project Proposal
  • Item 3: 60% Design Project Report
Level: 4
Engineering and Materials Science
Embedded SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS714PSemester 17No

Embedded Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh

Description: This module provides a practice-oriented introduction to embedded real-time systems. The main topics are (1) Modelling and simulation in UML and state-of-the-art tools; (2) Basic concepts of micro-controllers; (3) Real-time systems with interrupts and schedulers; (4) Real-time operating systems: processes and communication; (5) Energy aware design and construction; (6) Debugging and testing as part of software development processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Lab and tests
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Embedded SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS714USemester 17No

Embedded Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh

Description: This module provides a practice-oriented introduction to embedded real-time systems. The main topics are (1) Modelling and simulation in UML and state-of-the-art tools; (2) Basic concepts of micro-controllers; (3) Real-time systems with interrupts and schedulers; (4) Real-time operating systems: processes and communication; (5) Energy aware design and construction; (6) Debugging and testing as part of software development processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Lab and tests
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Introduction to Computer VisionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS709PSemester 17No

Introduction to Computer Vision

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Cavallaro

Description: In recent years, research in computer vision has made significant progress. This is largely driven by the recognition that effective visual perception is crucial in understanding intelligent behaviour - unless we understand how we perceive, we will never understand how we reason The first part of the module will introduce the relevant concepts and techniques in machine learning. In the second part we will show how these techniques can be applied to various areas in computer vision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Technical Report 1
  • Item 3: 25% Technical Report 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Design for Human InteractionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS712PSemester 17No

Design for Human Interaction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pat Healey

Description: Developments in information technology have radically altered the nature of human communication. Spatial and temporal constraints on communication have been weakened or removed and new structures and forms of communication have developed. For some technologies, such as video conferencing, text messaging and online communities, the importance of understanding their effect on human communication is clear. However, even the success of 'individualistic' technologies, such as spreadsheets, can be shown to depend partly on their impact on patterns of interaction between people. Conversely, some technologies, such as videophones, that are specifically designed to enhance communication can sometimes make it worse. Currently, there is no accepted explanation of how technologies alter, and are altered by, the patterns and processes of human communication. Such an explanation is necessary for effective design of new technologies. This research led module explores these issues by introducing psychological theories of the nature of human communication and socio-historical perspectives on the development and impact of communication technologies. These models are applied to the analysis of new communications technologies and the effects of those technologies on communication patterns between individuals, groups and societies. A variety of different technologies are introduced ranging from systems for the support of tightly-coupled synchronous interactions through to large-scale shared workspaces for the support of extended collaborations. Detailed studies of the effects of different technologies on task performance, communication processes and user satisfaction are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the notion of communicative success and to the development of metrics that can be used in assessing it. Frameworks for analysing the communicative properties of different media will be introduced as well as approaches to the analysis of communication in groups and organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Critical essay
  • Item 2: 20% Diary study
  • Item 3: 20% Interaction Analysis
  • Item 4: 20% Technology Study
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Machine Learning DeploymentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7027PFull year7No

Machine Learning Deployment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jesus Requena-Carrion

Description: Machine Learning Deployment covers the fundamental concepts, methodology and practical tools necessary to turn machine learning models into products that generate value. This module combines modern machine learning and software engineering development and teaches how to design, build and maintain end-to-end machine learning production systems, both on-device and served by cloud platforms. The conceptual and practical skills learned in Machine Learning Deployment will allow students to create machine learning based products that solve real-world problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 40% Assignment 1 (3500 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Assignment 2 (3500 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Ethics, Regulation and Law in Advanced Digital Information Processing and Decision MakingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7025PSemester 27No

Ethics, Regulation and Law in Advanced Digital Information Processing and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mahesha Samaratunga

Description: This module takes a practical approach to the coverage of ethics in Artificial Intelligence and Data Science. It sees ethical considerations as part of a spectrum of concerns, including ethics, but extending through regulation and legal compliance as formal expressions of what is and is not ethical. It considers examples of the kinds of issues that arise in existing systems, and uses the UK Government's Ethical Framework as an example of how to embed considerations of ethics into business processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class learning check-tests
  • Item 2: 20% Case Study
  • Item 3: 50% Coursework
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Neural Networks and Deep LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7026PSemester 27No

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jesus Requena-Carrion

Description: The module covers the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of Neural Networks and automatic differentiation as a tool for modern AI. Neural Networks & Deep Learning are now the method of choice for solving various Machine Learning problems. They are applied to several real-world problems not only within Academia but most importantly within Industry. Knowledge of Neural Networks and how to apply them to solve practical problems is now considered one of the most essential skills in the job market for a CS graduate. The module will include a detailed exposition for Neural Networks and their implementation using a Deep Learning framework. Topics covered include but not limited to: Automatic Differentiation, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Regression, Softmax Regression, Multi-Layer Perceptrons, Training of Neural Networks and hyper-parameter optimization, Convolutional Neural Networks, Recurrent Neural Networks. Applications of Neural Networks to Vision and NLP.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Mini-project (Report and Software)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
5G Mobile and BeyondElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7021PSemester 27No

5G Mobile and Beyond

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Arumugam Nallanathan

Description: This module covers the fundamentals of 5G mobile telecommunication, including: Standardisation, Air interface, Waveforms, MIMO methods, Densification, SON and backhaul technologies, Cooperative communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Programming Lab and Tutorial Assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
5G Mobile and BeyondElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7021USemester 27No

5G Mobile and Beyond

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Arumugam Nallanathan

Description: This module covers the fundamentals of 5G mobile telecommunication, including: Standardisation, Air interface, Waveforms, MIMO methods, Densification, SON and backhaul technologies, Cooperative communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Programming Lab and Tutorial Assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Machine LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS708USemester 17No

Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Patras

Description: The aim of the module is to give students an understanding of machine learning methods, including pattern recognition, clustering and neural networks, and to allow them to apply such methods in a range of areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Laboratory Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 20% Laboratory Assignment 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Project Management for Big Data AnalysisElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7015WSemester 17No

Project Management for Big Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: This module will provide degree apprentices with the methodological skills to manage a big data project, both in terms of managing time/schedule and in terms of tools and technologies. It will encompass the whole data analysis pipeline, including obtaining and checking data, analysis, results evaluation, and feedback loop to evolve/improve the process. Degree apprentices will also gain practical experience in applying the taught methodology to data drawn from their own workplace context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Online test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Project Report (3000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Presentation (30 min)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Principles of Machine LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7020PSemester 27No

Principles of Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jesus Requena-Carrion

Description: Principles of Machine Learning covers the fundamental concepts, methodology and practical tools necessary to understand, build and assess data-driven models to describe real-world systems and predict their behaviour. We will follow the standard machine learning taxonomy to organise problems and techniques into well-defined families (supervised and unsupervised learning) and subfamilies. We will pay particular attention to the methodology that we need to use to avoid and identify common pitfalls. State-of-the-art models and the latest developments on model deployment will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework1
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Quantum ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7011USemester 27No

Quantum Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Donnan

Description: This module is designed for interested novices at final-year MEng/MSci undergraduate level to explore the coming revolution in computing and programming that will move to so-called 'quantum' systems that will massively transform the speed and quantity of computation that can be performed. Its impact on the Internet and mobile services is expected to be a sea-change. The student will be briefly introduced at a conversational-level to physical principles that enable quantum computing before moving on for the bulk of the time in hands-on programming special to quantum systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Lab Report 1
  • Item 2: 25% Lab Report 2
  • Item 3: 50% Multiple MCQs
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Modelling and PerformanceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7008PSemester 27No

Modelling and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Schormans

Description: Background material: probability, conditional probability, Markov models,
Queue modelling of OS, e.g. multi-tasking, proof (and uses) of Little¿s law.
Workload modelling: exponential versus Pareto; call centre analysis.
Simulation-how to generate random numbers from arbitrary distributions, steady state versus terminating; output analysis; some simple simulation applications.
Reliability theory: oriented towards electronic systems, though e.g. passive component failure, and then to microprocessor (embedded software) systems through s/w failures
Network Science: introduction to the fundamental ideas in network science: graph theory, network metrics, network models, network robustness. Approach to modelling emergence and topological robustness of supply networks, communication networks and general human-technology interaction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Coursework
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Quantum ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7011PSemester 27No

Quantum Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Raul Mondragon-Ceballos

Description: This module is designed for interested novices at postgraduate level to explore the coming revolution in computing and programming that will move to so-called 'quantum' systems that will massively transform the speed and quantity of computation that can be performed. Its impact on the Internet and mobile services is expected to be a sea-change. The student will be briefly introduced at a conversational level to physical principles that enable quantum computing before moving on for the bulk of the time in hands-on programming special to quantum systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% MCQ 1
  • Item 2: 10% MCQ 2
  • Item 3: 10% MCQ 3
  • Item 4: 10% MCQ 4
  • Item 5: 10% MCQ 5
  • Item 6: 25% Lab Report 1
  • Item 7: 25% Lab Report 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Principles of Machine LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7020PSemester 17No

Principles of Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jesus Requena-Carrion

Description: Principles of Machine Learning covers the fundamental concepts, methodology and practical tools necessary to understand, build and assess data-driven models to describe real-world systems and predict their behaviour. We will follow the standard machine learning taxonomy to organise problems and techniques into well-defined families (supervised and unsupervised learning) and subfamilies. We will pay particular attention to the methodology that we need to use to avoid and identify common pitfalls. State-of-the-art models and the latest developments on model deployment will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework1
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Advanced Robotics Systems (Robotics III)Electronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7004PSemester 27No

Advanced Robotics Systems (Robotics III)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lorenzo Jamone

Description: The module will introduce both basic and advanced concepts related to geometric, kinematic, and dynamic robots manipulation, vision and machine learning specifically for Robotics, motion control and practical implementation of locomotion solutions, mechanical considerations of medical robots and the necessity of understanding acceptance and ethical values, etc. It will introduce the practicality of applying multidisciplinary techniques in enhancing the current state of the art in Robotics and allow the students to explore creative and engineered solutions that are outside the box along side conventional industrial and cognitive applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Robot programming exercise 1
  • Item 3: 15% Robot programming exercise 2
  • Item 4: 25% MCQ
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Computer Architecture and NetworksElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7010PSemester 17No

Computer Architecture and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chris Phillips

Description: The main focus of this module is software engineering and systems analysis. Students will learn about binary digital logic, essential aspects of computer architecture, the hardware/software interface, and computer networks, particularly the Internet. Content covers:

Digital Logic and information representation in binary
The Concept of a Stored Program Computer: the von Neumann Architecture and the Fetch/Execute Cycle
The Memory Hierarchy and Caching
The Concept of a Packet Switched Network: Internet Protocols
Routing and Performance Issues with Networks
Representative Internet applications such as DNS and the WWW (HTTP)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Written Report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
End-Point AssessmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS698USemester 26No

End-Point Assessment

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Eranjan Padumadasa

Description: The end-point assessment (EPA) gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate that they have attained the skills, knowledge and behaviours set out on the standard.

There are two parts to the end-point assessment:
(a) A Project Report (a written account of a set of practical tasks undertaken within a work based project context), which the independent assessor assesses and grades.
(b) A Professional Discussion (a structured discussion with the independent assessor allowing the apprentice to respond to questions using a portfolio), which the independent assessor assesses and grades. The assessment methods are designed to assess the full set of knowledge, skills and behaviours as specified in the standard. Annex A shows which knowledge, skill or behaviour outcome is being assessed by which assessment method. A failure to pass either one of the methods means that the apprentice has failed overall and neither the apprenticeship nor the master¿s degree will be awarded. This is just until the failed assessment has been passed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% End-Point Assessment
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Digital Media and Social NetworksElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS757PSemester 27No

Digital Media and Social Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mathieu Barthet

Description: Introduction to Online Social Networks (OSN)
Characteristics of OSNs
Basic Graph Theory
Small World Phenomenon
Information propagation on OSNs
Influence and Content Recommendation
Sentiment Analysis in Social Media
Privacy and ethics

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 6% Assignment 1 - MCQ
  • Item 2: 6% Assignment 2 - MCQ
  • Item 3: 6% Assignment 3 - MCQ
  • Item 4: 20% Assignment 4 - Project presentation
  • Item 5: 6% Assignment 5 - MCQ
  • Item 6: 6% Assignment 6 - MCQ
  • Item 7: 50% Assignment 7 - Project paper
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
MSc by Research ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS754PFull year7No

MSc by Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem

Description: This substantial individual research project, worth 8 units, is taken as part of the MSc by Research offering from the Department of Computer Science. Candidates undertake an extended period of research embedded in an appropriate Departmental Research Group. Regular supervision and feedback sessions, combined with active engagement in departmental research seminars support students individual learning and development of research skills. Students will normally be expected to have authored an academic paper as part of the module. Assessment is by written thesis and viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project assessments
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Distributed SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS656USemester 26No

Distributed Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gianni Antichi

Description: The Internet interconnects billions of machines, ranging from high end servers to limited capacity embedded sensing devices. Distributed systems are built to take advantage of multiple interconnected machines and achieve common goals with them. The module will cover the fundamental concepts and technical challenges of building distributed systems. The topics will include the characteristics of network communications for applications, application-level communication protocols, the concept of synchronization (implications, role of consistency modes and protocols), as well as the impact of data replication, and options for tolerating failures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Labs
  • Item 3: 40% Project
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Music Perception and CognitionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS741PSemester 17No

Music Perception and Cognition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcus Pearce

Description: Music is a fundamental part of being human and exists only in the mind of the listener. This module will provide students with advanced training in current understanding of how musical sound is processed by the mind and brain. This is crucial for developing creative tools for musicians and intuitive interfaces for music lovers as well as for using technology in the creative production of new music.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Sound Recording and Production TechniquesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS749PSemester 17No

Sound Recording and Production Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mathieu Barthet

Description: The module develops the students' skills and understanding of contemporary audio production techniques. It will give the students a good grounding in the theoretical aspects of audio production, from the functionality of audio interfaces to the signal processing within audio effects, as well as providing practical experience in the use of all audio equipment to which the theory applies. The students will learn the implications of audio digitisation, through which they will gain an understanding of the various means by which digital media is disseminated in the modern age.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Short Soundscape
  • Item 2: 25% Mixing Technique
  • Item 3: 50% Final Soundscape/Music Project
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Security and AuthenticationElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS726USemester 27No

Security and Authentication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pasquale Malacaria

Description: This module is concerned with the principles and practice used for secure communications in the Internet and aims to give students an introduction to the principles and practice of cryptography and authentication used for network security.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% MCQ 1
  • Item 3: 30% MCQ 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
The Semantic WebElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS735USemester 27No

The Semantic Web

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gyorgy Fazekas

Description: The idea of putting semantic information on the Web has been around for a long time: we now have the beginnings of a practical application. This has its foundations in what is called Description Logic, which strikes a good balance between tractability and usability. This has led to a Web language called OWL, which is at the centre of modern work on the Semantic Web: there are now useful implementations, and there are workable, if modest, applications of this technology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% MCQ 1
  • Item 2: 25% MCQ 2
  • Item 3: 60% Written report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Digital Arts DocumentaryElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS748PSemester 27No

Digital Arts Documentary

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yi-Zhe Song

Description: This module focuses on the technical, creative and critical skills needed to produce a professional quality documentary. It introduces contemporary studio production techniques including digital recording and editing. Students, working in groups of three, will research and produce an arts-based video documentary of 12-15 minutes in length. This work will be a content-based research output which either itself implements an innovative digital production technique or reflects and explores an area of contemporary digital production practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Digital arts documentary production
  • Item 2: 30% Critical Study (2000 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Security and AuthenticationElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS726PSemester 27No

Security and Authentication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pasquale Malacaria

Description: This module is concerned with the principles and practice used for secure communications in the Internet and aims to give students an introduction to the principles and practice of cryptography and authentication used for network security.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% MCQ 1
  • Item 3: 30% MCQ 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
International RomanticismEnglish and DramaESH7066Semester 27No

International Romanticism

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Duff

Description: The artistic energies and intellectual currents of the Romantic movement crossed national boundaries and reflected the political and social upheavals of an increasingly globalised world in an age of revolution. This module examines key works of British and European Romanticism and investigates the cultural mechanisms through which Romantic ideas and literary practices were transmitted from one country to another. Diverse strands in British 'Four Nations' Romanticism, including work by Coleridge, Byron, Edgeworth and Carlyle, are analysed alongside Continental texts in translation including Rousseau's Confessions, Goethe¿s Faust, Staël¿s Corinne, and Leopardi¿s Zibaldone. Themes to be explored include the pan-European Ossian phenomenon, the reception of Kant¿s Critical philosophy, the role of literary periodicals, and the `natural supernaturalism¿ of the American Transcendentalists.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
English
Functional ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS713USemester 17No

Functional Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paulo Oliva

Description: Recent approaches to systems programming frequently involve functional programming either overtly in the sense that they use modern functional programming languages for rapid prototyping, or more covertly in that they use techniques developed in the functional setting as a way of lending greater structure and clarity to code. This module gives a structured introduction to programming in modern industrial functional languages such as Haskell and F# and to techniques such as map-reduce and monadic programming.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Individual coursework
  • Item 2: 45% Group Programming Project
  • Item 3: 10% In-term Test 1 (1.5 hours)
  • Item 4: 10% In-term Test 2 (1.5 hours)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
The Semantic WebElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS735PSemester 27No

The Semantic Web

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gyorgy Fazekas

Description: The idea of putting semantic information on the Web has been around for a long time: we now have the beginnings of a practical application. This has its foundations in what is called Description Logic, which strikes a good balance between tractability and usability. This has led to a Web language called OWL, which is at the centre of modern work on the Semantic Web: there are now useful implementations, and there are workable, if modest, applications of this technology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% MCQ 1
  • Item 2: 25% MCQ 2
  • Item 3: 60% Written report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Global Shakespeare: History and Theory and PerformanceEnglish and DramaESH7062Semester 27No

Global Shakespeare: History and Theory and Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Schalkwyk

Description: This module aims to provide students with a common grounding in the study of Shakespeare within a global context through sustained analysis of three areas: an understanding of Shakespeare in terms of genre, historical context and the close reading of his texts; the transformation of the Shakespearean text by the critical turn of theory; and the afterlife of Shakespeare in his appropriation, translation or adaptation in a global context. The module will be divided into sections. Each section will be devoted to a play of a different genre: comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. The first week of each section will deal with close reading, genre theory, and the play in its historical context. The second will examine a major critical turn by which a new theoretical perspective transformed perceptions of the play--in the classroom, the theatre, or in film. The third will study a particular, global appropriation of the Shakespeare text beyond Britain and North America, through popular cultural or political appropriations and in TV, theatre performance and film. The module will be cumulative: each section will build on the understanding and skills developed in the respective earlier one, and each week devoted to Shakespeare's afterlives will involve an intense critical conversation about the meaning and significance of the 'global'. The texts will be selected in accordance with available teaching expertise and performances of the plays in any year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
English
Machine LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS708PSemester 17No

Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Patras

Description: The aim of the module is to give students an understanding of machine learning methods, including pattern recognition, clustering and neural networks, and to allow them to apply such methods in a range of areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 20% Assignment 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Statistics for Artificial Intelligence and Data ScienceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7024PSemester 27No

Statistics for Artificial Intelligence and Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh

Description: This module has two components. The first introduces students to the use of probability and statistics in the context of data analysis. The module starts with basics of descriptive statistics and probability distributions. Then we go on with applied statistics techniques, such as visualisation, fitting probability distributions, time-series analysis, and hypothesis testing, which are all fundamental to the exploration, insight extraction, and modelling activities that are fundamental in handling data, of any size. The second covers some basic matrix algebra, including matrix multiplication and diagonalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Untimed MCQ
  • Item 2: 30% Data analysis
  • Item 3: 30% Statistical analysis
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Ethics, Regulation and Law in Advanced Digital Information Processing and Decision MakingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7025ASemester 17No

Ethics, Regulation and Law in Advanced Digital Information Processing and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mahesha Samaratunga

Description: This module takes a practical approach to the coverage of ethics in Artificial Intelligence and Data Science. It sees ethical considerations as part of a spectrum of concerns, including ethics, but extending through regulation and legal compliance as formal expressions of what is and is not ethical. It considers examples of the kinds of issues that arise in existing systems, and uses the UK Government's Ethical Framework as an example of how to embed considerations of ethics into business processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Assignment
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Statistics for Artificial Intelligence and Data ScienceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7024PSemester 17No

Statistics for Artificial Intelligence and Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh

Description: This module has two components. The first introduces students to the use of probability and statistics in the context of data analysis. The module starts with basics of descriptive statistics and probability distributions. Then we go on with applied statistics techniques, such as visualisation, fitting probability distributions, time-series analysis, and hypothesis testing, which are all fundamental to the exploration, insight extraction, and modelling activities that are fundamental in handling data, of any size. The second covers some basic matrix algebra, including matrix multiplication and diagonalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Untimed MCQ
  • Item 2: 30% Data analysis
  • Item 3: 30% Statistical analysis
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Functional ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS713PSemester 17No

Functional Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paulo Oliva

Description: Recent approaches to systems programming frequently involve functional programming either overtly in the sense that they use modern functional programming languages for rapid prototyping, or more covertly in that they use techniques developed in the functional setting as a way of lending greater structure and clarity to code. This module gives a structured introduction to programming in modern industrial functional languages such as Haskell and F# and to techniques such as map-reduce and monadic programming.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Individual coursework
  • Item 2: 45% Group Programming Project
  • Item 3: 10% In-term Test 1 (1.5 hours)
  • Item 4: 10% In-term Test 2 (1.5 hours)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Logic in Computer ScienceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7018USemester 17No

Logic in Computer Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pasquale Malacaria

Description: The module introduces students to Mathematical Logic concepts and their use in Computer Science.

The topics covered include:
- Propositional Logic and Introduction to Critical Thinking
- Solving SAT instances. DPLL algorithm, validity, satisfiability, SAT solvers
- Temporal Logics. For example: Linear Temporal Logic, Computation Tree Logic, model checkers (e.g. SPIN)
- Predicate Logic. First-order logic, syntax and semantics, satisfiability, SMT solvers
- Program Logics. For example, Hoare logic.

The module will include exercises and hands-on practicals e.g. using SAT solvers and model checkers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class test 1
  • Item 2: 50% In-class test 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Advanced Group ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7019UFull year7No

Advanced Group Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Akram Alomainy

Description: Advanced Group Project will enable MEng and MSci students to engage in projects with greater complexity, while working in teams. The projects will offer a broad range of challenges suitable for team work, covering the breadth and depth of the programme curriculum, and enabling the insights into advanced technologies that underpin the developments in areas identified as the society's 'grand challenges': clean growth, ageing society, future of mobility, and artificial intelligence and data economy. Students will master the engineering design and development method, including prototyping, optimisation, evaluation and testing processes, in teams that mimic real-life work situations. Challenges of sustainable design and development, lifetime management, usability, social impact, and social responsibility will be explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Group Project Report
  • Item 2: 20% Group project demonstration and viva
  • Item 3: 30% Individual contribution viva
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
End Point AssessmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7014WFull year7No

End Point Assessment

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Mahesha Samaratunga

Description: This module is only available to students enrolled on the MSc Digital and Technology Solutions Specialist degree apprenticeship.As defined in the approved Assessment Plan for the standard, a degree apprentice must pass this End Point Assessment in order to be eligible for the apprenticeship award. The End Point Assessment consists of 2 components: a project report and a Professional Discussion, both evaluated by an Independent Assessor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Project Report (10,000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Professional Discussion (90 min)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Fundamentals of Game DesignElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7015PSemester 17No

Fundamentals of Game Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk

Description: This module covers the fundamental principles of game design and provides a practical introduction to the game design process, relevant to both physical and digital games. It examines games in terms of their formal and dramatic elements, and how these combine to create experiences for players. Students are guided through the process of developing their own non-digital games, from initial concept, through prototyping and playtesting, to a final design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Game Play Labs
  • Item 2: 30% Prototype Demonstration
  • Item 3: 50% Game Design Document (4000 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Electronic SensingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS700USemester 17No

Electronic Sensing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ildar Farkhatdinov

Description: The new module focuses on electronic engineering aspects of sensing and instrumentation systems. It integrates the themes of signal theory, metrology, sensing & transduction, signal acquisition and conditioning for further processing, analysis, characterisation and design of sensing electronic systems, system-level considerations and sensor data analysis techniques. The knowledge and skills developed through this module are essential for any student engaging in the design of systems which extract signals from, or interact with the real world, and are highly relevant to electronic engineers designing, testing and using sensing systems and applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Machine LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS708ASemester 27No

Machine Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jesus Requena-Carrion

Description: The aim of the module is to give students an understanding of machine learning methods, including pattern recognition, clustering and neural networks, and to allow them to apply such methods in a range of areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 20% Assignment 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Research Methods and Responsible InnovationElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7007PSemester 17No

Research Methods and Responsible Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gyorgy Fazekas

Description: This module will teach generic high-level research and transferable skills applicable to pure and applied research in computer science and engineering. The module fosters the development of practical understanding of established approaches, methods and techniques of research; conceptual understanding that enables critical and rigorous evaluation of research; ability to communicate ideas and conclusions logically and fluently in both written and oral contexts. It will also discuss responsible research and innovation practices, acknowledging that science can raise questions and dilemmas, is often ambiguous in terms of purposes and motivations and unpredictable in terms of impacts. Topics include research writing with an introduction to LaTeX, research ethics and responsible innovation, quantitative, qualitative and reproducible research methods, including experiment design and basic statistical analysis with an introduction to statistical programming and an introduction to scientific programming environments and version control systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Research Writing
  • Item 2: 30% Research Review and Communication
  • Item 3: 35% Group Project
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Advanced Game DevelopmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7014PSemester 27No

Advanced Game Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Diego Perez Liebana
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS7003P

Description: This module covers games programming in C++, assuming the student has experience with object-oriented programming. The module introduces the C++ language and uses it to explores a range of topics in games programming, including 2D and 3D graphics, OpenGL, physics, input systems, and the use of C++ in modern game engines. It emphasises a practical approach to programming, with the students developing playable games for the final assessment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Lab exercises
  • Item 2: 60% Game development project
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Multi-platform Game DevelopmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7003PSemester 17No

Multi-platform Game Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Raluca Gaina

Description: This module covers the fundamentals of game development in a multi-platform (consoles, PC, Web and mobile devices) environment. The course focuses on development of 3D games, covering all aspects of game development: the game loop, math, physics, audio, graphics, input, animations, particle systems and artificial intelligence. This module has a strong programming content, required for laboratories and assignments. The practical aspects will be taught using a popular game development platform. The main assignment of this module consists of the development of a full game at the student's choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Game Prototype
  • Item 2: 70% Final Game
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
User Experience DesignElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS661USemester 26No

User Experience Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman

Description: Traditionally, interactive systems design has focused on enhancing people's efficiency or productivity. For example, to increase the speed with which tasks can be completed or to minimise the number of errors people make. Economic and social changes have led to a situation in which the primary use of many technologies is for fun; ie. in which there is no quantifiable output and no clear goal other than enjoyment. Computer games, mobile music players and online communities are all examples where the quality of the experience is the primary aim of the interaction. This module explores the challenges these new technologies, and the industries they have created, present for the design and evaluation of interactive systems. It moves away from a human computer interaction model, which is too constrained for real world problems and provides you with an opportunity to engage with theories relating to cultural dynamics, social activity, and live performance. It explores the nature of engagement with interactive systems and between people when mediated by interactive systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Electric and Hybrid Powertrain for TransportElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS662USemester 26No

Electric and Hybrid Powertrain for Transport

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shady Gadoue

Description: This module covers fundamentals of hybrid and electric powertrain for transport applications including electrification and hybridization concepts and technological trends. The content progresses from core topics including principles of electric machines and power electronics for transport, battery energy storage systems through to modern concepts such as fuel cell technologies and further applications of electric powertrain in aerospace and marine vessels.
Module Contents: Introduction to hybrid and electric vehicles, Principles of electric machines for HEVs, Principles of power electronics and electric machine drive control for HEVs, battery energy storage systems, fuel cell vehicles, energy management in HEVs, electric powertrain design for marine and aerospace applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 25% Assessment 2
  • Item 3: 25% Assessment 3
  • Item 4: 25% Assessment 4
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Security EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS655USemester 26No

Security Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arman Khouzani

Description: Cyber-security is an indispensable requisite of any IT-dependent enterprise and critical knowledge and skills in security is in increasing demand. This module emphasizes on cyber security engineering, and will cover a broad range of cyber security fundamentals, including major concepts, security requirements, practices, technologies and policies. Weekly labs will deliver a range of skills in enforcing security requirements, performing system evaluation and mitigating common vulnerabilities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Midterm Test
  • Item 3: 15% MCQ 1
  • Item 4: 15% MCQ 2
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Modelling and PerformanceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS660USemester 26No

Modelling and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Schormans

Description: The module investigates the key areas of knowledge that allow undergraduate engineers and to model and gain system level insight into modern technological systems. We aim to evaluate such important system level metrics as e.g. failure system probabilities.
The target technological systems will include:
- example forms of networked systems and technology, including networked systems in the natural sciences
- microprocessor based systems
- call centre based systems
- packet network based systems

Once adequate modelling has been achieved, the key numerical metrics can be evaluated; this is the 'performance' aspect of the module, and involves the use of network science, Markov chains, probability theory, reliability theory, system simulation.

This course covers 2 main areas:
The first half of the module provides a detailed introduction to the fundamental ideas in network science: graph theory, network metrics, network models, network robustness.
The second half of the module develops probabilistic solutions to the problems associated with the performance evaluation of electronics-based systems. Topics are: Review of probability theory, Markov chains and queueing models for computers and networks, Traffic theory, fundamentals of simulation for electronics-based systems, call centre modelling, reliability theory for electrical and electronic engineering and computer science systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Coursework
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
MSc by Research ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS753PFull year7No

MSc by Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem

Description: MSc by Research Project

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Assessments
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Music InformaticsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7006USemester 27No

Music Informatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Dixon

Description: This module introduces students to state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of music data, with a focus on music audio. It presents in-depth studies of general approaches to the low-level analysis of audio signals, and follows these with specialised methods for the high-level analysis of music signals, including the extraction of information related to the rhythm, melody, harmony, form and instrumentation of recorded music. This is followed by an examination of the most important methods of extracting high-level musical content, sound source separation, and on analysing multimodal music data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Business Information SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS745PSemester 27No

Business Information Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mahesha Samaratunga

Description: The role of software is increasingly critical in our everyday lives and the accompanying risks of business or safety critical systems failure can be profound. This module will provide students with a framework for articulating and managing the risks inherent in the systems they will develop as practitioners. Likewise, students will learn how to build decision support tools for uncertain problems in a variety of contexts (legal, medical, safety), but with a special emphasis on software development. This course will make a distinctive offering that will enable our students to bring a principled approach to bear to analyse and solve uncertain and risky problems. Course contents: Quantification of risk and assessment: Bayesian Probability & Utility Theory, Bayes Theorem & Bayesian updating; Causal modelling using Bayesian networks with examples; Measurement for risk: Principles of measurement, Software metrics, Introduction to multi-criteria decision aids; Principles of risk management: The risk life-cycle, Fault trees, Hazard analysis; Building causal models in practice: Patterns, identification, model reuse and composition, Eliciting and building probability tables; Real world examples; Decision support environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Online quizzes
  • Item 2: 50% Individual assignment
  • Item 3: 30% Group assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Microwave and Millimetrewave ElectronicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS752PSemester 17No

Microwave and Millimetrewave Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Donnan

Description: The module covers: RF SPECTRUM: Revision of basic RF spectrum. Radio transmission bands. Regulatory considerations. MODULATION & DEMODULATION: AM & FM modulation principles; basic modulation & demodulation circuits. Digital modulation principles; basic digital modulation & demodulation circuits. BEHAVIOUR OF ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AT RF: Behaviour of R, L and C at RF; use of reactance plots and reactance charts. Transistor equivalent circuits for RF applications. COUPLING NETWORKS & FILTERS: The design of RF coupling networks; design of basic Low Pass, High Pass, Band Pass and Band Stop filters. AMPLIFIERS: Revision of basic amplifier circuits. Multi-stage small-signal linear amplifiers. Class B & C amplifiers; switching amplifiers. R.F. & wideband amplifiers. Noise in amplifiers. Principles of feedback & feedforward. Frequency response. MIXERS & OSCILLATORS: Mixer and oscillator theory; basic mixer and oscillator circuits. L.C. tanks, quartz crystals and ceramic resonators. Phase Locked Loops & Frequency Synthesizers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45% Lab Exercises
  • Item 2: 25% Mid-term Test
  • Item 3: 30% Final Report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Advanced Control SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS654USemester 26No

Advanced Control Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Flynn Castles
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS601U

Description: This module introduces the advanced topics in control systems and the control engineering application in power electronic systems, automotive and robotics design. Topics include stability analysis of nonlinear systems, digital control systems, intelligent systems, model predictive control, adaptive control and variable structure control, estimator design and modeling and real-time simulation. This module will have labs either in the electronics lab, or in the ITL.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 10% Coursework 2
  • Item 4: 10% Coursework 3
  • Item 5: 20% Mid-semester test
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Database SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS740PSemester 17No

Database Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman

Description: Introduction to databases and their language systems in theory and practice.

The main topics covered by the module are:

The principles and components of database management systems.
The main modelling techniques used in the construction of database systems.
Implementation of databases using an object-relational database management system.
SQL, the main relational database language.
Object-Oriented database systems.
Future trends, in particular information retrieval and data warehouses.

There are 2 timetabled lectures a week, and 1 hour tutorial per week (though not every week). There will be timetabled laboratory sessions (2 hours a week) for approximately 4 weeks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Interactive System DesignElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS733USemester 27No

Interactive System Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Curzon
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS522U

Description: The main areas of study are (i) interaction and design (ii) modelling of interaction (iii) the design process (iv) design principles and (v) usability evaluation. Various types of interfaces will be considered including those encountered on the web and mobile computing devices. A historical perspective is encouraged in order to provide a means of understanding current and projected developments in the discipline and profession of interactive computer system design. The module will include seminars and group laboratory classes in which analysis, design and evaluation methods will be used in practical contexts. Students will be expected to participate fully in the seminars by presenting and discussing their own designs and evaluations. Students will be required to construct prototype interfaces using techniques of their own choice (e.g. Java, Director).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Class Assessments
  • Item 3: 30% Report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Design for Human InteractionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS712USemester 17No

Design for Human Interaction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pat Healey

Description: Developments in information technology have radically altered the nature of human communication. Spatial and temporal constraints on communication have been weakened or removed and new structures and forms of communication have developed. For some technologies, such as video conferencing, text messaging and online communities, the importance of understanding their effect on human communication is clear. However, even the success of 'individualistic' technologies, such as spreadsheets, can be shown to depend partly on their impact on patterns of interaction between people. Conversely, some technologies, such as videophones, that are specifically designed to enhance communication can sometimes make it worse. Currently, there is no accepted explanation of how technologies alter, and are altered by, the patterns and processes of human communication. Such an explanation is necessary for effective design of new technologies. This research led module explores these issues by introducing psychological theories of the nature of human communication and socio-historical perspectives on the development and impact of communication technologies. These models are applied to the analysis of new communications technologies and the effects of those technologies on communication patterns between individuals, groups and societies. A variety of different technologies are introduced ranging from systems for the support of tightly-coupled synchronous interactions through to large-scale shared workspaces for the support of extended collaborations. Detailed studies of the effects of different technologies on task performance, communication processes and user satisfaction are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the notion of communicative success and to the development of metrics that can be used in assessing it. Frameworks for analysing the communicative properties of different media will be introduced as well as approaches to the analysis of communication in groups and organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Critical essay
  • Item 2: 20% Diary study
  • Item 3: 20% Interaction Analysis
  • Item 4: 20% Technology Study
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Mobile ServicesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS725PSemester 27No

Mobile Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stefan Poslad

Description: This module covers the motivation behind and development of Mobile Services, enabling students to understand the characteristics, motivation and opportunities for developing mobile user services while appreciating the strengths and weaknesses of developing mobile services using different software architectures. The module also covers the e-commerce and management issues associated with rapid development and deployment of mobile services.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Fundamentals of DSPElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS707USemester 17No

Fundamentals of DSP

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luk Arnaut
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECS602U

Description: Introduction: Why DSP, sampling, quantization, Signals, LTI systems, Z transforms and polynomials, DFT, FFT, Spectrum Analysis, FIR filters, IIR filters

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Lab Reports
  • Item 3: 5% MCQ
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Power ElectronicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS720PSemester 17No

Power Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kamyar Mehran

Description: This module is intended to strengthen the electrical power component of our UG programmes. This has been highlighted as an area of weakness in the past by our accrediting body, the IET. This module is intended to complement ECS618U Electrical Power Engineering. This module will be optional on Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and optional on Electronic Engineering and Electronic Engineering and Telecomms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 20% Coursework 4
  • Item 5: 20% Coursework 5
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Logic in Computer ScienceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7018PSemester 17No

Logic in Computer Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pasquale Malacaria

Description: The module introduces students to Mathematical Logic concepts and their use in Computer Science.

The topics covered include:
- Propositional Logic and Introduction to Critical Thinking
- Solving SAT instances. DPLL algorithm, validity, satisfiability, SAT solvers
- Temporal Logics. For example: Linear Temporal Logic, Computation Tree Logic, model checkers (e.g. SPIN)
- Predicate Logic. First-order logic, syntax and semantics, satisfiability, SMT solvers
- Program Logics. For example, Hoare logic.

The module will include exercises and hands-on practicals e.g. using SAT solvers and model checkers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class test 1
  • Item 2: 50% In-class test 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Programming for Artificial Intelligence and Data ScienceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7023PSemester 27No

Programming for Artificial Intelligence and Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Tautschnig

Description: This module provides an intensive practical introduction to programming in Python, suitable for students with some degree of mathematical or statistical maturity. It covers a range of practical skills and underlying knowledge. These include the basic programming constructs for control, data structuring and modularisation; the use of systems for collaborative development and version control such as Git; unit testing and documentation; project structures and continuous integration/deployment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Initial lab-book submission
  • Item 2: 10% In-class learning check test (90 min)
  • Item 3: 65% Final lab-book submission
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Computational Game DesignElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7017PSemester 27No

Computational Game Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Raluca Gaina
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS7002P and take ECS7015P

Description: This modules explores computational and data-oriented approaches to game design, drawing on both latest academic research and games industry practice . Topics include formal models of games, applications of game theory, game description languages, player modelling, gameplay and experience metrics, games user research, game analytics, and automated playtesting and game tuning The module is taught through a mixture of lectures, labs and seminars, with guest speakers from academia and the games industry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Design study report (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Seminar presentation (30 min)
  • Item 3: 40% Post-seminar essay (3500 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Deep Learning for Audio and MusicElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7013PSemester 27No

Deep Learning for Audio and Music

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Quoc Huy Phan
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS708P

Description: This module, for those who have some prior knowledge of machine learning, focusses on deep learning methods and how they can be used to address many tasks in audio and music. The theory of modern deep neural networks (DNNs) is covered, including training of common DNN types as well as modifying DNNs for new purposes. Various tasks in analysis/generation of audio and music are studied directly to inspire the content, using raw audio and/or symbolic representations. Background in machine learning is essential, and some background in digital signal processing is highly recommended. Music knowledge would be desirable but is not a requirement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Paper presentation/report
  • Item 2: 10% Mid-way revision test (45 min)
  • Item 3: 40% Computer experiments with written report (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 40% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Fundamentals of DSPElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS707PSemester 17No

Fundamentals of DSP

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luk Arnaut

Description: Introduction: Why DSP, sampling, quantization, Signals, LTI systems, Z transforms and polynomials, DFT, FFT, Spectrum Analysis, FIR filters, IIR filters

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Lab Reports
  • Item 3: 5% MCQ
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Programming for Artificial Intelligence and Data ScienceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7023PSemester 17No

Programming for Artificial Intelligence and Data Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Tautschnig

Description: This module provides an intensive practical introduction to programming in Python, suitable for students with some degree of mathematical or statistical maturity. It covers a range of practical skills and underlying knowledge. These include the basic programming constructs for control, data structuring and modularisation; the use of systems for collaborative development and version control such as Git; unit testing and documentation; project structures and continuous integration/deployment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Initial lab-book submission
  • Item 2: 10% In-class learning check test (90 min)
  • Item 3: 65% Final lab-book submission
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Electronic SensingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS700PSemester 17No

Electronic Sensing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ildar Farkhatdinov

Description: The new module focuses on electronic engineering aspects of sensing and instrumentation systems. It integrates the themes of signal theory, metrology, sensing & transduction, signal acquisition and conditioning for further processing, analysis, characterisation and design of sensing electronic systems, system-level considerations and sensor data analysis techniques. The knowledge and skills developed through this module are essential for any student engaging in the design of systems which extract signals from, or interact with the real world, and are highly relevant to electronic engineers designing, testing and using sensing systems and applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Music InformaticsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7006PSemester 27No

Music Informatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Dixon

Description: This module introduces students to state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of music data, with a focus on music audio. It presents in-depth studies of general approaches to the low-level analysis of audio signals, and follows these with specialised methods for the high-level analysis of music signals, including the extraction of information related to the rhythm, melody, harmony, form and instrumentation of recorded music. This is followed by an examination of the most important methods of extracting high-level musical content, sound source separation, and on analysing multimodal music data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Artificial Intelligence in GamesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7002PFull year7No

Artificial Intelligence in Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Diego Perez-Liebana

Description: This module covers a range of Artificial Intelligence techniques employed in games, and teaches how games are and can be used for research in Artificial Intelligence. This module has a strong programming component. The module explores algorithms for creating agents that play classical board games (such as chess or checkers) and real-time games (Mario or PacMan), including single agents able to play multiple games. The module gives an overview of multiple techniques, such as Monte Carlo Tree Search, Evolutionary Computation, Deep and Machine Learning applied to games.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 40% Assignment 1 (3500 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Assignment 2 (3500 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Artificial Intelligence in GamesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7002PSemester 17No

Artificial Intelligence in Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Diego Perez-Liebana

Description: This module covers a range of Artificial Intelligence techniques employed in games, and teaches how games are and can be used for research in Artificial Intelligence. This module has a strong programming component. The module explores algorithms for creating agents that play classical board games (such as chess or checkers) and real-time games (Mario or PacMan), including single agents able to play multiple games. The module gives an overview of multiple techniques, such as Monte Carlo Tree Search, Evolutionary Computation, Deep and Machine Learning applied to games.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 40% Assignment 1 (3500 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Assignment 2 (3500 words)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Neural Networks and Deep LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS659USemester 26No

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Tzimiropoulos

Description: The module covers the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of Neural Networks and automatic differentiation as a tool for modern AI. Neural Networks & Deep Learning are now the method of choice for solving various Machine Learning problems. They are applied to several real-world problems not only within Academia but most importantly within Industry. Knowledge of Neural Networks and how to apply them to solve practical problems is now considered one of the most essential skills in the job market for a CS graduate. The module will include a detailed exposition for Neural Networks and their implementation using a Deep Learning framework. Topics covered include but not limited to: Automatic Differentiation, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Regression, Softmax Regression, Multi-Layer Perceptrons, Training of Neural Networks and hyper-parameter optimization, Convolutional Neural Networks, Recurrent Neural Networks. Applications of Neural Networks to Vision and NLP.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Neural Networks Assignment (Report and Software)
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Advanced Robotics Systems (Robotics III)Electronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS653USemester 26No

Advanced Robotics Systems (Robotics III)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lorenzo Jamone
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS426U and take ECS526U

Description: The module will build on previous knowledge acquired in the previous years on the programme and also introduce new and advanced concept related to geometric, kinematic, and dynamic robots manipulation, vision and machine learning specifically for Robotics, motion control and practical implementation of locomotion solutions, mechanical considerations of medical robots and the necessity of understanding acceptance and ethical values, etc. It will introduce the practicality of applying multidisciplinary techniques in enhancing the current state of the art in Robotics Engineering and allow the students to explore creative and engineered solutions that are outside the box along side conventional industrial and cognitive applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Robot programming exercise 1
  • Item 3: 15% Robot programming exercise 2
  • Item 4: 25% MCQ
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Introduction to Software EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7009PSemester 17No

Introduction to Software Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anne Hsu

Description: The main focus of this module is software engineering and systems analysis. Students will learn about system complexity and the special challenges of building software systems. They will learn how to analyse system and software requirements, produce object-oriented designs, and learn the principles of how to plan, manage and test systems. Content covers:

Systems Analysis
Requirements capture and analysis
Use cases; UML for use-cases
Object oriented design; UML for class diagrams
Project management
Software lifecycle
Quality assurance and testing

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Neural Networks and Deep LearningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS659PSemester 26No

Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Tzimiropoulos

Description: The module covers the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of Neural Networks and automatic differentiation as a tool for modern AI. Neural Networks & Deep Learning are now the method of choice for solving various Machine Learning problems. They are applied to several real-world problems not only within Academia but most importantly within Industry. Knowledge of Neural Networks and how to apply them to solve practical problems is now considered one of the most essential skills in the job market for a CS graduate. The module will include a detailed exposition for Neural Networks and their implementation using a Deep Learning framework. Topics covered include but not limited to: Automatic Differentiation, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Regression, Softmax Regression, Multi-Layer Perceptrons, Training of Neural Networks and hyper-parameter optimization, Convolutional Neural Networks, Recurrent Neural Networks. Applications of Neural Networks to Vision and NLP.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Neural Networks Assignment (Report and Software)
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Graphical User InterfacesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS744PSemester 27No

Graphical User Interfaces

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: Computers are tools that people interact with and through for work and pleasure.

Nowadays computers are ubiquitous and are fundamental to all sorts of devices such as washing machines, cars, mobile phones, airplanes, televisions, and musical instruments. However, it is still very difficult to design user interfaces which are simple, intuitive, and easy to use you only have to look at the number of help books (e.g. the proliferation of books with titles such as 'the idiots guide to ') and modules to realise that designers often simply fail to make interfaces usable.

This course introduces you to basic concepts of psychology and communication which inform the way in which interfaces should be designed. The course comprises lectures, problem classes, and lab sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 20% Assignment 2
  • Item 4: 10% Assignment 3
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Information RetrievalElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS736USemester 27No

Information Retrieval

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Qianni Zhang
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS509U and take ECS519U

Description: The field of information retrieval (IR) aims to provide techniques and tools to support effective and efficient access to large amounts of textual information (e.g. stored on the web, digital libraries, intranets). This involves representation, retrieval, presentation and user issues.

The following topics will be covered:

1. Application of representation and retrieval approaches described in the Foundations of Information Retrieval module, Semester A, in the context of structured documents, in particular web documents, and digital libraries.

2. Databases & information retrieval, and logical models for information retrieval.

3. The organisation of documents according to categories (e.g. Yahoo directory) or their content to provide more effective presentation of the collection to the users.

4. The design of interfaces and visualisation tools that aim at supporting end-users in their search tasks.

5. User aspects, including the evaluation of IR systems according to user satisfaction, and the incorporation of user information seeking behaviour in the search task.

The module consists of 3 hours per week of lectures for 12 weeks, including labs and tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 65% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 10% Assignment 2
  • Item 4: 15% Assignment 3
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Summer InternshipElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7200USemester 17No

Summer Internship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Claire Revell

Description: This module is only available to EECS undergraduate students between their penultimate and final years of study. Students will undertake a summer internship of 3 weeks minimum. There are two streams: an industrial internship, with an appropriate employer in a role that relates directly to the student's field of study; and a research internship, with an academic supervisor in a topic area directly related to their field of study. Students will be supported throughout the preparation process in the preceding academic year and the internship itself. The module will be assessed on their return to final year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Learning objectives - employer / supervisor evaluation
  • Item 2: 35% Report (3000 words)
  • Item 3: 15% Viva
  • Item 4: 35% Poster and poster presentation
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
PoetryEnglish and DramaESH124Semester 14Yes

Poetry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Brady

Description: This module introduces students to poetry in English. Working across a wide range of examples, from the ancient through the contemporary, it introduces poetic genres, techniques, and key theoretical debates in the history of poetry. It will help you to make sense of how poetry works, why poets make the choices they do, and how poetic experiences emerge from the conjunction of sound, rhythm, form, the body, lyric subjects, performance, readers and listeners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Portfolio (2000 words)
Level: 4
English
Research Methods IElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS719PSemester 27No

Research Methods I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gyorgy Fazekas

Description: The module will teach the generic high-level research and transferable skills applicable to pure and applied research in computer science. It will also prepare students for employment or further academic study by enabling them to apply these in relevant, practical contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Research Writing
  • Item 2: 30% Research Review and Communication
  • Item 3: 35% Group Project
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Introduction to Computer VisionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS709USemester 17No

Introduction to Computer Vision

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Cavallaro

Description: In recent years, research in computer vision has made significant progress. This is largely driven by the recognition that effective visual perception is crucial in understanding intelligent behaviour - unless we understand how we perceive, we will never understand how we reason The first part of the module will introduce the relevant concepts and techniques in machine learning. In the second part we will show how these techniques can be applied to various areas in computer vision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Technical Report 1
  • Item 3: 25% Technical Report 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Computational CreativityElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7022PSemester 27No

Computational Creativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cook

Description: There will be two main areas of content for this module: (i) creative AI procedures and practice and (ii) philosophical issues of Computational Creativity. The first area will cover the application of well-known AI techniques such as Deep Learning and Markov Models to generative projects, as well as ad-hoc techniques. These will be illustrated with applications in music, the visual arts and video game design, considering issues of human-computer interaction in these domains. The second area will raise and discuss questions around the value of having autonomous and semi-autonomous creative AI systems in society, drawing on philosophy, sociology, psychology and cognitive science, as well as engineering disciplines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Designing a Creative AI
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Computational and Mathematical Modelling 2Engineering and Materials ScienceEMS418USemester 24No

Computational and Mathematical Modelling 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angadh Nanjangud

Description: This module builds on Computational and Mathematical Modelling 1 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computational techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Mathematical topics covered are differential vector algebra, vector calculus and introduction to ordinary differential equations. Students will further develop programming techniques using Python. The module will provide an introduction to the modelling and analysis of one-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. It includes an analysis of the motion (kinematics) of particles and considers the forces causing these motions (kinetics) by the application of Newton¿s laws of motion. Analytical and computational methods for the solution of the differential equations describing the equations of motion will be studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid-term test
  • Item 2: 30% Group project
  • Item 3: 40% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Engineering and Materials Science
Experimental Design and Practice 2Engineering and Materials ScienceEMS420USemester 24No

Experimental Design and Practice 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Helena Azevedo

Description: This module will centre around a problem-based learning framework which focuses on the design of experiments to achieve specific objectives, with autonomous data analysis and reporting by the students, supplemented with supporting delivery to build on prior knowledge and content from the other modules in the second semester of the School of Engineering and Materials Science first year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group report
  • Item 2: 20% Group presentation
  • Item 3: 25% Report
  • Item 4: 5% Peer assessment 1
  • Item 5: 5% Peer assessment 2
  • Item 6: 5% Peer assessment 3
  • Item 7: 20% Programming exercise
Level: 4
Engineering and Materials Science
ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7016WFull year7No

Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem

Description: Degree apprentices will have the opportunity to apply the methodologies, approaches and technologies that they have learned during their taught modules to a significant advanced project embedded in their workplace context. The project topic will be appropriate to the degree apprenticeship specialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project assessments
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7016WFull year7No

Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem

Description: Degree apprentices will have the opportunity to apply the methodologies, approaches and technologies that they have learned during their taught modules to a significant advanced project embedded in their workplace context. The project topic will be appropriate to the degree apprenticeship specialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project assessments
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Project Management for Big Data AnalysisElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7015WSemester 27No

Project Management for Big Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: This module will provide degree apprentices with the methodological skills to manage a big data project, both in terms of managing time/schedule and in terms of tools and technologies. It will encompass the whole data analysis pipeline, including obtaining and checking data, analysis, results evaluation, and feedback loop to evolve/improve the process. Degree apprentices will also gain practical experience in applying the taught methodology to data drawn from their own workplace context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Online test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Project Report (3000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Presentation (30 min)
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Interactive Agents and Procedural GenerationElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7016PSemester 27No

Interactive Agents and Procedural Generation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jeremy Gow

Description: Modern video games employ various agents that interact with the player as opponents or characters, and that generate new content. This module covers the broad range of computational approaches developers currently use to create these in-game agents. The first part deals with techniques for authoring agent behaviour. The second part explores approaches procedural content generation for environments, narrative and others forms of game content.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Case Study (3500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Progress Test (30 min)
  • Item 3: 40% Programming Assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Introduction to IOTElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS782USemester 17No

Introduction to IOT

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stefan Poslad

Description: This module provides a comprehensive overview of the Internet of Things, also called machines, smart objects, smart devices and ubiquitous computers. These Things will support smarter interaction with physical environment things; smarter interaction with each other, virtual or cyber things and with humans. Form factors for smart devices will be based upon the form factors of Smart Tabs (Wearable centimeter sized devices, e.g., smart tags used to track good), Smart Pads (Hand-held decimeter-sized devices for personalised communication, e.g., tablets, smart phones), Smart Boards (Meter sized displays and surfaces for collaboration), and Smart Dust: MEMS (ICT devices can be miniaturised, cheaply manufactured, without visual output displays, ranging from mm to nm, that can be embedded into 2D & 3D surfaces or scattered into 3D spaces), Smart Skins (fabrics based upon light emitting, conductive, polymers, organic computer devices that can be formed into more flexible non-planar display surfaces and products such as clothes and curtains), Smart Clay (ensembles of smart dust and smart skins that can be formed into arbitrary three dimensional shapes as artefacts resembling many different kinds of physical object, including additive printing), and Smart Containers (use to house or transport goods or people. This module will define the core system architectures, including middleware to design single device and multi-device systems. It will also offer hands-on experience in labs to build smart device applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Report
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Computational and Mathematical Modelling 1Engineering and Materials ScienceEMS412USemester 14No

Computational and Mathematical Modelling 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wei Tan

Description: This module provide students with knowledge of mathematical and computational techniques that are essential for Engineering and Materials Science students. Mathematical topics covered are matrix algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, differentiation, Taylor and Mclaurin series, basic limits, integration and partial derivatives. Students will be trained in command prompt applications of the numerical and symbolic toolboxes of Python. The mathematical and computational techniques will be developed through the introduction of the fundamental principles of statics for linearly elastic materials and their application to structures. It focuses on the behaviour of structures, in particular beams and shafts, and provides underpinning knowledge for a range of analyses on applications relevant to engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Assessment 1 (Maths)
  • Item 2: 25% Assessment 2 (Python)
  • Item 3: 10% Assessment 3
  • Item 4: 40% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Engineering and Materials Science
Music and Audio ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7012PSemester 27No

Music and Audio Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Mcpherson

Description: This module will introduce a broad class of principles of programming music and audio systems, with a particular focus on real-time digital signal processing on embedded hardware. Students will develop audio projects using the Bela embedded hardware platform, which is based on an ARM Cortex-A series processor, an architecture also commonly found in mobile devices. This is a project-based module, with the overall mark determined by two smaller assignments and one more extensive final project. It is expected that students already understand basic digital signal processing theory and have a moderate familiarity with programming in C, C++ or a similar language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 50% Individual Project
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Risk and Decision-Making for Data Science and AIElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7005PSemester 27No

Risk and Decision-Making for Data Science and AI

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Norman Fenton

Description: This module provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges of risk assessment, prediction and decision-making covering public health and medicine, the law, government strategy, transport safety and consumer protection. Students will learn how to see through much of the confusion spoken about risk in public discourse, and will be provided with methods and tools for improved risk assessment that can be directly applied for personal, group, and strategic decision-making. The module also directly addresses the limitations of big data and machine learning for solving decision and risk problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Neural Networks and NLPElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7001PSemester 27No

Neural Networks and NLP

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Massimo Poesio
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECS763P

Description: Natural Language Processing (NLP) has become one of the most important technologies in Artificial Intelligence. Automatic methods for processing natural language now find application in almost every aspect of our communication in person or online, in particular through social media. The increased use of Neural Networks has played an important role in the most recent progress of NLP, as NN techniques have delivered improved performance in applications ranging from language modelling (next word prediction) to speech to machine translation to sentiment analysis. The proposed module provides a thorough introduction to this cutting-edge approach to developing NLP systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Theoretical Quiz 1
  • Item 2: 40% Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 10% Theoretical Quiz 2
  • Item 4: 40% Assignment 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS750PFull year7No

Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem

Description: The aim of the MSc project is to give students the opportunity to apply to a significant advanced project, the techniques and technologies, that they have learned in their lecture modules. Projects will either be significantly development based, or else have a research focus. All projects will be expected either to investigate or to make use of techniques that are at the leading edge of the field. Candidates will be asked to submit a project report on completion of the allotted project period (3 months full time). This report will be evaluated using the standard criteria for scholarly work. Projects will also include a viva where students will be required to demonstrate and defend their work.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project assessments
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Risk and Decision-Making for Data Science and AIElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7005ASemester 27No

Risk and Decision-Making for Data Science and AI

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evangelia Kyrimi

Description: This module provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges of risk assessment, prediction and decision-making covering public health and medicine, the law, government strategy, transport safety and consumer protection. Students will learn how to see through much of the confusion spoken about risk in public discourse, and will be provided with methods and tools for improved risk assessment that can be directly applied for personal, group, and strategic decision-making. The module also directly addresses the limitations of big data and machine learning for solving decision and risk problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Written assignment 1
  • Item 3: 25% Written assignment 2
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Further Object Oriented ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS658USemester 16No

Further Object Oriented Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Huntbach
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS505U and ( take ECS414U or take ECS414A )

Description: This module is about writing code in a way that breaks large programs into small well-defined parts. It takes further what was taught about object-oriented programming in the first year, and its use in software engineering in the second year, emphasising practical coding aspects.

The "SOLID" principles of good program design will be covered, and also implementation of important design patterns.

Further aspects of the language Java will be considered, and comparison of Java with other programming languages. Some time will be given to programming in Scala, a functional style language implemented with the Java Virtual Machine/

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Lab Work
  • Item 3: 10% Term Tests
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Multi-platform Game DevelopmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS657USemester 16Yes

Multi-platform Game Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Raluca Gaina
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS414U or take ECS414A

Description: This module covers the fundamentals of game development in a multi-platform (consoles, PC, Web and mobile devices) environment. The course focuses on development of 3D games, covering all aspects of game development: the game loop, math, physics, audio, graphics, input, animations, particle systems and artificial intelligence. This module has a strong programming content, required for laboratories and assignments. The practical aspects will be taught using a popular game development platform. The main assignment of this module consists of the development of a full game at the student's choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Game Prototype
  • Item 2: 70% Final Game
Level: 6
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Interactive Digital Multimedia TechniquesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS742PSemester 17No

Interactive Digital Multimedia Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charalampos Saitis

Description: This is a Master's level course in developing real-time interactive digital media systems. The course will focus on graphics and sound programming, with a secondary emphasis on basic electronic hardware design for sensors and human-computer interfaces. The course will employ widely-used development environments including Arduino, Processing Max/MSP and Jitter, Processing. Course material will be delivered through a combination of lectures, interactive lab sessions, and individual/group exercises (both in and out of class). Generally speaking, each class period will consist of a combination of lecture and interactive lab session.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Arduino assignment
  • Item 2: 10% Processing assignment
  • Item 3: 20% Pure data assignment
  • Item 4: 50% Final Project
  • Item 5: 10% Summative assignment
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Regulation of Financial MarketsLawSOLM003Semester 17Yes

Regulation of Financial Markets

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Rosa Lastra

Description: The module provides an overview of monetary and financial regulation drawing on a comparative study of the law in relevant financial centres in the US, UK, EU and Japan as well as on the increasing corpus of international financial `soft law¿ (such as the Basel capital rules) and considers the dynamics of financial regulation in emerging economies. The module goes beyond the description of the black letter law and explains the underlying economic and political forces which bring that law into being, analysing the interaction between law and finance. Focus is on regulatory issues, and not on contractual or transactional aspects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Information RetrievalElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS736PSemester 27No

Information Retrieval

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Qianni Zhang

Description: The field of information retrieval (IR) aims to provide techniques and tools to support effective and efficient access to large amounts of textual information (e.g. stored on the web, digital libraries, intranets). This involves representation, retrieval, presentation and user issues.

The following topics will be covered:

1. Application of representation and retrieval approaches described in the Foundations of Information Retrieval module, Semester A, in the context of structured documents, in particular web documents, and digital libraries.

2. Databases & information retrieval, and logical models for information retrieval.

3. The organisation of documents according to categories (e.g. Yahoo directory) or their content to provide more effective presentation of the collection to the users.

4. The design of interfaces and visualisation tools that aim at supporting end-users in their search tasks.

5. User aspects, including the evaluation of IR systems according to user satisfaction, and the incorporation of user information seeking behaviour in the search task.

The module consists of 3 hours per week of lectures for 12 weeks, including labs and tutorials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 65% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Assignment 1
  • Item 3: 10% Assignment 2
  • Item 4: 15% Assignment 3
Level: 7
Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Research Project in TranslationLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6204Full year6Closed

Research Project in Translation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans

Description: In the Research Project in Translation, final-year students will acquire the background knowledge and skills to produce the translation of a previously untranslated text from one of the languages studied within their degree into English, and a commentary addressing their overall approach and strategy for rendering into appropriate English a source emanating from a different culture. A series of workshops will provide training in the relevant methodologies and theories, to enable students to implement meaningful translation choices. Students must approach a supervisor and agree on the text to be translated prior to enrolling in the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Presentation (10 mins)
  • Item 2: 60% Translation (5000 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Commentary (3000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Languages in the Classroom 1: Practical and Theoretical Approaches to TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6211Semester 16Yes

Languages in the Classroom 1: Practical and Theoretical Approaches to Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf

Description: This module introduces you to language teaching at school. It includes French, German, Spanish, and Russian. The module can count for a degree in those languages. It also includes English but for exchange students only.
It is the first of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the theoretical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other one (SML6212 which runs during the second semester) focuses on practical matters.
Through the completion of this module, you will gain an understanding of key aspects of Applied Linguistics and Psycholinguistics. You will focus on theoretical aspects of second/ foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and the design of teaching materials. This will involve planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. This module will also enable you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.
Important: If you are planning to attend the module SML6212 (Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice) in semester 2, you will be required to complete a placement in a local school and will therefore require clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). towards the end of the first semester. Please contact the module organiser for further information.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Lesson Plan and Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Demonstration of Teaching Techniques (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Essay (1500 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Securities RegulationLawSOLM001Semester 27Yes

Securities Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: This module examines the law and regulation of conduct of business/market conduct aspects of financial intermediation seeing from the angle of investor protection in primary and secondary capital markets. It covers a wide range of issues including the reform of the regulation of financial intermediation in the aftermath of the 2008 credit crisis, mandatory disclosure and transparency requirements for securities trading, conduct of business rules, financial mis-selling, market abuse, the regulation of credit rating agencies, hedge funds regulation, and the regulation of financial resilience. The module covers policy issues, statutory materials and case law. UK regulation is examined within the context of EU law and regulation. Where appropriate specific themes are discussed with reference to international harmonization initiatives and/or comparative analysis with parallel developments in the US. The module also places emphasis on the practical problems, which arise in capital markets and consider ways in which these may be addressed in the future.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
The Law of Registered Trade MarksLawSOLM083Semester 27No

The Law of Registered Trade Marks

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module covers all legal issues that might arise from the very moment someone decides to apply to register a sign as a trade mark. Following topics will be discussed in class: what may constitute subject matter eligible for trade mark protection?; absolute grounds for refusal and invalidity; relative grounds for refusal and invalidity; distinctiveness acquired through use; trade mark infringement; invalidity; revocation; defenses; the concept of the trade mark functions; economic justifications for trade mark protection; trade mark protection against dilution; the free-riding theory of trade mark protection; the particularities of the EUTM system; common law rights in the US; the federal US registration system; the US functionality doctrine

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (Two Languages)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML6203Full year6Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (Two Languages)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Consuelo Sanmateu-Martinez

Description: This course is designed for final year students doing doing Joint Honours Modern Languages BA (French, or Spanish, or Russian combined accordingly with French, or Spanish, or Russian). The course is for the students who have already reached a high level of linguistic competence and aim at developing listening comprehension and oral production skills ¿ including bilateral communicative skills ¿ to a very high level. Students will learn to perform different types of speech acts in everyday life situations and to perform tasks required in working and social environments, such as summarizing, reporting and presenting, as well as consecutive interpreting (interpreting between speakers of two different languages). This module is not designed for true native speakers of French, Spanish or Russian. QMUL HSS students can take this module at the discretion of the module organiser.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Test 1 (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% In-class Test 2 (50 mins)
  • Item 3: 3% Coursework: Transcription (Language 1) (375 words)
  • Item 4: 3% Coursework: Transcription (Language 2) (375 words)
  • Item 5: 3% Coursework: Summary (Language 1) (375 words)
  • Item 6: 3% Coursework: Summary (Language 2) (375 words)
  • Item 7: 3% Coursework: Register (Language 1) (375 words)
  • Item 8: 3% Coursework: Register (Language 2) (375 words)
  • Item 9: 3% Coursework: Interpreting (Language 1) (375 words)
  • Item 10: 3% Coursework: Interpreting (Language 2) (375 words)
  • Item 11: 20% In-Class Test 3 (50 mins)
  • Item 12: 20% In-Class Test 4 (50 mins)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Mathematics AScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF040Full year3No

Mathematics A

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anum Khalid

Description: This module reviews mathematical notation, basic principles of arithmetic and algebra, logarithms and powers, functions and graphs, coordinate geometry and trigonometry, an introduction to the techniques of calculus; and demonstrates how these principles may be applied to solve problems in science and mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Three in-class tests (3x50 min)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Mathematics BScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF041Full year3No

Mathematics B

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anum Khalid

Description: This module covers mathematical topics such as algebra, functions, geometry and trigonometry, and aims to provide students with a more extensive knowledge of calculus (especially in techniques of integration) and an introduction to complex numbers, numerical methods, differential equations, vector analysis and power series. It is appropriate for those students progressing onto degree programmes in mathematical sciences, and those degree programmes in physical science and engineering which require a more thorough and comprehensive grounding in mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Three in-class tests (3x50 min)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Russian Film: Memory and HistoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6028Semester 26Yes

Russian Film: Memory and History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks

Description: This course examines how Russian cinema, through the films of Eisenstein and Vertov to Tarkovskii, Mikhalkov and Sokurov, have used biographical and historical films to construct or contest views of the past and a coherent sense of common identity and purpose. Students acquire key concepts for the analysis of filmic treatments of memory and history, enabling them to examine representations of Russian history paying particular attention to twentieth century Russia's traumatic turning points.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 6
Russian
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 23No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Poster presentation (600 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Individual Reflection (250 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Case Study (1200 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Individual Presentation (15 min)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
A Closer Look at ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF004Semester 23No

A Closer Look at Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yao Lu

Description: This module expands upon topics covered in SEF003 and provides a further introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry; including topics such as thermochemistry, reaction kinetics and equilibria, molecular structure, aspects of organic chemistry, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: SEF003 Introductory Chemistry

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% MCQ (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Physics (Mechanics and Materials)Physical and Chemical SciencesSEF005Semester 13No

Physics (Mechanics and Materials)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Elise Stacey Agra

Description: This is one of three modules providing a detailed introduction to concepts of physics. This module covers the following topics: Newtonian mechanics, including statics, linear and rotational dynamics; forces and energy, and their role in the molecular structure of matter, properties of liquids and gases; basic concepts of thermodynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Communication in Science and TechnologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF030Semester 13No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Poster presentation (600 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Individual Reflection (250 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Case Study (1200 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Individual Presentation (15 min)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Competition and the State: EU State Aid LawLawSOLM056Semester 17No

Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: This course examines EU state aid rules, i.e. rules restraining the public conferral of selective advantages to certain companies. In recent years, EU state aid rules have attracted increased attention not only in Europe but internationally, especially as a result of the European Commission¿s actions against big multinationals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Introductory ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF003Semester 13No

Introductory Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stoichko Dimitrov

Description: This module introduces essential principles and concepts in chemistry, including atomic structure, electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, stoichiometry of reactions, measures of concentration, oxidation states and redox chemistry, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% MCQ (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Russian Novel: Self and SocietyLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS6023Semester 26Yes

Russian Novel: Self and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Inna Tigountsova

Description: This module examines the emergence and development of the Russian novel until 1860. We will focus on novels about the constitution of individual, gender, and collective identity in an environment marked by the influx of ideas and fashions coming from the West while the structure of Russian society remained staunchly committed to an absolutist model of power. Readings from Pushkin, Lermontov, Dostoevsky, and Gogol'. Themes include nobility and its others, the romantic construction of gender differences, fashion and self-fashioning, the poet and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Skills
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Essay (1500 words)
Level: 6
Russian
Comparative Competition LawLawSOLM055Semester 27No

Comparative Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: The course is designed to include `comparative¿ elements, covering, among other things, developed competition law systems (EU competition law and US antitrust law), BRICS, Japan and other developing jurisdictions. In the light of the globalisation of markets, this module will focus on the different elements of various competition law systems. Starting with an introduction to competition law and economics, we will then proceed with discussing different regimes in a comparative perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201Full year5Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian. Compulsory for second year students of Russian who are native speakers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% English-Russian Translation (Equivalent to 1200 words)
  • Item 2: 8% Russian-English Translation (Equivalent to 1000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Cultural Research Project (2500 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 5: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201ASemester 15Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 5
Russian
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202ASemester 14Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Russian
Strategic Decision Making for LawyersLawSOLM038Semester 27Yes

Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: "This module provides the students with effective decision analysis skills, coupled with comprehensive theoretical background in the fields of decision making, game theory, and contracting theory to provide the theoretical context for applied decision analysis in a legal context. Aspects of various decision-making theories will be examined which may include: decision analysis involving independent decision-making under uncertainty which may include basic probabilistic modelling, decision tree construction and rollback, assessment of probabilities and ranges, sensitivity analysis, analysis of risk profiles and risk-attitudes, and application of decision analysis to litigation; game theory involving interdependent decision-making under certainty and uncertainty which may include consideration of relevant case studies, sequential and simultaneous games, common cooperative and noncooperative games, dominant strategy, iterated dominance and Nash equilibria, information asymmetry, Akerlof¿s adverse selection and moral hazard, and specific application of game theory in the legal setting; contracting theory involving function of contracts and key elements of effective agreements which may include risk allocation and incentive analysis, value creation in legal work, impact of strategic considerations and information asymmetry, probabilistic analysis of zone of possible settlement in litigation, and analysis of common contracts such as construction and production contracts, principal-agent contracts, sale and lease of property contracts, financing contracts and joint venture agreements; and decision-making Irrationality involving various aspects of bounded rationality and judgmental heuristics, information availability driven biases, anchoring, judgmental overconfidence, and instances of bounded awareness in strategic settings (inattention and change blindness, winner¿s curse in negotiation and in auctions). Classes combine classic academic teaching with a case method approach with particular emphasis on utilising the presented material for improvement of students¿ strategic decision making in the legal context."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201BSemester 24Yes

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Russian
Russian I NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4202Full year4Yes

Russian I N

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 8% English-Russian Translation (Equivalent to 1000 words)
  • Item 2: 8% Russian-English Translation (Equivalent to 800 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Cultural Research Project (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Oral Examination (20 mins)
  • Item 5: 40% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Conduct of Hostilities in International LawLawSOLM113Semester 17Yes

Conduct of Hostilities in International Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: This module is concerned with the rules of international law that govern the conduct of military operations in situations of armed conflict. Since these rules are largely intended for the protection of the civilian population, they apply irrespective of the legality or illegality of war. In the literature, the issues studied in this module are variously referred to as humanitarian law, jus in bello, or the law of war. The module will examine the core principles of humanitarian law , in particular, the centrality of the principle of distinction between civilians and combatants; rules for assessing the proportionality of military operations and their impact on targeting decisions; means and methods of warfare including the prohibition of weapons of mass destruction. The module will also consider the law applicable to situations of military occupation in light of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 1 (200-250 words)
  • Item 2: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 2 (200-250 words)
  • Item 3: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 3 (200-250 words)
  • Item 4: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 4 (200-250 words)
  • Item 5: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 5 (200-250 words)
  • Item 6: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 6 (200-250 words)
  • Item 7: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 7 (200-250 words)
  • Item 8: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 8 (200-250 words)
  • Item 9: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 9 (200-250 words)
  • Item 10: 2% Weekly Assigned Reading 10 (200-250 words)
  • Item 11: 1% Weekly In-Class Project (200-250 words)
  • Item 12: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 2 (200-250 words)
  • Item 13: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 3 (200-250 words)
  • Item 14: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 4 (200-250 words)
  • Item 15: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 5 (200-250 words)
  • Item 16: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 6 (200-250 words)
  • Item 17: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 7 (200-250 words)
  • Item 18: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 8 (200-250 words)
  • Item 19: 1% Weekly In-Class Project 9 (200-250 words)
  • Item 20: 1% Weekly In-class project 10 (200-250 words)
  • Item 21: 70% Independent Research Essay (1500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement (semester A)Languages Linguistics and FilmRUS295ASemester 15No

Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement (semester A)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Semester Abroad Learning Log, which consists of two academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Work Placement Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Banking and FinTech LawLawSOLM008Semester 27Yes

Banking and FinTech Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the nature and content of private banking law at the UK, European and international levels. Banking Law is concerned with the private law aspects of banks and banking including both Commercial Banking and Investment Banking. Banks are among the most important financial institutions within any economy, nationally and internationally, and the City of London is one of the foremost financial centres of the world. This module examines all aspects of the law governing the structure, operation and function of banks and banking markets from a UK as well as European and international perspective. The course is essentially private law based although it also examines recent areas of significant law reform especially following the recent financial crises in banking markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (One Language)Languages Linguistics and FilmSML6202Full year6Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Modern Languages (One Language)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Laetitia Calabrese

Description: This course is designed for final year students doing Single Honours Modern Languages BA (French, or Spanish, or Russian) or doing Joint Honours Modern Languages BA (French, or Spanish, or Russian) with a non-language subject. The course is for the students who have already reached a high level of linguistic competence and aim at developing listening comprehension and oral production skills ¿ including bilateral communicative skills ¿ to a very high level. Students will learn to perform different types of speech acts in everyday life situations and to perform tasks required in working and social environments, such as summarizing, reporting and presenting, as well as consecutive interpreting (interpreting between speakers of two different languages). This module is not designed for true native speakers of French, Spanish or Russian. QMUL HSS students can take this module at the discretion of the module organiser.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test 1 (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 5% Coursework: Transcription (250 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Coursework: Summary (250 words)
  • Item 4: 5% Coursework: Register (250 words)
  • Item 5: 5% Coursework: Interpreting (250 words)
  • Item 6: 40% In-class Test 2 (50 mins)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Principles of TaxationLawSOLM118Semester 17Yes

Principles of Taxation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The module covers the structure, principles, rules and application of a selection of taxes from a multi-jurisdictional and comparative perspective. In particular, the module looks at the taxation of individual income and wealth, the taxation of corporations and indirect taxation, as well as taxation at the sub-national level and tax administration. This is crucial not only for an understanding of specific domestic tax systems and the options available in designing domestic tax systems, but also to an understanding of the international tax system, which is determined by the interaction of national tax systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Afropean IdentitiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6052Semester 16Closed

Afropean Identities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince

Description: 'Afropean' is a term coined by Belgian music artist Zap Mama to encompass being both African and European, not as a contradiction but as an expression of plurality and site for creativity. Beyond identity politics, though acutely aware of racism as manifested across European contexts, Afropean writers acknowledge the dark histories of slavery and colonialism while uniting around cultural memories and contemporary activist movements. Students will analyse literary texts including essays, poems, novels, and short stories. They will engage with race critical theory and Afropea as a utopian concept, as well as positioning themselves in relation to local Afropean history and culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
International and Comparative Law of Unfair CompetitionLawSOLM082Semester 17Yes

International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: "The module aims at providing the students with a thorough account of the main legal theories of unfair competition in various jurisdictions with a particular focus on US, EU, UK, French and German law in light of the binding European and international legal frameworks. Legal problems are approached from a comparative perspective. At the same time, emphasis is placed on the practical problems that arise in the context of disputes that involve claims of unfair competition."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Essential Foundation Mathematical SkillsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF026Semester 13No

Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rainer Klages

Description: This module is designed to strengthen manipulative skills in elementary arithmetic and algebra; includes consideration of integers, fractions, decimal representations, estimation, polynomials, rational functions, square roots, inequalities, linear and quadratic equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Test 1
  • Item 3: 15% Test 2
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Introduction to Business Information SystemsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF036Semester 23No

Introduction to Business Information Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jorge Del Bosque Trevino
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take SEF034

Description: The module balances business and technical aspects but adopts a high-level view, aiming for example to explain the purpose and use of databases rather than develop specific skills in database query or design. Alongside learning the basic ideas of programming, this module provides an introduction to the context of much IT.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Class Tests
  • Item 2: 20% Poster and Presentation
  • Item 3: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Design and Intellectual Property: EU and United StatesLawSOLM081Full year7No

Design and Intellectual Property: EU and United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: The importance of design within competitive economies has been underestimated academically. Designs increase the visual, ergonomic, aesthetic and branding appeal of a product, and has the potential to increase the impact and competitiveness of the product within different market sectors. This option will teach students the key ways to protect the investment in graphic, environmental and product designs, with an emphasis on design patents, trade mark/trade dress and copyright laws. While the focus of the course will be on EU and US laws, the course will also cover the international design registration system, as well as specific design-related issues in major industries such as competition and consumable markets (coffee pods, spare parts, cartridges), 3D printing, and counterfeiting within furniture & fashion lifestyle industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Competition LawLawSOLM054Semester 17Yes

International Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: Competition law has witnessed an impressive increase in significance and geographical scope during the last two decades or so. From the situation which existed in the 1980s - when there were only a few systems of competition law in the world ¿ we have moved to a new one where currently there are about 120 jurisdictions in which some form of competition law has been introduced and 30 others seeking to develop the process. It is anticipated that this remarkable geographical expansion of the law will increase in the future. With this unprecedented increase in significance and remarkable geographical expansion of the law (as well as other significant developments such as the process of globalisation), it has become important to examine the role and place of competition law and policy in a globalised economy. The course will aim at such an examination. The course is designed to include 'international' elements (comparative elements will then be addressed in the Comparative Competition Law course in semester 2), looking at, among other things, issues such as, the process of internationalisation of competition law and policy; the role of international organisations and multinational enterprises (MNEs) in this process; the extraterritorial reach of the competition rules of the EU, the USA and those of other jurisdictions; and the relationship between competition and trade policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Study Abroad Year (English)English and DramaSED004Full year5No

Study Abroad Year (English)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr James Vigus

Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year English programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Russian Film: Memory and HistoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5028Semester 25Yes

Russian Film: Memory and History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks

Description: This course examines how Russian cinema, through the films of Eisenstein and Vertov to Tarkovskii, Mikhalkov and Sokurov, have used biographical and historical films to construct or contest views of the past and a coherent sense of common identity and purpose. Students acquire key concepts for the analysis of filmic treatments of memory and history, enabling them to examine representations of Russian history paying particular attention to twentieth century Russia's traumatic turning points.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200BSemester 25Yes

Russian II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202BSemester 25Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This is the second-year Russian language module for associate students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian Novel: Self and SocietyLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5023Semester 25Yes

Russian Novel: Self and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Inna Tigountsova

Description: This module examines the emergence and development of the Russian novel until 1860. We will focus on novels about the constitution of individual, gender, and collective identity in an environment marked by the influx of ideas and fashions coming from the West while the structure of Russian society remained staunchly committed to an absolutist model of power. Readings from Pushkin, Lermontov, Dostoevsky, and Gogol'. Themes include nobility and its others, the romantic construction of gender differences, fashion and self-fashioning, the poet and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Skills
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Essay (1500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
History of RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5024Semester 25Yes

History of Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Makarova

Description: This module offers an overall historic, linguistic, and social view of the Russian language. Learning about the processes that shaped Russian will deepen and enrich your understanding of the modern language. Seemingly peculiar language features will no longer be random facts you have to memorise, but rather the outcome of regular and well-understood historical developments in grammar and vocabulary. The module will explain how Russian came to be the way it is now.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework (750 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Russian
Transnational Problems of Commercial LawLawSOLM036Semester 27Yes

Transnational Problems of Commercial Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prosir Bernard Rix

Description: In an era of globalisation English contract law governs many international transactions between commercial parties and is essential to energy, shipping, commodities and the construction industry. This course will introduce students to the making, breaking, interpreting and disputing of contracts. It covers a range of subjects including contract interpretation, frustration, breach, termination, misrepresentation and fraud, and some of the special problems of insurance, shipping, and sale of goods law. It will also provide them with insights into the procedural aspects of commercial law; and into the different ways in which good faith may be approached in the common and civil law. In doing so, we consider typical problems concerning contract law, private and public international law, and procedure, which are encountered by commercial lawyers in negotiation, litigation, arbitration and mediation. Do you interpret contracts as a literalist goat or as a purposive sheep? When does a breach of contract destroy a contract? What are the modes and dangers of terminating a significant contract? What is the role of an ¿international commercial court¿? What is the role of private and public international law in commercial law? How does ¿good faith¿ differ in the common and civil law? Would you advise a client to arbitrate or litigate or mediate? It will give students and practitioners the ability to answer these questions and apply contract law to complex commercial disputes. It will teach them to be lawyers in business and pragmatists in law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201ASemester 14Yes

Russian I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS060N.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 4
Russian
Russian Language PlayLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4046Semester 24Yes

Russian Language Play

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: In the second semester of each academic year the Russian department prepares a play for performance in Russian. This is a unique opportunity for shared close analysis, examination, and realisation of a Russian text. The actors and directors are selected from among the students. Numbers will be limited by the size of the cast, but there is no obligation whatsoever for everyone participating to register for the module In addition to participating in the performance, students registering for the module write a supervised essay-project on a theme associated with the play performed and supported by three formal supervisions. The language of the presentation and essay is English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 4
Russian
Russian ILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4201Full year4Yes

Russian I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Translation from and into Russian. Comprehension of, and conversation in, spoken Russian. Compulsory for students specialising in Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Russian
Psychology of Individual DifferencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ233Semester 25Yes

Psychology of Individual Differences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students taking this module have previously studied introductory-level psychology and research methods in psychology

Description: This module provides an in-depth analysis of a central area of psychology known variously as 'individual differences' or 'differential psychology'. We will build on several key areas of psychology that show substantial individual differences including personality, psychopathology, intelligence and cognition. We will then explore the proposed causes and effects of these individual differences drawing from research using approaches from psycho-dynamics to behavioral genetics. Finally, we will explore the evidence behind several key controversies in individual differences including the continuum between personality and mental health, the nature vs nurture debate, race differences in intelligence and genetic determinism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Written Coursework (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% MCQ Test
Level: 5
Psychology
Use of Force in International LawLawSOLM112Semester 17Yes

Use of Force in International Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Phoebe Okowa

Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the legal framework regulating the use of force in international affairs. It examines in detail the content of the prohibition on use force in a historical context , as well as the self-defence and collective security exceptions that were explicitly provided for. The course will also examine in detail the effect of threats from terrorists and rogue states on the development of the law. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of human rights norms on the law on use of force and whether international law recognises a distinct right of humanitarian intervention. It is will also consider arguments advanced in support of a general responsibility on States to intervene militarily in support of those facing mass atrocity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Health PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ216Semester 15Yes

Health Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students taking this module have previously studied introductory-level psychology and research methods in psychology

Description: This module introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists ¿ namely, psychology as applied to health behaviour. The course covers the central models and evidence bases concerning the relationship between psychological processes and health and illness. Topics covered by this module will include health promotion and public health; health behaviour models; illness maintenance and treatment adherence; chronic illness; and health through the lifespan.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Written Article (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% MCQ Exam
Level: 5
Psychology
International Finance Law AppliedLawSOLM006Semester 27Yes

International Finance Law Applied

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the principal markets and main professional documentation used in more specialist international finance and capital markets. International finance markets are key drivers in national and international economies and the new global economy. The City of London remains one of the key financial centres in the world for all of these markets and activities. The course examines the nature, function, structure, operation and importance of all of the key financial markets involved. This is essentially a private law, contract or transactional and documentation course which provides professional preparation in designing, structuring and executing all of the principal separate financial contracts involved. The course can be taken with International Finance Law or as a free standing module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Banking Law InternationalLawSOLM007Semester 17Yes

Banking Law International

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the course is to examine the nature and content of banking law and regulation at the international, European and UK levels with reference to US law as well. Banking markets are key drivers in any national, regional or global economy with banks carrying out a number of essential services without which no economy could operate. Banking markets are nevertheless unstable and prone to significant crisis and collapse which was confirmed by the severity and damaging impact of the recent financial crises in global, European and national financial markets. Many difficult problems still arise with regard to the causes of the crises and most appropriate responses going forward. All of the relevant issues that arise in this exciting area are examined in this course.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and LawLawSOLM080Full year7No

Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: In this module, students will engage directly with industry and commercial fashion practice through workshops and enterprise development, gaining specific insight into design practice, fashion media, merchandising, branding, and retail curation. Seminars will cover a range of topics in commercial fashion enterprise and will consider in detail practical examples in management and innovation, allowing students to gain a comprehensive insight into building a fashion brand identity and an understanding of commercial and artistic practice in fashion and design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Features of English: Linguistics for English Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5205Semester 25Yes

Features of English: Linguistics for English Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf

Description: Students considering a Foreign Language Assistantship, or any other English language teaching activity such as private English lessons or tuition, during their Year Abroad or after graduation, are recommended to choose this module. We would advise you to do this level 5 module in your second year, just before your year abroad. The module is especially recommended if you have little or no knowledge of English Linguistics. The module covers all main areas of English Linguistics which are relevant for the teaching of English: English phonetics; word classes and phrases (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, particles); the role of English in the world; development of English; English usage / prescription and description. Please note that this module is not available for students with prior knowledge of English Linguistics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Portflio (equivalent to 1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (1500 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
ComputingScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF034Semester 13No

Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Dharini Krishnamoorthy

Description: The Computing module will provide SEFP students with an understanding and practical experience of core areas of computer science: programming and algorithms; underlying theory; software development; computer systems; and networks. It will include hands-on programming experience during supervised lab sessions. The module is designed principally to prepare students for pursuing study in the areas of computer science or electronics; however, it will also provide a basic introduction for students not intending to pursue study in these areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Programming Assignment 1
  • Item 2: 15% Programming Assignment 2
  • Item 3: 15% Programming Assignment 3
  • Item 4: 20% Programming Assignment 4
  • Item 5: 40% Online class tests
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Digital Electronics and Computer SystemsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF035Semester 23No

Digital Electronics and Computer Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Nida Aziz

Description: This module will introduce SEFP students to basic electronics, with a focus on digital and programmable systems. This module follows on from SEF034 Computing, which introduces basic programming skills and seeks to look below the abstract level at which most computers are programmed and ask 'how are computers created?'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Practical Skills Assessment
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and CultureLawSOLM079Semester 17Yes

Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This interdisciplinary module brings a range of perspectives to the analysis of intellectual property law in the fashion and design industries, including business sociology and knowledge management, art history and fashion theory, fan theory and fashion tribes, and economic and cultural aspects. Students will understand and analyse fundamental interactions between protection frameworks, the creative process, and the fashion customer, analysing critically the social, political and legal aspects of the industry and its interaction with other cultural forms. The course equips students with the skills to identify and manage intellectual property in fashion practice and to analyse critically policy aspects of the fashion industries and the interaction with the law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Discrete Mathematics (Foundation)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF015Semester 23No

Discrete Mathematics (Foundation)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module introduces students to arithmetic beyond the integers and rational numbers: modulo arithmetic, and the arithmetic of polynomials, matrices, logical propositions and sets. Applications of these concepts in prepositional logic, relational algebra and graph theory will also be covered. Prerequisite: SEF026 Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Introduction to EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceSEF024Semester 23No

Introduction to Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF005

Description: This module aims to introduce students to the application of scientific principles to solve practical engineering problems; it includes discussion of the development of the engineering field and standards, as well as basic engineering principles, mechanical applications and stress analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Online assessment 1
  • Item 3: 15% Online assessment 2
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
English Language IScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF009Semester 13No

English Language I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Sharon Turner

Description: Reading and study skills, lecture comprehension and seminar skills, and an introduction to academic writing in English. This module is intended for students, primarily from overseas, whose first language is not English and who do not already have IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Portfolio: text responses
  • Item 2: 25% Individual talk (5 min)
  • Item 3: 50% Timed writing (1.5 hours)
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Study Abroad Year (Drama)English and DramaSED003Full year5No

Study Abroad Year (Drama)

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This core module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Drama programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass the ssessments set by the partner institution in accordance with the requirements noted on the programme specification in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module will be zero-weighted. Students will study the majority of modules in their core subject, developing their skills while witnessing how the discipline is
taught in another context. They can take modules outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200ASemester 15Yes

Russian II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS5201A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 5
Russian
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202ASemester 15Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This is the second-year Russian language module for associate students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Practical Skills Assessment
Level: 5
Russian
International Merger Control: Special TopicsLawSOLM053Semester 27Yes

International Merger Control: Special Topics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: Within the field of competition law, merger control has attracted special attention. The reason for this attention can be found in the special nature of mergers as a business phenomenon, especially when compared with other business phenomena, such as abuse of dominance by firms or cartel activities. The process of relentless globalisation which has been developing since the 1990s has meant that merger operations can produce an effect on the conditions of competition in more than one jurisdiction. This means that, quite inevitably, regulatory approval in more than one jurisdiction may need to be sought. Such a consequence - as is widely accepted ¿ can give rise to uncertainty for the firms concerned and cause huge expense and significant delay. Those who are involved in advising business firms in a merger situation are also not immune from the uncertainty when merger operations have to be notified to more than one competition authority. Often legal advisors have to answer extremely difficult questions in merger cases, such as whether notification of the merger to the competition authorities in one or more jurisdictions is necessary or mandatory or even desirable; which authorities need to be notified; what is required for this purpose and how to go about notifying the authorities concerned; and how will the authorities assess the merger, including any relevant time framework within which they will operate and ultimately reach a decision in a given case. The Module will aim at a thorough examination of the highly important phenomena of international mergers and their regulation worldwide. The focus of the Module will be on special topics including: government intervention and national champions; the treatment of conglomerate effects from practical perspective, merger remedies among others. The Module will be taught in a very practical manner, to reflect the very nature of the topic. A highly interesting range of case studies and the knowledge and expertise of practitioners in the field will be a key aspect of the course. The Module should prove to be attractive for students attending other competition law courses and those with an `international¿ dimension in other areas of commercial orientation on the LLM.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Russian II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5202Full year5Yes

Russian II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This is the second-year core language module for students who started their degree in Russian 'ab initio'. It offers further intensive instruction in the Russian language, and by the end of the module you should be at a level comparable to those who have taken Russian II. This module completes the presentation of basic Russian grammar. Apart from grammar, oral practise of the spoken language, aural comprehension and translation from and into Russian are also addressed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Online Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Exam (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Coursework
Level: 5
Russian
Contemporary Russian Short StoriesLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5016Semester 15Yes

Contemporary Russian Short Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks

Description: This module analyses the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, history, considering how the genre¿s specific features have been used to express the concerns and currents of recent Russian life since 1991. Themes analysed include post-modernism, women¿s writing, the reckoning with the Soviet past, diasporic literature and the search for a new, Russian identity. Authors studied include Liudmilla Petrushevskaia, Tatiana Tolstaia, Viktor Pelevin, Zakhar Prilepin and Anna Starobinets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Assignment 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Assignment 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian IILanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5200Full year5Yes

Russian II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Tuition in spoken Russian aimed at enhancing communication abilities in the language. Translation from English into Russian and from Russian into English, complemented as appropriate by free composition, comprehension, précis, and exercises. Native speakers of Russian should register for RUS212.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 40% Online Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
History of RussianLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4024Semester 24Yes

History of Russian

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olga Makarova

Description: This module offers an overall historic, linguistic, and social view of the Russian language. Learning about the processes that shaped Russian will deepen and enrich your understanding of the modern language. Seemingly peculiar language features will no longer be random facts you have to memorise, but rather the outcome of regular and well-understood historical developments in grammar and vocabulary. The module will explain how Russian came to be the way it is now.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework (600 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Russian
Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ211Semester 15Yes

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students taking this module have previously studied introductory-level psychology and research methods in psychology

Description: This module introduces theory and research in cognitive psychology, the study of the human mind and mental processes. Key theories and research in cognitive psychology will be discussed, including visual and multi-modal perception, attention, memory, language, reasoning, and decision-making. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided throughout to illustrate these concepts. This module will demonstrate the essential role of that cognitive psychology plays in everyday life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Written Midterm
  • Item 2: 60% MCQ Exam
Level: 5
Psychology
Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY713PSemester 27No

Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valdas Noreika

Description: This module will focus on further developing the key skills required to conduct interdisciplinary research in the mental health sciences. It will provide further support for students during the data collection phase of their projects and semester B modules. It will also provide support in career development to boost students¿ employability on graduation. We will invite speakers from industry, academia and/or the public sector to give careers talks and provide workshops on career planning and job applications, including how to develop a funding application for PhD positions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% CV and application
  • Item 2: 80% Science communication piece (article and video)
Level: 7
Psychology
Psychology of EmotionBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSZ127Semester 24Yes

Psychology of Emotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will allow students to learn about the different conceptualisations of emotion both in terms of historical developments as well as contemporary theoretical models of emotions. The module will also consider the biological basis of emotions in the brain and the body, how emotions are expressed and perceived in faces, bodies, voice and music. The relationship between emotions and cognitions will be considered, including emotion regulation and individual differences in emotions. Finally, cultural differences and disorders of emotion will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Video presentation
  • Item 2: 5% Written review
  • Item 3: 75% MCQ Test
Level: 4
Psychology
Psychiatric Genetics and GenomicsBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY706PSemester 27No

Psychiatric Genetics and Genomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giorgia Michelini

Description: This module will focus on the genetic underpinnings of mental health and illness. Students will learn about the variety of genetic approaches that have been developed to understand the genetic risk for psychiatric and neurodevelopmental conditions, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. Drawing on the wealth of research studies in this field, we will explore novel clinical applications that integrate genetic information, discuss the way genetic predispositions interface with the environment and are manifested in cognitive and brain phenotypes, and highlight key strengths and limitations and future directions for genetic studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Report (3000 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY711PSemester 17No

Academic Skills in Mental Health Sciences I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Caroline Brennan

Description: This module will focus on developing the key skills required to conduct interdisciplinary research in the mental health sciences. You will learn about the different genetic, social, cognitive, behavioural and neuroscientific approaches to mental health research, how to read and critically evaluate the literature and how to translate clinical findings to basic science questions. A key outcome of this module is to develop a MSc project proposal focusing on an aspect of psychiatric disorders or psychological wellbeing that can be investigated from a social, cognitive, behavioural, neuroscientific, or genetic perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Project proposal
Level: 7
Psychology
International Finance LawLawSOLM005Semester 17Yes

International Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof George Walker

Description: The purpose of the module is to examine the principal markets and main professional documentation used in the international finance and capital markets. International finance markets are key drivers in national and international economies and the new global economy. The City of London remains one of the key financial centres in the world for all of these markets and activities. This course examines the nature, function, structure, operation and importance of all of the key financial markets involved. This is essentially a private law, contract or transactional and documentation course which provides professional preparation in designing, structuring and executing all of the principal separate financial contracts involved.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Contemporary Russian Short StoriesLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4016Semester 14Yes

Contemporary Russian Short Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks

Description: This module analyses the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, history, considering how the genre¿s specific features have been used to express the concerns and currents of recent Russian life since 1991. Themes analysed include post-modernism, women¿s writing, the reckoning with the Soviet past, diasporic literature and the search for a new, Russian identity. Authors studied include Liudmilla Petrushevskaia, Tatiana Tolstaia, Viktor Pelevin, Zakhar Prilepin and Anna Starobinets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Assignment 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Assignment 2 (2000 words)
Level: 4
Russian
Cognitive NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY705PSemester 27No

Cognitive Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Frederike Beyer

Description: This module will focus on developing the skills required to conduct cognitive and neuroscientific studies of mental illness. A variety of different methods will be covered in-depth, including EEG, fMRI, and psychophysiology. The lectures will cover the theoretical basis of each method and its application to mental health research, and accompanying workshops will teach students how to analyse and interpret neuroimaging data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class activities
  • Item 2: 30% Experimental plan
  • Item 3: 40% Report
Level: 7
Psychology
Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML6212Semester 26Closed

Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf

Description: This module introduces students to language teaching at school. It includes French, German, Spanish, and Russian. The module can count for a degree in those languages. It is the second of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the practical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other one (SML6211 which runs during the first semester) focuses on theoretical issues.
Through the completion of this module, and building up on the theoretical knowledge which you have acquired in SML6211, you develop practical knowledge of how to design and deliver materials for the purpose of teaching foreign languages. You focus on practical aspects of second/ foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and design of teaching materials. You complete a teaching placement in a local primary or secondary school, where you have an opportunity to apply the theoretical knowledge gained in SML6211 in the actual teaching and learning context. This involves planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. The module also enables you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.
Important: As you are required to complete a placement in a local school, you will have to provide clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) towards the end of semester 1 BEFORE this module in semester 2. Please contact the module organiser for further information.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% A Scheme of Work for the 5 Weeks of Assisting and Teaching in Schools (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% A Critical Reflection of the Students' Placement at School and Their Overall Teaching Experience (2000 words)
Level: 6
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
DissertationLanguages Linguistics and FilmSMLM005Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood

Description: Dissertation

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Language MythsLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5201Semester 15Yes

Language Myths

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luisa Marti Martinez

Description: Are some languages harder to learn than others? Are double negatives illogical? Do children lack grammar? Do dialects lack grammar? Did your parents teach you your mother tongue? In this module we explore commonly held views on human language from a contemporary, comparative perspective. The module is of interest to anyone studying for a language degree.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Assignment 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Assignment 2 (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 35% Assignment 3 (1400 words)
  • Item 4: 20% Quizzes (800 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Computers and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmSML5202Semester 15Yes

Computers and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge

Description: This module is designed as an introduction to the application of technology, specifically web technology, in language education. Providing a balance of theory and practice, it equips students with the knowledge and skills to make enhanced use of computers in their studies and research activities. The module covers key concepts in the use of digital technologies for language learning, as well as providing practical experience in the creation of web-based materials using a variety of computer applications, including elementary coding in HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Evaluation Report (1200 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Weekly Tasks and Quizzes (equivalent to 1000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Website Project and Rationale (1500 words)
Level: 5
Interdisciplinary Modern Languages
Molecules to CellsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF032Semester 23No

Molecules to Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Viji Draviam Sastry

Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the study of Biology at the molecular level. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Biological Information Technology. It is also suitable for students wishing to study microbiology or more general biology degree programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% MCQ (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Diversity and EcologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF033Semester 23No

Diversity and Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sally Faulkner
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF031

Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles of evolution and to develop an appreciation of the dynamic nature of ecological systems. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Ecology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology, Genetics, and Biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% MCQ (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Licensing Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM078Semester 17Yes

Licensing Intellectual Property

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM096

Description: The module begins with an explanation of the principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing contracts. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution. The module will discuss current issues in the field of licensing including trade marks and selective distribution agreements; standard essential patents and FRAND (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory) licensing; as well as copyright licensing, news aggregation; and technological self-help measures including blockchain technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Form and Function in BiologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF031Semester 13No

Form and Function in Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gail Schofield

Description: This module is designed to introduce you to the basic biology of microbes, plants and animals. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology and Ecology. It is also suitable for students who wish to study the more microbial and molecular aspects of biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% MCQ (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Physics (Electricity and Atomic Physics)Physical and Chemical SciencesSEF007Semester 23No

Physics (Electricity and Atomic Physics)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Dunstan
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SEF005

Description: Aspects of electrical theory (current and charge, resistance, capacitors, circuits and meters); atomic structure and properties of the electron; the nucleus, radioactive decay and nuclear energy; introduction to quantum physics. Prerequisite - SEF005

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
SBCS Industrial/Professional Experience Placement ModuleBiological and Behavioural SciencesSBC5001Full year5No

SBCS Industrial/Professional Experience Placement Module

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the 'Year in Industry/Research' programmes in the field of Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Psychology offered by SBCS.

Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Semester A. Academic & industrial supervisors monitoring meeting
  • Item 2: 20% Semester B. Academic & industrial supervisors monitoring meeting
  • Item 3: 20% Student report (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 20% Industrial (500 words)
  • Item 5: 20% Presentation (10 min)
Level: 5
Physics (Fields and Waves)Physical and Chemical SciencesSEF006Semester 23No

Physics (Fields and Waves)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrei Sapelkin

Description: The role and characteristics of fields, in particular gravitational and electromagnetic fields. The description of natural phenomena and the widespread occurrence of oscillations and wave motion, with examples taken from the physics of sound and light. Prerequisite - SEF005

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 3
Science & Engineering Foundation
Culture and Revolution: Russia and ChinaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5067Semester 15Yes

Culture and Revolution: Russia and China

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SML5067 or take RUS6067

Description: This module examines the notion of culture as a central instrument in the transformation of society as it was adopted and deployed in the 20th century¿s two most influential Communist revolutions, in Russia and China. The module covers themes including the representation of the revolution, the image of the Communist and debates around Socialist Realism, tracing their evolution and expression in a variety of media including film, prose fiction and art. This module is offered at level 5 and level 6 and students' performance will be considered against the relevant level benchmark as outlined in the SLLF UG Handbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (1750 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (1750 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Russian II NLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5201BSemester 25Yes

Russian II N

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: This module is for native speakers of Russian only. Tuition is aimed at improving students' ability to communicate in Russian, and to translate from Russian into English, and particularly from English into Russian.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Advanced CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7028USemester 27Yes

Advanced Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6311 and take SPA6308. Before or while taking this module you are advised to take SPA7019U

Description: This module covers advanced concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular will introduce the student to cosmological perturbation theory. It discusses the observed structure of the universe, how these structures formed, and how they can be used to test our theories and models of the universe. The module will also discuss recent and upcoming experiments and large scale structure surveys and their relevance for cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Russian Language PlayLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5046Semester 25Yes

Russian Language Play

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: In the second semester of each academic year the Russian department prepares a play for performance in Russian. This is a unique opportunity for shared close analysis, examination, and realisation of a Russian text. The actors and directors are selected from among the students. Numbers will be limited by the size of the cast, but there is no obligation whatsoever for everyone participating to register for the module. In addition to participating in the performance, students registering for the module write a supervised essay-project on a theme associated with the play performed and supported by three formal supervisions. The language of the presentation and essay is English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central AsiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS5057Semester 15Yes

Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze

Description: Once part of the ancient Silk Road, the countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia have a roller-coaster history which includes subjection to Russian imperial and Soviet rule. Through the prism of award-winning literature and film by a new post-Soviet generation of women (e.g. Mariam Petrosyan¿s The Gray House, 2009; Nana Ekvtimishvili¿s In Bloom, 2013), this module explores the cultural and socio-political developments in the now independent Georgia, Armenia, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Themes to discuss will include childhood, youth, migration, post-Soviet identity, the effects of colonialism, and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian
EU Trade LawLawSOLM035Semester 17Yes

EU Trade Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard

Description: "This module is concerned with the legal framework for cross-border trade in the European Union. The module provides an in-depth study of the economic and commercial aspects of the 'four freedoms' (free movement of goods, services, establishment and capital) in the EU single market and discusses the various approaches to regulating the single market adopted by EU institutions. Indicative list of topics that might be covered would include: the concept of the Single Market - market integration in the EU vs other forms of international trade liberalisation; non-tariff barriers: non-discrimination and market access; locating and relocating in another EU Member State - freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services for companies ¿ regulatory competition; tariff and fiscal barriers to free movement - free movement of capital; regulating the Single Market: harmonisation policy - governance of the Single Market"

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Russian I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4204BSemester 24Yes

Russian I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who have completed at least one semester of Russian language at home university. It has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential Russian grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the Russian language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based grammar tutorials, mixed-skills revision and oral and reading classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 4
Russian
Reading Contemporary RussiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS4205Semester 24Yes

Reading Contemporary Russia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: Reading Contemporary Russia consists of reading comprehension and content analysis of simple texts on contemporary Russia. The main focus of the class is to introduce students to current cultural, social, and political issues, using books, newspaper articles,journals, TV and radio broadcasts, and web sources from Russia. Selected readings and films will familiarize students with culture and features of everyday life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Online Examination (1 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral Assessment and Presentation
  • Item 3: 25% Practical Skills Assessment
Level: 4
Russian
Year Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmRUS296Full year5No

Year Abroad ¿ Russian Non-Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Year Abroad Learning Log, which consists of three academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Cultural Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Work Placement Report (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Erasmus Work Placement (semester B)Languages Linguistics and FilmRUS295BSemester 25No

Semester Abroad ¿ Russian Erasmus Work Placement (semester B)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Nadezda Bragina

Description: The Year Abroad is a compulsory part of any four-year undergraduate degree involving Russian and students may spend it by completing a Work Placement in the country of the target language. Students taking this module are expected to fulfill their contractual duties (as set by their employers) as well as successfully complete the Semester Abroad Learning Log, which consists of two academic assignments to be submitted at set intervals throughout the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Work Placement Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination (15 mins)
Level: 5
Russian
Advanced Research Methods and StatisticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY702PSemester 17No

Advanced Research Methods and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gwen Brekelmans

Description: This 15-credit module provides students with advanced-level training in research techniques appropriate for postgraduate research projects. It includes lectures on key research principles and research methodology, as well as practical workshops focused on developing skills in data analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework (750 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Psychology
Translational Mental Health Sciences IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY703PSemester 27No

Translational Mental Health Sciences II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valdas Noreika

Description: This module will focus on further developing the key skills required to conduct interdisciplinary research in the mental health sciences. It will provide further support for students during the data collection phase of their projects and semester B modules. It will also provide support in career development to boost students¿ employability on graduation. We will invite speakers from industry, academia and/or the public sector to give careers talks and provide workshops on career planning and job applications, including how to develop a funding application for PhD positions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% CV and application
  • Item 2: 80% Science communication piece (article and video)
Level: 7
Psychology
Social-Environmental Influences on Mental Health and Well-BeingBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY704PSemester 27No

Social-Environmental Influences on Mental Health and Well-Being

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jessica Blais

Description: This module investigates the role of social and environmental factors on psychopathology and psychological wellbeing across the life span. Prenatal influences, the immediate social context (i.e., parenting, family structure), the socio-economic context, the wider social context (i.e., neighbourhood quality, green spaces), adverse life events such as exposure to war and displacement, as well as cultural factors, will be covered. This module will also have an applied perspective: reviewing social and environmental interventions that have been developed to address adverse mental health outcomes and promote positive development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Report (3000 words)
Level: 7
Psychology
Transnational Law and Governance in PracticeLawSOLM027Semester 27Yes

Transnational Law and Governance in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Christou

Description: The central question this module discusses is the application and implication of Transnational law, its formation, supervision, and enforcement process in the context of the transnational business community and globalised markets. This module will take a series of case studies from different areas of law to provide examples of how governance can be conducted in a globalised world. The focus will be on the role and functioning of transnational law in a globalised world. Guest lecturers will be invited to talk about the impact of globalisation on their specialism and a Transnational Law solution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Dissertation in Politics / International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL318Full year6No

Dissertation in Politics / International Relations

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Phillips

Description: The final-year Dissertation module allows students to study in depth and at length a topic of their own choosing, under the personal supervisor of an academic. Students begin to formulate their research focus before the end of their second year, and undertake formative preparatory work during the summer vacation. In-year assessment involves a Research Proposal, Presentation, and 10,000-word dissertation. Support is provided through personal supervisions and training workshops, but the emphasis is predominantly upon students' individual research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Research Proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Presentation
  • Item 3: 85% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International RelationsPOL_6_A
Company Law: Foundational and Constitutional IssuesLawSOLM020Semester 17Yes

Company Law: Foundational and Constitutional Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module aims to inform and educate students as to the field of law that governs UK corporations. The course is a UK focused Company law course covering: Meaning of Corporate Personality and distinction between incorporated and unincorporated associations. The nature, types and functions of companies. Historical development of the modern business company. The consequences of incorporation and its practical advantages and disadvantages. The corporate entity principle and exceptions to it. The ultra vires doctrine and the Articles of Association. The company's organs and agents and the liability of the company for their acts. Formation and flotation of companies. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in the regulation of companies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Company Law: Corporate Finance and Management IssuesLawSOLM021Semester 27Yes

Company Law: Corporate Finance and Management Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shalini Perera

Description: The module aims to inform and educate students as to the field of law that governs UK corporations. The course is a UK focused Company law course covering: Minority protection. Capital, The duties of directors and of the controlling majority and the enforcement of these duties. Shareholder Remedies and Liquidation of companies. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in the regulation of companies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Animal Law, Media and CultureLawSOLM026Semester 17Yes

Animal Law, Media and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module brings together an interdisciplinary perspective on behaviour science, welfare, economics, and law in order to introduce students to a range of legal and welfare issues arising through the use of animals in media, culture and entertainment. The module will deal with both domesticated and wild animals, considering animals in film and television, advertising, fashion, zoos and conservation, circuses, and sport. Students will also explore a range of critical questions and specific episodes on animals and creativity, including the animal as performer and the animal as author, analysing the significance for sentience and welfare, and gaining important insight into creativity and intentionality in other areas of the law (including intellectual property).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare MarketsLawSOLM106Semester 27Yes

Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard

Description: "This module examines how EU competition rules and regulatory principles and processes affect healthcare markets. We will look at internal market rules primarily from the perspective of corporate actors (whether public or private) rather than individual patients and healthcare professionals. We will consider the legal regime for the placing of medicines and medical products on the market, market surveillance and product liability regimes as well as the application of competition law rules in this sector. Indicative list of topics that might be covered include: free movement of health goods and services in the European Union: general principles and intellectual property issues; pharmaceutical products: clinical trials and marketing authorisations; medical devices and human tissues; post market policies (vigilance, advertising and product liability); applicability of competition rules to the healthcare sector; cartels and abuses of dominant position; use of intellectual property rights and competition law; Services of General Economic Interest and competition law; state aids and public procurement in the healthcare sector."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH776PSemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Shestopaloff

Description: The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Trade SecretsLawSOLM096Semester 17Yes

Trade Secrets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Hull
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM078

Description: Every intellectual property right starts life as a trade secret. Trade secrets and related intellectual assets are viewed as critical to the success of many businesses. But they are also uniquely fragile rights and so their protection under different legal systems requires close assessment. This module complements other IP modules by providing an opportunity to study the economic and legal foundations of these important rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Intellectual Property Law in ChinaLawSOLM095Semester 17Yes

Intellectual Property Law in China

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: Reflecting the growing importance of Chinese developments in IP, and its vital role in the current and future global market economy, this module is designed to provide an insightful study of Chinese IP law and its relevance to the international community. The seminar based module looks into China's current copyright, trademark and patent, the law, policy and enforcement in the context of trade, and identifies the diverse approaches to effective management for IP in China.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Independent research essay (5000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (15 min)
Level: 7
Law
Modern Political Thought 1Politics and International RelationsPOL263Semester 15Yes

Modern Political Thought 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elke Schwarz

Description: This module builds on the analysis of concepts and ideologies begun in POL110. It enables students to follow through key ideas and debates about equality, power, revolution, democracy, identity and politics in modern political thought. It covers a range of thinkers from exemplars of Liberalism and Marxism to their anarchist, feminist, and anti-racist critics. The module focuses on thinkers from the latter part of the C19th to the early C20th, such as Marx, Dewey, Du Bois, Goldmann, Luxemburg and Sorel (the thinkers covered may change from year to year).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Take-Home Exam (3000 words) (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Law of Geographical IndicationsLawSOLM088Semester 27No

Law of Geographical Indications

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans

Description: Geographical indications (GIs) recognise the provenance and heritage of products, especially food and drink. The GI provides registered products with protection against imitation; and protects consumers from being misled about the geographical origin or quality of goods. They are important to the economy and environment of rural regions. GIs, such as Scotch Whisky, Parmigiano Reggiano or Darjeeling Tea, have become a valuable form of collective intellectual property. This module is intended for those involved in the drafting of specifications for the registration of GIs; or the formulation of regulations governing GIs; or the complementary administration of trade mark systems; or more generally, in the devising socio-economic policy for rural regions. The module will focus on EU law for the regulation of GIs; while having due regard to the comparative relationship other influential jurisdictions, including those of India and China; and by way of contrast, to the means by which GIs are protected as trade marks in the United States (US). The module will examine the substantive and procedural law relating to the EU regulation of GIs including the definition and eligibility of geographical names for registration; control or inspection obligations; enforcement and; the inter-relationship of GIs with trade marks. The module will consider the international enforcement of GIs, especially the way in which the competing models of EU and US regulation might be further harmonised within trade agreements; as well as possible approaches to future agreement between the UK and the EU concerning the recognition and protection of GIs following the withdrawal of the UK from the EU.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Music Industry ContractsLawSOLM089Full year7No

Music Industry Contracts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Florian Koempel

Description: The Music industry contracts module analyses the contracts between the various parts of the music industry. On the creative side it looks at the contracts between composers and music publishers; performers/ producers and record companies as well as other players such as music managers. A key aspect of the creative side of the music value chain concerns the activities of Collective Management Organisations and the module analyses the membership agreements of PRS for Music, MCPS and PPL respectively.The module we also look at the relation of music industry players with users such as broadcasting organisations and online platforms. The course will show how copyright is applied in practice on the example of the music industry. The music industry has been at the cutting edge of legal and commercial developments dealing with new business models throughout the years. The course will look at the main markets for music such as US and UK. Experiences in the field of music are transferable to all creative sectors such as audio visual and book publishing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Law of Patents and Related RightsLawSOLM077Semester 27Yes

International Law of Patents and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents provide, for a limited time, the right to exclude others from acts of making, using, selling, keeping or importing products containing the patented invention. Under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) WTO Members, in particular developing countries, face challenges in meeting their obligations to provide patent protection and related rights. The module will assess the extent to which these obligations derived from international law impact on access to medicines, traditional knowledge, biological diversity, farmers' rights, food security and human rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Power in Global GovernancePolitics and International RelationsPOL261Semester 25Yes

Power in Global Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andreas Papamichail

Description: Much of the fabric of multilateralism and international organisation appears to be threatened by 'populism'. Powerful political forces are re-asserting the national sovereignty principle. For some theorists this development is inevitable given the lack of a global hegemon willing and able to enforce international co-operation. Others, however, point to the continued globalisation of certain ways of governing state and society. On this module we will examine this debate using case studies such as Ebola, tobacco, logistics, tax evasion, drugs and sport.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Reform proposal (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
European and US Law of PatentsLawSOLM076Semester 17Yes

European and US Law of Patents

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents are exclusive rights granted for the protection of an invention that offers a new and inventive technical solution or way of doing something. This module compares the process of obtaining and enforcing a patent under the provisions of the European Patent Convention (EPC) with the equivalent legal arrangements under Title 35 of the Code of Laws of the United States of America (USC).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Human Rights Law: Law, Practice and InstitutionsLawSOLM070Semester 17Yes

International Human Rights Law: Law, Practice and Institutions

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos

Description: "This course explores the institutional and legal foundations of the post-WW2 framework for international human rights law protection, as well as a number of key rights and topics in contemporary international human rights law and practice. The first part examines the core institutions and legal regimes that together constitute the core of international human rights law. The second part of the course 'samples' a number of substantive rights, such as the right to life, the prohibition on torture and inhuman and degrading treatment, and the right to housing. It also explores the international human rights regimes from the perspective of different subjects or groups, such as women and labour, paying particular regard to the possibilities and limitations of human rights as a truly universal and emancipatory project. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2% Weekly written assignment 1 (200 words)
  • Item 2: 2% Weekly written assignment 2 (200 words)
  • Item 3: 2% Weekly written assignment 3 (200 words)
  • Item 4: 2% Weekly written assignment 4 (200 words)
  • Item 5: 2% Weekly written assignment 5 (200 words)
  • Item 6: 2% Weekly written assignment 6 (200 words)
  • Item 7: 2% Weekly written assignment 7 (200 words)
  • Item 8: 2% Weekly written assignment 8 (200 words)
  • Item 9: 2% Weekly written assignment 9 (200 words)
  • Item 10: 2% Weekly written assignment 10 (200 words)
  • Item 11: 80% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Human Rights of Women: Legal Framework and IssuesLawSOLM064Semester 27Yes

Human Rights of Women: Legal Framework and Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: The course will follow on from the material covered in Human Rights of Women - Feminist Legal Theory by covering the general international human rights legal framework before moving on to the gender specific international human rights framework. This will include assessing provisions such as CEDAW and the ECHR. The course will then move on to examine and assess international law and policy on a number of substantive areas such as violence against women, prostitution, trafficking, the veiling of women etc. In any given year the precise subjects to be studied will vary according to the provenance of the members of the class and other factors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Multinational Enterprises: Business and Legal OrganisationLawSOLM030Semester 17Yes

Multinational Enterprises: Business and Legal Organisation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Janet Dine

Description: "This module will provide a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the business and legal organisation of MNEs and of the regulation of their activities. Throughout the module we will aim to examine the regulatory environment for international business by dealing with sub-national, national, regional and multilateral policies and rules for the regulation of MNEs."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
EU Competition Law and PracticeLawSOLM051Semester 27Yes

EU Competition Law and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eyad Dabbah

Description: This module (along with the prerequisite module 'EU Competition Law') aims at a comprehensive study of the basic provisions of European Union (EU) competition law. The Module will provide participants with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EU competition law, especially Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and EU Merger Regulation 139/2004 are applied. The Module will aim to consider an important business phenomena in the market namely abusive dominance and mergers. It is hoped that by the end of the Module participants will gain a solid understanding of the relevant competition rules of the EU whilst developing a good business and market perspective and practical approach in order to help them identify situations in which such phenomena may arise and how should these phenomena be addressed.EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Article 102 TFEU and Regulation 139/2004. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 101 TFEU. EU competition law is based on the rules contained in Articles 101-109 of the Treaty on The Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and upon subsequent secondary legislation. The focus of the Module will be however on Article 102 TFEU and Regulation 139/2004. The Module will however consider where relevant and appropriate other provisions of EU competition law, especially Article 101 TFEU. EU competition rules are applied by the Directorate General (DG COMPETITION (COMP)) of the European Commission, the Directorate in charge of competition matters; there is also shared competence with designated national competition authorities (NCAs) in relation to the application of Articles 102 (and 101) TFEU. Decisions of the Commission are the principal means of enforcement in competition cases. The Commission¿s decisions are subject to review by the General Court of the EU (GCEU) (formerly the Court of First Instance (CFI)) and the Court of Justice of the EU/European Court of Justice (CJEU/ECJ). This has created an extensive case-law in competition law matters and reference will be made to this case law. In addition to considering substantive issues, the Module will also deal with relevant procedural mechanisms, sanctions etc. Particular attention will be given to questions of practice under Regulation 1/2003.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Commercial LawLawSOLM019Semester 27Yes

International Commercial Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: The module covers the fundamental characteristics of international contracts for the sale of goods and to a lesser extent, the key ancillary contracts for the financing of trading activities, transportation of goods to their place of destination and insurance of the cargo. When traders sell or buy goods or commodities on the international markets, that transaction is composed of several contracts: the goods are sold under a contract of sale, transported under a contract of carriage, insured under a contract of insurance and frequently have payment assured through a letter of credit. The purpose of this module is to examine primarily the regulation of the sale contract under CISG, English Sales law and other international law instruments and standards. The regulation of peripheral contracts to the contract of sale will be examined too but in less detail as this is now considered in depth by more focused specific modules (e.g., on the shipping of goods, marine insurance etc). The module will also place emphasis on the practical problems, which arise in the international commercial arena and consider ways in which these may be addressed in the future.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Animal Law,Welfare and TradeLawSOLM025Full year7No

Animal Law,Welfare and Trade

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: Animal Law and Welfare is of considerable and growing importance, particularly in the areas of trade and development, access and equality, welfare and criminal liability, public liability, and health. This module brings together interdisciplinary perspectives from behaviour studies, welfare, economics, and law in order to consider a range of issues in domestic animal welfare, including companion animal law and welfare, ownership and liability, shelters and rescue, breeding industries and the commercial pet industry, farm animal welfare and trade, science and research. The course develops an evidence-based approach to legislative practice, policy and development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Racism and Anti-Racism in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL336ASemester 16Yes

Racism and Anti-Racism in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adam Elliott-Cooper

Description: How has race become a method for categorising and ordering humanity? How has the politics of anti-racism sought to dismantle both racial orders and the categories they rely on?

In this course, we will grapple with these questions by exploring the diverse intellectual voices have sought to understand and theorise racism and anti-racism. These thinkers will include those who were engaged in struggles against imperialism and colonialism, in addition to contemporary forms of racial domination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Critical Review
  • Item 2: 60% Research Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Analysing Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOL350Semester 16Yes

Analysing Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Karl Pike

Description: The aim of this module is to examine the theory and practice of policy-making in modern liberal democratic political systems. The module explores the way in which public issues and problems are triggered, defined and constructed, how policy agendas are set, how decision making takes place, and how policies are implemented. The module is comparative in scope and focuses primarily on case studies from the UK and USA.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Policy brief (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Take-home exam (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Competition Law, Intellectual Property and InnovationLawSOLM094Semester 27Yes

Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: Innovation, recognized as critical to growth of national economies, is often cited as a primary justification for the grant of intellectual property rights and the varying periods within which these `monopolies¿ can be exercised. It is sometimes claimed, therefore, that there is a tension between competition law that might be viewed as `antimonopoly¿ and intellectual property law that grants exclusive rights that might be viewed as monopolistic. This, however, is not the case. Although competition law has, in some cases, restricted intellectual property rights, e.g., those that are exercised beyond their lawful scope, competition law and intellectual property law often have similar objectives, including to further consumer interest through a competitive market place offering innovative products and services. However, in some competition cases against companies engaged in innovation such as Microsoft, Google, Intel, Apple, etc., that are rooted in intellectual property principles, the balance between applying competition principles and IP principles is not always clear or uncontroversial. While the European courts have sought to draw a distinction between the existence of IP rights and their exercise within the specific subject matter of the right that, in principle should not be affected by competition law, the distinction does not provide a safe harbour for IP rights. This is because the ECJ has also considered abusive practices that fall within the scope of the ¿specific subject matter¿ of the IP right in certain 'exceptional circumstances'. The Court also gives a broad definition to the term ¿exercise¿, thus keeping an important discretion as to the scope of the application of competition law. The course aims at exploring in detail the relationship between competition law and intellectual property law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Independent Research Essay (1750 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
The Business of FilmLawSOLM087Full year7No

The Business of Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module deals with intellectual property and the international film industries, including the transformative environment of digital technology and user-generated content, through a consideration of protection and commercialisation in key jurisdictions and markets. Topics include the development of a film prospectus, ancillary rights, financing and alternative funding (including crowdfunding models and fan-based theories), development and production, distribution, merchandising and co-branding, film franchises and adaptations, censorship, titles and credits, cast and performers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Differential Geometry in Theoretical PhysicsPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7027USemester 17Yes

Differential Geometry in Theoretical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Constantinos Papageorgakis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take SPA6324 and take SPA6308
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SPA7018U

Description: The aim of this course is to complement the core Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields (RWQF) module by providing the student with some advanced tools essential for research in modern Theoretical Physics. Using the same starting point as RWQF, Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism, we will focus on the Lagrangian formulation of the two most prominent theories of our time: Yang-Mills (gauge) theory and gravity. The alternative notation of differential forms will be explored and the geometric aspects of gauge theory emphasised. Building on this, and introducing elements from group theory and fibre bundles we will introduce classical solitons as localised, finite energy solutions to the classical field equations in various dimensions (kinks in 2d, vortices in 3d, monopoles in 4d, instantons in Euclidean 4d) and discuss their properties, including the existence of zero-modes, associated collective coordinates and moduli spaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
International and Comparative Copyright LawLawSOLM075Semester 17Yes

International and Comparative Copyright Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: "Copyright, the legal foundation of the creative industries, is by its modern nature international and comparative This module will offer students a solid basis for understanding the essential elements of copyright law ,its philosophical and legal basis, the international Copyright Treaties, and the different approaches adopted in major civil and common law countries, including the United Kingdom, France, Germany and the United States. We further focus on the growth of EU copyright law with its distinctive flavour, which incorporates civil law doctrines in a pragmatically common law precedent-based approach. Where relevant, reference is also made to well-known decisions on certain topics in Australia, Canada and India. This interactive course will explore copyright principles by considering and discussing crucial topics, namely, the types of protected works, copyright ownership, beneficiaries, term, nature of rights, exceptions and limitations, collective management, enforcement and user rights - from national and international perspectives. The course also looks at current international copyright policy discussions such as new Treaties and Trade Agreements. The module will enable students to embark on more specialised and in-depth courses. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Case Study (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Independent Research Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Politics of International LawPolitics and International RelationsPOL259Semester 15Yes

Politics of International Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andreas Papamichail

Description: States spend a great deal of time and effort justifying their actions with law. Yet international relations scholars have often doubted international law's ability to shape state behaviour. This course examines this by paradox by introducing students to the major debates about the politics of international law. These perspectives will be applied to the history of international organisations and (legal) order since 1919, including the development of collective security and humanitarianism at the League of Nations and United Nations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Case Study (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Competition Law in the CyberspaceLawSOLM060Semester 27Yes

Competition Law in the Cyberspace

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: We live in a world of unprecedented technological change. The way we live our lives today, with the most essential services being only a click away, has radically transformed our existence as consumers. On the face of it, markets are performing well, as the prices for services have radically decreased - or are even provided for 'free', that is, without monetary payment ¿ through the use of online platforms. We can shop for less money, compare products in real time, search virtually any question, hail a cab on our mobile phone, order any kind of food in an instant ¿ the list is seemingly endless. As such, these technological advancements have transformed consumers¿ choice, yet they have simultaneously created new causes of concern about competition in the marketplace and the role of consumers within it. This course will critically examine how big data, algorithms and AI are transforming market dynamics, challenging the foundations of competition law enforcement and raising new challenges for competition authorities, regulators, businesses and consumers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
International Human Rights Law: History, Theory and PoliticsLawSOLM069Semester 17Yes

International Human Rights Law: History, Theory and Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eva Nanopoulos

Description: "This module explores the history, theory and politics of international human rights. It will explore both traditional and revisionist accounts of the philosophical and historical foundations of international human rights. It introduces the students to the main critiques of rights, from the early critiques of natural rights, including the Marxist critiques of rights, to feminist and post-colonial critiques, exploring the different strands within each of these schools of thought, all of which have generated considerable debates. Through these different lenses, it aims to engage the students with the ambivalence of international human rights, both as a concept, and as a contemporary praxis and ideology. The course closes by putting these theoretical insights and foundations into practice by looking at two contemporary phenomena that illustrate the ambivalence of the human rights project, namely the war on terror and the advent of neoliberalism. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Nanotechnology and NanomedicineEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM803Semester 17No

Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gleb Sukhorukov

Description: This module will define and describe nanostructures and nanomaterials. it will include how they are manufactured, appropriate characterisation technologies and a description of their application in a range of fields. In particular the application and challenges in the use of nanotechnology in medicine will be considered, including the regulatory issues to be considered, the use of nanomaterials for drug delivery and the development of lab in a chip technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Engineering and Materials Science
Competition Enforcement: From Investigation to SanctionsLawSOLM059Full year7No

Competition Enforcement: From Investigation to Sanctions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The European Commission is empowered to send information requests to companies, enter the premises of companies, examine the records related to the business, take copies of those records, seal the business premises and records during an inspection, ask members of staff or company representatives questions relating to the subject-matter and purpose of the inspection and record the answers. At the end of the initial investigative phase, the Commission can take the decision to pursue the case as a matter of priority and to conduct an in-depth investigation, or to close it. Alternatively to a prohibition decision the Commission may take a commitment decision under Article 9 of Regulation 1/2003. This is a quick way of restoring effective competition to the market. Finally, as the Directorate General for Competition of the European Commission states, infringements of competition rules, such as price cartels and abuses of a dominant position in the market, are not only negative for the economy and consumers as a whole: they also cause direct harm to the infringer's customers and competitors (e.g. higher prices, lost profits). The European Court of Justice held that any citizen or business who suffers harm as a result of such breaches is entitled to compensation from the infringers. Thus, any citizen or business which suffers harm as a result of a breach of the EU competition rules is entitled to claim compensation from the party who caused it. This means that the victims of competition law infringements can bring an action for damages before the national courts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Investment Treaty Arbitration: Foundations, Jurisdiction and ProcedureLawSOLM047Semester 17Yes

Investment Treaty Arbitration: Foundations, Jurisdiction and Procedure

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international investment arbitration at the juncture of dispute resolution and public international law and policy. The course is divided into three main topics: (1) International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution; (2) ICSID - Jurisdiction and Procedure; and (3) Bilateral Investment Treaties - Jurisdiction and Procedure. The classes will explore, first by way of integration, international trade and investment disputes out of court and the evolutionary process of their institutionalisation. Then, we discuss the related regulatory and institutional framework, and the basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to investment with focus on sovereign immunity, arbitrability and applicable laws (domestic and international). The following lectures will address ICSID Jurisdiction (ratione materiae, ratione personae, temporal) and consent to jurisdiction. These classes will be followed by classes on ICSID Procedure, including annulment of awards and enforcement of awards. The next set of classes will explore jurisdiction based on Bilateral Investment Treaties (with focus on umbrella clauses, parallel proceedings and MFN clauses)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH791USemester 27No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MTH5120

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and ContextLawSOLM043Semester 17No

International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last four decades by the increasing use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. In the last ten years more than 5,000 arbitration cases have been recorded annually in London alone. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre and the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central importance in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Chinese Business LawLawSOLM029Semester 17Yes

Chinese Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: The module will introduce the structure of the Chinese legal system, its cultural and political background and historical development. With these in mind, it will then cover major business and commercial law areas, including company, contract and trade law; taxation; financial regulation; and dispute resolution and litigation, with a particular focus on their application to foreign businesses, investors and individuals. The module will provide students with an understanding of the principles and rules of the Chinese business and commercial law regimes. It will also provide them with the knowledge and skills to study the Chinese business and commercial legal system in greater depth. No knowledge of Chinese is required to take the module, but students will be expected to become familiar with the relevant Chinese business and legal terms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Essay (4000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (15 min)
Level: 7
Law
Computational Statistics with RMathematical SciencesMTH791PSemester 27No

Computational Statistics with R

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin

Description: This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science. The techniques covered in the module are implemented with the statistics package R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Corporate Governance: Operation and PracticeLawSOLM023Semester 27No

Corporate Governance: Operation and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alan Dignam
Prerequisite: SOLM023 pre-requisite

Description: The module aims to inform and educate students as to the issues affecting both the business community and the wider societal effects of the debate on corporate governance. As such the module will focus on the systems by which companies are or should be directed and controlled, particular emphasis will be given to: self regulatory systems and their provenance, the UK Corporate Governance and associated Codes, Hostile Takeovers, and Case studies of extreme Corporate Governance failure eg. Enron and The financial crisis 2008 onwards. As such, students will have an enhanced knowledge of the issues surrounding various corporate governance industry and state regulatory perspectives on corporate governance. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Comparative Contract LawLawSOLM024Semester 27Yes

Comparative Contract Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Marc Van Hoecke

Description: This optional module aims at offering a thorough analysis of French, German and English contract law from a comparative perspective. After an overview of the worldwide strong position of English, French and German private law, and most notably contract law, their historical roots will be analysed, including their mutual influence. Core concepts in the different legal systems will be discussed (cause/consideration; implied terms/moral principles; objective/subjective interpretation; etc.) and the more practically oriented English approach as opposed to the use of general principles on the continent (reasonablenes, good faith, fairness, equilibrium, protection of the weaker party). Also the influence of EU law will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Racism and Anti-Racism in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL336Full year6Yes

Racism and Anti-Racism in World Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Adam Elliott-Cooper

Description: How has race become a method for categorising and ordering humanity? How has the politics of anti-racism sought to dismantle both racial orders and the categories they rely on?

In this course, we will grapple with these questions by exploring the diverse intellectual voices have sought to understand and theorise racism and anti-racism. These thinkers will include those who were engaged in struggles against imperialism and colonialism, in addition to contemporary forms of racial domination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Theory Essay
  • Item 2: 25% Creative Writing
  • Item 3: 50% Research Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
The Politics of Social Resilience and Risk: Comparative Analysis of Welfare StatesPolitics and International RelationsPOL335Semester 16Yes

The Politics of Social Resilience and Risk: Comparative Analysis of Welfare States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Diamond

Description: Welfare states are vital for prosperity and human well-being in advanced capitalist societies. This course will provide students with the analytical tools to identify similarities and differences across welfare systems in developed economies, predominantly in Europe and the United States. The reason for the emergence of distinctive national social policy institutions will be examined alongside the influence of international organizations and agencies. There will be consideration of the crises and opportunities that are shaping reforms in contemporary welfare states.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Coursework essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Intellectual Property and the Life SciencesLawSOLM093Semester 27Yes

Intellectual Property and the Life Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: The life sciences can be defined as the use of living organisms (biotechnology) and the protection or treatment of living organisms (medicine, veterinary medicine and plant protection). It comprises the science behind medicine, pharmacy and agriculture and their corresponding industries. The module will provide detailed knowledge of the role that intellectual property plays in providing investments for investment and incentives in the life sciences. It will also focus on the question of how to distribute the benefits of life sciences research fairly so that it benefits society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Civil Society: Democracy, Activism and Social ChangePolitics and International RelationsPOL332Semester 16Yes

Civil Society: Democracy, Activism and Social Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module explores the nature of civil society and the political role of civil society actors - at local, national, and global levels. Civil society's traditional role as a third-sector between the state and the market will be critically examined by considering both theories of civil society and empirical case studies of democratic activism and social change. The module will cover the contested meaning of `civil society¿, attending to its historical and cultural variation. Empirical case studies will consider a variety of social movements and, where possible, include meetings with activists and other practitioners. The module will enable students to critically evaluate the changing role of contemporary civil society and develop a practical understanding of how civil society actors pursue social change, along with why they fail and why the succeed. This module is a prerequisite for POL301 Civil Society Internship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Short Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Long Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Migration and the Politics of BelongingPolitics and International RelationsPOL334Semester 26Yes

Migration and the Politics of Belonging

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Humphris

Description: Contemporary life is hardly imaginable without mobility - of capital, things, ideas, and images and people. At the same time, some forms of mobility such as international migration, are often thought to undermine modern political forms, such as the nation-state, as well as threaten the polities associated with them. This module will investigate the relationship between mobility, modern political forms and different conceptions of belonging and membership. It will pay attention to some of the crucial tensions of the current historical moment - for example, the tension between the principle of freedom of movement and nation-state sovereignty. It will also ask whether and how practices of mobility open possibilities for imagining organization of collective life beyond the currently predominant political forms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Short Research Essay
  • Item 2: 60% Longer Research Essay
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Principles of RegulationLawSOLM018Semester 27Yes

Principles of Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Georgosouli

Description: Regulation covers virtually all significant aspects of modern life. It is here to stay but it remains as controversial as ever. This is an advanced foundational course on regulation. The module examines problems that are common to the regulation of a wide range of industries and fields and considers how these problems are (or fail to be) treated. In particular, the module considers the nature of regulation and its relationship with law, economics and politics, the regulation of risk, standard setting, compliance and enforcement strategies, the issues of accountability and legitimacy and the rise of multi-level governance and transnational regulation. Being `problem-solving sensitive¿ but 'industry neutral', this module is an ideal complement to more narrowly-focused modules irrespective of choice of LLM Specialism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Commercialisation of IPLawSOLM092Semester 27Yes

Commercialisation of IP

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr John Hull

Description: Getting intellectual property rights is relatively easy. It's what you do with them that's difficult. And since 80% or more of a business's value is made up of IP (sometimes called 'Intellectual Assets'), understanding how a business, a research charity or a university puts its IP to profitable use is fundamental to understanding how modern commercial life works. This module, which is unique in UK universities, is focused on how IP is created, owned and commercialised (or "monetised""). It is taught by a practising lawyer with extensive experience in all aspects of IP. Guest speakers with front-line experience of IP commercialisation are a key part of this module, allowing students to understand how commercial transactions take place in real life."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Interactive Entertainment LawLawSOLM085Semester 17Yes

Interactive Entertainment Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Interactive Entertainment Law analyses some of the legal, commercial, contractual and regulatory issues that the Games and Interactive Entertainment industry faces in. It delineates and analyses the legal parameters within which developers and publishers operate and in which players create and consume content, providing students with an in-depth analysis of the industry from the development to the commercialisation of interactive entertainment products.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
The Law of FilmLawSOLM086Semester 17Yes

The Law of Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson

Description: This module introduces students to skills in reading film and intellectual property critically and analytically. Students will undertake interdisciplinary evaluation of film protection and commercialisation using film theory, fan and cultural studies, and intellectual property. Studying key jurisdictions and markets, topics include history of film and its protection, film theory and intellectual property, film theory and creative practice, authorship and film practice, audience and reception, sound and intellectual property, adaptation and genre.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The International Politics of SecurityPolitics and International RelationsPOL258Semester 15Yes

The International Politics of Security

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans

Description: This module examines the study of security in world politics, investigating the development of the study of the international politics of security and the key concerns surrounding security today. The module broadly surveys different kinds of security practice and their contemporary significance. It also introduces political questions and contestations that both shape and are resulting from developments in security practice. Overall, the module gives a wide-ranging perspective on the politics of security in contemporary international politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Review Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Take-home Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
International and Comparative Social RightsLawSOLM065Semester 27Yes

International and Comparative Social Rights

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Neve Gordon

Description: International and Comparative Social Rights examines the contribution of law to making poverty history. The course critically examines the role of international and comparative law in constructing and maintaining historic and current social, political and economic inequalities. The course will analyse the law¿s potential and limitations as an instrument of redistributive and egalitarian social, economic, cultural and political change. New legal tools such as human rights budgets and the minimum core will be critically analysed together with legal and political philosophies focusing on the separation of powers, justiciability and institutional conversations

The history of the different systems of implementation will be studied together with new developments both procedural and substantive within the United Nations human rights machinery. The implementation of positive obligations on governments within the African Union, the Organisation of American States as well as within Europe are also analysed.

International and Comparative Social Rights will also include comparative jurisprudence from Argentina, India, Philippines, South Africa and Venezuela as well as other relevant jurisdictions and will explore the potential of these different approaches for other democracies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 1
  • Item 2: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 2
  • Item 3: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 3
  • Item 4: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 4
  • Item 5: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 5
  • Item 6: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 6
  • Item 7: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 7
  • Item 8: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 8
  • Item 9: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 9
  • Item 10: 2% Weekly report on assigned readings 10
  • Item 11: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 1
  • Item 12: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 2
  • Item 13: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 3
  • Item 14: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 4
  • Item 15: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 5
  • Item 16: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 6
  • Item 17: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 7
  • Item 18: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 8
  • Item 19: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 9
  • Item 20: 1% Weekly in-class project with report 10
  • Item 21: 75% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Law
The International Politics of the Developing WorldPolitics and International RelationsPOL257Semester 25Yes

The International Politics of the Developing World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Antunes De Oliveira

Description: Cartel violence in Central America, rapid urbanisation in West Africa, and huge wealth disparities in the 'rising powers' of India and China. What connects these issues? How useful and accurate is it to talk about 'the developing world' in these contexts? This module introduces students to a number of case studies across what is referred to as the developing world, in order to explore the historical and ongoing relationships between wealth and poverty, the 'international' and the 'domestic'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Reflexive supply chain analysis (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Commercial Conflict of LawsLawSOLM046Semester 27Yes

Commercial Conflict of Laws

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: This module introduces students to the fundamental questions of applicable law that arise in a globalised society. The course gives a broad theoretical underpinning to the concepts of conflicts of laws as well as examining from a practical standpoint the challenges faced by litigators dealing with cross-border disputes. The substance of the module provides an overview of choice of law principles in the main areas of civil and commercial practice (contracts, torts, property, and company matters) and takes a closer look at developing and problematic areas as well as the challenges posed to these traditional principles by new technologies and an increasingly interconnected global marketplace. The starting point of the course is to address these issues of applicable law as they arise before the English courts. In this context, aspects of both the English common law rules as well as the European regulations, which now govern substantial aspects of English private international law in civil and commercial matters, are covered in depth. Where appropriate, the course also considers from a comparative perspective the approaches taken in other major jurisdictions (for example the USA, Switzerland and South America).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Ethics in International ArbitrationLawSOLM049Full year7No

Ethics in International Arbitration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Rogers

Description: Parties, attorneys, and arbitrators come to international arbitral proceedings different jurisdictions and with often distinctive legal cultures and ethical assumptions. As a result, many ambiguities exist about what rules apply to their professional conduct and often parties and counsel from different jurisdictions effectively play by different ethical rules. This module, which is to be offered as an option at the Centre for Commercial Law Studies, will address these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790USemester 17No

Programming in C++ for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH6150

Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Computer-based Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 50% Computer-based Assessment 2
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected IssuesLawSOLM041Full year7No

Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Behn

Description: This module seeks to explore specialised issues arising in dispute resolution processes that are alternative to conventional forms of adjudication. The module will examine selected issues in ADR and may include issues dealing with confidentiality and enforcement, issues of globalization and transplantation of ADR systems, ethics and morality in ADR, special areas of ADR application (for example, on-line dispute resolution), role of lawyers, the professionalisation of ADR, system design, for example. ADR is a vibrant area of scholarship; it is impossible to give 'yes' or 'no' answers to most of the issues arising in scholarship. Therefore the module will employ a critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students will be willing to share the results of their analysis, research and supported opinions, and be involved in active discussion of all issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
International Commercial LitigationLawSOLM045Semester 17Yes

International Commercial Litigation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: The module examines matters relevant to the resolution of all commercial transactions before national courts. It looks into general principles of International Commercial Litigation and Private International Law, and focuses in particular on issues related to Jurisdiction of National Courts, Conflicts between Jurisdiction of National Courts and International Tribunals and Recognition and Enforcement of National Judgments. The approach taken is international and comparative, although particular emphasis is given on the European regime and legal framework. Thus, sources relevant to the course include the EC 44/2001 Regulation on Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Transnational Law and Governance AppliedLawSOLM028Semester 17Yes

Transnational Law and Governance Applied

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Theodora Christou

Description: The central question which this module will address is how Transnational law impacts on the future of law-making, supervision and enforcement of rules in a globalised world of transnational business and markets. Globalisation and polycentrality are phenomena that influence every aspect of the world society and challenge the efficiency and validity centralized law-making by the states. In a globalised world where business is mostly done at transnational level coupled with the pace that both economic and technology change, traditional national law-making is proving ineffective and as a result we have witnessed alternatives appearing, including from regional and international organisations but also from private transnational market actors too. The law has emerged from its national setting and presents itself as transnational which has important ramifications for policy making. A weekly topical issue related to Transnational Law will be discussed in depth. The discussions are based on readings and will follow a presentation of the readings. Potential issues which could be covered include: Is Transnational Law, Law?; The World Justice Forum Index; the Cape Town Convention; Climate Change as a Transnational Legal Order; private law-making in the diamond trade and financial markets; and Transnational lawyering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Independent research essay (5000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Annotated Bibliography (1000-1500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Programming in C++ for FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH790PSemester 17No

Programming in C++ for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mykhailo Poplavskyi

Description: This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Computer-based Assessment 1
  • Item 2: 50% Computer-based Assessment 2
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Corporate Governance: Foundational and TheoreticalLawSOLM022Semester 17No

Corporate Governance: Foundational and Theoretical

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alan Dignam

Description: The module will inform and educate students as to the issues affecting both the business community and the wider societal effects of the debate on corporate governance. As such the module will focus on the systems by which companies are or should be directed and controlled, particular emphasis will be given to the legal and extra-legal rules/systems governing internal corporate accountability and the legal and extra-legal rules/systems governing the corporations accountability to the external world. As such students will gain an enhanced knowledge of the issues surrounding various corporate governance theories that seek to explain the position of, and relationship between, the company as a metaphysical entity and its members, managers and other interested constituencies (i.e.`stakeholders¿) and the different theoretical and industry perspectives on corporate governance. The concept of shareholder primacy will be critically examined and contrasted with alternative approaches. The module also aims to highlight future directions and trends in corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Corporate Rescue and Cross-border InsolvencyLawSOLM017Semester 27Yes

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: The module covers the various procedures available in cases of reorganization and insolvency of corporations; the relationship between the general law of property, obligations and insolvency; and, the law of credit and security issues in the context of distress scenarios. The module will have a transactional focus with actual case studies and will also analyse general principles of international financing techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Special Areas in the Law of TreatiesLawSOLM117Semester 27Yes

Special Areas in the Law of Treaties

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Malgosia Fitzmaurice

Description: This module focuses on the most fundamental elements of the law of treaties. It is based on the analysis of the text of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the law of Treaties. It relies on the case law of international courts and tribunals and the theory of international law. Anyone who wants to study or practice international law should take this module, as giving an invariable analysis of the law of treaties, which is the pillar of international law. This module deals with less known areas of the law of treaties, such as conflict of treaties, treaty termination (including material breach of a treaty) and third parties and the law of treaties. These areas are as well very important especially for practicing of international law . Some other fundamental issues of the international law will be also analyzed such as state responsibility .

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Politics of South Asia: Independent ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL320Semester 26No

Politics of South Asia: Independent Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elizabeth Chatterjee
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POL319

Description: This module gives you the chance to take a deep dive into the politics or international relations of a particular South Asian country or province. With academic guidance, you will choose a research question of significance for understanding South Asia today. Over the semester you will carry out your own self-directed but supervised study of the topic. We will hone your analysis through seminar discussions, presentations, and written assignments with detailed feedback. By the end of the module you will have developed your own substantive interpretation of a key contemporary South Asian issue and built up practical research skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Research Proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Research Presentation (10 minutes)
  • Item 3: 60% Comparative Analysis (3000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Critical Currents in North American Political ThoughtPolitics and International RelationsPOL323Semester 26Yes

Critical Currents in North American Political Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Hoover

Description: This module examines critical traditions in American political thought , with specific authors and themes varying from year to year. Central themes will include the promise and betrayal of freedom from the founding of the nation to the present day, the tension between radical individualism and contested notions of community, and the constant struggle to maintain faith in the possibilities of democratic government and culture. The module will focus on close reading of primary texts, while also incorporating reflections on American literature, music, and film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Politics of South AsiaPolitics and International RelationsPOL319Semester 16Yes

Politics of South Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elizabeth Chatterjee

Description: South Asia is home to almost one in every four people alive today. It is the world's fastest-growing region and boasts the world's largest democracy. Yet it also contains one-third of the world¿s poor, and societies divided by religion, caste, class, language, gender, and region. This course will provide an in-depth survey of the politics, political economy, and international relations of the major South Asian countries: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. By the end of the course, students will be able to contribute to key debates on democratization, economic development, identity politics, and nuclear-armed conflict in the region.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Film/Book Review
  • Item 2: 30% Group Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Final Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Intellectual Property and the Creative IndustriesLawSOLM090Semester 27Yes

Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Noam Shemtov

Description: This module addresses the major creative industries, the way they operate and their impact on the national global economy, with a particular focus on the interplay between intellectual property protection and the industries' business environment. This module will analyze various contentious issues in the law surrounding the creative industries with a focus on intellectual property. A number of specific creative industries will be examined as well as famous' persons rights over their name and image and the commercialization of such rights. The module is international in scope, looking at a variety of jurisdictions according to significance and relevance to particular industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Law
Digital Intellectual PropertyLawSOLM097Full year7No

Digital Intellectual Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: The module introduces students to fundamental problems and concepts pertaining to intellectual property rights, with an emphasis on copyright law, in digital environments. The module focuses on the divergent interests of various stakeholders, such as authors, exploiters, consumers and creators that challenge law making today, and addresses topics ranging from the protection of software and databases, exclsuive rights and limitations, technological protection measures, the relationship between IP and fundamental rights, and online enforcement amongst others. A further emphasis will be placed on the role of the European Court of Justice and the interface between international norms and market integration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Law and Practice of the Unified Patent CourtLawSOLM098Semester 17No

Law and Practice of the Unified Patent Court

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take SOLM076

Description: The establishment of a Unified Patent Court is the most significant change to patent law and practice in Europe since the early 1970s. The module will provide advanced knowledge of EU Regulation 1257/2012 on the creation of unitary patent protection, detailed knowledge of the Agreement on the Unified Patent Court, and advanced knowledge of procedures, litigation and practice before the Unified Patent Court.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Independent Research Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Mock trial (Moot)
Level: 7
Law
War in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL256Semester 25Yes

War in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katharine Hall

Description: This module examines the study of war in world politics, investigating the practices of war in the modern international system and the key concerns surrounding them today. The module surveys three interrelated issues: the connections between war, violence and politics; war and socio-political change; and war as normative problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Fact Sheet (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Review Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Global Intellectual Property LawLawSOLM084Semester 17Yes

Global Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Uma Suthersanen

Description: What is intellectual property? Who benefits from these laws? What types of subject matter are protected in the global perspective under patent, copyright, trade mark, etc. laws? What are the main I.P. treaties and conventions? What is the connection between trade (WTO-TRIPS) and intellectual property law? What are the main justifications and criticisms in relation to IP law? By looking at national and global IP laws, the course gives a fundamental grounding in patents, copyright, trade marks, as well as international hybrid rights such as geographical indications, plant and seed protection, utility model, design, and unfair competition protection. The module also examines the global nature of intellectual property law and policy as it is affected arising from emerging technologies, and the consequential impact on the rights and obligations of peoples and corporations. Concentrating on the jurisprudence of major countries, including the EU and US, the course also examines the conflicting positions adopted as to the propertisation of (i) drugs, biological organisms and gene technologies; and (ii) traditional knowledge and cultural heritage. The module further examines the controversial clashes which have emerged between IPRs and international norms in various fora including competition law, human rights, development and environmental agendas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Case Study (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Independent Research Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
Law
Cartels, Collusion and Competition LawLawSOLM057Semester 27Yes

Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The Directorate General for Competition of the European Commission states that a cartel is a group of similar, independent companies which join together to fix prices, to limit production or to share markets or customers between them. Instead of competing with each other, cartel members rely on each others' agreed course of action, which reduces their incentives to provide new or better products and services at competitive prices. As a consequence, their clients (consumers or other businesses) end up paying more for less quality. This is why cartels are illegal under the competition legislations of a vast number of jurisdictions and why competition authorities impose heavy fines on companies involved in a cartel. Since cartels are illegal, they are generally highly secretive and evidence of their existence is not easy to find. The 'leniency policy' encourages companies to hand over inside evidence of cartels to competition authorities. This results in the cartel being destabilised. In recent years, most cartels have been detected by competition authorities around the world after one cartel member confessed and asked for leniency, though the authorities also successfully continue to carry out its own investigations to detect cartels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Law
Colonialism, Capitalism and DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOL255Semester 15Yes

Colonialism, Capitalism and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Antunes De Oliveira

Description: This module covers both the origin and trajectory of colonialism, capitalism, and development. It simultaneously surveys competing theoretical explanations for the emergence and reproduction of a structural inequalities in the world system over the last 500 years. The module analyses a range of theoretical approaches to development - modernization, dependency, uneven and combined development, post-colonialism, and Marxism. It also connects historical inquiry to more recent processes, such as decolonization, Third World Revolutions, global commodity chains, ecological crisis, and the fate of the world's peasantry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Book Review (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOL358Semester 26Yes

US Foreign Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Johnson

Description: The United States plays a powerful role in contemporary international relations. Therefore understanding its place in the international system and how its foreign policy is made are of crucial importance for every student of international relations. The module broadly focuses on the theme of American power in the world, through three areas: the historical development of US foreign policy, the institutional background, and current expressions of American power. Knowledge of these areas will give a solid overview and understanding of US foreign policy in the contemporary world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Investment Treaty Arbitration: Agreements and Substantive ProtectionLawSOLM048Semester 27Yes

Investment Treaty Arbitration: Agreements and Substantive Protection

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take SOLM189

Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international investment arbitration at the juncture of dispute resolution and public international law and policy. The focus will be on BITs, FTAs and other International Investment Agreements, Investor Protection and State Defences. There are a number of reasons why a course on substantive protection of investors through investment arbitration is important at this time. Indeed, recent and rapid changes in investment arbitration prompted by globalisation and widespread foreign investment. There are also debates about legitimacy crisis and further debates about the negotiation and drafting of new generation treaties - so-called mega-regionals. The course is divided into three main topics: (1) Major Treaty Systems - Fragmentation and new Regionalisation, (2) Case Law of and case studies relating to Substantive Protection, (3) Specific Policy issues and State Perspectives to Investment Arbitration and ISDS. The classes will address the content and negotiations of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) and Multilateral Treaties (Energy Charter Treaty, NAFTA, CAFTA, ASEAN, CETA, TPP (CPTPP) and TTIP). The discussions will focus on substantive protection and the evolution of such protection as well as policy considerations associated with BITs and MITs. The second section of the class will focus on substantive protection as developed through jurisprudence of international tribunals. The classes will cover (1) expropriation, (2), fair and equitable treatment, (3) umbrella clauses and fork-in-the-road, (4) full protection and security and (5) MFN clauses. The third section of the course will discuss balancing interests - public interest, public policy and regulatory chill and typical state defences raised in investment disputes (including corruption and admissibility defences). Specific attention will also be paid to treaty Shopping, Transparency and Third-Party-Funding and assessment of damages by investment tribunals."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Manufacturing ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM713Semester 27No

Manufacturing Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Haixue Yan

Description: This module provides a development of both fundamental and technological studies of shaping, fabrication, and product-evaluation processes. It applies phase transformation, microstructure, stress analysis, diffusion, plastic deformation and/or rheology to the manufacture of different products. Examples of current practices in the automobile, aerospace and bio-medical industries are illustrated, where appropriate, to enhance students' technological awareness.
In more detail, the syllabus will cover the following topics:
Casting: nucleation, crystal growth, solidification, segregation, ingot microstructure, casting defects, casting processes, temperature and recrystallization, strain rate.
Forming: element of plasticity and deformation mechanics, selected methods of analysis of simple forming processes, element of transport properties and viscous flow, extrusion, injection moulding.
Joining and Welding: fusion welding, solid-state welding, effect of welding on materials microstructure, brazing and soldering.
Additive manufacturing methods: Rapid Prototyping.
Inspection and testing, non-destructive methods: ultrasonic inspection, magnetic inspection, acoustic emission monitoring.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Problem solving coursework
  • Item 3: 15% Poster on materials processing
  • Item 4: 15% Engagement with online material
Level: 7
Engineering and Materials Science
International Arbitration Law and Practice: Applicable Laws and ProceduresLawSOLM044Semester 27No

International Arbitration Law and Practice: Applicable Laws and Procedures

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: "The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented. The focus is on selected issues of applicable law(s) and procedures. In particular, in the first section the classes will explore the role of arbitral institutions as regulators of arbitration and classes will also discuss issues of legitimacy and how concerns users may have can be best addressed. In the second section of the course the focus will shift to applicable law issues. In particular, classes will discuss how applicable laws are being determined (and by whom) before looking at specific applicable substantive laws and rules as well as the role of lex mercatoria and transnational commercial rules. There will also be specific discussion of the impact of mandatory rules or law as an issue of methodology and practice. In the third section of the courses the classes will discuss they key (f)actor of arbitration: the arbitration tribunal. In particular, classes will cover the selections, status, rights and duties of arbitrators, how arbitrators are being appointed and the main duties of independence and impartiality. In this context the classes will also address liability and/or immunity of arbitrators. In the penultimate and longer section the classes will explore issues of procedure and evidence in international arbitration, ranging from the law governing the procedure (`lex arbitri¿), the classification of procedural issues, the organisation and management of procedure. Then the classes will look at provisional and interim measure as well as emergency arbitration and will also cover multi-party, multi-contract and multi-action arbitration. Issues of evidence, such as evidentiary means (witnesses, documents and document production, experts) and regulation of evidence will also receive specific attention. Finally, we will discuss efficiency as a driver of arbitration micro-regulation. Depending on the class size we may also endeavour a simulation of an arbitration process."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced CosmologyPhysical and Chemical SciencesSPA7028PSemester 27No

Advanced Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karim Malik

Description: This module covers advanced concepts of modern cosmology, and in particular will introduce the student to cosmological perturbation theory. It discusses the observed structure of the universe, how these structures formed, and how they can be used to test our theories and models of the universe. The module will also discuss recent and upcoming experiments and large scale structure surveys and their relevance for cosmology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Exam (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Coursework
Level: 7
Physics and Astronomy
Trading and Risk Systems DevelopmentMathematical SciencesMTH789USemester 27No

Trading and Risk Systems Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pedro Vergel Eleuterio

Description: A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

Part I: Programming skills
- Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
- Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
- Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
- Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
- Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
- Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
- Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
- Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
- Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
- Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
- Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

Part II: The development framework
- Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
- Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
- Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
- Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

(note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Class Test
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Globalisation: Issues and DebatesPolitics and International RelationsPOL355Semester 16Yes

Globalisation: Issues and Debates

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

Description: The module provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes. It examines these influences through detailed analysis of contemporary manifestations of globalisation, including the study of global production and commodity chains, state-market relations, the nature and direction of capital flows, patterns of global inequality, international institutions and global governance, questions of cultural homogenisation/imperialism, the US state and globalisation and East Asia and globalisation, and anti-globalisation. The module aims to provide students with a well-rounded understanding of the globalisation debate, and how this relates to contemporary international and global political issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (1200 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and ContextLawSOLM040Semester 27Yes

Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: The module will seek to provide an understanding of the various dispute resolution processes available to parties in dispute, and to understand the necessity of considering the process which best suits the dispute. The module will cover such topics as the nature of conflict, the emergence of disputes, the history of the ADR movement with its attendant debate between informalism and formalism, the adjudication process, the nature of negotiation and their strategies, the mediation process and approaches, the continuum of dispute resolution processes, the relationship between ADR and institutes such as courts, the English Courts and within the EU. ADR is a vibrant area of scholarship; it is impossible to give 'yes' or 'no' answers to most of the issues arising in scholarship. Therefore the module will employ a critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students will be willing to share the results of their analysis, research and supported opinions,and be involved in active discussion of all issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Law
Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH787USemester 27No

Advanced Derivatives Pricing and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck

Description: This module covers a number of advanced topics in the pricing and risk-management of various types of derivative securities that are of key importance in today's financial markets. In particular, the module covers models for interest rate derivatives (short-rate and forward-curve models), and looks at the multi-curve framework. It then considers credit risk management and credit derivatives (both vanilla and exotic). Finally, it also discusses credit valuation adjustment (CVA) and related concepts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Class test
  • Item 2: 80% Written exam (3 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
Optimisation for Business ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH784PSemester 27No

Optimisation for Business Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felipe Rincon Pabon

Description: This module will present the basics of optimisation techniques employed in business. It will be based around exercises and realistic business case studies. The topics to be covered are multiple variables, optimisation with constraints, linear programming, convex optimisation and the review of one variable case.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Mathematical Sciences
British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243BSemester 25Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Strong

Description: This module offers an intermediate-level grounding in contemporary British politics and government. Students will learn about the UK's political constitution, sovereign parliament, electoral politics, public debate, cabinet government, civil service and devolved and local administrations. They will develop a breadth and depth of knowledge, and a range of capabilities, that will prepare them to pursue careers in Westminster, Whitehall and beyond.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Portfolio (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Analysing Public Policy - Independent StudyPolitics and International RelationsPOL306Semester 26No

Analysing Public Policy - Independent Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Diamond
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take POL350

Description: The aim of the module is to give students the opportunity to engage more systematically and rigorously in major debates about the public policy process by undertaking their own independent study. The course will require students to prepare draft policy advice for a major policy-making institution, NGO or civil society organisation. This structured exercise will require students to consider not only the content of advice but how to articulate policy advice clearly and concisely to an audience that may have limited technical knowledge of a particular policy problem or issue.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group presentation (15 min)
  • Item 2: 80% Policy Report (2500 words)
Level: 6
Politics and International Relations
US PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL254Semester 15Yes

US Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Johnson

Description: The United States remains an important actor in the world and understanding its politics is vital both in comparison to other political systems and in terms of how its own political outcomes emerge. The module provides a comprehensive overview of US politics, starting from its foundations in the Constitution, through the core institutions of US government, and the political process itself. The module covers rival perspectives on understanding US politics and government, as well as core thematic areas such as political culture, informal actors in the political system, the influence of ideas, foreign policy, and an understanding of race, class and gender in US politics and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Social TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL280Full year5Yes

Social Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely

Description: This module provides students with an advanced introduction to central theories and and concepts in Sociology, from nineteenth- and early twentieth-century theorists through to the present day. This will include consideration of the work of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, through to more recent work by Foucault, Butler, Mitchell, Bauman, Stuart Hall and Beck.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Critical Reflection (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Research Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Social TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL280ASemester 15Yes

Social Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giulia Carabelli

Description: This module provides students with an advanced introduction to central theories and and concepts in Sociology, from nineteenth and early twentieth century theorists through to the present day. This will include consideration of the work of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Du Bois, among others.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Short essay
  • Item 2: 70% Research essay
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Political Data ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL269Semester 15Closed

Political Data Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Javier Sajuria

Description: This module is designed to enhance undergraduate students' understanding and use of empirical methods, mostly quantitative, in the social sciences. Through the focus on substantive and relevant topics, the module will enable students to become more sophisticated users of quantitative readings in political studies. It will also enable them to undertake quantitative analysis in their own research, including their final-year research projects. The skills acquired in this course will enhance students' employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Take-Home Exam (48 hours) (2 hours)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Doing Qualitative ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL270Semester 25Closed

Doing Qualitative Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sharri Plonski

Description: This module is designed with two core goals in mind: On one hand, to introduce students to qualitative methods in the design and production of research in politics and international relations. On the other, to develop a critical toolbox for engaging and challenging methods as a form of colonial epistemological practice, bound up with historical and contemporary modes of domination and erasure. Through a range of relevant topics, students will reflect on dominant knowledge systems and structures, practice 'doing' qualitative research, and develop the skills to design their own research projects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Methods Portfolio (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Research Project Assignment (3000 words)
Level: 5
Politics and International Relations
Exploring Psychology IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY125Semester 24No

Exploring Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Pettit
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take PSY124

Description: This module builds upon PSY124 Exploring Psychology I by extending the introduction of basic concepts, theories, methods and research findings in psychology. The areas introduced include the core and interdisciplinary fields in psychology. Lectures for exploring psychology II will include an introductory lecture followed by lectures on specific topics in psychology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% MCQ midterm
  • Item 2: 75% Final Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Psychology
Science of BiocompatibilityEngineering and Materials ScienceMTRM312Semester 26No

Science of Biocompatibility

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karin Hing

Description: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts related to biocompatibility. It will cover topics including proteins and protein adsorption, cells and tissue interactions (attachment, fluid shear and mechanotransduction), biomaterial blood and cell interactions, Inflammation, wound healing and foreign body response and Toxicity, hypersensitivity and infection.
The In vitro testing of biomaterials will be considered with respect to
- chemical exchange and degradation
- cell response (proliferation vs differentiation)
- evaluation of material compatibility
- evaluation of device functionality (biomechanics, remodelling/adaptation)
Matters related to clinical trials and regulatory approval will be considered including clean manufacturing, microbiology, packaging and sterility assurance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Test 1
  • Item 2: 20% Test 2
  • Item 3: 15% Engagement with module material
  • Item 4: 45% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Engineering and Materials Science
Exploring Psychology IBiological and Behavioural SciencesPSY124Semester 14No

Exploring Psychology I

Credits: 15.0