Module directory 2019-20

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2019-20. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • A Queen Mary student looking for information on QMUL Model modules and their availability.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

Please go to myQMUL for further information on the QMUL Model. 

Please go to QMUL Model Extra opportunities for further information on the non-credit bearing Model extra-curricular opportunities available.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.
  • For the QMUL Model, we cannot always guarantee your first choice of module selection.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

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N.B - Please ensure you clear filters between each search.

TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesQMUL ModelDescriptionThemeAvailable to
Cell BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO111Semester 14YesNo

Cell Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kenneth Linton
Overlap: BMD115
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to cell biology. It covers pro and eukaryotic cell structure, the structure and function of the cell membrane, the organelles, the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Interactions between cell components, the cell cycle and cell differentiation from stem cells to specialised cells are all examined in detail.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

EvolutionBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO113Semester 14YesNo

Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers essential topics of whole-organism biology, introducing the theory and mechanisms of evolution and speciation, the fossil record and human evolution.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

EcologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO123Semester 24NoNo

Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers the essentials and fundamental concepts of population and community ecology as well as applied issues such as conservation. There is an one-week residential field course where students will study organisms in their natural environments, rather than in the laboratory.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Enhancing Learning and TeachingThe Learning InstituteADP7115Full year7NoNo

Enhancing Learning and Teaching

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the face-to-face PGCLTHE; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these non-research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, teaching practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own teaching. Participants will and plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own teaching practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own teaching further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module of their choice and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Enhancing Learning and TeachingThe Learning InstituteADP7115Full year7NoNo

Enhancing Learning and Teaching

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the face-to-face PGCLTHE; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these non-research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, teaching practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own teaching. Participants will and plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own teaching practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own teaching further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module of their choice and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Learning and Teaching in the DisciplineThe Learning InstituteADP7117Semester 27NoNo

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake two teaching observations and create a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Learning and Teaching in Higher EducationThe Learning InstituteADP7116Semester 17NoNo

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the first module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team, including the Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and the both PGCerts (Academic Practice and Learning & Teaching in Higher Education). The module runs over 1 semester.

Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing one's teaching. The module comprises seven core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching, and three sessions in which participants practice teaching and giving/receiving feedback thereon. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Learning and Teaching in the DisciplineThe Learning InstituteADP7117Semester 17NoNo

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake two teaching observations and create a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Organisational Change and DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUS317Semester 16NoNo

Organisational Change and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to equip students with the skills and resources for thinking critically about organisational change and development. Students will be introduced to -- and encouraged to critically interrogate -- a range of perspectives on 'change' and forms of intervention from across a broad spectrum of social science disciplines and real world case studies, applying them to the core problematics of change management on both micro and macro levels. The meaning, purposes and interests underlying processes of change, as well as its agents, along with sources and theories of resistance are also considered.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related RightsLawLAW6455Semester 16NoNo

Intellectual Property - Copyright and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module focuses on the substantive law of copyright and related rights in the United Kingdom. It covers (i) the subsistence, ownership and term of copyright, (ii) exclusive economic rights and infringement (iv) exceptions and limitations to infringement and (v) moral rights. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Intellectual Property - Industrial PropertyLawLAW6456Semester 26NoNo

Intellectual Property - Industrial Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module focuses on the law of the United Kingdom (and the European Union) relating to those forms of intellectual property that are sometimes described as industrial property. It covers (i) patent law, (ii) the law of trade secrets, (iii) the law of registered trade marks and (iv) the tort of passing off. Particular attention will be paid to areas of current controversy in the law.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

Developing Academic Practice (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7214Full year7NoNo

Developing Academic Practice (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the distance learning PGCAP; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, research-related academic practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own academic practice. Participants will and plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own academic practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own practice further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module of their choice and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research or public engagement).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Developing Academic Practice (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7214Full year7NoNo

Developing Academic Practice (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the distance learning PGCAP; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, research-related academic practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own academic practice. Participants will and plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own academic practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own practice further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module of their choice and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research or public engagement).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7217Semester 17NoNo

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake two teaching observations and create a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Learning and Teaching in Higher EducationThe Learning InstituteADP7116Semester 27NoNo

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the first module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team, including the Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and the both PGCerts (Academic Practice and Learning & Teaching in Higher Education). The module runs over 1 semester.

Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing one's teaching. The module comprises seven core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching, and three sessions in which participants practice teaching and giving/receiving feedback thereon. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7216Semester 27NoNo

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the first module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team, including the Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and the both PGCerts (Academic Practice and Learning & Teaching in Higher Education). The module runs over one semester.

Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing one's teaching. The module comprises eight core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Enhancing Learning and Teaching (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7215Full year7NoNo

Enhancing Learning and Teaching (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the distance learning PGCLTHE; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these non-research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, teaching practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own teaching. Participants will and plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own teaching practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own teaching further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module of their choice and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7216Semester 17NoNo

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the first module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team, including the Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and the both PGCerts (Academic Practice and Learning & Teaching in Higher Education). The module runs over one semester.

Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing one's teaching. The module comprises eight core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Developing Academic PracticeThe Learning InstituteADP7114Full year7NoNo

Developing Academic Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the face-to-face PGCAP; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, research-related academic practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own academic practice. Participants will plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own academic practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own practice further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module or a VLE course of their choice, and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research or public engagement).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Developing Academic PracticeThe Learning InstituteADP7114Full year7NoNo

Developing Academic Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the face-to-face PGCAP; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, research-related academic practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own academic practice. Participants will plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own academic practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own practice further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module or a VLE course of their choice, and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research or public engagement).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Enhancing Learning and Teaching (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7215Full year7NoNo

Enhancing Learning and Teaching (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the third and final core module of the distance learning PGCLTHE; the module runs over two semesters.

Designed to build on the first two modules, this module will help these non-research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in: programme-design to support inclusive and student-centered learning, teaching practice, leadership in teaching, and action research on their own teaching. Participants will and plan and write a funding grant in support of a piece of practice-related research.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own teaching practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action research project to help them develop their own teaching further. The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to design or redesign a module of their choice and pitch and write a funding proposal (pedagogical research).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Business AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM114Semester 17NoNo

International Business Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students would be expected to understand the nature of international business and key analytical techniques for the operation of a business in a global setting. This module will involve developing a critical understanding of the key techniques that can be employed to support the allocation of corporate resources within an international sphere of operation. It will introduce you to the notion of resource and regulatory arbitrage.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

International FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM115Semester 27NoNo

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: As the international company becomes the norm rather than the exception, the need to internationalize the tools of financial analysis is apparent. We now live in a highly integrated world economy, and it is crucial that businesses understand both the risks and opportunities that globalization brings. This module is designed to immerse student in the international dimension of financial issues. It specifically focuses on the international aspects of financial management so you are able to appreciate the issues that international investments and money management that international operation involves.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Management ControlBusiness and ManagementBUSM116Semester 17NoNo

Management Control

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of management control in relation to: the nature of corporate governance and the importance of resource stewardship. Corporate governance is concerned with the stewardship of resources and risk management techniques. This module will cover the nature of corporate governance and obligations of managers to manage resources, controls costs and returns on investment whilst taking into account risks

Governance as resource stewardship
Types of budgeting process
Business planning/forecasts
Variance analysis and cost control
Allocation of capital and investment analysis
Demands for shareholder value and control metrics
Risk management /analysis

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Risk and Crisis ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM117Semester 27NoNo

Risk and Crisis Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This qualitative module introduces students to the distinctive features of risk and crisis management. Core concepts of probability, severity, uncertainty, anticipation, resilience, robustness and bias are explored as the module examines, in turn, managerial varieties of bias among managers and regulators in risk perception, assumptions underpinning approaches to assessment and contrasting approaches to the management of risk. It focuses on operational risk, risks of external shock, risks of system failure, risk to customers and clients, and political risk. Throughout the module, regulatory requirements and imperatives for risk management are given full attention. The final weeks will introduce students to decision-making and public relations issues during crises and dealing with regulatory and government bodies when company crises escalate to become matters of wider public concern.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Group Project in Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM130Full year7NoNo

Group Project in Business Analytics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the capstone module for the MSc in Business Analytics. Students will work in groups and will be required to provide analysis of a problem or question using complex data from a business context. Each group will be assigned a mentor who will guide the group through the process of structuring the analytical problem, obtaining and organising the data, data analysis and presentation of results. Students will present initial results as a group to an audience consisting of mentors and practitioners. Final assessment of the module will then be based on individual essays which cover specific aspects of the case and in which the students will be required to reflect on their work in the light of the methods and theories which their learning in the MSc has touched upon.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Innovation and Global CompetitionBusiness and ManagementBUSM177Semester 17NoNo

Innovation and Global Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Technological and organisational innovation is the main source of competitive advantage and, therefore, one of the core elements of entrepreneurship and economic leadership. Thus, education in entrepreneurship would not be complete without an understanding of the industry and firm dynamics of technological innovation. This module addresses innovation issues within the context of globalisation, development and digitalisation. We will approach innovation as a strategic process, beginning with assessing the context, and then moving on to address the formulation and implementation of innovation strategies. We will address several strategic dilemmas within innovation, such as standards battles and design dominance, timing of entry, choosing innovation projects, collaborative innovation strategies and the benefits of protecting or opening up innovation for competitive strategy.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Graduate Professional and Academic SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUSM178Semester 17NoNo

Graduate Professional and Academic Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The NCM (Non-Credit Module) will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). All these initiatives are expected to pave the way to a smoother transition to Post-Graduate setting and the expectation set by the University. The Module aims to boost the skills associated with quantitative analysis and computer lab exposures using both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

International Business in the Digital AgeBusiness and ManagementBUSM181Semester 27NoNo

International Business in the Digital Age

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Lioliou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The objective of this course is to examine how organizations develop and execute their international business strategies in a rapidly digitizing business environment. Classic international business theories and concepts will be revisited in the light of evolving information and communication technologies. International business strategies (with a special focus on the global sourcing of IT) will be discussed. Further themes such as the development of new forms of organization and labour, new ways of competing, and the emergence of a sharing economy will also be examined. The course will involve a critical appreciation of contemporary developments and future trends.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Managing Yourself and Building Positive Relationships at WorkBusiness and ManagementBUSM182Semester 17NoNo

Managing Yourself and Building Positive Relationships at Work

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module draws on theories and ideas from organisational behaviour and (positive organisational) psychology to provide students with an understanding of how individuals and groups behave in organisational settings. Students are invited to reflect on how various models are relevant to their practice as future HR practitioners, in terms of enhancing the self-awareness and interpersonal skills required in such roles. The module tackles understanding individual differences, managing group dynamics, communicating with impact, influencing and persuasion skills, working across differences, managing workplace politics constructively, building nurturing relationship for professional growth and career progression. A distinctive feature of the module is the emphasis on self development through practical and experiential activities embedded in weekly sessions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Services ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM183Semester 27NoNo

Services Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The services sector has become one of the most important sectors from both an economic and a managerial point of view. Besides pure services providers an increasing number of 'new' services providers emerge, usually offering hybrid offerings that include goods and services components. This module provides students with an overview of important aspects of services management. This module outlines relevant frameworks, concepts, tools, and processes to improve the understanding of service design, management and commercialisation. As such, the module provides an advanced understanding of key elements of services management as well as the linkages between them.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Masterclass in Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM131Full year7NoNo

Masterclass in Business Analytics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will be split across two terms. There will be six sessions in each term at which outside speakers will present cases on business analytics in companies or cases on the context of business analytics in society or a specific business analytics tool. Each case study will be preceded by student self study on the main topics and will be followed by a seminar in which students summarize insights and the case study. The course will be assessed through students' presentations and through individual coursework in which students elaborate on one of the topics presented by the outside speakers.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

European ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP001Semester 27NoNo

European Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore aspects of the European political, economic, social and cultural context that are relevant for managers doing business in Europe. It will begin with an introduction to Europe's institutional framework, and the history of European integration. It will then introduce students to key features of Europe's business environment such as the Single European Market, competition policy, labour policy and monetary union. Case studies will explore these trends in particular industries such as transport, energy and high tech. Students will also be engaged in discussions over Europe's place in the world and future structural changes.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

LeadershipBusiness and ManagementBUSP002Semester 27NoNo

Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate and discuss how change is lead in organisations from theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will learn how to critically reflect on organisational change processes and apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. The module will focus on theories and concepts of leading change, how to lead change in different cultural environments, the nature and practice of responsible leadership, and followers' roles in and contributions to organisational change.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Global Governance and International OrganisationsBusiness and ManagementBUSP068Semester 27NoNo

Global Governance and International Organisations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: ¿his module examines the emerging structure of global governance and the role of international organisations, looking at the roles played by Western states and international agencies in setting norms for good governance and for managing trade, labour and the environment. Students will acquire a solid historical and critical understanding of key developments and concepts such as the role of international financial institutions and the United Nations, "good governance" and "global civil society", and a comprehension of policy making at the global level.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSP069Semester 17NoNo

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organizational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, ethics, group dynamics, patterns and negotiation practices which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviour both at individual, group and organisational levels. Students will gain an awareness and knowledge of contemporary issues and
approaches to organisational change and development facing organizations. Beyond providing theoretical frameworks, the module will augment skills to prepare students for the work place through communication and team management skills, and through analytical and critical thinking skills.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP086Semester 17NoNo

International Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the traditional competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, strategy as practice, scenario planning, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches, and the role of leadership. In particular, the emphasis on business ecosystems will allow students to appreciate the internal and transnational nature of strategic management with specific reference to the European context and European businesses. Nonetheless, throughout the course we will also examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Global Supply Chain ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP091Semester 27NoNo

Global Supply Chain Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Over the last few decades the business world has become more complex, fragmented, and geographically scattered. As firms outsource a growing portion of the activities and functions that were previously carried out in-house, they become one element of a multifaceted and intricate process of value creation and capture that cut across firms' and states' borders: the supply chain. As value-creating activities and functions are shared between ever more players their linkages increase as well as their interdependence. The study of global supply chains and their management looks at this scattered environment: the linkages and
relationships among firms, and among firms and other actors; and focuses on how leading firms attempt to drive this complexity in multiple ways, whether by increasing coherence, consistency and unity in the supply chain, or by shifting costs to other chain members and increasing competitive pressures among them.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for MSc Accounting and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM184Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for MSc Accounting and Finance

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: An MSc Dissertation is a significantly lengthy piece of independent work on a theme chosen by the student. Each Dissertation must fulfil certain topical areas which are supported with the guidance of a supervisor, and involves an extended period of research and writing (two to three months). The Dissertation is supported by the BUSM143 Research Methods Module and the deadline for submission is usually set in mid-August.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSP107Semester 17NoNo

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module addresses a range of interconnected topics such as: The evolution of the accounting conceptual framework and the centrality of managers reporting to investors, shareholders and government; The range of financial statements (as specified by IAS1): income, cash, changes in equity and balance sheet; Comprehensive income statement (recognizing holding gains); Applications of Cost Volume Profit Analysis on Management Accounting and implications on decision making; Cost Allocation using Traditional methods and Activity Based Costing ; Strategic Investment Decisions: How companies use accounting information in order to make important decisions; Budgeting and Variance Analysis; Performance Evaluation: How business evaluate business units¿ performance; Presentation of different techniques, Performance Evaluation: EVA vs Balanced Scorecard.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Management ConsultingBusiness and ManagementBUSP111Semester 27NoNo

Management Consulting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what management consultancy is, the variety and types of consulting firms and the markets they serve. We will examine a range of approaches to consultancy as a process of diagnosing management and organisational problems, designing implementing and evaluating organisational interventions. We will examine studies of some of these interventions and case studies we will examine how consultants present their knowledge and
expertise, the claims they make for its efficacy and the role of ethics in this. We will examine and explore different kinds of organisational context where management consultancy has been used: firms, public institutions, voluntary organisations and other organisational forms. We will also practise skills critical for consultancy such as diagnosis, intergroup facilitation and evaluation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Marketing ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP137Semester 17NoNo

Marketing Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is meant to provide an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. It is providing students on the MSc in Management a with a theoretical foundation of theories and concepts of marketing management which allows them in their subsequent studies to understand and situate more specialised aspects of marketing (e.g. consumer behaviour, social and political marketing, or business relationships and networks). Special emphasis is given to understanding current academic debates in the field. This means students are expected to read articles independently in leading marketing journals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Methods for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP145Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods for Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to put together a research proposal, how to draw out objectives of research, how to undertake literature reviews, how to assess suitable research methods to use. In terms of research methods, the course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students will know how to put together their own research proposal and will have done some preliminary analysis of
literature, assessment of data required and methods to be used.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in Medieval IberiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4003Semester 14YesNo

Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in Medieval Iberia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval
Overlap: HSP4003
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to medieval literature through the study of poetry in Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, and Spanish. Taking love as a unifying theme, it will explore a series of genres (traditional lyric, song-books), time periods (from the 13th to the 15th century), and themes within medieval literary culture (translation and multilingualism). It will also serve as an introduction to the critical analysis and study of poetry as a literary form more generally.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and FootballLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4011Semester 24YesNo

Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and Football

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: COM4011
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Topics covered include: nationalism; the politics of language; the avant--garde art of Salvador Dalí and Miró; literature; football. There is no language requirement for this module; therefore it is suitable for students with no knowledge of Catalan and Spanish.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUSP100Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Catalan Literature: An IntroductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT5055Semester 15YesNo

Catalan Literature: An Introduction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: COM5055
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: How did a language with so few speakers give rise to texts of world importance? Covering examples by well-known writers from the medieval period to the present, this module provides an overview of Catalan literature. Theatre, mystical prose, modern novels and postmodern short stories are analyzed and discussed on their own stylistic terms and in relation to historical and aesthetic developments. Love and war, as well as national and personal identity make for a potent literary mixture.
All texts are available in English and/or Spanish translation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Catalan II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT5200Full year5YesYes

Catalan II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Bolo
Overlap: CAT512
Prerequisite: CAT4200 knowledge of Catalan equivalent to CEFRL level A2?
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is aimed at students who already have a basic knowledge of Catalan. Its focus is on developing oral fluency, improving aural and reading comprehension skills, learning new structures and vocabulary, and writing skills.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Avant-Garde Theatre in EuropeLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT6007Semester 26YesNo

Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: "COM6007, HSP6007"
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature module; knowledge of Catalan equivalent to CEFR level C1
Corequisite: None

Description: Why should characters behave illogically on stage or not exist at all? How can image rival plot? And what is the point of shocking audiences? This module introduces some fundamental styles and plays from European avant-garde theatre and sets them within an artistic and socio-political context. Futurism, Dada, Expressionism and the Theatre of the Absurd are included. Special attention is paid to Catalan drama. We will at all times try to see texts as excuses for performance and use other aspects of culture to understand the challenges of this new drama.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Catalan IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT6200Full year6YesYes

Catalan III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Bolo
Overlap: CAT601
Prerequisite: CAT512,CAT5200
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is for students who have completed Catalan II Intensive. The focus will be on fluency, expansion of vocabulary, grammatical accuracy, advanced oral and reading comprehension, and development of writing skills.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Law and EconomicsLawCCLF001Semester 17NoNo

Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module investigates the intersection of law and economics. This module discusses how economics has been used to analysis different areas of the law (e.g., contract law). This module discusses how the law impacts the economic analysis. The module looks at the neoclassical economic model, market failures, behavioural economics and their application to the law. The module looks at how laws shape economic models. The module looks at variety of laws (e.g., corporate law) and their applications to economic reasoning.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Advanced Law and EconomicsLawCCLF002Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module further dives into the intersection of law and economics. First, this course looks at the theory of the firm: why firms are formed, financed, etc. Second, this course looks at the economics of antitrust through market definition and merger and acquisitions. Third, this course looks at how intermediaries like credit agency attempt to address information asymmetries and discusses signalling theory. Finally, this course looks at the rational agent hypothesis by looking at the empirical literature on criminal law.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 3 pm

Introductory CatalanLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4200Full year4YesYes

Introductory Catalan

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Bolo
Overlap: CAT110
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module should be chosen by students wishing to take a full academic year of Introductory Catalan. Successful students will complete Level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Language (CEFRL). Teaching materials are selected with a view to introducing students to Catalan culture and society. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. They must attend five hours of teaching per week and expect to spend a further five hours per week on private study.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Maritime ArbitrationLawCCLG145Semester 27NoNo

Maritime Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CCLG142 or CCLG143
Corequisite:

Description: Specialist dispute resolution mechanisms catering to specific industry needs are popular in international commerce, and arbitration has emerged as the dominant industry choice for resolving shipping disputes, in particular charterparty disputes. Indeed important maritime arbitration centres have long been established in London and New York, and more recently others have started to emerge in countries such as Russia, China and Singapore. London remains a leader in this field with a large number of disputes being decided each year through arbitration in accordance with the terms of the London Maritime Arbitrators Association. The module will tackle questions such as: What is special about maritime arbitration and what distinguishes it from general commercial arbitration? What are the features of maritime arbitration that make it particularly popular? Is arbitration by its nature more suited to the resolution of disputes arising in connection with certain types of shipping contracts (e.g. charterparties) rather than others (e.g. contracts of carriage contained in bills of lading)? Why? What are the implications of widespread use of arbitration for the continued development of shipping law?

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Regulation of ShippingLawCCLG146Semester 17NoNo

International Regulation of Shipping

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexandros Ntovas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: "Since time immemorial, ships and their activities were the subject of customs and laws that inexorably transcended authorities anchored in a single land jurisdiction. It is historically recorder that shipping is the oldest economic activity that engendered the legal concept of, what today we refer to in contemporary terms as, international regulation. In particular the module covers: The international regulatory framework of shipping; Registration of ships; Access to ports and the evolving port-State control; Safety and security (including cyber-security) ship requirements; Ship-source pollution; Rescue of distressed persons at sea (including matters relating to refugees and irregular migration; covering also the issue of stowaways); Maritime labour; Construction and Recycling of ships."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and ContextLawCCLG043Semester 27NoNo

International Arbitration Law and Practice: Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last four decades by the increasing use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. In the last ten years more than 5,000 arbitration cases have been recorded annually in London alone.

This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre and the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central importance in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE102ASemester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level chemistry (or equivalent)
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE102BSemester 24YesNo

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xacobe Cambeiro
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level chemistry (or equivalent)
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Fundamentals of SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE104Semester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giorgio Chianello
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level chemistry (or equivalent)
Corequisite: None

Description: Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionised our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools in chemical research and in the development of the subject. This module aims to provide students with a coherent and rigorous introduction to the principles and applications of spectroscopic techniques, in a way that spans the traditional fields of chemistry. It covers the more common techniques, including IR, UV-VIS and NMR spectroscopy, and lays the foundations for more detailed coverage of spectroscopic techniques in subsequent years of the degree programme.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

States of Matter and Analytical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE108Semester 24YesNo

States of Matter and Analytical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the properties of the different phases of matter (gases, liquids and solids), and to the theory and practise of analytical chemistry viewed from a physical and inorganic chemistry perspective. The module considers the various types of interactions that occur between atoms and molecules, and how these influence the molecular behaviour and the characteristics of the various phases of matter. The review of solid structures includes an introduction to crystallography and diffraction. The introduction to analytical chemistry will cover topics such as sample preparation, qualitative tests, gravimetric and combustion analysis, electroanalytical chemistry, an introduction to mass spectrometry and the basics of separation science, including GC and HLPC.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 10, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Protection and Indemnity (P&I) ClubsLawCCLG153Semester 17NoNo

Protection and Indemnity (P&I) Clubs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: "The module will examine the operation of P&I Clubs as mutual insurance associations vital to the existence and running of the international shipping community and trade. The module will cover their history, development and structure, their basic rules of cover and the provision of security, as well as the basic (and sui generis) concepts underlying their operation. The module will additionally examine the various risks P&I Clubs insure against, their financial operation, the International Group of P&I Clubs (including its structure, cover and importance), and how these associations relate to other forms of insurance."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation in International Shipping LawLawCCLG917Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Shipping Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: "Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field."

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLM911Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLM911Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Securities and Markets RegulationLawCCLP001Semester 27NoNo

Securities and Markets Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module covers the most important pieces of EU legislation applicable to capital markets. These include the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive and Regulation (MiFID and MiFIR), the Transparency Directive and the UCITS and AIFM Directives, which discipline collective investment funds and alternative investment funds managers. Particular attention will be given to the study of market venues as well as the European and International institutional framework governing their supervision.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Banking RegulationLawCCLP007Semester 17NoNo

International Banking Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module provides students with an in depth and thorough understanding of the legal and supervisory framework covering the entire life-cycle of a bank, from its inception to its failure. It also considers the economic and legal rationale for regulating banking institutions. The module covers both the regulatory and the supervisory framework in the UK and the EU. However, reference to international standards and the activities of international standard setters, such as the Financial Stability Board and the Basel Committee of Banking Supervision, is made throughout the module.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Mergers and AcquisitionsLawCCLP010Semester 27NoNo

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in corporate finance. The module will focus on issues such as: the use of debt and equity; why merge or acquire a business; due diligence, acquisition/sale agreements and contractual governance; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, US and the EU and the protection of minority shareholders through the regulation of this bid process; the role of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ethics and Governance in Business and FinanceLawCCLP011Semester 17NoNo

Ethics and Governance in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module analyses unethical practices arising in business and in the financial sector and links them with corresponding corporate governance problems. The module then provides a critical evaluation of the relevant regulatory and supervisory framework which strive to address them.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border InsolvencyLawCCLP013Semester 27NoNo

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This course is premised upon the notion that the student of insolvency law ought to develop a sound understanding of the dynamics of insolvency and debt restructuring, including available options, methods and techniques in the light of regulatory theories, applicable legal framework, shareholders capitalism and public policy objectives. The course will provide a critical and insightful view of current international legal developments and trends with the aim of identifying the most salient legal issues involved in insolvency and debt restructuring in the context of an increasingly complex financial phenomena and global markets.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Fundamentals of Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE113Semester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to fundamental principles underpinning inorganic chemistry. The module will give detailed consideration to theories of atomic structure, the nature of bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the structure of inorganic complexes including consideration of their colour and magnetism as well as an introduction to symmetry operations and point groups. Emphasis is placed on developing understanding of concepts which can then be applied to more advanced topics in inorganic chemistry.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 9, 12: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Fundamentals of Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE114Semester 24YesNo

Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Palma
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: An introduction to the thermodynamics of chemical systems: 1st Law; state functions and exact differentials, Internal energy, reversible and irreversible work of expansion of ideal gases; heat capacities; enthalpy, enthalpy changes of specific physical and chemical processes, and Hess's law; entropy and entropy changes accompanying specific processes, 2nd and 3rd law; spontaneous change, Helmotz energy, Gibbs free energy and equilibrium constants. An introduction to the kinetics of chemical reactions, including: differential rate equations, elementary and composite reactions, integrated rate equations,
experimental methods, effect of temperature, kinetics of multi-step reactions, catalysed processes.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 9, 11: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Professional Placement in ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE200Full year5NoNo

Professional Placement in Chemistry

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the "Year in Industry/Research" programmes in the field of chemistry offered by SBCS.
Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.
Successful applicants are supported by the School's placement coordinator and an academic tutor, who will keep in contact with students throughout the placement. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance.
It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE202ASemester 15YesNo

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE102A, CHE102B
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: enolate chemistry, introduction to radical chemistry, oxidation and reduction reactions. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 9, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE202BSemester 25YesNo

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE102A, CHE102B
Corequisite: None

Description: This course aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: reactivity of conjugated systems, pericyclic reactions and introduction to heterocyclic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 9, 11: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 9, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE203ASemester 15YesNo

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE103A, CHE103B, CHE104
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces key aspects of inorganic chemistry, including crystal chemistry, crystallography, electronic structure of solids and main group chemistry. Periodic trends in the p-block are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed, with emphasis on aluminosilicates and boron hydrides. In addition, characterisation techniques such as X-ray diffraction and multi-nuclear NMR are introduced.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm

Lawyer NegotiationsLawCCLP039Semester 17NoNo

Lawyer Negotiations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The course will explore negotiation through various theoretical approaches including strategic bargaining, cognitive theories, processual analysis, for example. The focus will be on the lawyer as negotiator and the intent is to blend theoretical analysis with practical application. Lectures will be delivered in combination with role-play simulations and exercises. Students will be expected to participate in exercises and simulated roleplays each class.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Construction Contracts and Dispute ResolutionLawCCLP042Semester 27NoNo

International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: International construction contracts have by their nature special features, which affect the methods of resolving disputes arising from them. The module, conducted through series of seminars, examines in detail the nature of international construction contracts, the typical clauses included in the standard form of FIDIC conditions, the parties to construction contract (and in particular the role of the Engineer and the Contractor), their structure, and the types of disputes that arise under them.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Arbitration: Regulation and InfrastructureLawCCLP043Semester 27NoNo

International Arbitration: Regulation and Infrastructure

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last sixty years by the increased use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central important in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Arbitration: Applicable Laws and ProceduresLawCCLP044Semester 27NoNo

International Arbitration: Applicable Laws and Procedures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last sixty years by the increased use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central important in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Investment Treaty ArbitrationLawCCLP047Semester 17NoNo

Investment Treaty Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue a claim of, for example, alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour by a host State. Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles of state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners are aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes. The subject has become very topical with broader political and economic debate on ISDS. This debate has intensified in recent years and various reform projects are underway at UNCITRAL, ICSID and other international organisation. The course is divided into four main topics: Topic 1: International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution; Topic 2: ICSID; Topic 3: Bilateral Investment Treaties and Free Trade Agreements; Topic 4: Substantive Protections. Course content: Introduction: International trade and investment disputes out of court; Regulatory and institutional framework; Basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to trade and investment; Applicable law issues; ICSID Jurisdiction; ICSID Procedure; Bilateral Investment Treaties - substantive protections and state defences; Enforcement of decisions and awards; Grey zone between substance - procedure / public - private international law; Case studies.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE203BSemester 25YesNo

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE103A, CHE103B, CHE104
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces key aspects of transition metal chemistry. Periodic trends in the transition metals are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed in transition metal complexes. In addition, characterisation techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy are introduced, and d-d transitions and spectroscopic term symbols discussed.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE204ASemester 15YesNo

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: CHE204
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces key concepts of quantum mechanics in a chemical context, explaining how the theories of quantum mechanics can be applied to atoms and molecules so as to rationalise the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of such entities.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE204BSemester 25YesNo

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso
Overlap: CHE204
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module considers the fundamental role of molecular symmetry in bonding and in determining molecular properties. A range of spectroscopic techniques are then considered in detail, with emphasis on developing understanding of the theoretical principles and the applications of the techniques in studying molecular structure and chemical reactivity.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE206ASemester 15YesNo

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE102A, CHE102B
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the action of medicinal drugs. The topics covered include receptors, concentration-response relationships, drug disposition and pharmacokinetics and elementary structure-activity relationships.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 10, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 10, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE206BSemester 25YesNo

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE206A
Corequisite: None

Description: Major classes of drugs, and their mechanism of actions in treating disease, are reviewed in this module. Prototypical drugs and those developed to refine the properties of earlier examples are also considered. The rationale for developing, or prescribing, a particular drug is presented. Undesireable effects of drugs and drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 8, 10: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 8, 10: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE211Full year5NoNo

Practical Chemistry

Credits: 10.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE101
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed for second-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training at an intermediate-level in the principles and application of techniques of practical chemistry, and spans the traditional disciplines of organic, inorganic, physical and theoretical chemistry. Students will gain experience in a range of analytical methods, synthetic procedures, instrumental techniques and computational techniques. The module also includes training in the preparation of laboratory reports and data analysis techniques, as well as aspects relating to health and safety in the laboratory.

Assessment: 90.0% Practical, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 9: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Friday 2 pm - 6 pm

Applied SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE215Semester 25NoNo

Applied Spectroscopy

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE104
Corequisite: None

Description: Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionized our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools across all areas of Natural Science. This module is designed for second-year students on Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry degree programmes where its main purpose is to reinforce, integrate and extend existing knowledge of spectroscopic techniques, particularly relating to multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in relation to structure determination.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

European Copyright LawLawCCLP075Semester 17NoNo

European Copyright Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module focuses on the copyright law of the European Union and on the relationship between that body of rules and the copyright laws of the Union's member states (including France and Germany). It aims to provide students with a broad understanding of those systems and a more detailed awareness of specific topical issues within European copyright law.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

European Law of PatentsLawCCLP076Semester 17NoNo

European Law of Patents

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Patents are exclusive rights granted for the protection of an invention that offers a new and inventive technical solution or way of doing something. This module deals with the process of obtaining and enforcing a patent under the provisions of the European Patent Convention (EPC) and the Unified Patent Court, including infringement, defences, recovation and remedies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Law of Patents and Related RightsLawCCLP077Semester 27NoNo

International Law of Patents and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Patents provide, for a limited time, the right to exclude others from acts of making, using, selling, keeping or importing products containing the patented invention. Under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) WTO Members, in particular developing countries, face challenges in meeting their obligations to provide patent protection and related rights. The module will assess the extent to which these obligations derived from international law impact on access to medicines, traditional knowledge, biological diversity, farmers' rights, food security and human rights.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Licensing Intellectual PropertyLawCCLP078Semester 27NoNo

Licensing Intellectual Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The module begins with an explanation of the principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing contracts. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution. The module will discuss current issues in the field of licensing including trade marks and selective distribution agreements; standard essential patents and FRAND (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory) licensing; as well as copyright licensing, news aggregation; and technological self-help measures including blockchain technologies.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

EU and US Design LawLawCCLP081Semester 27NoNo

EU and US Design Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Design rights are exclusive rights granted for the protection of a design that offers a new and individual appearance. This module deals with the rationales for and process of obtaining and enforcing design protection under the provisions of the European and US statutes, including infringement, defences, revocation and remedies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International and Comparative Law of Unfair CompetitionLawCCLP082Semester 27NoNo

International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The module aims at providing the students with a thorough account of the main legal theories of unfair competition in various jurisdictions with a particular focus on US, EU, UK, French and German law in light of the binding European and international legal frameworks. Legal problems are approached from a comparative perspective. At the same time, emphasis is placed on the practical problems that arise in the context of disputes that involve claims of unfair competition.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

European Law of Trade MarksLawCCLP083Semester 17NoNo

European Law of Trade Marks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The emphasis is on European trade-mark law and, the relevant legal instruments and the extensive jurisprudence developped by the CJEU in that regard, with particular emphasis on the manner in which the latter is applied by UK courts. Trade-mark law has become an important driver of the economy, while brand loyalty, commercial reputation and goodwill are some of the most important assets a commercial entity might posses. These aspects will be covered in depth in relation to the trade-marks jurisprudence in Europe. Moreover, with the looming UK departure form the EU, the interplay between EU and UK trade-mark will be explored as it is of utmost importance to lawyers involved in pan-European transactions and litigation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Intellectual Property and the Life SciencesLawCCLP093Semester 27NoNo

Intellectual Property and the Life Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The life sciences can be defined as the use of living organisms (biotechnology) and the protection or treatment of living organisms (medicine, veterinary medicine and plant protection). It comprises the science behind medicine, pharmacy and agriculture and their corresponding industries. The module will provide detailed knowledge of the role that intellectual property plays in providing investments for investment and incentives in the life sciences. It will also focus on the question of how to distribute the benefits of life sciences research fairly so that it benefits society.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Trade SecretsLawCCLP096Semester 17NoNo

Trade Secrets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Hull
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Every intellectual property right starts life as a trade secret. Trade secrets and related intellectual assets are viewed as critical to the success of many businesses. But they are also uniquely fragile rights and so their protection under different legal systems requires close assessment. This module complements other IP modules by providing an opportunity to study the economic and legal foundations of these important rights.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE300Semester 16NoNo

Advanced Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Giordano
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: A module of practical work designed to familiarise chemistry students with modern experimental methods and techniques in inorganic and organic chemistry. This module will build upon the practical skills acquired during the first two years. A report based on a literature search will also form part of the module, and instruction in the technique of searching the literature will be provided.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Organic SynthesisBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE302PSemester 17NoNo

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers the techniques used to plan the syntheses of organic compounds, together with a selection of reaction types that may be used in organic synthesis. The aim is to provide you with sufficient knowledge and experience to analyse and evaluate the design of syntheses of molecules of pharmaceutical relevance. The second half is specifically designed to give students an understanding of advanced heterocyclic chemistry, again covering examples that are appropriate to the pharmaceutical industry. The aim here is to enable you to design syntheses of a range of types of heterocyclic compounds and to predict the reactivity of these compounds with a variety of common reagents.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Organic SynthesisBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE302USemester 16NoNo

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE202B
Corequisite: None

Description: The module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: theory and application of retrosynthetic analysis, modern heteroatom chemistry, reactive intermediates & aromatic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will be embedded within the course. The module builds upon the knowledge of structure and reactivity of organic molecules gained in CHE202.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE303PSemester 16NoNo

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 9, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE303USemester 16NoNo

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Atomic, Molecular and Ionic Structure (CHE111), Transition Metal Chemistry (CHE312). This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 9, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE304PSemester 16NoNo

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the properties of interfaces and the behaviour of molecules at interfaces, and experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems. This will include discussion of topics such as the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, the structure of solid surfaces and experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 10, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE304USemester 16NoNo

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the properties of interfaces and the behaviour of molecules at interfaces, and experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems. This will include discussion of topics such as the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, the structure of solid surfaces and experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 10, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Computational ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE305PSemester 26NoNo

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Insurance LawLawCCLP140Semester 27NoNo

Insurance Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Philip Rawlings
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module looks at particular types of insurance contract. It considers the impact on specific insurance contracts of the application of general principles of insurance contract, the terms that appear in different types of contract, their function and how they are interpreted by the courts, and how the applicable legislative environment varies with different types of insurance. Insurance is fundamental to a modern economy, allowing businesses and individuals to transfer the risk of loss, thereby facilitating investment and protecting wealth, and London is a world centre of the insurance industry. Students require no prior knowledge of insurance or English law. They will learn all they need to know as the module progresses.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Law and Ethics in the Energy SectorLawCCLP157Semester 27NoNo

Law and Ethics in the Energy Sector

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Energy plays a central role for the existence and subsistence of human life on earth. The production, distribution and use of energy resources raise numerous ethical questions beyond legal and political issues. Such questions include: (a) who owns energy resources? (b) how can the interests of present and future generations in the enjoyment of resources be balanced? (c) what is the role of states in securing a reliable energy supply to their citizens? (d) what are the risks in entrusting multinational corporations with conducting exploration and exploitation activities? and (e) are states and multinational corporations adequately addressing anthropogenic phenomena, such as pollution or climate change, and doing so consistently with other political, social, economic measures? The module on Energy Law and Ethics will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the ethical implications of international laws, policies and practices in the energy sector. It will enable them to identify these implications and to apply a more comprehensive ethical view to energy law and policy. The Energy Law and Ethics module is concerned with the study of the ethical dilemmas arising in the energy sector. It aims to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to the analysis of these issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Energy and Climate ChangeLawCCLP160Semester 17NoNo

Energy and Climate Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module will look at the international legal regime relating to climate change and consider how this will directly impact the energy sector. There is a fundamental shift in the energy industry away from fossil fuels (non renewable sources) to clean energy (renewable sources). This transition and how it will take place over the coming years will be discussed. This module will also consider emissions trading and its effectiveness, the NDC (nationally determined commitments of states to achieve climate change goals. In addition it will consider the polluter pays principle as well as the growing number of climate change disputes and consider how these might impact future energy regulation, international and national. The focus is climate change exclusively from the perspective of the energy sector.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Oil and Gas Law and Contracts in the Energy TransitionLawCCLP161Semester 27NoNo

International Oil and Gas Law and Contracts in the Energy Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Carlos Bellorin Nunez
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Petroleum laws and contracts are the ultimate manifestation of policy and are the result of lengthy negotiation processes and have an unusual dynamic. According to the World Bank, between 1999 and 2010 more than 30 countries revised their petroleum contracts and made major amendments or completely changed their petroleum legal and fiscal framework. Several more countries have done the same since the 2014 oil price downturn in order to adapt themselves to the changes in the industry. This module will examine the main type of contracts used in the upstream petroleum industry (Production Sharing Agreements, Concessions and Service Agreements) and their most important legal and fiscal mechanisms and the reasons why these are so frequently changed. This course will also focus on the study of these contracts dynamics within the so-called energy transition, risk mitigation strategies in order to avoid the most common forms of legal and political risks: expropriations and contract renegotiation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Energy TransactionsLawCCLP162Semester 17NoNo

International Energy Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module provide students with a good understanding of the main types of energy transactions. International energy transactions are complex, large, incredibly high risk and very expensive. They involve many parties from hosts states, international oil companies, national oil companies, NGOs, IGOs as well as service providers. The course is focused on practical issues including specific contract provisions used in upstream contacts from PSC's to JOA's. The module also looks at the structure used in finance energy projects and reserve base lending. The unconventional and LNG value chain and increasing market is also covered. Nuclear power is still part of the energy matrix of many states being a low carbon process and ensuring energy security.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Arbitration and EnergyLawCCLP163Semester 17NoNo

International Arbitration and Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: International arbitration proceedings in the energy sector have seen an important increase in recent years, both in terms of their numbers and their economic and political importance. This module provides students with the basis for understanding the particular issues of disputes in the energy sector, both in international investment and commercial arbitration. It gives students aiming to work in the arbitration area an important qualification in a very competitive market.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Computational ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE305USemester 26NoNo

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE306PSemester 26NoNo

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE306USemester 26NoNo

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules. The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Bioorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE307Semester 26NoNo

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE302U
Corequisite: None

Description: This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 10, 11: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE308PSemester 26NoNo

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE308USemester 26NoNo

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm

Topics in Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE309Semester 16NoNo

Topics in Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This modules focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view. Background knowledge of biochemistry is not assumed.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 8, 10: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

International Regulation and Governance of EnergyLawCCLP164Semester 27NoNo

International Regulation and Governance of Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module will provide students with a good knowledge of the regulation and governance of the energy sector. It considers the issues impacting the continuing development of the sector as it relates to regulation with particular emphasis on the EU and the internal energy market it seeks to create. It will examine specifically, for example, energy regulation models, and the regulation and governance of specific markets such as oil and gas, electricity and alternate energy sources. It will explore issues such as the role of ACER as a transnational regulator, the European Target Model for the electricity and gas markets, market coupling and the likely shape of future energy markets as the Energy Union continues to take shape. It will encourage students to critically analyse the issues impacting regulation and to apply their knowledge to factual problems encountered by regulators and non-state actors.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Mining and Natural Resources LawLawCCLP166Semester 27NoNo

Mining and Natural Resources Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module covers all of the legal aspects of the mining industry. It sets out the legal regime relating to the mining sector. Mining companies also have to be aware of political considerations and the impact of the nationalisation cycle. The different stages of the mining industry will be reviewed from development, production and remediation at the closure of the mine. Each phase requires certain licences and permits to proceed to the next stage. Some of the newer innovations of underwater mining will be looked at and the impact of the relevant provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Of particular interest, is the work of the International Seabed Authority and the regulations and recommendations it is making on prospecting in the sea. Environmental considerations and corporate social responsibility standards will also be discussed. Finally, there will be a review of mining disputes, how they are resolved and their impact if any on the mining sector.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Information Technology Transactions: Management and DisputesLawCCLP206Semester 27NoNo

Information Technology Transactions: Management and Disputes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The module covers information technology transactions, contracts and licences in a variety of areas, such as: system procurement contracts, commercial software licensing, outsourcing, cloud computing and free and open source software.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Cybercrime                       LawCCLP207Semester 27NoNo

Cybercrime                       

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Internet technologies have enabled new ways of committing crimes and have moved 'old' crimes such as fraud online. This has created interesting challenges to substantive criminal law and to its investigation, prosecution and enforcement. This Module examines the harmonization efforts, specifically the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime (2001) and the EU framework for the harmonization of the law in the fields of cybercrime. The Module looks at four categories of cybercrime: (a) computer integrity offences (e.g. hacking and viruses); (b) computer-related cybercrimes (e.g. fraud and forgery); (c) content-related cybercrimes (such as child sex abuse images; pornography; IP infringement; terrorism propaganda; and (d) contact-related offences (e.g. harassment and revenge porn). This Module will also examine the legal procedural issues arising from transborder online crime, specifically the formal (e.g. mutual legal assistance) and informal approaches to international co-operation, including the role played by services providers (payment intermediaries; cloud computing; Internet access providers; domain name registries and registrars etc). The exercise of national powers for collecting intelligence & evidence (including surveillance) will also be examined.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

EU Data Protection Law                                                                LawCCLP209Semester 27NoNo

EU Data Protection Law                                                                

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module examines EU data protection laws and examples of the regulatory frameworks established in the Member States. It explores the key debates and commercial implications of the current regime under the Data Protection Directive and the new regime under the General Data Protection Regulation, including the challenges of particular developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Regulation on Media Reporting of the Legal System       LawCCLP218Semester 17NoNo

Regulation on Media Reporting of the Legal System       

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: One of the most fundamental concepts governing a legal system is not only that justice should be done, but that it should also be seen to be done. The modern notion of open justice sees the media encouraged to report on the court system in operation; indeed, the right to do so comes under the scope of Article 10. There are, however, situations in which limits must be put upon what may be reported, such as, for example, where the public interest lies in protecting the Article 8 privacy rights of an individual, or perhaps even where it is necessary for information identifying them to be withheld from publication lest it put their actual lives in danger, as was seen in regards to the Bulger killers, Thompson & Venables (UK). Prior to and during legal proceedings, it can be necessary to put limits on the manner in which the media report particular proceedings; in some circumstances, it may even be necessary to prevent certain key information from being able to be reported at all for the duration, as to do otherwise could pose a threat to the integrity of the proceedings, violating the Article 6 right. This module will undertake a comparative exploration of different legal approaches which seek to maintain the balance between open justice and media freedom of expression on the one hand, and the protection of vital interests in the integrity of the justice process on the other. Consideration will also be given to the challenges posed by the nature of the contemporary media: online, global, and instantaneous. Can traditional approaches in this area, designed in an era of professional journalists and defined boundaries, be adapted in order to really address the internet era of amateur commentators, online gossips, and international communication platforms with global reach?

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Professional Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE401Full year7NoNo

Professional Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims at developing students' awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as green chemistry, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 9: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE402Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE302U
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined critically. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 8, 10: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE402PSemester 17NoNo

Advanced Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined critically. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 8, 10: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE403PSemester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module seeks to provide a coherent introduction into the roles that metals play in biological and medicinal systems. The first six lectures of the module focus on electron transfer and will include an introduction to basic terms (redox potential and its tuning in biological systems, excited-state electron transfer) and elements of the Marcus theory, followed by a discussion of electron transfer processes in biology, including light-energy harvesting and conversion in photosynthetic reaction centre, long-range electron transfer in metalloproteins, DNA and molecular wires. Application in molecular devices will be discussed as well. Molecular redox chemistry and electrochemistry including redox catalysis is surveyed.The next set of lectures detail the role that metal plays in a range of biological systems and in medical applications. Initially the focus will be on electron transport in naturally occurring systems such as in the oxygen evolving centre within PS2 of the photosynthetic apparatus, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer. There will then follow a discussion of the roles metals play as Lewis acids in a range of biological systems covering metalloenzymes such as carbonic anhydrase, liver alcohol dehrdrogenase and nickel urease. The final lectures in this part of the module will focus on the roles metal play in medicine eg anti-ageing drugs, anti-cancer drugs and in imaging agents.The final four lectures of the module will begin with an introduction to the important area of biomaterials, which will then be followed by an overview of selected topics from the areas of metallic biomaterials, ceramic biomaterials and bioglasses. The final lecture will consider implant/host interactions and the factors affecting long-term performance of a biomaterial.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

E-commerce TransactionsLawCCLP219Semester 17NoNo

E-commerce Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module investigates the difficulties posed by the problem of creating legally effective e-commerce transactions in a complex cross-border legal environment and potential solutions to those difficulties. It focuses on how e-commerce businesses are constrained to undertake and structure their online activities, and on how legal creativity might be used to reduce or eliminate legal uncertainties.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

English Contract LawLawCCLP601Semester 27NoNo

English Contract Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The module will cover the English law of contract, including the rules governing the formation, construction and interpretation of contracts (including the incorporation and implication of terms), the circumstances where contracts may be deemed to be vitiated, as well as the available remedies for breach of contract. This module will also give students insight into the workings of the common law.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy)LawCCLP602Semester 27NoNo

International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: International Arbitration is a more and more specialized area of law. In this module, students will learn the specific skill sets needed to become a successful arbitration lawyer. Oral and written advocacy, understanding of different cultural legal backgrounds and other skills will be taught on a 'learning by doing basis'. Students will take part in practical exercises, stepping in the shoes of arbitrator, counsel or clients. Applying the theoretical concepts of international arbitration in practice, students will lean the fundamental skills that will give students an important qualification in a competitive legal market.

Assessment: 50.0% Practical, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Law of Financial Crime: European and International PerspectivesLawCCLP603Semester 27NoNo

Law of Financial Crime: European and International Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Valsamis Mitsilegas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module will examine the European and International Law of Financial Crime. It will focus in particular on the development of legal responses to money laundering and terrorist finance, corruption and fraud (including fraud against the budget of the European Union). The synergy between European and international initiatives in developing a system of global governance in the field will be analysed and the impact of such system on domestic legal systems will be explored. The module will also place emphasis on the impact of new legislative initiatives in the field on fundamental principles of commercial and criminal law, as well as on the protection of fundamental rights.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Cloud Computing Law                                                                   LawCCLP604Semester 17NoNo

Cloud Computing Law                                                                   

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Millard
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module will provide a foundation for understanding and analysing cloud computing structures and contracts for private and public sector cloud services, including standard terms and contract negotiations; the application of data protection law to the storage and other processing of information in cloud environments, including what is regulated, who is responsible, which laws apply and the circumstances in which law enforcement authorities access information; and the subsistence and ownership of proprietary rights in data stored, processed and generated in cloud environments.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Copyright Law - United Kingdom and United StatesLawCCLP605Semester 27NoNo

Copyright Law - United Kingdom and United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module focuses on the copyright systems applicable in leading common law jurisdictions - with particular reference to the United Kingdom and the United States. It aims to provide students with a broad understanding of those systems and a more detailed awareness of specific topical issues within UK and US copyright law.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Legal Aspects of International FinanceLawCCLP606Semester 17NoNo

Legal Aspects of International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Philip Rawlings
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module is concerned with the raising of large-scale finance by sovereigns, corporations and banks. it focuses on certain key financial transactions, such as syndicated loans, bonds and securitisation, but discusses them within the broader context of the legal issues that arise in the international capital and money markets. In particular, it looks at the various legal issues that shape how these cross-border transactions are structured.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

Introduction to Competition LawLawCCLP607Semester 27NoNo

Introduction to Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The module will provide an introduction to competition law. The module will address the essentials of Article 101 TFEU (undertaking, agreement etc.), discuss various types of anticompetitive agreements, as well as the modern approach to the application of Article 101(3) TFEU in defending anticompetitive agreements. Then the module will look at Article 102 TFEU. The module will analyse the essential features of Article 102 TFEU i.e. the concept of dominance and the concept of abuse. Then the module will present some of the abuses (e.g. tying/bundling, exclusive dealing, price discrimination, refusal to supply). Finally, the module will analyse the assessment of mergers and acquisitions, focusing on substantive analysis. The content of the module is relevant for the competition enforcement by the European Commission, but also by National Competition Authorities of the EU Member States. The module will adopt a very practical perspective (case studies, quizzes) and will aim to equip students with the tools they need to assess/address infringements of national and EU competition law. Indicative topics include: ARTICLE 101: Agreements, concerted practices and decisions of associations of undertakings; Market Definition; Object or Effect; Article 101(3) Exemption; Sanctions, Settlements and Commitments. ARTICLE 102: Definition of Dominance; Concept of collective dominance; Concept of abuse; Abuses. MERGERS : Horizontal Mergers & Non-Horizontal Mergers; Remedies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE403USemester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Giordano
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will cover advanced topics in inorganic chemistry from the more traditional aspects to the latest trends. This will include the role that metals play in biological systems and in medical applications; also the more recent role of nanoparticles will be discussed, with a focus on inorganic nanomaterials, from synthesis to applications, including a comparison between 'nano' and 'bulk' properties. Electron transport in naturally occurring systems will be covered such as in the electron transfer chain of aerobic respiration, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE404PSemester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal system and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE404USemester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE304
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal systems and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Topics in Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE405PSemester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathalie Lebrasseur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is designed to give you a detailed understanding of stereochemistry, an appreciation of the relevance of this topic to the activity and regulatory requirements of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, and a detailed knowledge of the methods available to generate single enantiomers of pharmaceutical relevance. Furthermore the module will provide you with an overview of the principles, practicalities and applications of contemporary catalytic methodology of relevance to drug discovery and manufacture within the pharmaceutical industry. The aim is to furnish you with sufficient knowledge that you will be able to appraise and develop synthetic strategies for the synthesis of complex organic molecules using catalytic methodology.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE405USemester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xacobe Cambeiro
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is designed to give you a detailed understanding of stereochemistry, an appreciation of the relevance of this topic to the activity and regulatory requirements of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, and a detailed knowledge of the methods available to generate single enantiomers of pharmaceutical relevance. Furthermore the module will provide you with an overview of the principles, practicalities and applications of contemporary catalytic methodology of relevance to drug discovery and manufacture within the pharmaceutical industry. The aim is to furnish you with sufficient knowledge that you will be able to appraise and develop synthetic strategies for the synthesis of complex organic molecules using catalytic methodology.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Complex Networks and InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM132Semester 27NoNo

Complex Networks and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module focuses on the structure and dynamics of a variety of complex networks, including the Internet, the World Wide Web, online social networks, inter- and intra-organisational networks, and import-export trade networks among countries. The module aims to develop a unified theoretical framework for the analysis of sociologically relevant phenomena that exhibit complex network structures and dynamics, such as information diffusion, cultural fads, financial crises, and viral marketing. Special emphasis will be placed on innovation, with a view to uncovering the structural foundations of knowledge creation, transfer, sharing, and diffusion in various empirical domains. To this end, the module will develop an interdisciplinary perspective by combining current research on complex networks with contributions from relevant organisational and sociological research.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

New Boundaries in Competition EnforcementLawCCLP608Semester 27NoNo

New Boundaries in Competition Enforcement

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The first part of the module will focus on anticompetitive agreements and it will examine algorithmic collusion and cartels, providing an assessment of the current status of competition enforcement when faced new technologies and their impact on the achievement and sustainment of collusive conducts. This part will also assess platform sharing. The next part of the module will focus on the boundaries of unilateral conduct enforcement in digital markets and will provide a detailed review of the new types of abuses and the strength and weaknesses of the EU Commission theory of harm as illustrated in the Google Shopping case both from the perspectives of the European Commission and the antithesis from perspective of practitioners highlighting the reasons for expanding the enforcement toolbox and balancing it against the negative impact of such intervention of innovation and legal certainty. In the area of merger control, the test of public interest is profoundly influenced by the enforcement approach applied to the control of concentrations. Among the public interest considerations, one that has been at the heart of important cases has been that of national security. The module will explore all issues related to this new resurgence of protectionism. Finally the module will discuss the importance of innovation in merger enforcement.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Essential Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE100Full year4NoYes

Essential Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Crespo Otero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and how they impact on others.
  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is intended for students studying on chemistry-based degree programmes (including F100, F103, 9A32, F152, 2L22 and F154).

This module is structured around three main key areas:

(1) Acquiring mathematical skills for problem solving in chemistry.
The module will explain how mathematics underpin chemistry and will support students in acquiring a variety of key mathematical skills used to solve problem in chemistry. The material covered in this module includes: basic numeracy skills, units and order of magnitude, simple mathematical calculations, introductory calculus (differentiation/integration), complex numbers, matrices, geometry, application of probability theory in chemistry and statistical analysis of data.

(2) Considering the role of Chemistry in the "real world" and Developing graduate skills.
Through personal investigation and series of talk of professional Chemists, students will be encouraged to consider the role of chemistry in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline. Students will also develop through this module, oral and written communication skills and some basic literature search technique.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional Chemists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 9: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 8, 10: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
Foundations of Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE101Full year4NoNo

Foundations of Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is appropriate to first-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training in the principles and practice of key techniques of practical chemistry - including analytical methods, synthetic procedures, methods of purification, and the use of a range of instrumental techniques. Topics such as good laboratory practice, health and safety in the laboratory, the preparation of laboratory reports amd data analysis techniques are also covered.

Assessment: 90.0% Practical, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Chemistry Investigative ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE601Full year6NoYes

Chemistry Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Chemistry programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: Students work independently on topics set by their project supervisors. The work involves extensive searching, reviewing and critical evaluation of a specific area of the scientific literature. A final dissertation is prepared, based upon the investigative work that has been undertaken. Students are also required to present their work in a variety of other forms, including a poster and seminar appropriate for a specialist audience, and in an alternative format in which the topic is made more accessible to the general public.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

NetworkingCHE_6_S
Evidence-based Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM136Semester 27NoNo

Evidence-based Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Briner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The ultimate goal of evidence-based practice is to help practitioners become more effective through providing a framework for making decisions and taking actions which incorporate the best available evidence from multiple sources including scientific evidence. This module will focuses on a practical project in order to provide participants with hands-on experience of how to use different types of evidence and information both to identify real HRM problems and their potential solutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Introduction to Marketing ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM137Semester 17NoNo

Introduction to Marketing Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Zahra Sharifonnasabi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is meant to provide an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. It is providing students on the MSc in Management and Management and Organizational Innovation with a theoretical foundation of theories and concepts of marketing management which allows them in their subsequent studies to understand and situate more specialised aspects of marketing (e.g. consumer behaviour, social and political marketing, or business relationships and networks). Special emphasis is given to understanding current academic debates in the field. This means students are expected to read articles independently in leading marketing journals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7217Semester 27NoNo

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claire Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Educational Development Team. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake two teaching observations and create a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Essential Skills for BiologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO100Full year4NoYes

Essential Skills for Biologists

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and how they impact on others.
  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biologists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills. This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as essay writing, information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations.

(2) Considering the role of biological sciences in the "real world". Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biological sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways. Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 10: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
PhysiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO125Semester 24YesNo

Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dunja Aksentijevic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to physiology. The structure and function of major systems including the nervous, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems are surveyed in a variety of different taxa and physiological functioning including homeostasis, temperature regulation, gas exchange, digestion and the endrocrine systems are all reviewed.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Basic BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO161Semester 24YesNo

Basic Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Overlap: BMD123
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will cover amino acids, the fundamentals of protein structure, isolation and purification of proteins, modification of proteins, and methods of determining protein conformation. You will also cover the basics of enzyme catalysis and kinetics with specific case studies. Other topics include ion transport, and other transport proteins, and the utilisation of proteins and soluble cofactors to generate and store metabolic energy. You will cover the basics of metabolism in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, as well as ATP synthesis and membrane bound electron transfer in mitochondria. Chloroplasts in plants and algae, and molecular motors, such as muscles, that consume metabolic energy are also covered. A detailed module synopsis will be handed out in the first lecture, and summary outlines of subsequent lectures will be available on the school teaching website for guidance.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Leadership Skills for Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM139Semester 17NoNo

Leadership Skills for Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxine Robertson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will familiarise students with the fundamentals of effective leadership in analytical initiatives and projects such as the difference between leading and managing initiatives/projects, dealing with resistance and different stakeholder interests, transactional leadership in teams and projects, building commitment for change, inspiring peers and subordinates, challenging others' assumptions and views, effective communication within teams/project groups and with other teams/projects, executives and stakeholder, building and nurturing relationships and social networks, presenting and pitching concepts and results, managing and mobilising the organisational energy of a team/project and dealing with acceleration and over-acceleration in analytical initiatives and projects.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Project ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM141Semester 27NoNo

Project Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evangelos Markopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The focus of the module will be on recent project management techniques that encourage the use of incremental delivery of projects. These techniques are appropriate to projects that deliver complex outcomes in a context of high uncertainty about the desired result. The course will also provide a grounding in traditional project management techniques that focus on projects that are concluded to a clear specification within a pre-specified time frame. Students will be encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to earn an accreditation for project management and the course will prepare students for this additional examination.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Research Methods for AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM143Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods for Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to put together a research proposal, how to draw out objectives of research, how to undertake literature reviews, how to assess suitable research methods to use. In terms of research methods, the course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students will know how to put together their own research proposal and will have done some preliminary analysis of literature, assessment of data required and methods to be used.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Research Methods for Human Resources ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM144Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods for Human Resources Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nelarine Cornelius
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to the nature of research in the field of business and management/ human resource management and to some of the techniques used in business research. The module is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and expertise to undertake a successful dissertation as part of the MSc. The module will introduce you to the fundamentals of research in business and management/ HRM, help you to design a relevant and rigorous dissertation project, and to identify suitable quantitative and/or qualitative research methods techniques. It will walk you through the entire research process from finding a research question to the final results including how to write-up your research. With a strong focus on the dissertation the module will also provide the fundaments for future research projects in academia and different business contexts.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Research Methods for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM145Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods for Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valeria Cavotta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to put together a research proposal, how to draw out objectives of research, how to undertake literature reviews, how to assess suitable research methods to use. In terms of research methods, the course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students will know how to put together their own research proposal and will have done some preliminary analysis of literature, assessment of data required and methods to be used.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Social and Sustainable InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM146Semester 27NoNo

Social and Sustainable Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Global challenges such as environmental pollution, inequality or climate change, have driven an increasing need and demand for products or services that contribute value through enhancing environmental performance (e.g. low-carbon or renewable energy) or alleviating social issues (e.g. for the socially excluded, or to enhance social justice). This module has been developed to address these important trends. The module is designed to equip students with the skills and resources for thinking critically about the role of innovation in social justice and sustainable development. It provides a rigorous conceptual understanding of sustainable and social innovation, and of the practical challenges of innovation management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

World Economy and DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM090Semester 17NoNo

World Economy and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Liam Campling
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers a broad overview of the process of economic 'globalisation' and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm - set in the context of trends in the world economy, with particular emphasis on the period since the 1970s. It provides a critical and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins and development, theories of international trade and its regulation, conceptualisations of international supply chains, and attempts to reform and resist multinationals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm

Global Supply Chain ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM091Semester 27NoNo

Global Supply Chain Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Over the last few decades the business world has become more complex, fragmented, and geographically scattered. As firms outsource a growing portion of the activities and functions that were previously carried out in-house, they become one element of a multifaceted and intricate process of value creation and capture that cut across firms' and states' borders: the supply chain. As value-creating activities and functions are shared between ever more players their linkages increase as well as their interdependence. The study of global supply chains and their management looks at this scattered environment: the linkages and relationships among firms, and among firms and other actors; and focuses on how leading firms attempt to drive this complexity in multiple ways, whether by increasing coherence, consistency and unity in the supply chain, or by shifting costs to other chain members and increasing competitive pressures among them.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

MRes DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUSM093Full year7NoNo

MRes Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is available to MRes Business and Management students only. Given that the programme is a Masters by research, it is appropriate to have a longer length dissertation (15,000 words) than the standard SBM PG dissertation (10,000 words). This will enable students to bring together the learning from the taught methods modules and the taught subject modules into an independent piece of work that will act as a springboard for a research career and/or PhD study. The module is core.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Introduction to Marketing Theory and ConceptsBusiness and ManagementBUSM094Semester 17NoNo

Introduction to Marketing Theory and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Leischnig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will provide an overview of marketing across national boundaries and within countries in foreign markets. It will focus on the opportunities to be gained from international marketing, and also its dangers and the challenges that marketers face when they operate in foreign markets. The course will begin by examining the reasons and rationale behind firms deciding to market overseas. It then goes on to analyse the decision making processes behind which markets firms should enter, examining political, economic, social, legal and technological factors. Following this, market entry strategies will be discussed and then the integrated marketing mix of product, price, place and promotion will be taught from an international perspective. Implementation, customer relations and the increasingly important role of e-marketing will also be discussed.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Social and Political MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM095Semester 27NoNo

Social and Political Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas O'Shaughnessy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Our perspective is that marketing is a dynamic tool and a potent agent of change that can civilise or de-civilise society. The design of the module: the course explores five major themes. Collectively they cover the universe of social/civic/ political persuasion via methods of partial commercial derivation. These themes are analysed both via descriptive approaches, case studies and theoretical constructs: Cause marketing (single-issue groups); Civic marketing (health and safety campaigns etc); Party political marketing - Selling Barack Obama Abuse of marketing - selling war A theory of propaganda and persuasion: myth, symbolism, rehetoric The claim is that marketing has shaped, and continues to shape, the culture we live in today. Examination is via oral presentation and project; however the project will be integrative across the whole course so that it discourages over-specialisation.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Strategic AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM147Semester 17NoNo

Strategic Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Panagiotopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the traditional competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate these analytical approaches and their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to examine the challenges of strategy implementation, including analysing structural, cultural and functional issues.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Leadership in the Social and Public SectorsBusiness and ManagementBUSM149Semester 27NoNo

Leadership in the Social and Public Sectors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Mcgurk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate and discuss leadership in the social and pubic sectors from a theoretical sound and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on leadership processes and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases from and practices in this sector. Furthermore, understanding and challenging leadership practices in social and public organisations will contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, this module this module explores principal theories, typologies (e.g. transactional and transformational) and styles of individual and collective leadership at all levels of social and public organisations. Includes research evidence on the effectiveness and otherwise of leadership on performance in social and public sector organisations, often in politically- or resource-constrained environments. Particular attention is given to crisis leadership.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Experiments for Business and AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM160Semester 27NoNo

Experiments for Business and Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is compulsory and will be taught in term B. The module builds on statistical methods covered in the Data Analytics module in term A.

The aim of the module is to introduce students to the problem of causal inference, to theories of how causality is established and to empirical methods used to identify causal effects. The main focus will be on randomized controlled trials and settings that are similar. Students will learn about different econometric techniques used to identify causal effects and will develop an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of these effects. Students will also learn how to collect and organize data that comes from real or natural experiments, to analyze such data and to report on their results in ways that are accessible to non-specialists.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Funding and Financing in the Creative and Cultural IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUSM161Semester 27NoNo

Funding and Financing in the Creative and Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on the theory and practice of financing creative and cultural projects and organisations. The module will give students a grounding in the landscape of funding streams as well as technical aspects of understanding and intelligently interrogating financial accounts and project budgets. It will cover how accounting numbers are generated and reported at project, site, organisational and sectoral levels, and will develop students' critical analysis of how financial information is deployed to control and manage organisational resources.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Heritage: History, Theory and PracticeBusiness and ManagementBUSM162Semester 17NoNo

Heritage: History, Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edward Legon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide the theoretical basis for understanding heritage from a range of cross-disciplinary perspectives. It will address the relationships between heritage, history and memory in theory and practice, exploring heritage on personal and collective scales, the politics of heritage, and the materiality of heritage sites and objects alongside intangible heritage in the form of testimony and stories. The module will explore the ways in which different understandings of heritage inform practice in the heritage sector, from community archives and heritage projects to museums, historic houses and palaces.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

History of Cultural IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUSM163Semester 17NoNo

History of Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on the social and economic history of the formation of cultural production networks in different historical and global contexts. It asks us, what are the overlapping histories of media technologies, organizational form, accumulation strategies, and value generating activities in the creative industries and arts and cultural sector? This module will provide students with key historical knowledge to be able to engage critically with creative industries practice and organisations.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Relationship and Network MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM096Semester 17NoNo

Relationship and Network Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephan Henneberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module Relationship and Network Marketing provides students with an overview of important aspects of business-to-business marketing. For this purpose, students will explore crucial underlying concepts of relationships and networks as well as develop a sense of business marketing practices. Thus, the module covers both relationship marketing and network marketing theory and practice and thereby fosters an understanding of how organisations are embedded in a net of business exchanges, which create interdependencies between business actors. Using collaborative and cooperative relational management provides firms within such nets with the possibility to mobilise important external resources via business partners in the supply and customer network. The module will use case studies and practical example throughout.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Research Methods for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM098Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods for Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paolo Antonetti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will introduce students to the concepts and practices of scholarly and practitioner marketing research. It will introduce students to research design, address the breadth of research methods used in the field, and the underlying logic (methodology) of those methods. The following will be covered: Key quantitative techniques (e.g., descriptive statistics and methods of hypotheses testing), qualitative methods (e.g., content analysis and contemporary anthropological methods such as netography), key data gathering methods (e.g., surveys, interviews and focus groups), as well as secondary sources.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 6 pm - 7 pm

Digital MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM099Semester 17NoNo

Digital Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nima Heirati
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Welcome to one of the most evolving topics in the marketing literature. The development of the Internet and digital technologies have transformed marketing and has impacted every industry from retail to health. Now more than ever, companies and managers face the challenge of developing and maintaining their business operations and customer engagement in a constantly evolving digital space. The key question is not whether to pursue digital marketing strategies but how to successfully deploy them. What are the techniques that companies need to master to make effective use of digital marketing? This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive guide to the concepts, strategies, and best practice to support all the digital marketing processes. This module empowers students with skills and knowledge needed to work as the digital marketing professional after graduation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM100Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for International Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM101Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for International Financial Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Managing Heritages at Historic Royal PalacesBusiness and ManagementBUSM164Full year7NoNo

Managing Heritages at Historic Royal Palaces

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The MA in Heritage Management combines academic rigour with applied professional theory and expertise to introduce students to the actual practice of heritage management at historically renowned sites. This compulsory module, which introduces the practice of heritage management, will be taught and coordinated by Historic Royal Palace's Programme Director with masterclass sessions by other specialists from within HRP and, on occasion, possible visits to other heritage organisations. A combination of classroom-based discussion based on readings, site visits and masterclasses with HRP staff will take a 'critical practice' approach that will connect QMUL compulsory module themes to HRP case studies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 9 am - 9 pm

Organising in the Creative and Cultural IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUSM165Semester 17NoNo

Organising in the Creative and Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores the multiple organisational forms in the creative and cultural industries. The purpose is to give students critical and practical tools to organise in the creative economies. Rooted in the ethical mission of the School of Business and Management, the organising methods and organisational forms and behaviours common and emergent in the creative inddustries and cultural sector will be explored through an interdisciplinary understanding of creative ecologies and networks. This module will students with the relevant organising methods, conceptual tools and factual information necessary for critical understanding of the multi-scalar institutional contexts of the creative economies. The module makes use of contemporary examples and case studies to draw out practical and theoretical implications for organising in creative economies.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Professional Practice in Heritage ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM166Full year7NoNo

Professional Practice in Heritage Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The Professional Work Experience module will be delivered at at least two of HRP's London sites: Tower of London and Hampton Court Palace. This is a key feature of the programme. Students will be given the necessary training to begin to develop the skills and 'real work' experience that will enable them to make informed decisions about their own future career development within the heritage sector and make them competitive in the job market. Students will be assessed on a reflective piece of writing, responding to the challenges in heritage management, conservation and engagement that they have experienced during the placement.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Thursday 9 am - 9 pm

Leadership SeminarBusiness and ManagementBUSM167Full year7NoNo

Leadership Seminar

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module consists of professional development seminars within the theme of creative industries and cultural sector leadership designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes through practitioners willing to come share their experiences, and also their contacts. The seminars will provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from the creative and cultural sectors. Seminar or workshop sessions can include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and case studies to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of relevant organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Dissertation in Heritage ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM168Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Heritage Management

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the university's MA programmes, carrying a weighting of three 15-credit modules i.e. one quarter of the entire programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Heritage Management programme. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by one or more supervisor/s. Members of academic staff at Historic Royal Palaces may co-supervise dissertation projects. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research design and methods module, GEG7135. Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QMPlus.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM102Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment Relations

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUSM103Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for International Business

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for Accounting and ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM105Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for Accounting and Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM106Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for Marketing

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Paolo Antonetti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM107Semester 17NoNo

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are reported and disclosed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control resource allocations and generate performance evaluation, credit ratings and monitor shareholder value. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and manage corporate organizations towards generating income for liquidity and capitalizations for solvency where both are essential and maintain a reporting entity as a going concern.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Chemistry Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE600Full year6NoYes

Chemistry Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Chemistry programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: Prerequisites: Students with an average of 60% or above (combination of first year and second year results) are eligible to register for this module. Overall the module is expected to involve students for approximately 18h/week, for 12 weeks, spent on laboratory and library work, plus additional time spent on data analysis and on writing the dissertation.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

NetworkingCHE_6_S
Dissertation in Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUSM169Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the university's MA programmes, carrying a weighting of three 15-credit modules i.e. one quarter of the entire programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Creative Industries and Arts Organisation programme. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by one or more supervisor/s. Students may also need to draw on work conducted as part of the Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation module for their dissertation. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Applied Methods Masterclass. Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QMPlus.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Applied Methods (Master Class)Business and ManagementBUSM170Semester 27NoNo

Applied Methods (Master Class)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on the relevant methods of analysis and applied research into the organisation history of the creative industries. What are the interdisciplinary methods that generate innovation and leadership in the creative industries and arts and cultural sector, and which methods are more or less appropriate for engaging these different sectors of society? This module will provide students key methodological knowledge to be able to engage critically with creative industries practice and organization, and prepares students to undertake dissertation and practice-based projects in the third semester.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Introduction to Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUSM171Semester 17NoNo

Introduction to Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores the foundational concepts and theories of the creative industries. This module provides students with the relevant theories, conceptual tools and factual information necessary to gain an understanding of, and be able to engage critically with, the realities of managing, working and progressing within the cultural and creative industries. Specifically, this module aims to give you a theoretical and practical understanding of the specific characteristics of the creative sector in terms of how it is organised, intra- and inter-organisational behavior, relationship management in creative industries value chains, different business models and the major challenges creative industries firms face in the current media and competitive environment, as well as an examination into how creative sector work and development (locally and internationally) might inform each other.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUSM172Full year7NoNo

Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The professional practice module runs throughout the year, in collaboration with partner organisations and with degrees of co-supervision as and when possible where students will work individually or in small groups with QMUL academics and sector practitioners. This module will allow students to get practical experience in business and public engagement strategy, organisational behavior, and global value chain ecologies in arts and cultural organisations in London. Students will form groups and co-create a specific research brief for one organisation, this assessment to be submitted in the summer term. This research work will additionally feed into students' dissertations project submissions, which are also conducted over the third semester.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 3: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business EthicsBusiness and ManagementBUSM175Semester 27NoNo

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Corporate Social Responsibility will offer students an introductory and in-depth module unpacking the sensitive relationship between corporations and issues of social justice, environmental destruction (animal, climate, pollution, ecologies) and labour rights. At a time when globalisation is perceived as a threat to international business addressing inequalities across the global North and South, this module will provide postgraduate students with indispensable knowledge about key issues facing corporations today. The module will also address both philosophical issues that include ethical theories, moral debates and social scientific perspectives as well as a grounding in real life case studies and access to a local stakeholder engagement project with charities in Tower Hamlets and Poplar. Specific modules will cover a wide-range of subjects including: 'greening' management (reducing emissions, waste management, protecting biodiversity), workers rights (trade unions, ILO, outsourcing, supply-chains), sustainable consumption (ethical marketing, corporate lobbying, consumerism), and promoting democratic processes (governance, accountability, stakeholder engagement).

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Leading Organisational ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUSM108Semester 17NoNo

Leading Organisational Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stefan Krummaker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate and discuss leading change in organisations from a theoretical sound and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on organisational change processes and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. Furthermore, understanding and challenging practices of leading change will contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, the module will focus
- forces and conceptual perspectives of organisational change
- theories and concepts of leading change - in particular Transformational Leadership (visionary, motivational and inspirational leadership)
- creating an environment for creativity and innovation
- leading change in different cultural environments
- responsible leadership in organisational change
- followers' role in and contributions to organisational change
- organisational energy and energising leadership strategies
- avoiding overacceleration and stress in organisational change
- self-leadership in organisational change

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM110Semester 17NoNo

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides learners with a critical understanding of the internal and external contexts of contemporary organisations, including the managerial, business, regulatory, labour market and institutional contexts. It further examines the role of the HR function, HR strategy and the link between HR and organisational performance. The module also introduces the major functions of HRM including resourcing, performance management, learning and development and explores the applications in professional practice in different types of organisational scenarios (large, small, global, national, public, private). This is further achieved through additional skills workshops that engage learners in the analysis of case studies, role play and problem solving exercises. Finally, the module seeks to understand the impact of globalisation on employment and its implications for HR strategy and practice.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Management ConsultingBusiness and ManagementBUSM111Semester 27NoNo

Management Consulting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what management consultancy is, the variety and types of consulting firms and the markets they serve. We will examine a range of approaches to consultancy as a process of diagnosing management and organisational problems, designing implementing and evaluating organisational interventions. We will examine studies of some of these interventions and case studies we will examine how consultants present their knowledge and expertise, the claims they make for its efficacy and the role of ethics in this. We will examine and explore different kinds of organisational context where management consultancy has been used: firms, public institutions, voluntary organisations and other organisational forms. We will also practise skills critical for consultancy such as diagnosis, intergroup facilitation and evaluation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Applied Empirical MethodsBusiness and ManagementBUSM112Semester 27NoNo

Applied Empirical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides a non-technical overview of quantitative methodologies frequently used in finance and international business research.

The module is data driven and covers the basics of: Hypotheses testing, OLS and Logistic Regression Analysis, Instrumental Variables, Time Series Analysis, Panel Data Models, Differences-in Differences, Sharp and Fuzzy Regression Discontinuity. The module also teaches how to apply these methods using STATA (a leading econometrics software).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Corporate ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUSM113Semester 17NoNo

Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Onakanmi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organizations such as the EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB.

This module considers how changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for integrated corporate reporting (including Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting) and also Integrated and Business Model Reporting

Students will understand and appreciate how financial statements have evolved to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income . The evolution of accounting standards --financial instruments and fair value reporting and debates on the accounting conceptual framework.

How do external consultants impact upon disclosed financial information: role of valuation advisers, actuaries etc in terms of the various forms of accounting standard: financial instruments, tangible assets, pension fund accounting etc

Impact of new institutions on the nature of corporate reporting (IIRC, WRI, UNEP)

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 27NoNo

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Franco Vivaldi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Ethics and BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS212Semester 15YesNo

Ethics and Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Ethics and Business introduces students to different understandings of ethics and its relation to business in society. Deontological and descriptive approaches to ethics are introduced and applied to analyses of a selection of case studies. These are organised around three main developments that affect contemporary business: changes in the labour market, the knowledge economy, and the environment. Amongst the issues covered are: value; rationality; self-interest; self-love and self-realisation; the gist economy; utilitarianism and hedonism; growth, wealth and sustainability.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

AdvertisingBusiness and ManagementBUS213Semester 25YesNo

Advertising

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul Hackley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores advertising as an evolving category of social communication within a convergent media landscape. A strategic managerial perspective is taken to generate insight into the development of advertising and the roles and processes so entailed. The consumer perspective is also considered in the light of advertising's role as a vehicle for cultural meaning. Media consumption issues are also important to consider given the rapid growth in expenditure on digital (especially mobile) advertising communication. The module takes a multi-disciplinary approach drawing on socio-cultural, psychological and anthropological perspectives.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Accounting for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS216Semester 25YesNo

Advanced Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module builds on the foundation provided by BUS106 Accounting for Business in Year 1. In the area of Financial Accounting, the proposed module focuses on Financial Reporting by companies, and impact of company law and accounting standards. In Management Accounting the module looks at different approaches to costing, and the concept of identifying relevant costs for management decision-making; the appraisal of investment opportunities (capital budgeting) and accounting as a control mechanism.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Persuasive Strategies in MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS220Semester 15YesNo

Persuasive Strategies in Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUS101
Corequisite: None

Description: This module investigates the techniques adopted by professionals in marketing, sales, as well as general business negotiation environments in order to change stakeholder behaviour and attitudes, influence outcomes, and gain compliance. Students will explore, compare and integrate a variety of theories of persuasion grounded in research from the fields of linguistics, psychology, sociology, and rhetoric. Case studies and examples are used heavily throughout the module in order to highlight common practice and explore ethical dilemmas in the practice of persuasion across different business, national and ethnic cultures. Students are encouraged to recognise the techniques that they themselves use to gain compliance in common conversation as well as to analyse the ways in which commercial and public organisations attempt to influence their behaviour and attitudes. In addition to analytical proficiency, students are expected to demonstrate the creative and efficient use of various techniques of persuasion in negotiation and marketing simulations. The module considers the extent to which persuasion is a part of all communication interactions, the relationship between dialogue and influence, and the possible alternatives that exist to the persuasive paradigm in business.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Laboratory MethodsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6015Semester 16NoNo

Laboratory Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xuenong Bo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Finding, reading and evaluating research literature, experimental design and statistics, ethics of experimentation, how to give oral presentations, essay & dissertation writing, record keeping, molecular biology methods, in situ hybridization, western blot, use of microscopes, flow cytometry, histochemistry and tract tracing, electrophysiological methods, proteomics, cell culture, gene therapy.

Assessment: 55.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical, 15.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Neuroscience Research ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6016Semester 26NoNo

Neuroscience Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a practical-based module wherein students conduct original research supervised by an academic member of staff for a period of approximately 10-12 weeks. Students are required to explore the background of the research and its rationale, construct hypotheses to be tested, learn necessary skills with which to conduct the work, compile results and analyse them. They will write a dissertation of approximately 8-10,000 words including critical analysis of literature, reporting of experimental design
and results as well as their evaluation.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Cancer BiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6020Semester 26NoNo

Cancer Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to students on the intercalated BSc in Experimental Pathology programme. This module will define neoplasia, describe the macro and microscopic appearance of range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. Specifically, the causes of the transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The module will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Experimental NeuropathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6021Semester 16NoNo

Experimental Neuropathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases covering techniqiues such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects cover trauma, Alzheimers Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tautopathies.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

Inflammation and Special Topics in PathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6022Semester 26NoNo

Inflammation and Special Topics in Pathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Inflammation is central to many disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases are a major source of disability. The module will examine the scope of inflammatory disorders, the causes of inflammation, how to treat it and how it should be assessed, both experimentally and clinically. The principal aim is to understand the mechanisms and treatments of common chronic inflammatory disorders. The module will also cover a variety of additional topics in pathology. Material covered in many of the lectures will reflect the research interests of the speakers, and will include such diverse subjects as gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary tumours, and ageing and oncogenes.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

Startups and IncubatorsBusiness and ManagementBUS342Semester 26NoYes

Startups and Incubators

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.
  • Students will be able to justify approaches they have taken when participating in module based enterprise projects and/or situations.Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

Description: The module provides an integrated introduction to the processes and management of emerging businesses at their final stages of entrepreneurial activity. This module follows a practise-based-experiential approach as students not only work in group but also produce several advanced aspects of both the Business Model and the business plan for their organisation derived from their innovative and entrepreneurial idea. However, the taught component introduces the theories of start-up and incubator and links them to practice by creating a framework in which innovative ideas are processed to evolve from business concepts to market readiness. The framework recognises the importance of time spending to access the right information as well as an efficient process that guides the students, with an objective of having the possibility to have a business ready to launch within a reasonable period of time, after completion of the module. The taught component also outlines the role played by the emergence of incubators, the impacts they have on innovation and their practical implications.

Method of Assessment of the Proposed Module:
1- Team presentation to a panel composed by the module organiser and an incubator consultant or a coach (30%),
3- Exam (70%)


By taking this module, students will learn the key aspects of startup and incubator. This module will increase students' awareness of the latest research trends in this field of startup and incubator and in the discipline of business innovation. It will also provide the possibility to analyze critically the different forms and approaches to startup and incubators strategies.
In addition, this module will offer the opportunity to create both an advanced Canvas Business Model applied to students own business innovative idea AND a Business Plan. These two tools are essential not only for the acquisition of skills and knowledge but also for the preparation of the potential launch of students business in a near future.
By its nature this module requires students to explore additional approaches from different disciplines of business and management such as communication, marketing, law and legal and finance, which contribute to the module learning outcomes.
This module will helps students to develop further not only their employability skills but also the attributes expected of graduates of Queen Mary and in relation to UN's PRME.
Finally, the assessments are designed to help students to identify and apply these new skills gained during the study of this module.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Digital MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS345Semester 26NoYes

Digital Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitrios Dousios
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module has been designed to provide students with an introduction to the theoretical and practical fundamentals of contemporary digital marketing. The module takes a (broadly) relationship marketing (RM) approach and focuses upon the ways in which digital, interactive media can be used to build, maintain, and evolve dialogue between stakeholders in the marketing system. Students will explore the marketing potential of email, web commerce, mobile communications, social networking sites, search engine optimization, forums, blogs, and viral messaging through critical engagement with the marketing thinking behind them and the practical details of their implementation.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Functional Genomics and EpigeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO327Semester 26YesNo

Functional Genomics and Epigenetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Hurd
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO241 (SBS641), BIO223 (SBS642)
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to provide students with an introduction into the variety of ways that genetics and genomics have been applied in biotechnology and functional genomics. The module covers a variety of topics including biotechnology, protein expression, microarrays, proteomics, systems biology, genome projects (assembly. annotation and comparison) and the identification and functional characterisation of non-coding sequences in vertebrate genomes

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Mammals and EvolutionBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO331Semester 26YesNo

Mammals and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chris Faulkes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO113
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: The Diversity of Life (SBS005). This module covers the following: the fossil record, origin and evolution of mammal-like reptiles. Evolution of monotremes, marsupial adpative radiation. Evolution and classification of eutherian mammals, cladistics, molecular approaches to phylogeny reconstruction. Adaptation in the main orders of eutherian mammals. Evolution of hominids. Evolution of reproductive strategies and social evolution: the origins of societies; kinds of societies; evolution of cooperation; mammal vs complex insect societies; skew theory as a unified approach to social evolution; genetic, phylogenetic and environmental factors and social evolution. Recent controversies in mammalian evolution.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Neuroscience: from Molecules to BehaviourBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO333Semester 26NoNo

Neuroscience: from Molecules to Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Preece
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO215 (SBC222), BMD225 (SBC402)
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: EITHER SBC502 Fundamentals of Neurobiology OR SBC402 Biomedical Pharmacology. This module provides a detailed survey of the molecular components that mediate neurotransmission in the nervous system and confer plasticity on neurons and nervous systems (e.g. ligand-gated ion channels, NMDA receptors, G-protein coupled receptors, second messengers, gaseous signalling molecules such as nitric oxide). This leads on to the role of such components in various aspects of nervous system function and in control of whole-animal behaviour. Topics covered include: mechanisms of learning and memory; mechanisms by which drugs of abuse (e.g. cannabis) affect brain function; mechanisms of phototransduction, olfaction, touch and hearing in animals; genetic and neural substrates of circadian clocks that regulate rhythmic behaviours.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Parasites and Infectious DiseasesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO335Semester 26YesNo

Parasites and Infectious Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: (BIO161 or BIO111 or BIO163) and (BIO113 or BIO123)
Corequisite: None

Description: Module cannot be taken with SBC325 (Topics in Public Health Microbiology) This module covers the following topics: Parasite diversity. Microparasites vs macroparasites. The evolution of complex life cycles. The evolution of virulence and the importance of transmission route. Host-parasite co-evolution. Distributions of parasites within host populations. Effects of parasites on host individuals and populations. Host-parasite population dynamics. Parasite effects on host evolution: the evolution of sexual reproduction, parasite mediated sexual selection. Parasite manipulation of host behaviour. Parasite control: using population biology to design treatment and vaccination strategies.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Reproductive and Development BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO337Semester 26YesNo

Reproductive and Development Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anthony Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD211 (SBS009), BIO241 (SBS641)
Corequisite: None

Description: This module reviews all aspects of reproductive and developmental biology (from molecular and cellular mechanisms to physiology, ecology and evolution). Topics to be addressed will include molecular gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, placentation, pregnancy, parturition, lactation, reproductive and parental strategies, reproductive suppression, courtship and sexual selection, and the evolution of reproductive-isolating mechanisms. The module will take a comparative approach to compare and contrast reproductive and developmental mechanisms across a range of vertebrate and invertebrate species.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 12: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Primary Care Capacity Building: Leadership and LearningSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7182Semester 27NoNo

Primary Care Capacity Building: Leadership and Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: High quality primary health care is the cornerstone of a universal, equitable and efficient health system. Many countries are seeking to shift from a hospital-led health care system to one characterised by a greater degree of healthcare delivery in community settings, based on systems of primary care delivered by multidisciplinary teams. Building and sustaining capacity to deliver appropriate primary care for different populations requires a range of critical skills, knowledge and practical attributes.
This vision for developing primary care is widely held but depends critically on capacity building to produce research leaders, educators, and policy-makers. Healthcare planners and leaders need to respond to local epidemiological, political, economic, demographic, workforce and socio-cultural phenomena. Developing capacity for the 21st century demands transformative skills in leadership and learning to achieve maximum potential health gain in the face of shifting burdens of disease, workforce and population mobility, environmental changes, availability of evidence and information technologies.
This module is aimed at students likely to be involved in primary care development as healthcare professionals and policy makers. Whether from high income , low income or situations of stress, graduates will be equipped with knowledge and capabilities in leadership , quality improvement and education to scale up and enhance flexible primary care teams and workforce .

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Oral Biology for Biomedical SciencesBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD357Semester 16NoNo

Oral Biology for Biomedical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahmad Waseem
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115, BMD181, BMD219
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a taught module and will be delivered through lectures and self-directed learning. The module will provide an in-depth knowledge of cell biology of oral tissues in health and diseases. Areas to be covered will include cell adhesion, apoptosis, cell cycle, angiogenesis, tissue engineering, oral implications of HIV and AIDS etc. Most of the content of these lectures given by staff members will be drawn from their current research interests.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Drug Design for PharmacologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD359Semester 26NoNo

Drug Design for Pharmacologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Roger Corder
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The search for new drugs to treat a wide range of human ailments remain a great challenge to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Students will be given a perspective on the history of drug discovery to the present challenges in drug design. The medicinal chemistry content will provide students with an understanding of the complex biological and chemical problems that are involved in the design and synthesis of novel therapeutic agents. They will be given an in-depth analysis of the principles of identifying new compounds with the potential to be drugs, and their development for therapeutic use. Students will also be given an understanding of preclinical testing of drugs including the use of animal models for safety testing, intra and inter-species variations, detecting carcinogenicity in experimental systems and man, strategies of new initiatives in pharmaceutical development and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm

Repair and Regeneration in the Nervous SystemBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD361Semester 16NoNo

Repair and Regeneration in the Nervous System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD261, BMD265
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on response of the nervous system to injury focusing on the peripheral nervous system and spinal cord. Detailed organisation of the peripheral nervous system, spinal cord including pathways and relevant higher brain structures will be covered. Pathological mechanisms and plasticity of the system will be examined. Topics will be covered in the context of experimental studies to develop understanding of current research strategies in the laboratory and clinic aiming to lessen effects of such injuries and facilitate neural regeneration and functional recovery.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Stem Cells and Regenerative MedicineBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD363Semester 16NoNo

Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristin Braun
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115 or BIO111
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide a comprehensive overview and foundation in stem cell biology, including applications in regenerative medicine. The module will cover topics including: developmental origin of stem cells, comparing/contrasting different types of stem cells, biological regulation of stem cells and tissue-specific functions. The module also will cover fundamental principles of tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming. Finally, the module will explore how these concepts can be applied in academic, industrial and clinical settings, towards the development of novel regenerative technologies and treatment of disease. Essential generic skills that will be developed on this module include critical thinking, organisation and communication.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 10.0% Practical, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 10, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Biomarkers in NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD365Semester 26NoNo

Biomarkers in Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of biomarkers in both neurological and psychiatric disorders. The application of biomarkers for diagnosis, patient stratification, monitoring disease progression and establishing drug effects and safety will be discussed. Students will gain an appreciation of current genomic, proteomic and neuroimaging approaches to undertake biomarker discovery and validation. Neurological conditions such as Parkinson's, Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases and neurotrauma will be discussed as well as emerging biomarkers for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and depression.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Organisational Learning in the WorkplaceBusiness and ManagementBUS221Semester 25YesNo

Organisational Learning in the Workplace

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Fox
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what organisational learning and knowledge management is, the variety and types of organizational learning strategies adopted by firms and the markets they serve. We will examine a range of approaches for understanding organisational as both a 'natural' and designed activity within organisations. We will examine research studies of the implementation of such approaches and case studies which indicate how consultants and organisational learning professional present their knowledge and expertise and the claims they make for its efficacy. We will examine and explore different kinds of organizational context where organisational learning has been identified or designed: firms, public institutions, voluntary organisations and other organisational forms.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS222Semester 25YesNo

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Lioliou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore various theoretical to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the ""traditional"" competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, cognitive approaches and strategy-as-practice. Throughout the course we will examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations as well as firms.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Technologies in the WorkplaceBusiness and ManagementBUS223Semester 15NoNo

Technologies in the Workplace

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Manuela Perrotta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what technologies in the workplace are, the variety and types of technologies and the uses that they have. We will examine a range of approaches to organising and managing technology as a solution or part of a solution to certain management and organisational problems. We will examine studies of some technologies in use and the ways in which they configure and interact with users.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am

International Corporate ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUS224Semester 15NoNo

International Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of international accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organizations such as the EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB. Also how corporate reporting has evolved from nationally specific practices to a more convergence towards IASB standards and why and how this has been sponsored.
Students would understand and appreciate how financial statements have evolved to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income . The evolution of international accounting standards --financial instruments and fair value reporting and debates on the accounting conceptual framework. How changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for international integrated corporate reporting (including Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting)

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Corporate Finance and StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUS225Semester 25NoNo

Corporate Finance and Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will develop a student's understanding of the nature of corporate finance in terms of the sources of finance and nature of internal calculations that are employed to allocate financial resources into strategic investment projects. Students will appreciate how the techniques of financing and allocation of financial resources have evolved. This understanding will be blended with an appreciation of the strategic management literature on how financial resources are deployed strategically to both create and capture value.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Cardiovascular PathophysiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6023Semester 16NoNo

Cardiovascular Pathophysiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Greenwald
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world and is fast becoming a comparable problem in the developing countries. The module describes some of the mechanical factors that underlie the pathogenesis and progression of vascular disease. This requires a brief outline of fluid dynamical and elasticity theory sufficient to understand the properties of extensible and non-linearly elastic materials such as arteries, and the behaviour of blood flowing in them. This approach is not commonly followed in the preclinical medical course, but it provides an essential adjunct to the biochemical and metabolic description of cardiovascular disease that students will encounter in their clinical studies.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Experimental Pathology ProjectSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6024Full year6NoNo

Experimental Pathology Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The project will normally be a piece of original research which is expected to occupy at least half of the time throughout the course. It will normally involve experimental work or measurements on patients undergoing clinical investigation, and is presented as a written report of not more than 8000 words submitted at the end of the project. The report is assessed by internal examiners and forms the basis of student vivas by our external examiners. The main body of the report is often divided intosections like a journal paper: introduction, materials, results, discussion, references and appendices.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Social Network AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUS346Semester 26YesYes

Social Network Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: The module focuses on the field of complex networked systems in its infancy and presents the structure of networks and their dynamics as a key concept across disciplines. Examples of networked systems include the Internet, the World Wide Web, social networks of acquaintance or other connections between individuals, inter-organisational networks, neural networks, metabolic networks, food webs, and many others. There is increasing evidence that such diverse networks share common topological and dynamical features, indicating the existence of robust self-organising principles and evolutionary laws that govern many natural and social systems. The course aims to develop a unified theoretical framework for the analysis of these common properties shared by a wide range of networked systems. This framework will then be used for the discussion of sociologically relevant phenomena that exhibit complex network structures and dynamics, such as epidemics of disease, cultural fads, financial crises, organisational innovation and inter-firm coordination. If public health authorities want to minimise the danger of a viral epidemic, but have limited vaccinations, how should they be distributed throughout the population? If a firm wants to initiate a word-of-mouth campaign for a new product, but can hand out free samples to only a few people, who should they pick? How vulnerable are large infrastructure networks like the power grid or the Internet to random failure or even deliberate attacks? How do new ideas become crazes, or small shocks get blown out of all proportion in the form of cascades throughout a financial system? To address these and many other problems, the course will develop a highly interdisciplinary approach to social science by combining current research literature on complex systems and social networks with contributions of relevant organisational and sociological research.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Marketing Group Project Involving an External OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUS347Semester 16NoYes

Marketing Group Project Involving an External Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: This module provides a realistic experience of the work environment for marketing staff in various sectors and offers students the opportunity to gain hands-on industry-like experience by working on a project for an external client/company. It is open to students who are not registered for the Dissertation module. 2-3 clients will be identified by the module leader for each academic year and groups of 4-5 students will be formed by the module leader and assigned to one of the external companies/clients. A semi-structured learning approach is employed for this module, which incorporates: 1) group-based primary and secondary research for an external company/client in the form of a marketing project, 2) lectures from the module leader and group discussions in seminar style settings and computer labs, and 3) arranged company visits in London to learn about potential companies students could work for in the future and future job opportunities after graduation. Up to 25 students will be able to register for this module via a competitive application process assessing aptitude for this module. The student number cap is required given the learning approach required for this module and the number of clients available.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

NetworkingSBM_6_A
Climate Change and Conservation ChallengesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO343Semester 26NoNo

Climate Change and Conservation Challenges

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ozge Eyice-Broadbent
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will consist of lectures, group discussions, lab and computer-based practical sessions. These will cover aspects of climate change, ecosystem services and sustainability, impact of global warming on the ecosystems at different levels and the role of human activities. The students will also learn about the global conservation challenges such as deforestation and habitat fragmentation and modelling simulations in adaptation to climate change. Work will be both theoretical and practical, with emphasis on current research questions in global ecosystem conservation and methodologies in the primary literature.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 15.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Membrane ProteinsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO361Semester 16NoNo

Membrane Proteins

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Ruban
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO263 (SBC228)
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Membrane Biochemistry (SBS908). This module covers a wide range of topics, including: A detailed study of structure and function of a selection of membrane proteins. Examples will illustrate different mechanisms by which proteins achieve vectorial electron transfer, ion transport and the generation of electrochemical gradients, the coupling of electrochemical gradients to ATP synthesis and transmembrane signalling. Electron transfer through proteins (e.g. cytochrome c). Structure and function of redox centres and the proteins that contain them. Membrane proteins studied will include respiratory chain complexes, light-harvesting pigment-proteins, photosynthetic reaction centres, bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin, ATP synthase, tyrosine kinase reception.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 10: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Molecular Basis of DiseaseBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO363Semester 16YesNo

Molecular Basis of Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Module cannot be taken with SBC324 (Human and Medical Genetics). Prerequisites: Biochemistry background required. An introduction to a number of human diseases, with an emphasis on how these diseases are characterised at the molecular level. The module will include a study of the processes associated with the following amyloid formation in Mad Cow and Alzheimer's diseases, Bactorial Invasion, Flu, TB, Heart Disease, flavin deficiency and the role of metals in disease.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Enzyme CatalysisBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO365Semester 26YesNo

Enzyme Catalysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO265 (SBS905)
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Metabolic Pathways (SBS905). This module covers various aspects of enzyme catalysis including: enzymes as proteins; enzymes as catalysts; enzyme classification; and the role of molecular mobility in enzyme catalysis. You will also investigate the active site concept and the catalytic and substrate binding properties of amino acid residue sidechains. Binding energy, driving forces and free energy relationships; the use of kinetic analysis in the study of enzyme mechanism and inhibition; and recent theories on catalysis are also discussed. Several enzyme mechanisms will be described in detail to illustrate the applications of biophysical techniques (eg spectroscopy, crystallography) and site directed mutagenesis in the study of such mechanisms. you will be taught a number of important computer-based applications towards the study of enzymes, including the use of bioinformatics and molecular graphics programmes.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Protein Structure, Folding and AssembliesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO367Semester 26YesNo

Protein Structure, Folding and Assemblies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vidya Darbari
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD269 (SBC920)
Corequisite: None

Description: In the first part this module will cover the processes of protein biosynthesis, folding and degradation, and assembly of large macromolecular complexes, as well as structure and function of the macromolecular complexes that are involved in these processes. These complexes include the nucleosome, the ribosome, chaperonins and the proteasome. The module will also cover the relationships between misfolding, formation of amyloid fibres and human disease. In the second part our present knowledge about structure and function of the following macromolecular assemblies will be presented: collagen, muscle proteins, and fatty acid synthase, as well as the different types of viruses.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Species: Dinosaurs to DNABiological and Chemical SciencesBIO397Semester 16NoNo

Species: Dinosaurs to DNA

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Understanding the nature of the species and how they are defined is a crucial part of modern biology, especially in the context of biodiversity and conservation. This module will cover all aspects of the correct identification and naming of species and higher groups of organisms (taxonomy) and how these data are used in modern biological research. The work will be both theoretical and practical, with formal lectures and a fieldtrip. and will address both extinct and extant taxa. The content will cover challenges in describing biodiversity and advances in the field.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Governance of Migration, Displacement and HealthcareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7183Semester 27NoNo

Governance of Migration, Displacement and Healthcare

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module investigates how migration, displacement and healthcare is managed by national governments, inter-governmental organisations, humanitarian agencies and private actors. It examines how political, legal and economic processes interplay to shape governments¿ attempts to manage migrants¿ healthcare, including national, regional and international frameworks for human rights, labour rights and `migration health¿ policy. Focusing on migrants as both non-citizens and citizens, it contemplates the differential healthcare experiences of labour migrants and forced migrants when they migrate internally and across borders or continents.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Perspectives on Brain DisordersBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD369Semester 26NoNo

Perspectives on Brain Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will focus on understanding the mechanisms underlying complex brain disorders and injury. Topic covered will include an integrated view of the major neurotransmitter systems and in-depth analysis of the mechanisms underlying the effects of drugs used in central nervous system. Neuronal pathways using excitatory and inhibitory amino acids and neuropeptides will be reviewed, with emphasis on their involvement in neuropathological processes underlying disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, schizophrenia, mood disorders, pain, head injury, stroke, epilepsy and drug abuse.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 9: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Drug Discovery and DesignBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD371Semester 26NoNo

Drug Discovery and Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gareth Sanger
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Students will be given an introduction to the principles of drugs design. This will include an analysis of the principles of identification of new compounds with the potential to be drugs, and their development for therapeutic use, and quantification of drug efficacy. Students will develop the ability to critique the importance of drug-receptor affinity and selectivity. The economic, social and ethical aspects of drug discovery will be analysed and discussed. Lectures in specialised areas will be given by experts in their field, providing a sense of the frontiers of their subject. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide seminars and tutorials with opportunities to critically examine research papers.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm

Clinical PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD372Semester 16NoNo

Clinical Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Vikas Kapil
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce to the students the mechanisms of action and clinical use of commonly used drugs in the context of the progression of diseases they are used to treat. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically evaluate research methods and papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 9, 11: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Receptors and Mechanisms of Cell SignallingBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD373Semester 16NoNo

Receptors and Mechanisms of Cell Signalling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will consider the general properties of receptors, signal transduction pathway, and the regulation of their activity. Emphasis will be given to G-protein coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases and nuclear receptors. Introductory lectures will be followed by interactive sessions in specialised areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers and reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 8: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Translational Pharmacology and Innovative TherapeuticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD375Semester 16NoNo

Translational Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michele Bombardieri
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Students will be exposed to innovative therapeutics in areas including vaccines, oncology, cardiovascular, metabolic diseases, pain and neuroscience, inflammation and immunology as well as rare disorders. Students will also gain awareness into challenges that the pharmaceutical industries face. Lectures will cover topics such as drug shortages, targeted/personalised drugs, use of biomarkers, clinical trial design, drug safety, risk/benefit assessments, collaboration between patient, academia, industry and the regulatory community, international collaborations, policy and bioethics, novel tools for scientific/clinical communication, sustainability of innovation/financial models of product development/pricing, marketing and licencing. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in both academia and industry. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 8, 10: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 10: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Strategic MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS226Semester 15NoNo

Strategic Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Leischnig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module extends conceptually and operationally the core concepts of segmentation, targeting and positioning introduced in BUS101. Specifically, students will learn develop 'go to market' strategies, including the practice of, and critical evaluation of, the concepts and techniques that frame the process of marketing strategy development. An important part of this is applying and critically reflecting on the methods of analysing data to make marketing strategy decisions.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

International MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS227Semester 25NoNo

International Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jieke Chen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: International marketing requires leaving behind the assumptions of the domestic market. Firms frequently struggle to adapt to the social and economic practices that shape markets outside their sphere of experience. Firms' internationalisation also can influence the nature of those practices (for better and for worse). This module examines they nature of the problems and theory that guides developing solutions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Quantitative Research Methods and Data AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUS229Semester 25NoNo

Quantitative Research Methods and Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eun-Seok Kim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will provide an overview of quantitative methods in business and management research. Following a revision of descriptive statistics and inference, the focus will be on fitting models, synthesising and communicating the results. The module will then discuss different types and sources of quantitative data before advancing on more contemporary issues of data applications and analytics (e. g. government data, clickstreams, web and social media analytics). Emphasis will be placed on the use of statistical software with practical examples and interpretation of results.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Entrepreneurial LearningBusiness and ManagementBUS230Semester 15NoYes

Entrepreneurial Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Fox
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.

Description: The module provides an integrated introduction to the processes and management of emerging businesses with a specific concentration upon entrepreneurial learning in the earlier stages of entrepreneurial activity. The taught component will introduce key perspectives on the recognition and nature of entrepreneurial opportunities, evaluation of resources and relations, and roles of entrepreneurial creativity and legitimation processes. The experiential learning component enables students to explore and evaluate different approaches to entrepreneurial learning and develop entrepreneurial skills through working in small-groups to collectively create, develop and legitimate their own entrepreneurial opportunities.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

NetworkingSBM_456_A
Creative IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUS233Semester 25YesNo

Creative Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to engage students through a practically oriented overview of creative industries technical and media infrastructures and their histories, organisational behaviour of creative industry firms, legal and policy framework for developing creative industries, as well as the emerging frameworks in which culture and creativity is seen as a central site for creating new value. Throughout we will pay close attention to how marketing, management, and supply chain processes in the creative industries create value through cultural production. This introductory overview of creative industries takes a critical look at the tactics and strategies that define the history of capitalist cultural production. Interactive and socially engaged, this module requires good preparation and active involvement with the module content and case studies to achieve the learning goals.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Experimental HaematologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6025Semester 26NoNo

Experimental Haematology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Allen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This will be a taught module delivered through lectures. Subject matter will include normal haemopoiesis, the achievement of haemostasis and the diseases associated with de-regulated haemostasis. The student will go on to acquire an associated knowledge of haemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders. Key elements of red cell abnormalities including the thalassaemias, sickle cell disease and certain anaemias e.g. Diamond Blackfan, are covered in-depth. The science and clinical aspects of blood transfusion will be covered. The module will encompass inherited bone marrow failures illustrated by lectures on monogenic disorders associated with aplastic anaemia such as Fanconi anaemia and dyskeratosis congenita. Progress in the clinical resolution of these diseases is covered by clinical members of faculty. The latest in genetics, the hereditary aspects of some of these diseases, and the molecular diagnosis of haemtological disorders is taught by our scientific community.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6040Semester 16NoNo

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sally Kerry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Creative Brand MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS348Semester 16NoYes

Creative Brand Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Olga Sidoruk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: "Creating a true brand is one of the most powerful things any company can do to enhance its market power" (Elliott and Percy, 2007, preface). Successful brands contribute to financial value, sustain future sales, maintain high price points and margins, create a barrier to new competitors and can reduce risks for product and line extensions. When a product-commodity becomes a brand, its use value is imbued with symbolic value that consumers deploy in constructing and maintaining their identities. Hence, successful branding is a complex task as it involves a semiotic act of naming a product, and denoting authenticity, reassurance, differentiation, the development of its cultural meaning and the transformation of experience. The module draws on sociology, psychology, cultural studies, anthropology and social theory to understand current issues in brand management rather than merely relying on the cognitive, information-processing approach to branding. With a dynamic, global, diverse and fragmented media landscape and the ever-increasing significance of social media, this broad theoretical base is important to help the brand management subject move forward also to provide branding strategies that are rich in managerial applications.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Gender at WorkBusiness and ManagementBUS349Semester 26YesYes

Gender at Work

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Tessa Wright
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module examines how gender impacts on management and work, resulting in men's and women's differential participation across occupations and in senior positions in the private and public sectors. We will critically analyse modern workplaces and the assumptions we carry into work from an intersectional and feminist perspective. The module will discuss theory as well as empirical evidence seeking to explain and understand the persistence of inequalities in the workplace, and effective strategies for change.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
New Product DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUS350Semester 26NoNo

New Product Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module addresses the relationship between product/process innovation, supply chain configurations and the emergence of organizational and technical architectures within technological and organizational platforms. Drawing on current theories concerning platforms, open innovation and organizational ecologies, the module will provide students with frameworks for a systematic analysis of the innovation activity in large firms as well as in entrepreneurial and start-up organizations. In this light, students will engage with the analysis of current case studies concerning traditional industries, as well high-tech organizations engaging with the development of digital ecosystems, smart devices, smart cities/organizations and the internet of things.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Tissue-specific Stem CellsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7144Semester 27NoNo

Tissue-specific Stem Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristin Braun
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide in depth knowledge of the role of tissue-specific stem cells during tissue homeostasis and wound-healing, as well as current and future applications in regenerative medicine. The course will cover tissue-specific stem cells present in tissues derived from each of the three primary germ cell layers:
Ectoderm (e.g. neural; melanocyte; epidermis; eye lens)
Endoderm (e.g. respiratory; intestine; liver; bladder; pancreas)
Mesoderm (e.g. kidney; mesenchymal; bone; muscle; hematopoietic; heart)

In addition, this module will examine cutting-edge experimental techniques (e.g. lineage tracing; cellular barcoding; xenotransplantation; sphere formation assays) that are used to evaluate adult stem cells.

Students will develop skills including critical analysis of scientific literature, interpretation of experimental design, evaluation of statistical analysis, and design of presentations. Essential generic skills include critical thinking, organisation, writing, and oral communication.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 30.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Thursday 10 am - 2 pm

Advanced Biochemical Research MethodsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO491Full year7NoNo

Advanced Biochemical Research Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide an advanced training in techniques in biochemistry. In addition to lectures from members of staff and seminars from external speakers, there will be computer and practical workshops to teach methods in molecular biology, structural biology, biophysics and synthetic biology.

Assessments:
(1) Laboratory report (25%)
(2) Creation of article on Biochemwiki.sbcs (35%)
(3) Structural biology techniques essay (25%)
(4) Report from research seminars with invited speakers (15%)

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 7: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 9 am - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Biological Sciences Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO600Full year6NoYes

Biological Sciences Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Axel Rossberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work and/or computational work in some aspect of Biological Sciences. The background, results and conclusions of the study to be reported in the form of an oral presentation (part-way through Sem B) and a dissertation (submitted toward the end of Sem B). The dissertation will not normally exceed 10,000 words, which includes a review of relevant literature, data presentation, analysis and discussion.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Investigative Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO601Semester 16NoNo

Investigative Research Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: 30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 50.0% Dissertation, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Project Skills in the Life SciencesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO603Full year6NoYes

Project Skills in the Life Sciences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: 30-unit project modules require prior SBCS approval. In this module students will: create a short, investigative project based on individual reading lists; give a presentation based on the above using Powerpoint; develop scientific writing and critical appraisal skills (referee a real but anonymous paper, write a referees report, redraft the paper); attend research seminars, research background to any two of them (by consulting web-site of speaker), and produce two reports discussing the research in non-technical language and explaining its likely significance for the layman. You will also have to either produce a website on a topical biological subject (eg environmental, health or ethical scientific issue), or produce a small portfolio of scientific images, either macroscopic or microscopic.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 9, 10: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 9, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm

NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Bioinformatics Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO702PFull year7NoNo

Bioinformatics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc Bioinformatics modules, by conducting a novel piece of bioinformatics work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at a partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Planetary Health and International Health PolicySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7184Semester 27NoNo

Planetary Health and International Health Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Doreen Montag
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce the student to historically grown concepts of ecological global health. It gives an overview of scientific background on planetary boundaries in relation to health and sustainable development, allowing people to comprehend and apply the analysis to case studies. The module will begin with a human rights approach to health and environmental justice as a tool for critical analysis of the complex interrelationship of historically grown political, economic, cultural and social factors that have impacted the planetary system, putting health of people at risk. It will engage with public policy, international relations, health centred global environmental governance and medical anthropological approaches to health and environment to provide students with the necessary tools to engage in current local, national, regional and global affairs.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Classic Papers and Current Topics in PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD377Semester 16NoNo

Classic Papers and Current Topics in Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carol Shoulders
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module Students will carry out an exhaustive search of the scientific and medical literature which is relevant to their research project using the resources of the University, including appropriate databases and specialist search engines, as well as paper-based resources in the University Library. This module will provide PBL-like tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. Some students may further develop this work to include a meta analysis of multiple papers.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 10, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 9: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Clinical Trials and Regulatory AffairsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD378Semester 26NoNo

Clinical Trials and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Livia Carvalho
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to the whole spectrum of the clinical trials process from first-time-in-human-beings studies through to post-marketing studies that examine whether clinical trial promises translate to 'real-life' benefits for patients, with reliable evidence that benefits are likely to exceed their harms. The stringent processes for establishing and appraising the evidence with be critically discussed, together exploring the issues of the global market-place for medicines, the roles and challenges of regulators responsible for approving new drugs for public.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Cancer BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD381Semester 26NoNo

Cancer Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Martin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the Biomedical Sciences (B990), Medical Genetics (C431), Pharmacology & Innovative Therapeutics (B211), and with Forensic programmes. This module will define neoplasia, describe the macro and microscopic appearance of range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. Specifically, the causes of the transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The module will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 4, 6, 8: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 5: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Friday 9 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Molecular Basis of Personalised MedicineBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD383Semester 26NoNo

Molecular Basis of Personalised Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angus Cameron
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD181
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will build on basic information on the pathological processes and cancer biology provided in other modules to provide an in-depth analysis of the tools available to analyse heterogeneity in disease (gene expression arrays, SNP analysis, next generation sequencing), and how these can be used to stratify disease and then exploited to develop individualised treatment. It will examine strategies being developed to refine treatment programmes and also investigate how such analyses can be used to predict risk and so develop preventive strategies. It will be lecture based, delivered by experts in the field, and supplemented with seminar sessions describing approaches to analysing data and interrogating the literature.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Biomedical Sciences Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD600Full year6NoYes

Biomedical Sciences Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Axel Rossberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: 30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Corporations and Social ResponsibilityBusiness and ManagementBUS237Semester 25NoNo

Corporations and Social Responsibility

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Corporations and Social Responsibility will deliver a comprehensive introduction to students interested in issues of social justice and specifically in Corporate Social Responsibility or CSR. CSR is an applied field of management theory that is becoming increasingly important for both academics and managers to consider. It is an area of corporate self-regulation that integrates sustainability into the business model. Whereas in the past, there has been a clear distinction between the roles of government, the third sector and the corporate sector in responding to social issues (such as workers rights and the environment), today corporations exist in a business context where these sectors have not only merged, but also, actively impinge on each others responsibilities to society. CSR is a business policy response to this changing relation between the corporate sector and society and includes activities such as 'greening' management (reducing emissions, waste management, protecting biodiversity), workers rights (trade unions, ILO, outsourcing, supply-chains), sustainable consumption (ethical marketing, corporate lobbying, consumerism), and promoting democratic processes (governance, accountability, stakeholder dialogue).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am

International Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS238Semester 25NoNo

International Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUS134 or BUS106
Corequisite: None

Description: This module extends the financial accounting component of BUS134 Introduction to Financial and Management Accounting (or BUS106 Accounting for Business) in Year 1 (Level 4) to introduce the preparation and analysis of corporate financial statements. The content includes the function and content of the main published statements under UK company law and International Financial Reporting Standards, the analysis of these statements to assess company performance, and discussion of a number of key reporting issues and the relevant Standards.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Management Accounting for Decision MakingBusiness and ManagementBUS239Semester 15NoNo

Management Accounting for Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura
Overlap: BUS216
Prerequisite: BUS134 or BUS106
Corequisite: None

Description: The module explores key aspects of Management Accounting in the context of its key pillars planning, control, internal decision making and governance.

Students will be able to understand the interaction of Management Accounting with organization/business and society.
Learners will appreciate the manner by which Management Accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context within an organisation.

Critically blending professionalism with intellectualism in Management Accounting practices to ensure broad-based Management Accounting education and the enhancement of learning required in any modern organisation.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Services MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS240Semester 15NoNo

Services Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nima Heirati
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Services marketing, which typically refers to both business to consumer (B2C) and business to business (B2B) services, and includes marketing of services such as telecommunications services, financial services, all types of hospitality services, car rental services, air travel, health care services and professional services. Services are (usually) intangible economic activities offered by one party to another. This module will begin with providing an overview of the concept of services and how people traditionally view services and why services are important. Services is closely interlinked with customer behaviour and this module will pay close attention to the difficulty of customers in accessing services. It will introduce the 4Ps and its extension the 7Ps, in order for students to gain a deep understanding of what is services marketing. Students will learn to develop, design and implement services; as well as how to price and value services, in order to create a service blueprint. Knowledge on managing services (demand and supply), assessing service quality and managing service recovery will follow. The module will then provide an overview of what is happening in present developments in services marketing, specifically SDL and its implications. Finally the module will introduce some specialised topics such as services in manufacturing companies and the importance of HR for services management. This is a module that combines theoretical value and practical knowledge and therefore will generate the students' interest in marketing as a field given its evident linkages to the real world of marketing and management.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6042Semester 16NoNo

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrienne Milner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypotheses about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider the distribution of wealth, income , resources, and power at global, national, and local levels. Redistributive mechanisms work through either government or market control, and the economic implications for inequalities will be compared and analysed. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Business Internship ProjectBusiness and ManagementBUS351Semester 26NoNo

Business Internship Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Mcgurk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This Module will capture and deepen student¿s learning from their summer or yearlong internships. Through a series of small group workshops and individual supervision meetings, students will draw on material, networks and experience from their internships to: i) examine a critical business issue in a theoretically informed way; ii) analyse changing patterns of graduate employment and skills requirements in a chosen sector or profession; and iii) reflect and plan their future personal and professional development. To be eligible, students will have to have completed a University-approved internship or placement of at least 210 hours prior to enrolling on their final year.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Global Business and DemocracyBusiness and ManagementBUS352Semester 26NoNo

Global Business and Democracy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Can "business success" be thought of as requiring a specific political form, such as liberal democracy?
It is often argued that `free markets¿ lead to `free societies¿ and so globalising business requires the opening up not only of markets but also of `closed¿ political systems, so that political pluralism, plurality of consumer choice and firm competition go arm-in-arm. What if any grounds were there or - perhaps more urgently ¿ are there for this belief?
The remarkable economic expansion of one-party China alongside rising protectionism elsewhere might look like proof that this connection ¿ if it ever existed ¿ has broken down. Is the current combination of economic expansion and political `closure¿ an abnormality that will soon run out of steam and necessarily result in democratic revolutions in the `East¿ and the dropping of trade barriers and the fall of populists in the `West¿? Might a reflection on authoritarianism and capitalism in earlier periods (1920s-30s Europe, the South Korean `developmental state¿, the Gulf monarchies, etc.) provide lessons to make sense of the fluctuating and volatile relations between business and democracy? What or who is sovereign today? States, eroded by cross-boarder capital flows? Consumers, who's every desire is mined and sold to advertisers? Increasingly alienated citizens? Where should we turn to grasp the complex forces mining the present?

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm

International Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS353Semester 26NoNo

International Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will help students learn how the fundamentals of corporate finance relate to multinational firms, covering a segment that is usually excluded in a basic module on financial management. Managing international risks (including country risks) will form an important component of this module. On completion of this module, students should have gained understanding of the following topics: an overview of international financial management; the international monetary & financial systems including the foreign exchange market; international parity relationships; the opportunities in international FX investments & currency risk diversification; the relevance of hedging in the management of currency risk, using forwards, options, futures, & swaps; the relation between multinationals and their overseas subsidiaries in FDI decisions.
Students should be able to gain knowledge of international business and financial markets along with understanding the theoretical approaches and empirical evidence on different aspects of global business finance. Students will acquire numerical and problem-solving skills required by managers, and assess risk (including country risk) using financial analysis and reasoning while gaining an understanding of the international financial problems and complex decisions in the context of an ever-changing global business environment. They will learn how to forecast exchange rates and prevent currency risk exposure in the international environment. They will also gain other key skills in gathering, evaluating and presenting relevant financial information from a variety of sources, while enhancing critical reading, oral and other communication skills.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Audit and AssuranceBusiness and ManagementBUS354Semester 16NoNo

Audit and Assurance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces to the subject of Audit and Assurance starts with the nature, purpose and scope of assurance engagements both internal and external, including the statutory audit, its regulatory environment, and introduces governance and professional ethics relating to audit and assurance. It then leads into planning the audit and performing risk assessment. The syllabus then covers a range of areas relating to an audit of financial statements including the scope of internal control. These include, evaluating internal controls, audit evidence, and a review of the financial statements. In addition to final review procedures, the final section concentrates on reporting, including the form and content of the independent auditor¿s report.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Contemporary Strategic AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUS359Semester 16NoNo

Contemporary Strategic Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The central focus of contemporary strategic analysis is the organisation as a whole rather than the perspective of a single function. Consequently, the course takes the perspective of those people responsible for the long-term health of the entity as a whole, not just part of it.
In this module, we will explore a number of models and frameworks used by management teams and apply these frameworks in a variety of industrial settings (e.g. retailing, airline, automobile and digital businesses). We will pay particular attention to encouraging a critical awareness of the strengths and weakness of these analytical and conceptual tools. The aim is to develop the ability of the participants to use these methods selectively and skilfully in different contexts.
By covering both competitive and corporate strategy, this course will provide a comprehensive approach to shaping tomorrow¿s business.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO703PFull year7NoNo

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post-doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology. Dissertations may be undertaken with the assistance and guidance of relevant external organisations with the proviso that a suitable SBCS supervisor is also identified. The dissertation aims to make a novel contribution to scientific knowledge. It should demonstrate familiarity with the relevant literature and current scientific / environmental management debates to which the research contributes. In undertaking such an extensive project, you are expected to demonstrate a sound understanding of project design, sample collection, data analysis, and the ability to produce a coherent and well structured piece of written reporting. During Semester A, you are encouraged to talk with potential supervisors and 'shadow' our current PhD students. From February through to the end of July, you should be undertaking lab or field work, and then writing up in August for an early September submission. At the beginning of August, each student will prepare and give a research seminar based upon their work to an audience of staff members & peers, during which there will be plenty of time for questions

Assessment: 90.0% Dissertation, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO704PFull year7NoNo

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc EEG modules, by conducting a novel piece of genome analysis work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO709PFull year7NoNo

Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Leitch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO743P
Corequisite: None

Description: This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling or use of Kew's biological collections, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Students can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL and in RBG Kew. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that high quality supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in plant and fungal biology, ecology and evolution.

Assessment: 90.0% Dissertation, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation: Aquatic Ecology by ResearchBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO712PFull year7NoNo

Dissertation: Aquatic Ecology by Research

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The research project is a substantial piece of original research involving empirical laboratory and/ or field based studies. Students will be encouraged to choose a project from a diverse range of subjects closely aligned to existing cutting edge research
programmes in Aquatic Ecology (in its very broad sense) research groups of SBCS. Some may have ties to external agencies such
as the Environment Agency. Projects will involve a substantial component of lab and /or field data collection.

Students will be encouraged to identify advisors within the first half of semester 1 in order to start the heavy part of the research
project in January.

The preparation of the thesis will involve the majority of the following stages:
- considering an ambitious, suitable and achievable research topic
- discussion and preparing of a draft proposal in relation with academic advisor
- revision and finalization of the research goals and objectives
- write a literature review on the identified research topic
- field / lab work
- data analyses including up to date statistics
- writing thesis
- revision of the final text following supervisory comments
- oral presentation and viva.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Genome BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO721PSemester 17NoNo

Genome Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yannick Wurm
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the analysis of DNA sequence data. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as sequence assembly, gene finding and genome annotation, phylogenetics, analysis of genomic variance among populations, genome wide association studies and prediction of gene structure and function. Practical exercises are used to gain experience with relevant existing bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM933Semester 17NoNo

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal Disease

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ping Wang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic science of gastroenterology. It covers the anatomy, embryology, histology, immunology, physiology (pharmacology and neuroscience), cell biology and genetics of gut function. In addition, lectures focus on research methodologies allowing students to appraise the evidence base underpinning the taught content. Important study skills such as drafting an essay, critical appraisal and referencing, are also covered allowing the students to write an essay or other long documents, with referencing (for examples using endnote).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Biomedical Sciences Investigative ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD601Semester 16NoNo

Biomedical Sciences Investigative Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: 30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Research Project in NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD650Full year6NoYes

Research Project in Neuroscience

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD161, BMD163, BMD261, BMD265
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: The aim of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to conduct an original research project in the field of neuroscience. This is a practical-based module wherein students conduct original research supervised by an academic member of staff through the academic year. Students are required to explore the background of the research and its rationale, construct hypotheses to be tested, learn necessary skills with which to conduct the work, compile results and analyse them. They will write a dissertation including critical analysis of literature, reporting of experimental design and results as well as their evaluation.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 40.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Research Project in PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD670Full year6NoYes

Research Project in Pharmacology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work, normally resulting in a piece of original research in the area of pharmacology and therapeutics. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field. The student also gives a short oral presentation on their work. This is a compulsory module of 30 credits and will be presented as a report not exceeding 6000 words.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Fundamentals of ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS001Semester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS107
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide an introduction to Business Management and Administration. It offers an understanding of the external and internal business environment, the different contexts of business, an analysis of markets and issues within business management. The approach is informative but also seeks to provoke discussion and reflection and the desire to explore this area in depth. This module serves as a general introduction to the structure and functioning of business organisations. The internal and external environments of business are examined with particular emphasis on political, economic, sociological, technical, legal and ethical issues.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Operations ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS002Semester 15YesNo

Operations Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eun-Seok Kim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module in Operations Management (BUS002) has been designed to provide students with a clear understanding of the most important issues in OM (such as process design, capacity planning and control, supply chain management, just in time and total quality management) through a blend of theoretical approaches and seminar-based activities. Students are also encouraged to analyse the relationship between the production of services and goods and the reproduction of technical and managerial knowledge, and the implications of such a relationship in terms of governance and strategic decisions.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 6 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Corporate Financial ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUS241Semester 15NoNo

Corporate Financial Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organizations such as the EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB.

Students would understand and appreciate how financial statements have evolved to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income . The evolution of accounting standards --financial instruments and fair value reporting and debates on the accounting conceptual framework. How changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for integrated corporate reporting (including Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting). This module will also consider how external consultants including actuaries influence corporate reporting.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Evidence-Based ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS242Semester 15NoYes

Evidence-Based Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Briner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: The ultimate goal of evidence-based practice is to help practitioners become more effective through providing a framework for making decisions and taking actions which incorporate the best available evidence from multiple sources. This module will focus on evidence-based practice in management and to provide participants with hands-on experience of how to use different types of evidence and information including organizational/company data and scientific findings both to identify real management problems and their potential solutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_456_A
Responsible LeadershipBusiness and ManagementBUS243Semester 25NoYes

Responsible Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Szilvia Mosonyi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.
  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module covers principles, concepts and practices of Responsible Leadership. It focuses on the long-term 'footprint' of leadership and discusses what 'good' leadership is. The module builds on discussion from leadership literature such as virtues of ethical leaders, normative leadership theories such as Transformational Leadership and Servant Leadership, ethical/moral leadership, the 'dark side of leadership' and dealing with unethical practices as a leader and a follower. By doing this, the module uses an interdisciplinary approach and connects to discussions in Business Ethics and Philosophy (of Science).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_456_A
European Business ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS244Semester 25NoNo

European Business Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Lioliou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore aspects of the European political, economic, social and cultural context that are relevant for managers doing business in Europe. It will begin with an introduction to Europe's institutional framework, and the history of European integration. It will then introduce students to key features of Europe's business environment such as the Single European Market, competition policy, labour policy and monetary union. Case studies will explore these trends in particular industries such as transport, energy and high tech. Students will also be engaged in discussions over Europe's place in the world and future structural changes.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6049Full year6NoNo

Dissertation: Global Public Health and Primary Care

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Mccoy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This core module on the BSc Global Public Health and Primary Care offers students the opportunity to pursue a topic of interest in depth and produce a critical and scholarly review of the literature. Students will select a project from a range on offer, mostly from supervisors in the Centre for Public Health and Primary Care, though some from other Institutes with QMUL may be available. Students may be allowed to devise their own project, and/or include analysis of raw data, through discussion with a supervisor. Projects will be supported by a series of seminars covering critical evaluation, literature searching, presentation and writing skills. Students will acquire skills in developing, planning, organising and focusing a project as they work on a one to one basis with their supervisor. They will also acquire skills in searching, critically appraising, summarising and synthesising the literature.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Human Rights and Public HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6058Semester 26NoNo

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Quantitative Research MethodsBusiness and ManagementBUSM014Semester 17NoNo

Quantitative Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Kavetsos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides a relatively non-technical overview of the use of statistical methods in business research. There is an emphasis on practical work and interpretation, and there will be extensive use of Stata, a leading statistics/econometrics package. The course covers the basic elements of: descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, inference, and multivariate regression analysis.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Brand ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM026Semester 27NoNo

Brand Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will focus on the strategic role that brands play in the successful marketing of products and services. It aims to introduce current academic thinking and business practice of contemporary branding to students introducing key concepts such as brand equity, brand identity and corporate branding. In addition the course aims to introduce and show the actual process of brand management and the issues and dilemmas that contemporary brand managers and stewards have to face. It aims to comprehensively cover these areas and will deal with topics such as brand identity, brand development, brand strategy, organisational support for branding, brand features and personality, brand portfolios and the internet and branding. The focus of the course will be a final presentation and report that students both in groups and as individuals will have to prepare on analysing a failing brand and proposing ideas to reposition and revitalise it. The brand itself will be taken from the contemporary business world and so will provide the students with opportunities to carry out challenging and relevant research.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Multinationals and Global BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUSM028Semester 27NoNo

Multinationals and Global Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Kemeny
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines multinationals and global business in the era of globalization, offering a broad overview of the process of globalisation and the changing nature of global business over time. The course provides a dynamic and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of global business, its origins and development, the theories of multinational corporations, international trade, market selection and modes of entry. The course will examine the context of global business and the changing context of multinational operation through the changing nature
of the global political economy and through the influence of cultures and institutions. The course explores how the changing global environment affects the decisions of managers and the strategies, structures and activities of firms operating in the global market place.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Corporate Finance for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUSM030Semester 17NoNo

Corporate Finance for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The focus of this module is the financing and investment decisions made by the managers of companies in pursuit of corporate goals. It examines how managers can obtain the greatest possible return on investments for the smallest amount of risk. You will acquire the knowledge and understanding of theories, models, tools and techniques to assist in making financial decisions to achieve corporate goals. These will include identification of the cost of capital/rates of return, dividend distribution, investment appraisal, portfolio theory, foreign exchange and interest rate issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

International Macroeconomics and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM041Semester 17NoNo

International Macroeconomics and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Introduction to basic Concepts in Macroeconomics and Finance; Overview of the financial market, its institutions and instruments. Central banking and the Money supply process; conduct of monetary policy; Exchange rates and Monetary Policy; The International Financial System and Financial Crisis; The Euro and European Monetary policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 7 pm

International Reward ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM049Semester 27NoNo

International Reward Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Koumenta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Reward management is one of the key components of human resource management. It is one of the most sensitive and problematic areas of people management that poses additional issues when cast in an international setting. The module starts by giving students an international empirical and theoretical grounding before applying this knowledge to conceptual issues such as equality, fairness, performance and motivation. These issues are examined at a number of levels: internationally, nationally and organizationally by engaging with topical case studies and practical examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome EngineeringSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7145Semester 27NoNo

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces the students to the different types of pluripotent stem cells which are used for research and in therapeutics. The emphasis will be on induced pluripotent stem cells, where the focus will be on generation, verification, and applications of these cells. Additionally, techniques that are used for genome engineering will be covered which will be integrated in applications of induced pluripotent stem cells.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 11: Friday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Friday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 6: Friday 10 am - 2 pm

Anthropology and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7170Semester 27NoNo

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will introduce key theoretical themes and concepts in anthropology which relate to global health issues. A range of topics will be presented which demonstrate how anthropologists have understood global health issues as biological, cultural and social in nature. The content will include theoretical perspectives in medical anthropology, illness narratives, biopolitics, pharmaceutical governance, health citizenship, structural violence and social suffering, medical technologies, global mental health, the anthropology of communicable and non-communicable disease, medical pluralism, and the anthropology of bioethics.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Coding for ScientistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO723PSemester 17NoNo

Coding for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides a hands-on introduction to computer programming (popularly known as coding) using scripting languages popular in the field. The focus is on producing robust software for repeatable data-centric scientific work. Key programming concepts are introduced, and these concepts are then brought together in scientifically relevant applications to analyse data, interact with a database and create dynamic web content. Good coding practice, such as the importance of documentation and version control, is emphasised throughout.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 12: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 12: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 12: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Post-Genomic BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO725PSemester 17NoNo

Post-Genomic Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the management and analysis of data produced by so-called post-genomic methods such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as the identification and quantitation of transcripts, proteins and metabolites, and analysis of the interactions between these key biological molecules. Practical exercises are used to gain experience with bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases that have been developed for this field.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Bioinformatics Software Development Group ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO727PSemester 27NoNo

Bioinformatics Software Development Group Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same written specification for a piece of software that must be delivered by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate software architecture and development plan, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real software development environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Monday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Tuesday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Wednesday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Friday 10 am - 5 pm

Research Frontiers in Evolutionary BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO731PSemester 17NoNo

Research Frontiers in Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore the frontiers of research in evolutionary biology. Topics covered will include: incongruence in phylogenetic trees, neutral versus selective forces in evolution, the origin of angiosperms, the origin of new genes, the evolution of sociality, the significance of whole genome duplication and hybridisation. Current method being used to tackle these areas will be taught, with an emphasis on DNA sequence analysis and bioinformatics. This module aims to inspire students to seek a career in scientific research, and equip them to choose areas of research that are of current interest. Whereas undergraduate degrees commonly focus on what we know, this Master's course will shift the focus onto what we don't know. Students will explore the current frontiers of knowledge, and the questions that currently lack answers, or whose answers are currently debated. Students will learn to ask relevant questions themselves, and design approaches to seeking answers to those questions

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 9 am - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Liver and Pancreatic DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM934Semester 17NoNo

Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Graham Foster
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides the students with a comprehensive overview of the study of liver and pancreatic diseases in adults, with a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Topics: Causes of liver disease (alcohol, drugs). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. HCV. HBV. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Virological assays. Liver histology. Liver cancer - surgical aspects and chemotherapy. New drugs for viral hepatitis. Liver and HIV. Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. How interferon works. Benign liver lesions. Liver disease in children. Imaging of the liver

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM935Semester 27NoNo

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal Diseases

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Parveen Kumar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a comprehensive course on all aspects of adult luminal gastroenterology, excluding functional gastrointestinal diseases. There is a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM936Semester 27NoNo

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Sifrim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is an advanced course in the field of neurogastroenterology including the application of basic science and research to the problems seen in the clinics. Part of the module includes teaching and experience of complex diagnostic techniques within a GI physiology unit, such as oesophageal and small bowel manometry, high-resolution manometry, impedance, nuclear medicine techniques etc.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal InfectionsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM937Semester 27NoNo

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal Infections

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal ScienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM939Full year7NoNo

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal Science

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment: 70.0% Dissertation, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Quantitative Research Methods for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS005Semester 24NoNo

Quantitative Research Methods for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Kemeny
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to develop an appreciation of the role and practice of research methods, both in business and in research about business, and to prepare students for subsequent project work. It provides a first understanding of probability and of statistical inference, and develops skills in presentation of quantitative information. A subsidiary aim is to enhance student's familiarity with the use of spreadsheets.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Research MethodologyBusiness and ManagementBUS007Semester 15YesNo

Research Methodology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide students with an introduction to a range of methodologies and to help them conduct independent research whilst being sensitive to the scientific, political and cultural problems with different approaches. The course develops students' knowledge of research methods and the reliability of their outcomes, with an understanding of wider concerns with truth, logic and the sociology of knowledge.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS011Semester 25YesNo

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores the foundational concepts, practices, and processes of creating value through marketing and marketing management. This introductory module in marketing provides a broad overview of marketing practice, introducing the core marketing tactics and strategies including marketing research, segmentation, branding, ethics, targeting and positioning and the marketing mix activities. Interactive and socially engaged this module requires good preparation and active involvement with the module content and case studies to achieve the learning goals.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS014Semester 25YesNo

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Noon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will introduce you to the key processes concerned with the management of people within organisations. It will reveal the choices that managers are faced with when designing systems to regulate and control the use of human resources. It will assess the problems and difficulties with managing people and explore the variation in practice across different organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Economics for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS017Semester 24YesNo

Economics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cecilia Lanata Briones
Overlap: BUS137
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explains how firms, consumers and government interact in markets and how business decision-making is shaped by internal factors such as costs and by external market conditions. The unit examines the main concepts of economic theory and explores the importance of these within a business context, with emphasis on the applicability of economic theory to an understanding of the internal dynamics of business organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Introduction to FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUS245Semester 15NoNo

Introduction to Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to the fundamentals of finance and aims to develop an understanding of where the finance function fits within a business organization. It will introduce students to the critical knowledge of the time value of money, in a sense, that why the value of money depends on the time of its receipts or payments. Given the current state of the global economy where financial markets are highly integrated, it is imperative to know the functioning of financial markets and institutions and different financial instruments being traded. The theoretical approaches in determining financial securities value as well as assessing risk will be examined.

This module will be offered to the B.Sc. Business Management (NN12) program as an elective in Year 2, Semester A.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS246Semester 25YesNo

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores the foundational concepts, practices, and processes of creating value through marketing and marketing management. This introductory module in marketing provides a broad overview of marketing practice, introducing the core marketing tactics and strategies including marketing research, segmentation, branding, ethics, targeting and positioning and the marketing mix activities. Interactive and socially engaged this module requires good preparation and active involvement with the module content and case studies to achieve the learning goals.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Managerial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS247Semester 25YesNo

Managerial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: An intensive one semester module in managerial accounting. It examines how costs are identified and measured and explores differing views of the nature and definition of cost. Such considerations are important when managers are seeking to make decisions relating to cost determination, cost management, pricing, budgets and budgetary control, standard costing, and investment appraisal. These areas, together with aspects such as marginal and incremental costing and cost of capital and risk, are reflected within the considerations. The resultant financial information is placed in the context of the complexities of the business and economic environments of the world as managers seek to make to make appropriate decisions.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Managing Under RegulationBusiness and ManagementBUS249Semester 25NoNo

Managing Under Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This qualitative module introduces students to the management skills, frameworks, challenges, imperatives, organisational and inter-organisational processes they will face in their careers as managers, in ensuring that their organisations comply with rules set by regulatory authorities. Without experience of this, managers rarely progress in their careers. Whatever industry you work in, you will be regulated by generic regulators for health and safety, environment, information privacy, accounting standards, patenting, equality and diversity including physical access, etc. In addition, you may well have to deal with sector-specific regulators if you work in financial services, accounting, utilities, transport, pharmaceuticals, health care, education, airlines, railways, food standards, print and broadcast media, primary extraction, gambling and many other industries. This module enables students who will become managers to understand their regulators, what inspectors do and want, how far they can legitimately lobby regulators, how internal compliance units work, and how to operate across many countries each with their own national regulatory systems. The module will compare many industries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

TaxationBusiness and ManagementBUS250Semester 25NoNo

Taxation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces to the subject of taxation and provides the core knowledge of the underlying principles and major technical areas of taxation as they affect the activities of individuals and businesses. The students are introduced to the rationale behind - and the functions of ¿ the tax system. The syllabus then considers the separate taxes that an accountant would need to have a detailed knowledge of, such as income tax from self-employment, employment and investments, the corporation tax liability of individual companies and groups of companies, the national insurance contribution liabilities of both employed and self-employed persons, the value added tax liability of businesses, the chargeable gains arising on disposals of investments by both individuals and companies, and the inheritance tax liabilities arising on chargeable lifetime transfers and on death. Having covered the core areas of the basic taxes, candidates should be able to compute tax liabilities, explain the basis of their calculations, apply tax planning techniques for individuals and companies and identify the compliance issues for each major tax through a variety of business and personal scenarios and situations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Global Governance and International OrganisationsBusiness and ManagementBUS251Semester 25NoNo

Global Governance and International Organisations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stella Ladi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: ¿he module examines the emerging structure of global governance and the role of international organisations. This includes both informal aspects, such as the pressure from Western states and international agencies for all states to adopt "good governance" norms and formal aspects such as international organisations in areas like finance, trade, labour, immigration and the environment. The aim is to give students a solid historical and critical understanding of key developments and a comprehension of policy making at the global level.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Dissertation for Accounting and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM066Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for Accounting and Finance

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

You will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.
Students undertaking a dissertation based on qualitative methods within the School of Business and Management are required to attend Qualitative Research Methods Workshops in Semester 2.

Students undertaking a dissertation within the School of Economics are required to attend Data Analysis for Research classes will take place throughout Semester 2

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM067Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing organisations as they operate in a world of increasing competitiveness and change, requiring managers to combine management accounting ideas with those from other areas such as marketing, technology and HR. Accordingly it is interdisciplinary.
The module is arranged around:
1 Accounting for strategic management: introduction: methodological issues in management accounting
2 The essence of management control in private, voluntary and public sectors
3 Strategic Issues in cost allocation and activity-based costing and activity-based management
4 Advanced manufacturing technology, JIT, target costing and product life-cycle costing
5 Quality costing, total quality management and management accounting systems
6 Value-chain analysis and accounting
7 Customer profitability analysis/customer accounting
8 Competitor analysis/competitor accounting
9 Responsibility accounting, financial performance measures, and transfer prices
10 Measuring non-financial performance: the balanced scorecard
11 Benchmarking analysis
The module will draw upon a range of case studies drawn from the 'real world'.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM069Semester 17NoNo

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrizia Kokot-Blamey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organizational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, ethics, group dynamics, patterns and negotiation practices which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviour both at individual, group and organisational levels. Students will gain an awareness and knowledge of contemporary issues and approaches to organisational change and development facing organizations. Beyond providing theoretical frameworks, the module will augment skills to prepare students for the work place through communication and team management skills, and through analytical and critical thinking skills .

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Accounting for Business ModelsBusiness and ManagementBUSM070Semester 17NoNo

Accounting for Business Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module conceptualizes business models within an accounting framework. There are three significant parts to this module. how we can structure business models, designate business models with a sense of financial purpose (liquidity, solvency and capitalization) and finally evaluate performance and outcomes. These financial objectives are explored and evaluated using accounting data for a range of business model types for example, banking, private equity and bio-pharma and 3rd /public sector organizations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Accounting and Value ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM071Semester 27NoNo

Accounting and Value Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is framed with the context of managing for value and how managerial and investor interests are aligned and reflected in accounting information for value creation and market value added and value for money. This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are employed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control and drive value creation for market value added or value for money. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and direct corporate and non-corporate organizations towards generating value on invested funds whether these are public, private or state sponsored agencies.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Evidence, Policy and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7172Semester 17NoNo

Evidence, Policy and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Megan Clinch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and practical / applied public health perspective. The literature covered in the module will draw attention to the nature of social systems that are influenced by a range of socially, culturally and politically mediated factors and variables. Its approach to the study of the social factors that influence health, public health programmes and health policy will differ from, but complement, the teaching and methods of study that are covered in the Epidemiology and Statistics module (ICM6040). Overall the module will develop and strengthen critical appraisal skills and help intercalating students develop a command of the multi-disciplinary field of Global Health. These are skills that will be new, and crucial throughout their studies and in particular during the second semester as students begin to consider their dissertation project.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO733PSemester 27NoNo

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yannick Wurm
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same genomic or transcriptomic data set that must be analysed by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate analysis pipeline, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real data analysis environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Ecological Theory and ApplicationsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO735PSemester 27NoNo

Ecological Theory and Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Axel Rossberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module we look at the theory behind our understanding of ecological systems and how that theory can be applied to ecological problems in the real world. Starting with populations of a single species we will progress to understanding twospecies interactions including predation, competition and parasitism and then to whole communities of interacting organisms. We will then study how ecological theory, used in concert with population genetics and evolutionary theory, can be applied to understanding ecological issues such as the conservation of small populations, harvesting natural populations and predicting responses to environmental change.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecosystem Structure and FunctioningBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO737PSemester 17NoNo

Ecosystem Structure and Functioning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: While we have long appreciated the structure of ecosystems, the importance of ecosystem functioning has lagged behind somewhat. This module aims to redress the balance by exploring the use of modern tools which allow us to thoroughly integrate measures of ecological structure and functioning. Aspects of the Metabolic Theory of Ecology, body-size relationships, stable isotope analysis and DNA bar- coding will all be covered in relation to topics such as photosynthetic and chemosynthetic primary production; the impacts of invasive species; aquatic-terrestrial linkages and cross ecosystem boundary subsidies; biogeochemistry and nutrient dynamics; plankton dynamics and organismal physiology in a changing world.

Assessment: 85.0% Coursework, 15.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm

Science into Policy & ManagementBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO739PSemester 17NoNo

Science into Policy & Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Without knowledge, there can be no application. This module is designed to bring you 'face to face' with the regulators, policies and their science base, as these potential employers (e.g. CEFAS, Defra, the Environment Agency, Natural England) will give lectures on topical issues. The focus is on human impacts upon ecosystems, including pollution and habitat alteration and how these can be mitigated. National and international legislation and directives are considered (e.g. EU Water Framework Directive). Guest lecturers will also include consultants who will be able to advise on career paths. As a detailed case study, you will visit the River Communities Group based in Dorset for one week and investigate the link between successful science and policy: for example, contemporary aspects of the EU Water Framework Directive will be considered, including underlying methodology behind bioassessment and biomonitoring (e.g. RIVPACS). This will be closely linked to how the Environment Agency is working with Defra Test Catchments (DTCs).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Plant Taxonomy and DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO741PSemester 17NoNo

Plant Taxonomy and Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide an overview of global plant diversity, with a particular focus on flowering plants. It will be taught at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew by leading botanists, affording students the opportunity to explore the outstanding collections and facilities housed there. Topics will range from taxonomic principles and methodology, plant systematics and comparative biology (including morphology, chemistry and genomics), phylogenetics, biogeography and evolution. The module will have a practical component, providing excellent hands-on experience for students.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM941Semester 17NoNo

The Basis of Gastro-Intestinal Disease

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ping Wang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic science of gastroenterology. It covers the anatomy, embryology, histology, immunology, physiology (pharmacology and neuroscience), cell biology and genetics of gut function. In addition, lectures focus on research methodologies allowing students to appraise the evidence base underpinning the taught content. Important study skills such as drafting an essay, critical appraisal and referencing, are also covered allowing the students to write an essay or other long documents, with referencing (for examples using endnote).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Liver and Pancreatic DiseaseSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM942Semester 17NoNo

Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Graham Foster
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides the students with a comprehensive overview of the study of liver and pancreatic diseases in adults, with a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Topics: Causes of liver disease (alcohol, drugs). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. HCV. HBV. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Virological assays. Liver histology. Liver cancer - surgical aspects and chemotherapy. New drugs for viral hepatitis. Liver and HIV. Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. How interferon works. Benign liver lesions. Liver disease in children. Imaging of the liver

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM943Semester 27NoNo

Adult Gastro-Intestinal Diseases: Luminal Diseases

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Parveen Kumar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a comprehensive course on all aspects of adult luminal gastroenterology, excluding functional gastrointestinal diseases. There is a focus on research and science underpinning this speciality.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS021Semester 14YesNo

Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura
Overlap: BUS138
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This Course introduces you to and explores the purpose, nature and operation of the Financial Accounting function within businesses, particularly limited liability companies in the UK. It reveals, illustrates and explores how the financial accounting systems operate when tasked with measuring and recording the financial value of the transactions, events and activities of a business. In so doing, it examines the nature and scope of financial accounting and the underlying conceptual framework of accounting conventions and standards. It further looks at the ratio analysis and associated interpretation of published financial statements from the perspectives of a range of differing users of financial accounting information. Accordingly, the module seeks to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable you to identify and record the financial value of business transactions, events and activities, and to generate financial information through the construction of Balance Sheets, Income Statements (Profit Statements) and Cash Flow Statements, and through the use of financial ratios.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Managerial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS022Semester 25YesNo

Managerial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: An intensive one semester module in managerial accounting. It examines how costs are identified and measured and explores differing views of the nature and definition of cost. Such considerations are important when managers are seeking to make decisions relating to cost determination, cost management, pricing, budgets and budgetary control, standard costing, and investment appraisal. These areas, together with aspects such as marginal and incremental costing and cost of capital and risk, are reflected within the considerations. The resultant financial information is placed in the context of the complexities of the business and economic environments of the world as managers seek to make to make appropriate decisions.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Fundamentals of Management (for Science & Engineering)Business and ManagementBUS024Semester 14YesYes

Fundamentals of Management (for Science & Engineering)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Samuel Wa Sun Tang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS107
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module introduces students to the purpose, operations and implications of management by exploring the contexts within which management takes place. To put in a somewhat exaggerated way, it is not a "how to do business" module, but a module about the framework for understanding business as well as the environment and contexts in which it operates. We will reflect on management in relation to the social, economic and legal conditions within which it operates, as well as reflect on the political, cultural and environmental consequences of modern management. We will discuss how management practices are informed and, in some cases, defined by issues such as: the privatisation of public services, the environmental impact of technological change, the unequal distribution of the world's resources and the unequal influence of stakeholders on business practices.

Considering business and management as an object of social scientific study provides students with a broad social scientific approach to the subject. The module's interdisciplinary focus allows students to understand business within its macro-environment, pulled in different directions by competing exigencies within an ever-changing global system of relations. By developing a sense of those diverse pressures, the student can begin to develop an independent perspective and the intellectual tools to confront them.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
Innovation and EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUS300Semester 26YesYes

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shoutong Thomas Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to justify approaches they have taken when participating in module based enterprise projects and/or situations.Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

Description: This module examines how to cultivate an entrepreneurial mind set and increase your awareness of the routes available to turning your ideas into business ventures. The module covers intellectual property rights, financial planning, business planning and how to sell yourself and your ideas.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Organisation and IdentityBusiness and ManagementBUS302Semester 16YesYes

Organisation and Identity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowland Curtis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: This module takes up questions regarding the significance of dimensions of identity and meaning for dynamics of managing and organizing. The module also concerns itself with associated questions regarding knowledge and learning and their role in management education and wider organizational life. In pursuing these interests we draw upon an eclectic and innovative range of theory, literature and other media, including novels and films, as means by which to open up and explore the experiential and 'existential' dimensions that structure and deconstruct modern work organization. Course participants will also be encouraged to keep a personal learning diary and submit a (nonassessed) written piece of work during the term to support their development and engagement with module themes.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS304Semester 26YesYes

International Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lutao Ning
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

Description: This module offers a broad overview of the process of globalisation and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm set in the context of trends in the world economy, with particular emphasis on the period since the 1970s. It provides a critical and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins and development, the theory, policy and practice of international trade and direct foreign investment, conceptualisations of international supply chains/global production networks and the logistics revolution, and the social and political effects of multinational activities. These issues will be illustrated through case studies in the areas of manufacturing, agri-business and intellectual property.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Anthropology and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6070Semester 26NoNo

Anthropology and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce the students to the ways in which anthropological theory and methods have been used in global health contexts. It will involve the students in the anthropological analyses of health, illness experience and health care. It will demonstrate the ways in which anthropology can contribute to an understanding of global health issues and inform global health programmes.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Evidence, Policy and Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6071Semester 16NoNo

Evidence, Policy and Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Megan Clinch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides an introduction to the philosophy of science and debates about the nature of data and evidence from a public policy and practical / applied public health perspective. The literature covered in the module will draw attention to the nature of social systems that are influenced by a range of socially, culturally and politically mediated factors and variables. Its approach to the study of the social factors that influence health, public health programmes and health policy will differ from, but complement, the teaching and methods of study that are covered in the Epidemiology and Statistics module (ICM6040). Overall the module will develop and strengthen critical appraisal skills and help intercalating students develop a command of the multi-disciplinary field of Global Health. These are skills that will be new, and crucial throughout their studies and in particular during the second semester as students begin to consider their dissertation project.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

New Product Development and Business EcosystemsBusiness and ManagementBUSM084Semester 27NoNo

New Product Development and Business Ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The introduction and development of new products and processes is an essential drive of a firm's competitiveness. Yet, organizations do not operate in isolation but are a part of complex and increasingly globalized supply chains affecting innovation and new product development. The module Supply Chain and New Product Development enables students to analyze the innovation process within complex supply chains from the definition of a new product concept to the involvement of suppliers and partners in developing new product/process architectures. Students will address the organizational implications and challenges deriving from the involvement of partners and suppliers in new product development, through a blend of theoretical and case study based approaches. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate issues of Governance and Strategic Management, by addressing the dynamics underpinning the emergence of new technological platforms and by investigating issues of outsourcing and knowledge ""hollowing out"", architectural knowledge and path dependent product development, open innovation and architectural innovation.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Behavioural Finance and Decision MakingBusiness and ManagementBUSM085Semester 27NoNo

Behavioural Finance and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module identifies and challenges modern theory of finance and covers the major issues in behavioural finance and decision making. These include biases, which frequently occur in financial decision-making such as optimism, mental framing, over-reaction, trend-chasing, conservatism and anchoring of expectations. Emphasis is on related work in psychology in terms of several theories of human behaviour that have policy implications in Finance. Accordingly the module is arranged around:Traditional Finance and Historical development of behavioural finance, Biases in Financial decision making, their manifestation and reduction, Prospect theory and loss aversion, Use of mental frames in financial decision making, Heuristics and biases in financial forecasting, Group decision making processes, Financial Crisis and human behaviour, Empirical regularities such as overreaction and momentum, Introduction to experimental and empirical methodologies in measuring biases in fiancial domains.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM086Semester 17NoNo

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the ""traditional"" competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches and time/timing. Throughout the course we will examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations as well as firms.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

International Business StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUSM089Semester 27NoNo

International Business Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lutao Ning
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module aims to introduce students to concepts and practices related to managing in a globally volatile, complex, dynamic environment within which organisations, national and international institutions and individuals interact. The elective is designed to be an advanced global strategic management course presenting material that is highly contemporary. This course provides balanced global strategic insights along with proven practical business frameworks and prepares you to respond quickly to today's challenging global environment.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Fungal Taxonomy and DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO743PSemester 17NoNo

Fungal Taxonomy and Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will focus on fungal diversity and it will be taught at RBG, Kew by leading mycologists. Kew has the largest collection of fungal specimens in the world that will be available to the students during the course. The module will give an overview of the systematics and taxonomy of major fungal groups, of basic concepts in mycology, field collecting, and culturing and fungarium techniques. In addition, front-line research on the ecology of fungi (e.g., symbiosis, 'rotters and recyclers', pathogens), fungal biogeography, and fungal evolutionary genomics, will be explored through study of contemporary research. The module will have a practical component, providing excellent hands-on experience for students.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Conservation and Ecosystem ScienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO745PSemester 27NoNo

Conservation and Ecosystem Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will explore the role and application of plant and fungal science in integrated conservation and management of biodiversity, in the delivery of ecosystem services and livelihoods, and in the development of mechanisms for their maintenance and restoration in the context of a changing planet. Drawing on the exceptional breadth of expertise, collections and facilities across Kew's sites, and building on the fundamental understanding of plant and fungal taxonomy and diversity, it will provide an essential introduction to a range of technical approaches including policy development, species and habitat prioritisation, protected area management, conservation genetics, ecosystem service research, seed banking and propagation, application of traditional knowledge, and integrated conservation for biodiversity and livelihoods.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Statistics and BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO781PSemester 17NoNo

Statistics and Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rob Knell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is focussed on teaching data analysis using the statistical programming language R. The module covers the basics of using R; drawing publication-standard graphs with R; experimental design; exploratory data analysis; the fundamentals of statistical testing including t-tests and chi-square tests; ANOVA and Regression; fitting and interpreting general linear models; the basics of bioinformatic analysis in R. The module is taught with a mix of theory and practice, with a typical day including roughly two hours of theory instruction in the morning followed by a practical session in the afternoon, often involving hands-on analysis of real experimental data sets.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Statistics for BioinformaticiansBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO782PSemester 17NoNo

Statistics for Bioinformaticians

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rob Knell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is focussed on teaching data analysis using the statistical programming language R. The module covers the basics of using R; drawing publication-standard graphs with R; experimental design; exploratory data analysis; the fundamentals of statistical testing including t-tests and chi-square tests; ANOVA and Regression; fitting and interpreting general linear models; the basics of bioinformatic analysis in R. The module is taught with a mix of theory and practice, with a typical day including roughly two hours of theory instruction in the morning followed by a practical session in the afternoon, often involving hands-on analysis of real experimental data sets.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Biochemistry MSci Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO790Full year7NoNo

Biochemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Students work independently on a topic in biochemistry in which their supervisor is a recognized expert. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of this advanced research project. A thesis (dissertation) is written by the student describing the work undertaken, and placing it in context of other research in the field. The dissertation is defended in an oral examination, which includes a short oral presentation.

Assessment: 70.0% Dissertation, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Field CourseBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO792PSemester 27NoNo

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Field Course

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Rossiter
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module comprises a residential field course lasting approximately 12 days, designed to allow students to develop their field skills in situ. Teaching will comprise a combination of lectures, demonstrations and practical assignments. These will span topics in taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, conservation and evolution. Students will also undertake their own mini-project. This field-based module will include coverage of ecological processes in tropical rainforests (decomposition, pollination and seed dispersal), rainforest structure and defining characteristics (including the importance of rainforests as centres of biodiversity), and anthropogenic factors affecting rainforests (including disturbance, forest fragmentation and agriculture).
(The changes in detailed content are inevitably reflected in a change to the Recommended Reading for this module).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal DiseasesSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM944Semester 27NoNo

Neurogastroenterology: Advanced Functional Gastro-Intestinal Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Daniel Sifrim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is an advanced course in the field of neurogastroenterology including the application of basic science and research to the problems seen in the clinics. Part of the module includes teaching and experience of complex diagnostic techniques within a GI physiology unit, such as oesophageal and small bowel manometry, high-resolution manometry, impedance, nuclear medicine techniques etc.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal InfectionsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM945Semester 27NoNo

Paediatric and Adolescent Gastro-Intestinal and Liver Diseases, Gastro-Intestinal Infections

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUS025Semester 25NoYes

Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Engineering and Materials Science, School of Mathematical Sciences and School of Physics and Astronomy at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate their own attitudes, values and skills in the workplace and/or in the wider world.Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
  • Students will be able to recognise and prioritise areas for developing their own enterprising perspectives.Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate how they have enhanced their own learning through engaging in enterprising skills and behaviours.

Description: The module provides an integrated introduction to the processes and management of emerging businesses with a specific concentration upon entrepreneurial learning in the earlier stages of entrepreneurial activity. The taught component introduces key perspectives on the recognition and nature of entrepreneurial opportunities, evaluation of resources and relations, and roles of entrepreneurial creativity and legitimation processes. The learning component enables students to explore and evaluate different approaches to entrepreneurial learning to critically assess entrepreneurial approaches and opportunities.
The primary objective of the module is to help students develop competencies, skills and creativity to understand effectively what entrepreneur is about. Students will gain an appreciation of the conceptual foundations of entrepreneurial learning in terms of human resources, material and immaterial resources and relations, and value-creating and legitimating processes. This module will enable students to critique key entrepreneurial concepts and approaches and explore their significance. Working on contemporary case studies aims to stimulate students' imagination to generate ideas and provide insight into the day-to-day nature of entrepreneurial learning.
Finally, the assessments are designed to help students to identify and apply these new skills gained during the study of this module.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Networking,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEM_SPA_5_S
Project ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS027Semester 25NoYes

Project Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Engineering and Materials Science, School of Mathematical Sciences and School of Physics and Astronomy at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.
  • Students will be able to recognise and prioritise areas for developing their own enterprising perspectives.Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate how they have enhanced their own learning through engaging in enterprising skills and behaviours.

Description: The focus of the module will be on project management techniques that encourage the use of incremental delivery of projects. These techniques are appropriate to projects that deliver complex outcomes in a context of high uncertainty about the desired result. The module will also provide a grounding in traditional project management techniques that focus on projects that are concluded to a clear specification within a pre-specified time frame.

The assessment portfolio (report) will support students' ability to evaluate complex projects and recognise how future project management efforts can be improved. This will also be linked to an appreciation of such techniques in enterprise projects that they might be involved in or initiate in the future. The final examination will test students' abilities to explain how project management techniques can be applied in different and broader situations than the examples covered in the class.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEM_SPA_5_S
Principles of Management Studies and SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUS028Semester 25NoYes

Principles of Management Studies and Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students, except students from the Home School

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • International perspectives
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate their own attitudes, values and skills in the workplace and/or in the wider world.
  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.
  • Students will be able to recognise and prioritise areas for developing their own enterprising perspectives.

Description: The module will cover a wide variety of topics that will introduce students to management studies. Students will learn about key management theories, the nature of managerial work and related skills. This includes an understanding of what managerial work consists of, key theories from organisation and management studies that relate to managerial work, the skills required by managers to manage teams, how our perception of managerial work has changed over time and any implications in relation to responsible management practices.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Networking,International perspectives,Enterprising perspectives_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Managing DiversityBusiness and ManagementBUS305Semester 16NoYes

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module examines theories of equality and diversity and of occupational segmentation. It explores diversity and equality across the dimensions of gender, race, disability, age and sexual orientation and considers the organisational processes which produce and reproduce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups. The module also considers national and European legislative frameworks; policy approaches and implications at organisational level.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS306Semester 16YesYes

Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: Relationship between the financial manager and the capital markets; Investment appraisal, single and multi-period capital rationing, and risk analysis; Capital asset pricing model; Types of sources of finance and their characteristics; Efficient Markets Hypothesis; Dividend growth model and Business valuation; Weighted average cost of capital; Issues in capital structure and financial gearing.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6075Semester 16NoNo

Health Systems Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elias Kondilis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Migrants, Inequality and the Cultural Politics of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6077Semester 16YesNo

Migrants, Inequality and the Cultural Politics of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sajida Ally
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module examines various theoretical and conceptual frameworks for studying migration, culture and health. While migration is one of the key drivers of globalisation and cultural and economic transformations of contemporary societies, migrants¿ health is a topic that is central for understanding patterns of global health within and between origin and destination countries, and patterns of migration and inequality. Deliberate attention is drawn to the contested social, cultural and political relations within which migrants¿ health and healthcare are embedded.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Clinical Microbiology: Diagnosis and Management of Human Disease and Control of Hospital InfectionSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7036Full year7NoNo

Clinical Microbiology: Diagnosis and Management of Human Disease and Control of Hospital Infection

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Throughout this module, students will study microbial infections of humans. The clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy and infection control issues of the microbial infections are explored both theoretically and practically. The infections are studied by organ system e.g. respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and also by looking at specialist patient groups e.g. the immune-compromised, paediatrics.
Students also study the surveillance, legislation and methods of control of hospital acquired infection.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 15.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7042Full year7NoNo

Antimicrobials in the Laboratory and in Clinical Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will provide the trainee with detailed knowledge and understanding of the structure, function, mode of action and resistance mechanisms of antimicrobial agents. They will gain knowledge and experience of the use and monitoring of antimicrobial therapy and the impact on patient management in a variety of clinical settings.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Communicable Disease: Prevention and Control in the Hospital and in the CommunitySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7043Full year7NoNo

Communicable Disease: Prevention and Control in the Hospital and in the Community

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a compulsory module covering aspects of communicable disease control in the hospital and community. After an introduction to practical epidemiology with special reference to clinical microbiology and infectious disease in the community, the module focuses on the relationship between the NHS, PHE, infection control teams, environmental health services and other relevant bodies in the UK. The module also explores the worldwide public health issues which have implications for public health in the UK.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Managerial EconomicsBusiness and ManagementBUSM051Semester 17NoNo

Managerial Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The primary aim of the module is to provide students with a sound understanding of some of the insights from economics with respect to business and management decisions. The module focuses on issues typically addressed in microeconomics, including marginal analysis, supply and demand, production theory, market structures, price discrimination, signalling and screening, and incentives in organisations.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Financial ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUSM054Semester 17NoNo

Financial Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sean Mccartney
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the financial reporting of companies, and how such reporting can be analysed to evaluate performance. No prior knowledge of accounting is assumed: students learn how accounts are constructed and analysed, then examine the impact of various issues on the reported numbers. These include the reporting of intangible assets; creative accounting; currency translation; and the use of share options to reward management. The module takes a global perspective and refers largely to the regulatory regime of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Understanding Consumer BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM058Semester 17NoNo

Understanding Consumer Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: All marketing action is aimed at consumers. Without an understanding of the consumer the application of marketing tools is unlikely to yield the desired outcomes. This module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of consumer and market behaviour as a main consideration in marketing. The course offers a brief introduction into consumer research and then focuses on an understanding of the consumer from a mainly psychological perspective. Overall, the course provides frameworks that enable students to address the issue of understanding consumers responsibly, systematically, and creatively.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

International AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM059Semester 27NoNo

International Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUSM054
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides insights into the origins of accounting and its subsequent changes. Adopting this broader perspective, the module will attempt to trace the genealogy of accounting and its principles, standards and conventions. The module will discuss the historical developments in accounting by focusing on accounting issues created in the process of harmonisation. This approach will lead students to critically engage in the current debates on accounting, accountability and the responsibility of cross-border transactions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Corporate GovernanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM060Semester 27NoNo

Corporate Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module introduces students to key theories, concepts and issues in corporate governance. It critically explores corporate governance as an embedded practice and provides insights into how local cultures and developments in local contexts have impacted upon and shaped the development of corporate governance systems and practices and how these local corporate governance systems and practices are challenged by globalisation. Within this broad framework case studies provide detailed insights into specific aspects of corporate governance.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

Contemporary Issues in AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM061Semester 27NoNo

Contemporary Issues in Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module introduces students to some of the key developments and issues in accounting currently discussed by policy makers, the profession, the media and academics. The specific issues addressed will change over time but could include: - On-line Reporting - Accounting and Globalisation - Accounting Regulation: The Convergence Project - Accounting and Poverty - Accounting and Indigenous Peoples - Sustainability Reporting - The Relevance of History - Accounting, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion - Accountants and the Financial Crisis - Accounting in the Community - NGOs and Accountability

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Global Health, Governance and LawSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7174Semester 27NoNo

Global Health, Governance and Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jonathan Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The protection of public health at the national and subnational level often depends significantly on various decisions made at the international or global level by regimes, including those related to trade, finance, law, diplomacy and inter-governmental relations. Such regimes can have a profound impact on the determinants of health as experienced within countries, at the national and local levels, and have become increasingly important as a result of ever-deepening forms of `globalisation¿ and the threat of global hazards to health such as large-scale global environmental change.
This module provides an introduction to the disciplines of international relations, international politics, international jurisprudence, globalization and global governance as they relate to global health. It will examine the content and operation of various supra-national policy instruments, structures, institutions and processes, and place these within the context of the right to health and contemporary controversies and topical issues being confronted by the global health community.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political EconomySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7176Semester 27NoNo

Health Systems Theory, Policy and Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elias Kondilis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module we examine trends towards the reform of health systems in the context of globalisation. Particular attention is given to the impact of neoliberal policy and commercialisation; the move towards universal health coverage; policy on integration; and decentralisation. The role of actors in shaping policy will also be covered, as well as the impact of trade and investment related agreements on health systems. The impact of other aspects of globalisation on health systems - such as migration - will also be covered.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Marine Mammals and TurtlesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO794PSemester 17NoNo

Marine Mammals and Turtles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module focuses on the diversity, behaviour, ecology, physiology, conservation and management of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), and marine turtles. It covers such issues as the life history and migrations of turtles, their diving ability and behaviours, the social behaviour of dolphins, and the conservation of whales. It also includes (even though they are not mammals or reptiles!) a brief look at the sea-birds and sharks that will likely also be seen during field excursions. For part of the module you will be taught in the archipelago of Cape verde, with boat trips for whales and shark observations, sea turtle monitoring. Mornings will be dedicated to lectures and workshops while afternoons and evening will be dedicated to hands-on practical experience

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Quantitative Techniques for Surveying and Monitoring in EcologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO795PSemester 17NoNo

Quantitative Techniques for Surveying and Monitoring in Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Through a series of lectures, workshops and data analyses classes in the first week, you will learn the theory behind designing and initiating surveys and monitoring campaigns for blue skies science, conservation & for management. In the subsequent week, you will be able to put the theory into practice at a field location such as Lake Windermere and environs, undertaking electric-fishing and hydroacoustic surveys for fish populations, a census for aquatic birds, and camera-trapping for aquatic mammals. Other skills like telemetry will be demonstrated.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Field Study Skills in a Biodiversity HotspotBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO799PSemester 27NoNo

Field Study Skills in a Biodiversity Hotspot

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This Madagascar Field Course Module will provide an introduction to practical field work, including botanical surveys and flowering plant identification and how they can be applied to solving practical problems of conservation management as well as biodiversity research. It will be taught by botanists from the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC) in Antananarivo and local conservationists and researchers from collaborating institutions. Several site visits to conservation projects and some taught case studies will give an over-view of conservation in Madagascar. We reserve the right to change the location of this course if advice on travel to Madagascar from the Foreign Commonwealth Office changes, or for logistical reasons. For students unable to travel to Madagascar for this module, an alternative method of assessment will be undertaken.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUS029Semester 25NoYes

Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Engineering and Materials Science, School of Mathematical Sciences and School of Physics and Astronomy at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.
  • Students will be able to recognise and prioritise areas for developing their own enterprising perspectives.Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate how they have enhanced their own learning through engaging in enterprising skills and behaviours.

Description: The focus of the module will be on business analytics cases from existing businesses in which students will learn how data are collected and aggregated, how resulting data is analyzed and how the insights obtained are passed on and influence business decisions. Furthermore, the module will provide an overview of business analytics applications and the ways in which they have impacted different business areas and functions.
The assessment portfolio (report) will develop students' abilities to apply the appropriate analysis frameworks to gain insight into how business analytics can lead to the creation of organisational value in different contexts of use (e.g. operational analytics, optimisation, customer segmentation). The final examination will test students' abilities to transfer lessons learnt into new contexts of use through unknown case studies and examples.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SEM_SPA_5_S
Introduction to Marketing and CommunicationsBusiness and ManagementBUS101Semester 14NoNo

Introduction to Marketing and Communications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Zahra Sharifonnasabi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module forms a key building block which introduces the field of marketing to students and is compulsory for all students in the Business and Management (NN12) undergraduate programme. It introduces key concepts in marketing and forms the basis upon which students can build their knowledge of the field in marketing-related modules in the ensuing years.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Accounting for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS106Semester 14NoNo

Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: BUS139
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. Key concepts and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and the financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations and the use of accounting information by management for planning, decision making and control purposes.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Business and SocietyBusiness and ManagementBUS107Semester 14NoNo

Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gerard Hanlon
Overlap: BUS130
Prerequisite: BUS001
Corequisite: None

Description: The module covers the main aspects of the business environment. It covers: nature and types of business and other organisations; business and society: relationship between work organisations and society; business and governments: government as control, consumer, supplier; business and politics: managing influence; business and people: consumers, clients, employees, the public perceptions; business and the physical environment - sustainability in the business context; business and the technological environment; the social and ethical responsibilities of business; business in emerging economies; the and the international context ( regional economic blocs, World Trade Organization).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Business Management DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUS314Full year6NoYes

Business Management Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Mirela Barbu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUS007
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: In order to take this module students must have attained 65% or over in module BUS007. A dissertation is a piece of independent research carried out by the student under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Research can be carried out in any area of business and management, broadly defined, as long as there is sufficient expertise in the School of Business and Management to supervise the research. The student is expected to identify and review the relevant literature, identify a research problem and conduct original empirical research on primary data, or conduct original analysis of secondary data.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Consumer PsychologyBusiness and ManagementBUS318Semester 16YesYes

Consumer Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: Building on a general understanding of marketing, this module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of psychological theories relevant to the study of consumer behaviour. We start with an overview of the scope of consumer psychology and consumer behaviour and position it against mainstream marketing. Subsequently, we will focus on cognitive and affective processes that drive consumer behaviour. Once an understanding of the basic psychological processes has been gained we will look at various factors that are able to influence these processes. Particular attention is paid to how marketing practice influences consumer perception, evaluation and behaviour. Throughout the module real world hands-on exercises will facilitate understanding and transferability of contents.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Advanced Clinical Microbiology and Laboratory ManagementSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7044Full year7NoNo

Advanced Clinical Microbiology and Laboratory Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module extends the knowledge acquired in the other modules of this degree to create an in depth knowledge of infectious disease. Students also are equipped with knowledge essential to the efficient management of a diagnostic laboratory.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 2 pm

Project and DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7045Full year7NoNo

Project and Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The overall aim of this module, building on the Research Methods module is for the student to undertake research that shows originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret new information in a specialism of healthcare science. The student will undertake an original piece of research involving the application of scientific investigation to one or more clinical situations.

Assessment: 75.0% Dissertation, 15.0% Coursework, 10.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11: Friday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Friday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 10 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Friday 10 am - 2 pm

Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease in the Hospital and in the CommunitySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7046Full year7NoNo

Prevention and Control of Communicable Disease in the Hospital and in the Community

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a compulsory module covering aspects of communicable disease control in the hospital and community. After an introduction to practical epidemiology with special reference to clinical microbiology and infectious disease in the community, the module focuses on the relationship between the NHS, PHE, infection control teams, environmental health services and other relevant bodies in the UK. The module also explores the worldwide public health issues which have implications for public health in the UK. The role of the scientist and clinical laboratory in infection control and public health is explored.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Trauma NursingSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7057Semester 37NoNo

Trauma Nursing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Elaine Cole
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: The module will provide students with a more critical view of holistic trauma care. Subjects will include: patient assessment, pain management, psychological interventions, post injury nutritional needs, meeting elimination needs in the multiply injured patient, nursing the patient with Traumatic Brain Injury, care of the open abdomen, abdominal compartment pressure monitoring, older trauma patients - comorbidities and specific age related needs, the impact of early rehabilitation, organ and tissue donation, end of life care and human factors/team communication.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Open Fractures and Orthoplastic Surgical CareSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7065Semester 37NoNo

Open Fractures and Orthoplastic Surgical Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kashif Akhtar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This is a compulsory module that will focus on the multi-specialty management of open fractures, from pre-hospital care to definitive ortho-plastic surgical treatment

The module will provide students with a deep knowledge of how open fractures can be treated by a combined, collaborative approach between surgical disciplines, from the emergency room, to first debridement and then definitive fixation and soft tissue cover. Skeletal stabilisation and soft tissue reconstruction are discussed in detail, including decision-making around implants and choice of grafts/flaps for covering skin defects.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Financial Markets and InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUSM072Semester 17NoNo

Financial Markets and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alain Wouassom
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is about how the increasingly complex relation between financial institutions, markets and firms has evolved over a period of time. A process of financial innovation and deregulation is impacting upon recorded accounting numbers and financial performance of firms much more volatile. In the corporate and non-corporate sectors the relation between financial markets and accounting is complex and inter-related. A large proportion of balance sheet values are now adjusted to reflect financial market values and these adjustments can be significant and volatile. Fair value reporting also requires significant external advisory support to inform accountants: actuaries, credit rating agencies and specialists is specific asset valuations. The development of more sophisticated financial products impacts upon a range of corporate and non-corporate institutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Economics of DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM073Semester 27NoNo

Economics of Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course introduces contemporary theories and the empirical literature of the economics of developing countries with specific reference to public policy delivery. The course will address the problems with public policy delivery in developing countries and what solutions and strategies have been identified in the literature. The course will deal with debates such as centralised and decentralised delivery methods, political economy issues of corruption and state capture, and the role of incentives among politicians and bureaucrats in service delivery.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Public Financial Management and AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM076Semester 27NoNo

Public Financial Management and Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides understanding of the financial development and trajectory of central government finances in the advanced economies. The first half of this module will introduce students to the challenges facing governments in the advanced economies, and in particular, that of sustaining deficit financing. How have the components of central government revenues changed over time relative to expenditures in GDP and the nature of accumulated sovereign debt (roll-over timings and repayments schedule)? Students will examine the political context of public budgeting. We shall explore how the policy shift towards macro-prudential management of these economies has impacted not only on monetary policy, but also on public spending and cutback management, nationally and at regional and local levels of government. The module examines the link between changing budgetary politics and pressure to develop innovative financial vehicles, as well as exploring some of the medium-term financial risks to which these innovations can unintendedly give rise. The second half of this module will focus on the importance for public management of reforms in accounting systems which require a shift toward resource-based and accrual-based accounting. We examine the impact on managers' accountability for public expenditure of the convergence of public sector with corporate international financial reporting standards (IFRS) and role of resource-based auditing . What are some of the implications of adoption "corporate" financial accounting and performance key financial and non-financial KPIs? We examine public-private partnerships such as the UK's Private Finance Initiatives (PFIs) for financing public sector capital projects, and issues of risk transfer and cost-effectiveness. We will consider changes financial practices and reporting in sub-national public agencies (local authorities, health care, policing, etc), the possibilities in some countries for bond-financing for sub-national agencies, and their implications on their financial stability and organisational dynamics.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Essential Skills for Biomedical ScientistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD100Full year4NoYes

Essential Skills for Biomedical Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Szulgit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and how they impact on others.
  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biomedical scientists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills for Biomedical Sciences.
The module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as data and information handling, oral and written communication skills (including essay writing), experimental design, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations in the biomedical sciences. The module will explain how certain aspect of mathematics and chemistry underpin biomedical sciences and will support students in acquiring basic numerical and chemical skills (including SI units, order of magnitude, basic geometry, calculation of concentration and molarity, scales in time, linear and logarithmic equations and graphs). Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support biomedical sciences.

(2) Considering the role of biomedical sciences in the "real world".
Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biomedical sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9, 11: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
Chromosomes and Gene FunctionsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD111Semester 14NoNo

Chromosomes and Gene Functions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Pre-req - A-level Biology or equivalent. This module aims to provide Biomedical Sciences students with a basic understanding of genetic inheritance, chromosome structure and function, how the flow of biological information from DNA to RNA to protein gives rise to the recognisable, inherited attributes of living organisms and how genetic mutations affect these processes. It uses seminal experiments to introduce the students to basic classical and molecular genetics, and then expands on these themes to include genetic engineering and genomic approaches to these phenomena. By the end of the module the students should appreciate the power and limitations of genetics, understand how inherited information manifests as phenotypes, and be able to discuss the principles that underlie patterns of inheritance.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Human AnatomyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD113Semester 14NoNo

Human Anatomy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Le Comber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: B990 students only. In this module you will cover human anatomy from a systems-based perspective. Human anatomy will be introduced through review of the major systems. You will study material relating to systemic anatomy, especially the lymphatic and integumentary systems. You will be introduced to comparative hominid anatomy, and the evolution of human anatomy, especially in relation to the skull, skeleton and dentition.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal ScienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM947Full year7NoNo

Research Project in Gastro-Intestinal Science

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nick Croft
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides a thorough training in research methods, including original research leading to submission of a dissertation and presentation of the data. These skills are generic for any type of research work, and include background research, planning methods, practical work to collect data, analysis and presentation of the data, and defending the research in a viva.

Assessment: 70.0% Dissertation, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation - Clinical Case ReportsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM948Full year7NoNo

Dissertation - Clinical Case Reports

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Alicia Green
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students will write up four case reports of patients from their clinical practice. The student should describe the case using skills and knowledge acquired from previous modules. In addition, they will be expected to relate each case to basic science and/or research relevant to the case ( e.g. evidence for treatment, pathology of disease, etc.)
There are several reasons that may make a clinical case interesting for publication which include:
1. Unusual presentations or unknown disease
2. Unusual aetiology for a disease
3. Challenging differential diagnosis
4. Errors in diagnosis, their causes and consequences
5. Unreported or unusual side effects or adverse interactions concerning medications
6. New associations or variations in disease courses
7. Presentations, diagnoses and/or management of new and emerging diseases
8. An unexpected association between diseases or symptoms
9. An unexpected event in the course of observing or treating a patient
10. Findings that give new insight into the possible pathogenesis of a disease or an adverse effect
Case reports should be short, no more than 2000-3000 words with a maximum of 15 references and 3 figures for each case.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Economics for Business and SocietyBusiness and ManagementBUS108Semester 14NoNo

Economics for Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Caterina Gennaioli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Work and EmploymentBusiness and ManagementBUS124Semester 24NoNo

Work and Employment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: BUS132
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces core ideas relating to work. It applies theories and concepts to the analysis of business situations. It makes use of perspectives drawn from sociology, social psychology, industrial relations, organisation theory and human relations. The dominant theme is to explore work and employment from the employee's point of view rather than that of management. Different perspectives are integrated by focussing on particular work situations and problems.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUS127Semester 24NoNo

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to basic psychological concepts in organizational behaviour including personality and intelligence, motivation and job design, perception and communication, learning, memory and training, decision making , attitudes and job satisfaction. Five metaphors of organizations including the organization as a machine, an organism, a brain, a psychic prison and instrument of domination will be considered in terms of what these offer to our understanding of their effects on individual and group behaviour in organizations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Applied EconomicsBusiness and ManagementBUS128Semester 14NoNo

Applied Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Kavetsos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: "This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

The Management of Human ResourcesBusiness and ManagementBUS324Semester 26YesYes

The Management of Human Resources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowland Curtis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: Organisations often claim that their most valuable resources are their employees, but one of the most difficult tasks of management is to ensure that employees feel valued. This module examines the main theories, concepts and processes that are considered central to the management of human resources. The course combines theoretical analysis with examples of practical application to encourage students to think critically about the management of people. The course draws upon a range of literature and illustrative case studies to engage students and provides them with an opportunity to assess their own experiences of work.

This module has been designed specifically for 'with business students who study human resource management in their third year and is not available for students taking NN12.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Global Supply ChainsBusiness and ManagementBUS326Semester 16YesYes

Global Supply Chains

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module investigates companies' outsourcing strategies, i.e. the growing practice of parcelling out, delegating, or purchasing at least part of their activities from foreign suppliers, whether dependent or independent actors. The main focus is on primary sectors, namely energy, agriculture, non-energy minerals, and forestry/fisheries. It critically examines what value creating activities firms tend to outsource, how, why and to whom, and the relative implications. Outsourcing strategies are understood in a wider international context as characterised by multiple players, in particular global institutions, global private players, states, consumers, trade unions and social movements. For the analysis of global supply chains the module explores and applies different mainstream and non-mainstream theoretical frameworks from different disciplines, namely global supply chain management (business studies) and global value/commodity chains (economic sociology, development studies, economic geography).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Comparative Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM016Semester 17NoNo

Comparative Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldine Healy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will concentrate on the following key features: theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of employment relations; the value and difficulties of a comparative approach; the role of the key actors in employment relations; power, conflict and bargaining; convergence and divergence - a consideration of the debates; the complexity of the trade union role from a comparative perspective; a consideration of international solidarity; impact of globalization and transnational companies on national and cross-national management employment strategies; employee involvement and industrial democracy; social partnership and participation; standards in international employment relations; regulation and voluntarism; examining comparative employment relations through a gender, equality and diversity lens; reappraising comparative employment relations.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Managing DiversityBusiness and ManagementBUSM017Semester 17NoNo

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines theories of equality and diversity and of occupational segmentation. It explores diversity and equality across the dimensions of gender, race, disability, age and sexual orientation and considers the organisational processes, which produce and reproduce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups. The course also considers equality and diversity policy and practice at organisational level. Different national contexts are investigated.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

The Global EconomyBusiness and ManagementBUSM022Semester 17NoNo

The Global Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Introduction to the Global Economy; World Trade; International Factor Movements and the Multinational Enterprise; The Political Economy of Trade Policy; Controversies in Trade Policy ; The Global Capital Market; International Macroeconomic Policy; Economic Growth; Economic Inequality and Poverty; Role of the International Financial Institutions In the Global Economy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

The Human CellBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD115Semester 14NoNo

The Human Cell

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Philpott
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will study the structure, functions and organisation of a generalised human cell based on microscopical techniques. You will study membrane structure and dynamics, mitochondria, Golgi, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes and peroxisomes, the nuclear envelope, nuclear organisation, chromatin, nucleolus and the cell cycle. You will be introduced to endocytosis, exocytosis, cilial movement, the role of the cytoskeleton in cell shaping and motility, apotosis and cell differentiation from stem cells to examples of specialised cells. You will gain knowledge on how to use various microscopes and how to record visual information. You will use the Web to obtain and analyse ultrastructural images. The module work is designed to improve your planning, problem solving and organisational skills.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

The Microbial World and HumansBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD117Semester 14NoNo

The Microbial World and Humans

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme The module is an introduction to microbiology and will provide a general knowledge of archaea, bacteria, fungi and protists. There are also selective discussions in greater detail, for example of motility, adherence and metabolic diversity, as well as the bases for methodologies for asepsis and infection control. Microbial ecology is presented as a discipline which explores the roles of microorganisms in natural processes and mutualistic associations. Practicals allow students to observe living bacteria, fungi and protists and to gain experience in the safe handling and culture of microorganisms.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 11: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and IntegrationBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD121Semester 24NoNo

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and Integration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dunja Aksentijevic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD113, BMD115
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to major non-cardiovascular/respiratory physiological systems involved in human homeostasis for students reading for the degree in Biomedical Science. Topics covered will include: microanatomy and histology of the major human tissues; feedback control, temperature regulation, cell exchange processes; function and integration of nervous, muscle, gastrointestinal, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. The module will describe some of the major human physiological diseases, disorders and dysfunctions of these systems, and some parasitic diseases.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomolecules of LifeBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD123Semester 24NoNo

Biomolecules of Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module offers a grounding in a good range of biochemical topics including the structure function relationship of protein, carbohydrates and lipids; fundamentals of enzyme catalysis and kinetics; transport of molecules across biomembranes; biochemical reactions involved in the generation and storage of metabolic energy; in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle; mitochondrial electron transfer and ATP synthesis; and molecular motors.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigationsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICMM949Semester 17NoNo

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debra Fonalleras-Marcos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module allows the students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of the gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigations. It is intended as an update for those with some experience in endoscopy and as an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module. Specific learning objectives of this module includes:

To study the structure of an endoscope and how it works; Understanding the indications, contraindication and complications of the main diagnostic endoscopic techniques: gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and capsule endoscopy; Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images; Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients; How to organise and run an endoscopy service; Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy; Formulate their own options for investigating various GI symptoms/diseases; Describe the nuclear medicine techniques available for assessing diseases of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract; Learn the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for assessing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Corporate Law and GovernanceBusiness and ManagementBUS329Semester 26YesYes

Corporate Law and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Min Yan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: This module will provide an understanding of the major principles of UK Company Law with particular reference to the legal and corporate governance rules imposed on the board of directors, the senior management and advisors. The module examines the nature and formation of companies, their constitution and the role of and legal responsibilities of management including the theoretical and practical issues involved in the direction and control of companies. The module considers agency theory and stakeholder theory upon which the modern UK and US corporate governance models are based. It will also review some of the most spectacular failures of governance mechanisms in recent years which led to the development of codes of best practice and legislation in the UK and the USA respectively. In addition specific criminal laws affecting businesses today will be considered such as The Bribery Act 2010 and the Fraud Act 2006 and the active management required of the issues raised as a consequence of such legislation. Learning is sustained by case studies and problem solving scenarios.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Macroeconomics Modelling and PolicyBusiness and ManagementBUS330Semester 16NoYes

Macroeconomics Modelling and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: In this module, we will cover selected principles and policies that characterise the macroeconomy. The course will focus on theories and applications of economic growth and income inequality, unemployment and inflation, in particular. The theories will be tested using empirical methods popular in the literature. The student will be able to address questions popular in the new empirical macroeconomic literature such as, what causes a nation's economic activity to fluctuate, what causes unemployment, what are the new empirics of global income inequality, inflation, and unemployment, and what are the spatial distributions of economic growth and unemployment across the world.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Professional and Research SkillsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7091Full year7NoNo

Professional and Research Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The overall aim of this module is to ensure that the trainee has the underpinning knowledge of the importance of research, development and innovation across the NHS and in healthcare science in particular and to provide the underpinning knowledge for the research project

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Introduction to Clinical MicrobiologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7092Full year7NoNo

Introduction to Clinical Microbiology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces the clinically important bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi.
The lectures focus on recent developments in classification, pathogenicity and identification of these organisms.
The lectures are studied in conjunction with the practical sessions of the core diagnostic microbiology and laboratory methods module to develop a complete understanding of the organism, mechanisms of pathogenicity and laboratory diagnosis of clinically important micro-organisms.

Assessment: 45.0% Examination, 35.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15; Semester 3: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 16, 17: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm

Molecular biology and pathogensisSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7093Full year7NoNo

Molecular biology and pathogensis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olivier Marches
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers the student teaching and workshops covering the principles of molecular biology, the biology of bacteria, and explores the use of current molecular techniques in the research and diagnosis of infectious disease. The human immune system is studied followed by a study of the interaction of micro-organisms with the host immune system.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15; Semester 3: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Laboratory ManagementSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7098Full year7NoNo

Laboratory Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students are introduced to the key concepts of laboratory management.The students will study and reflect on: Good management practice. Legislation relevant to diagnostic laboratories. Health and safety in the laboratory. Development of standard operating procedures. Quality assurance in the laboratory. LEAN evaluation and Audit processes. Methods of evaluation of new methods for use in the diagnostic laboratory. Have a knowledge of the role of new technologies e.g. molecular and automation in the diagnostic laboratory. Understand of the role of th diagnostic laboratory within the NHS and with external agencies such as the HPA and WHO. Occupational health

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Essential Skills for BiochemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO101Full year4NoYes

Essential Skills for Biochemists

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and how they impact on others.
  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biochemists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills. This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as essay writing, information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations.

(2) Considering the role of biochemical sciences in the "real world". Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biochemical sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways. Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
Molecular GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO163Semester 14YesNo

Molecular Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: BMD111
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module consists of an introduction to genetics, a description of the process by which genetic information is converted into the molecules that make up living things, and a review of the essential properties of those molecules. Genetics topics covered include DNA structure, classical and molecular genetics and genomics. We then examine how information flows from DNA to RNA and then to protein to give the recognisable phenotypic features of living things.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Practical Molecular and Cellular BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO190Semester 14NoNo

Practical Molecular and Cellular Biology

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for molecular and cellular biology. The module will start by introducing basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, it will then move on through DNA extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 9: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 9: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 9: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Practical BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO192Semester 24NoNo

Practical Biology

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biologists. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then moves on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and finally studies involving whole multicellular organisms.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 6: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Practical BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO198Semester 24NoNo

Practical Biochemistry

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biochemists. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then move on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and techniques of practical chemistry.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 6: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Gender, Sexuality and HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7175Semester 27NoNo

Gender, Sexuality and Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrienne Milner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Recent media coverage and debate over female genital mutilation, trafficking, circumcision, gender reassignment, trans issues, and LGBTQI healthcare provision, have moved gender and sexuality to be central issues in health and human rights. Often in public health and medicine, through the adopting of a biomedical model, 'gender' is coupled with `woman¿ and heterosexuality assumed. Public and academic debate, though, regularly unpacks, even attacks, these assumptions. This module responds to such shifts and debates, encouraging students to explore contemporary issues around gender, sexuality and health in society through seminars and self-directed research. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate the broad array of potential developments around gender and sexuality in public and global health policy and practice.
This module aims to develop and deepen the students' knowledge and skills regarding gender and sexuality around global health policy and practice. It aims to develop an understanding of the diversity of conceptions and debates inside and around global health in responding to challenges to traditional and biomedical understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality, and to allow students to re-evaluate their own approaches and assumptions using appropriate theories and experiences. It aims to develop in students an understanding of the current debates, encouraging them to reflect on challenges and corresponding political and social movements. Students will be able to critique recent developments and theories, synthesizing different approaches to articulate novel developments, interventions and policies. The module aims also to allow students to conduct a piece of research on a topic of their own interest or from a list of suggestions, developing both their research practice and allowing engagement with contemporary or critical issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Causes and Prevention of DiseaseBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD153Semester 14NoYes

Causes and Prevention of Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Bestwick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.

Description: The most common causes of death and disease have changed dramatically over time. In this module you will explore how careful observation, experiment and analysis may eventually lead to improvement in health and in our ability to treat disease. Using examples of medical success stories you will look at the processes of scientific discovery and the many factors involved in moving from the discovery to the implementation of measures to prevent or treat disease. You will learn about the importance of statistical analysis in testing the effect of treatments or changes in behaviour. You will also look at the costs and benefits of medical research, who decides what research should be done, and who pays for it.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Exploring NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD161Semester 14NoNo

Exploring Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces leading topics of interest in neuroscience, through study of which students will gain essential skills in academic and scientific writing, reading scientific literature and writing short reports. An introduction to research methods and statistics will also be provided. The module will aim to give a historical and scientific overview of neuroscience from early anatomists studying the nervous system to the significant contribution to the discipline made by Nobel laureates.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Practical, 9.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 10: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 12: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Functional NeuroanatomyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD163Semester 24NoNo

Functional Neuroanatomy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to the development and anatomy of the nervous system. Topics will include the principles of nervous system development, axonal and dendritic growth. The anatomical organisation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including blood supply and functionally important neural circuits will also be covered. Lectures will be accompanied by practical workshops designed to encourage accurate observation and annotation skills and mastery of functional neuroanatomy.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

Introduction to PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD171Semester 24NoNo

Introduction to Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Egle Solito
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce to the students the concept of the interaction of drugs and other exogenous chemicals with living organisms. It will introduce students to the basic pharmacological principles and concepts which will define drug activity within the body including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These introductory lectures will give students a broad overview into approaches used in drug discovery, medicinal chemistry, main drug targets, drug absorption and routes of administration, drug metabolism and elimination, phamacokinetics, drug treatment of major medical conditions and rationale for prescribing a particular drug, the role of biotechnology in drug discovery, preclinical pharmaceutical development, understanding of the use of animals in pharmacology and adverse drug reactions. Lectures will be delivered by experts in both academia and industry. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, we will provide practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations (DL version)School of Medicine and DentistryICMM961Semester 17NoNo

Introduction to Endoscopy and GI investigations (DL version)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debra Fonalleras-Marcos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module allows the students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of the gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigations. It is intended as an update for those with some experience in endoscopy and as an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module. Specific learning objectives of this module includes:

To study the structure of an endoscope and how it works; Understanding the indications, contraindication and complications of the main diagnostic endoscopic techniques: gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and capsule endoscopy; Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images; Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients; How to organise and run an endoscopy service; Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy; Formulate their own options for investigating various GI symptoms/diseases; Describe the nuclear medicine techniques available for assessing diseases of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tract; Learn the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques for assessing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Trademarks - ITMALawIPLM008Full year7NoNo

Trademarks - ITMA

Credits: 30.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Exemption paper for MSc IP students undertaking the additional exemption exams associated with the professional stream programme (M3EZ). TRADEMARKS FOR INTENDING PATENT ATTORNEYS This module is for students undertaking M3U4/M3U5 additional exemption examinations on the Professional Programme. Students undertaking this module must also undertake IPLM027, IPLM028, IPLM041, IPLM044 plus either IPLM033 or IPLM044 in additiona to IPLM009. Part time (M3U5) students must take this option in their first year along with IPLM041, IPLM044, IPLM028 and IPLM009.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm

Patents - CIPALawIPLM009Full year7NoNo

Patents - CIPA

Credits: 30.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: Exemption paper for MSc IP students undertaking the additional exemption exams associated with the professional stream programme (M3EZ). TRADEMARKS FOR INTENDING PATENT ATTORNEYS This module is for students undertaking M3U4/M3U5 additional exemption examinations on the Professional Programme. Students undertaking this module must also undertake IPLM027, IPLM028, IPLM041, IPLM044 plus either IPLM033 or IPLM044 in additiona to IPLM009. Part time (M3U5) students must take this option in their first year along with IPLM041, IPLM044, IPLM028 and IPLM009.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Marketing Theory and PracticeBusiness and ManagementBUS129Semester 14NoNo

Marketing Theory and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This introductory module is designed to familiarise first year students with key concepts and theories of marketing by exploring its intimate relationship with communication platforms, consumer behaviour, strategies and markets in a connected world. The module will be delivered through a mix of lectures and seminars designed to engage students in the core concepts and theories. Through a combination of case studies from local and international contexts, the module seeks to move theory to empirical analysis of contexts and how other factors including indigenous cultures, values and beliefs can present different challenges in developed and developing countries. The incorporation of a mix of detailed case studies aims to move theory into application and deconstruction of both the strategies and challenges faced by organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Business in Social and Historical ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS130Semester 14NoNo

Business in Social and Historical Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gerard Hanlon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: "The module aims to introduce the idea that we are social rather than natural beings and this impacts upon how we produce, consume, labour, etc. It also means that there are different versions of whether we are collective, individualistic rational, or for how we should treat nature and that all of this shapes how a market society is organised and perceived and the role that the market can and should play within this framework. This directly links to how organisations, the state, management, etc. are encountered i.e. there are ways of viewing the market and its relationship to development, business, organisation, social cohesion, etc. which are important to any degree that purports to develop management education. It is also proposed that students would receive a reading pack and would be expected to make use of the library and develop their reading, interpretative and analytic skills."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Work and Employment in ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS132Semester 24NoNo

Work and Employment in Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: BUS124
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module aims to provide an introduction to the study of the world of work and employment by giving insight into relevant conceptual and theoretical approaches. The course takes a multi-level approach to understanding work and employment. This means that we will be exploring work and employment relations at three levels. At the macro level, wider social, economic, political and cultural context of work nationally and internationally will be explored.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Organisation StudiesBusiness and ManagementBUS133Semester 24NoNo

Organisation Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to basic psychological concepts in organizational behaviour including personality and intelligence, motivation and job design, perception and communication, learning, memory and training, decision making, attitudes and job satisfaction. Five metaphors of organizations including the organization as a machine, an organism, a brain, a psychic prison and instrument of domination will be considered in terms of what these offer to our understanding of their effects on individual and group behaviour in organizations

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Company ValuationBusiness and ManagementBUS331Semester 26YesYes

Company Valuation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing global managers and corporate consultants as they operate in a global world requiring them to know what an asset is worth and what determines its value where ever the asset is around the world. The postulate for sound investing is that a manager does not pay more for an asset than it is worth. In a global world and under competition managers assessments of value must be backed up by reality which implies that the price we pay should relate to realistic estimates of cash flows and uncertainties faced by global managers. Accordingly the module is arranged around: Estimating Discount Rates, Cash Flows and Growth Rates for Valuation purposes, Differences between firm and equity valuation, Real options corporate managers can come across and their valuation, Valuing companies in distress, Relative valuation , Biases in Valuation their manifestation and reduction, Imprecision and uncertainty in valuation, Payoffs to more versus less detail in valuation and cost of complexity, Principle of parsimony and different approaches to valuation

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

NetworkingSBM_6_A
Business Analysis and Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS333Semester 26NoYes

Business Analysis and Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Onakanmi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: This module will develop a student's understanding of the nature of business analysis from a business models conceptual framework grounded in financial accounting. Business models have been conceptualized in the management strategy literature but increasingly employed to inform business analysis. Specifically this module will inform students as to how financial performance is the outcome of variable and contingent stakeholder relations and how these impact upon financial viability and a firms value proposition.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am

International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Corporate Governance and AccountabilityBusiness and ManagementBUS334Semester 26NoYes

Corporate Governance and Accountability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Onakanmi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: This module will develop a student's understanding of the evolution of corporate governance and its central focus on the management of risk and agency gap which theoretically and practically explores differences between the demands of investors and behaviour of senior management. This narrow concept of corporate governance for 'investors' will be contrasted with more broadly conceptualised understandings in terms of how to reconcile managerial interests with a wider group of stakeholders. Students will consider how corporate governance regulation and legislation has evolved and explore the difference between rules and principles based systems of corporate governance.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Project and DissertationSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7099Full year7NoNo

Project and Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mrs Michele Branscombe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The overall aim of this module, building on the Research Methods module is for the student to undertake research that shows originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret new information in a specialism of healthcare science. The student will undertake an original piece of research involving the application of scientific investigation to one or more clinical situations.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Epidemiology and StatisticsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7100Semester 17NoNo

Epidemiology and Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sally Kerry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Biochemistry CommunicationBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO202Full year5NoYes

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guy Hanke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate their own attitudes, values and skills in the workplace and/or in the wider world.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: The module will focus on presenting science, types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review. Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and develop skills to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning. Students will create a podcast on a Biochemistry topic.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarityBIO_PSY_5_S
Professional Placement in BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO200Full year5NoNo

Professional Placement in Biochemistry

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the "Year in Industry/Research" programmes in the field of biochemistry offered by SBCS.
Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.
Successful applicants are supported by the School's placement coordinator and an academic tutor, who will keep in contact with students throughout the placement. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance.
It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

Research Methods and CommunicationBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO209Semester 25NoYes

Research Methods and Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Le Comber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: In this module we look at how to design experiments, how to analyse and present the data obtained and how to communicate those results to others. The lecture and workshop component includes the principles of experimental design, statistical analysis including t-tests, correlation and regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA and non-parametric tests and discussion of how to interpret and present data. The tutorial component consists of a series of writing exercises designed to teach how to structure an argument and how to communicate ideas effectively.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarityBIO_PSY_5_S
Animal and Plant DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO211Semester 15YesNo

Animal and Plant Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will consist of lectures and workshops. Collectively these will cover the diversity of organisms on Earth (with a primary emphasis on animals) including previous diversity (the fossil record) their relationships and key characteristics. During the semester there will be workshops consisting of trips to the Natural History Museum, Grant Museum and London Zoo to allow further study of extant and fossil animals.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Health Systems Policy and PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7179Semester 17NoNo

Health Systems Policy and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elias Kondilis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module we address the fundamental public health question of how best to finance and organise health systems in order to achieve universal health coverage and the effective delivery of comprehensive PHC. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among different social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. The relationship between health systems and the Primary Health Care Approach will be covered, as well as key debates around the interface between aid, global health governance and national health systems. This module will also cover the essential economic theories used to inform health systems policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Skills for PharmacologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD175Semester 14NoNo

Research Skills for Pharmacologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Whiteford
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will cover some basic laboratory skills including experimental design and hands-on experience of a range of laboratory practical (such as quantification of drugs in biological fluids) techniques enabling them to develop skills of working safely and accurately in the laboratory. This module will also provide a basic knowledge of the appropriate statistical ideas and methods to use in the collection, presentation and analysis of pharmacological data, and the use of statistical software. Students will also learn about Informatics (finding the correct information online), bioinformatics (how computers can be used to analyse genomes, genes and gene products), general scientific reading and writing skills (including how to avoid plagiarism), ethics and drug trial design as well as presentation skills in a scientific context.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 7: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Tissue BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD181Semester 24NoNo

Tissue Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Helen Rifca Le Dieu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will be introduced to the embryological development of the major organs and study the nature of different cell types, the structure of different organs and the structure-function relationship of major organs. Your work will include studies on connective tissue, muscle, blood vessels, circulatory system, skin, respiratory system gastrointestinal system, liver and pancreas, urinary system, endocrine system, male reproductive system, female reproductive system, central nervous system, skeletal system, lymphoreticular system, cytology and embryology. In practicals you will be using microscopes to learn the identification of normal tissues and organs.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem SolvingBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD201Full year5NoNo

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: B990 students only. This module is a pre-requisite for the 3rd year SBS320. The SBS320(X) modules comprise 6 Biomedical Science clinical case histories at both levels 5 and 6. The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour assessment sessions. The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS320(X) modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology, anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials. The module is examined in SBS320 year 3 and the 2nd year coursework marks will comprise 10% of the coursework marks for SBS320 3rd year.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 6, 10: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 6, 10: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Human Molecular BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD211Semester 15NoNo

Human Molecular Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Krysov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will look at the following: Structure and organisation of eukaryotic genes; replication and repair of DNA; gene transcription; RNA processing; translation and post-translational processing; control of eukaryotic gene expression; generation of antibody diversity; recombinant DNA technology; basic principles of human molecular genetics; the Human Genome Project; pharmacogenetics and pharmagogenomics; transgenic and knockout mice; and gene therapy.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Quantitative Analysis for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS135Semester 24NoNo

Quantitative Analysis for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: "This module focuses on some of the core skills required to succeed in this digital age: the course focuses on concepts needed to understand and undertake simple statistical analysis of data to extract insights hidden by randomness and the complexity of human interaction. The course provides a first understanding of probability, statistical inference and modelling, and develops skills in presentation of quantitative information. A secondary aim is to enhance student's familiarity with the use of spread sheets and statistical software."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Marketing PrinciplesBusiness and ManagementBUS136Semester 14NoNo

Marketing Principles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: BUS136 is the first module in marketing and available only for students on the BSc Marketing and Management. BUS136 introduces students the areas of research and practice that need to be understood by every marketing practitioner and researcher: buyer behaviour, market segmentation, marketing strategy, marketing mix management (including pricing, distribution and communication), marketing research and ethics. The module is taught with a mix of big and small group seminars.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Economics for Business ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS137Semester 24NoNo

Economics for Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov
Overlap: BUS017
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Principles of Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS138Semester 14NoNo

Principles of Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: BUS021
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will be offered at Level 4 as a compulsory module. The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates some accounting concepts in the context of financial reporting, decision-making, control and global governance. Key conventions and methods of financial accounting will be discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Business to Business and Relationship MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS335Semester 26NoYes

Business to Business and Relationship Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: Firms in industrial (business to business) markets form a much larger percentage of GDP and operate in different ways to business to consumer markets. There are key differences in buyer decision-making (collective rather than individual), the nature of interactions between buyers and sellers (often relational rather than transactional) and the possibility for alliances to influence behaviour. Together these observations lead to a relationship and network centric understanding of industrial marketing practice.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Business ComputingBusiness and ManagementBUS337Semester 26NoYes

Business Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Panagiotopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: The module will broadly explore the impact of computing applications on organisations and individuals. Traditional themes in information systems management will first be examined such as the role of information and how it relates to decision making, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Customer Relationship Management (CRM), e-commerce, IT planning and data applications.
The module will then cover more contemporary aspects of business computing including business intelligence, mobile devices information ethics and the emerging phenomenon of the crowd economy.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Firm Governance and Strategy in the Institution ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS338Semester 16NoNo

Firm Governance and Strategy in the Institution Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martha Prevezer
Overlap: BUS211
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is an optional third year module for undergraduates enrolled in the BSc programmes in Business Management NN12, Marketing and Management 4G44, and Accounting and Management 4P20. The module introduces students to the concepts of governance and to the coevolution of governance, firms' strategies and structures, and institutions. It explores this theme for both developed countries and emerging markets, looking at both historical periods and the current period.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Financial Institutions ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS339Semester 16NoYes

Financial Institutions Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alain Wouassom
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: This is an optional third year module for undergraduates enrolled in the BSc programmes in Business Management NN12, Marketing and Management 4G44, and Accounting and Management 4P20. The module introduces students to the concepts of governance and to the coevolution of governance, firms' strategies and structures, and institutions. It explores this theme for both developed countries and emerging markets, looking at both historical periods and the current period.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7102Semester 17NoNo

Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrienne Milner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health (defined as the unfair and avoidable differences in health status). It will consider structural/material and psychosocial theories, and hypothesis about social drift, self-selection, and genetics. Attention is given to the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Sources of data and measurement of scale of inequalities between and within groups are addressed. The module will consider association with income and distribution of money, resources, and power at global, national, and local level. Policy interventions and their different approaches will be explored including universal and targeted or selective approaches to reducing inequalities by reducing the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical EthicsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7108Semester 27NoNo

Globalisation and Contemporary Medical Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amos Miran Epstein
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics: consent and consensus medical confidentiality, the discourse on distributive justice, human and animal research ethics, end-of-life ethics, transplant ethics, and reproductive ethics. The introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Cell Biology and Developmental GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO213Semester 15YesYes

Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelika Stollewerk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115, BIO111
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.

Description: This module is designed to provide you with detailed up-to-date knowledge of cell biological techniques, the structural organisation, development and differentiation of eukaryotic cells as well as key processes in development that are based on cell-cell interactions and cell movements. In the practicals you will learn standard cell biological techniques in histology and immunohistochemistry and you will be familiarised with the preparation of cell material from living organisms. The module provides an invaluable foundation for genetics, biochemistry, molecular, neurobiological, physiological and biomedical programmes.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 11: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarityBIO_PSY_5_S
Comparative & Integrative PhysiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO215Semester 15NoYes

Comparative & Integrative Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maurice Elphick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO111
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.

Description: The following themes will be covered in this module:1). Comparative anatomy and evolution of nervous systems. 2). Molecular & cellular mechanisms of neuronal signalling. 3). Invertebrates as model systems for understanding mechanisms of neural control of behaviour. 4). An introduction to comparative endocrinology, including the evolution and functions of neuropeptides as regulators of physiological and behavioural processes. 5). Comparative physiology of muscle and connective tissue. 6). Comparative physiology of gas exchange. 7). Comparative physiology of circulatory systems 8). Comparative physiology of osmoregulation 9). Comparative physiology of excretion.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarityBIO_PSY_5_S
Evolutionary GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO221Semester 15YesNo

Evolutionary Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nichols
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO113, BIO163
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Evolution (SBS110) and Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008). This module provides an overview of the evolution of sex, and covers the following topics: Genetic diversity (eg cheetahs in Africa, gulls in Britain, Partula in the Pacific); reconstructing evolutionary history from genetic data; the geographic distribution of Cepaea genes (eg neutralism, frequency dependence in selection, founder events, environmental grain); pre- and post zygotic reproductive isolation, speciation illustrated by Hawaiian Drosophil; Polyploidy (eg occurrence, barriers and consequences); DNA amount (eg variability and ecological effects); meiotic and mitotic defects, tri and monosomies; B chromosomes; 'parasitic' chromosomes; and the evolution of the human genome.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Techniques in Biomedical SciencesBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD219Semester 15NoYes

Techniques in Biomedical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Patricia Munroe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences programmes

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
  • Students will be able to recognise and prioritise areas for developing their own enterprising perspectives.

Description: This module is restricted to students on BSc Biomedical Sciences. In this module you will improve your ability to handle information, to conduct independent study and to extract information from the scientific literature. The work will lead you to better appreciate understand the principles that underlie the techniques used in biomedical science research and analysis laboratories in academia and the NHS. You will cover a wide range of current techniques.
You will explore how technical innovations have driven scientific discovery and biomedical progress and the role of Life Science industry in development and automation of biomedical techniques. Through this you will gain a broader perspective on potential career pathways associated with innovation and enterprise.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 8: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Networking,Enterprising perspectivesBIO_4567_S
Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and RespiratoryBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD221Semester 15NoNo

Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and Respiratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel O'Callaghan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is for students who enter under the B990 programme only. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy (SBC102), The Human Cell (SBC100). This module provides an introduction to the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Topics covered will include: structure, function and regulation of cardiovascular activity and respiration. It will include descriptions of some of the major diseases, conditions, abnormalities anddysfunctions of the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems and problems associated with aerospace travel and diving.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 7, 10: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Essential Biochemistry for Human LifeBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD223Semester 25NoNo

Essential Biochemistry for Human Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Thorpe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD123
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only open to students on the Biomedical Sciences degree programme. The module aims to provide biochemical information on selected specialised structural and functional bulk proteins including: selected human physiological processes; monosaccharide, fatty acid, steroid, amino acid and nucleotide metabolic pathways; regulation of metabolic pathways; tissue specialisation; and metabolic diseases.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

The Law of Patents I and IILawIPLM041Full year7NoNo

The Law of Patents I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module is for MSc students in IP following the professional or business stream.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Trade Mark Law I and IILawIPLM044Full year7NoNo

Trade Mark Law I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module is for MSc students in IP following the professional and business stream.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm

Introduction to Law for Science and EngineeringLawIPLM701PSemester 17NoNo

Introduction to Law for Science and Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is introduced with an explanation of how law works and the systems and processes involved. The first part of the module then focuses on deals and agreements, via the law of contract. The process of negotiating and agreeing will be studied, along with the nature of the obligations contained in contracts, how the law deals with promises made outside contracts, what happens when a deal is broken, and this part will end with an analysis of a commercial contract which explains its different elements and what they do. The second part introduces a range of important non-cultural issues; negligence liability, intellectual property (in outline only), employment issues, and the regulation of scientific research.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Introduction to Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS139Semester 14NoNo

Introduction to Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: BUS106
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will be offered at Level 4 as a compulsory module and will provide the necessary foundation for the level 5 modules. The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. Key conventions and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the measuring and reporting of the financial position, the financial performance and cash flow of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Introduction to Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS140Semester 24NoNo

Introduction to Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will be offered at Level 4 as a compulsory module and will provide the necessary foundation for the level 5 modules. The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. It is intended to help students to understand area of management accounting.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Fundamentals of Management Studies and SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUS141Semester 24NoYes

Fundamentals of Management Studies and Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Athanasopoulou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and how they impact on others.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate connections between different theoretical perspectives within your discipline.

Description: The module will cover a wide variety of topics in management studies and skills. It aims at helping students learn about the nature of managerial work and management skills: what does managerial work consist of, what are the key theories from organisation and management studies that relate to managerial work (e.g. power and politics, motivation and empowerment), what skills are required by managers (e.g. effective management of groups, communication skills), how has our understanding of managerial work changed over time and what are the implications in relation to responsible management practices? The revised module will cover some of the themes taught in the previous version of the module but also extend to a broader range of topics in management studies and skills that prepare our students for their role as (responsible) future managers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Financial Markets and InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUS340Semester 16NoYes

Financial Markets and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ni Peng
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.
  • Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

Description: Financial Markets and Institutions will help students make sense of the financial activity that is so widely and prominently reported in the media. The Module takes a practical, applied approach without neglecting the appropriate theory in order to help students understand events as they happen in the real world. This Module is updated every year to reflect the changes that have occurred in the financial system in recent years.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Corporate Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS341Semester 16NoYes

Corporate Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Mathematical Sciences and School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to justify approaches they have taken when participating in module based enterprise projects and/or situations.Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

Description: This module will develop a students understanding of the nature of corporate finance in terms of the sources of finance and nature of internal calculations that are employed to allocate financial resources into strategic investment projects. Students will appreciate how the techniques of financing and allocation of financial resources have evolved. This understanding will be blended with an appreciation of the strategic management literature on how financial resources are deployed strategically to both create and capture value and how this impacts on risk, equity valuations and bond financing.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SBM_6_S
Evidence-Based Management Critically Appraised Topic ProjectBusiness and ManagementBUS343Semester 26NoYes

Evidence-Based Management Critically Appraised Topic Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: The ultimate goal of evidence-based practice is to help practitioners become more effective through providing a framework for making decisions and taking actions which incorporate the best available evidence from multiple sources. This module focuses on collecting and using one particular source of evidence - scientific research - and using it to address a specific management practice problem. Students will conduct their own Rapid Evidence Assessment report which will review the body of scientific evidence relevant to a specific management practice problem or question.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Genes and BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO223Semester 15NoNo

Genes and Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Hurd
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163, BMD111
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites:Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008) or Chromosomes and Gene Function (SBC210). Genes occupy most of a bacterial genome, but very little of the three million kb of DNA in the 23 pairs of chromosomes in the human genome, so what is a gene? This module provides a molecular view. Gene structure is illustrated in the context of how a gene is transcribed to produce RNA, how the RNA is processed and translated to produce protein and how these processes are regulated through other DNA sequences and proteins. An introduction to bioinformatics will explain how to recognise, compile and identify genes, and infer protein sequence, from DNA sequence, including procedures for interrogating public sequence databases and phylogenetic analysis.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Human Genetic DisordersBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO227Semester 15NoYes

Human Genetic Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jayne Dennis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.

Description: This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management. We will look at key examples of chromosomal abnormalities (i.e. Trisomy 21), monogenic disease (e.g. cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy) and common disease (e.g. coronary artery disease). Students will be introduced to methods and techniques for identifying genetic loci associated with disease (e.g. homozygosity mapping, genome-wide association studies, DNA sequencing). Finally, we will discuss issues around genetic screening, testing and counselling.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 8, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 8, 11: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarityBIO_PSY_5_S
Microbial Physiology and GrowthBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO231Semester 25YesNo

Microbial Physiology and Growth

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Mullineaux
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites:EITHER General Microbiology (SBS758) OR Basic Biochemistry (SBS017) plus one Chemistry Year 1 option. Diversity of microbial metabolisms. Bacterial growth and replication, including organization and division of the chromosome, yield and responses to temperature and nutrient availability. Photolithotrophy, photoorganotrophy, chemilithotrophy and chemoorganotrophy. Fermentation and anaerobic respiration. Growth and extension metabolism of fungi. Nitrogen transformations by microorganisms in free-living and mutualistic settings. Microbiological standards in public health. Clean water processing and waste-water treatment. Practical work will cover prokaryote photosynthesis, bacterial fermentation, fungal digestion of wood and nitrogen transformations in sediments, and microbiological water quality. There will be a brief consideration of clean water processing and waste-water treatment.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Ecological Interactions IBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO234Semester 25NoNo

Ecological Interactions I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Kratina
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO123
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological principles and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations. You will develop understanding of (i) distribution, growth and regulation of single species populations; (ii) interacting species pairs such as competition, predation, herbivory, parasitism; and (iii) structure and dynamics of multitrophic systems such as food webs, ecological communities and ecosystems. The topics will also cover spatial aspect of ecological systems in the metapopulation and metacommunity context, highlighting relationships between biodiversity, stability and ecosystem function.

Assessment: 85.0% Examination, 15.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Transmission GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO241Semester 25YesNo

Transmission Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163
Corequisite: None

Description: The aim of this module is to provide the students with an understanding of how the gene paradigm has changed with time. By examining a number of seminal experiments in detail, and reviewing the development of genetics and reverse genetics in different model organisms, the first half of the module explains how classical approaches to genetics are gradually giving way to a genomics-based approach to this subject. The second half of the module explores the molecular mechanisms involved in ensuring that DNA, the repository of inherited information, achieves the difficult balance of change (mutation and recombination) and stability (repair) necessary for evolution to occur. The various techniques involved in modern genetic analysis are covered as the module progresses. These include plasmids, restriction enzymes, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern and Northern blots, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), cDNA and genomic libraries, and targeted gene knockout technologies.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Biomedical PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD225Semester 25NoNo

Biomedical Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Preece
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD121
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the subject of pharmacology, the study of drug action on biological systems. Initial lectures focus on important general pharmacological principles, including a consideration of how drugs are absorbed, distributed and then removed from the body. Subsequent lectures focus on the therapeutic action of drugs on example disease states of specific physiological systems.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Clinical MicrobiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD231Semester 25NoNo

Clinical Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Wareham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD117, BMD231
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: The Microbial World and Humans (SBC211). In this module you will acquire a basic understanding of modern medical microbiology. You will study the processes by which microorganisms cause human disease, how the pathogens can be identified, and what steps can be taken for the prevention and treatment of infections. There will be a particular emphasis on the development of observational, practical and analytical skills through laboratory work and demonstrations. Your topics will include: pathogens and their interaction with the human host, covering bacteria, protists and viruses and including mechanisms of infection, mechanisms of defense, antibiotic action and antibiotic resistance, the transmission of disease, including public health microbiology, the prevention of infection in hospitals and in the community, and a review of newly emerging diseases. You will be provided with a catalogue of microbial diseases, including infections of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, the nervous system and wounds.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 4, 8: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 4, 8: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 9: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 9: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 10: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Basic ImmunologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD251Semester 25NoNo

Basic Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sian Henson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO171, BIO163, BIO161
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017), Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008), The Diversity of Life (SBS005). This module will cover the principles of innate and acquired immunity, as well as the structure and function of cells and organs of the immune system. Antigens, immunoglobins, complement, and immunoassays and the molecular basis of Bcell and Tcell responses are also covered. Other topics include major histocompatibility complex, antigen presentation, cellcell interactions and cytokines. Transplantation, tolerance, autoimmunity, infectious diseases, inflammation and hypersensitivity reactions are also considered.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD261Semester 15NoNo

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO161, BMD123
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will develop students' understanding of electrical and chemical signalling in neurons and synaptic transmission. Students will learn about the mechanisms of excitability of nerve cells, voltage-dependent membrane permeability, ion channels and synaptic transmission. Neurotransmitters and their receptors will be covered and students will gain an understanding of intracellular signalling and synaptic modulation. The module will provide an critical understanding of the regulation of neuronal signalling, necessary for advanced study of neuronal circuitry/network function.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Systems NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD265Semester 25NoNo

Systems Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arturas Volianskis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD163, (BMD113 or BMD121), (BMD261 or PSY121)
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide an overview of integrated systems which control cognition and behaviour. Topics include the organisation and planning of movement, visual processing, smell and taste perception, cognition, learning and memory. Students will gain understanding of techniques used in systems neuroscience including tract tracing of interacting groups of neurons, immunohistochemistry and extra-cellular electrophysiology. Practical sessions and workshops will give students experience in designing experiments, using apparatus, collecting and interpreting data.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10, 11: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Introduction to Law for Science and EngineeringLawIPLM701USemester 17NoNo

Introduction to Law for Science and Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module is introduced with an explanation of how law works and the systems and processes involved. The first part of the module then focuses on deals and agreements, via the law of contract. The process of negotiating and agreeing will be studied, along with the nature of the obligations contained in contracts, how the law deals with promises made outside contracts, what happens when a deal is broken, and this part will end with an analysis of a commercial contract which explains its different elements and what they do. The second part introduces a range of important non-cultural issues; negligence liability, intellectual property (in outline only), employment issues, and the regulation of scientific research.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Foundations of Intellectual Property Law and ManagementLawIPLM702PSemester 27NoNo

Foundations of Intellectual Property Law and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to both the legal foundations of intellectual property rights as well as to key aspects concerning IP management and exploitation. Students will be introduced (after and introduction into the main economic and moral justifications of IP rights and relevant domestic, European and international sources of law, including patent, copyright, trade mark and trade secret law as well as the basic legal rules concerning licensing and ownership. The focus will be, by way of example, on case studies relating to those rights that students from science subjects will most likely be confronted with in business, such as mechanical and chemical patents, software and database rights, confidentiality and licensing agreements, designs or aspects of brand protection in specific industries such as pharmaceutical industry. This is complemented by lectures explaining how IP rights portfolios are managed and how such rights may be enforced.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Contemporary Legal Issues in Business ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS142Semester 14NoYes

Contemporary Legal Issues in Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fernando Barrio
Overlap: BUS143
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate connections between different theoretical perspectives within your discipline.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is designed to introduce students to the business contexts in which law operates and how law shapes and is shaped by business. It will encourage students to think critically about the intersections of law and a series of key themes in the study of business. Topics will include law and corporate governance (e.g. shareholder v stakeholder theories), law and business strategy (e.g. outsourcing, intellectual property), law and industrial organisation (e.g. global value chains), law and competition (e.g. mergers & acquisitions), the intersection of standard setting and regulation with law-making (e.g. the growing role of private standards and their role as 'soft' law), and law and sustainable development. In addition to exploring these thematic issues, the module will equip students with resources and skills for thinking critically about the operation, structures and functions of legal systems across countries with differing levels of economic development, and different historical trajectories of legal development and how both shape and are shaped by the world of business. We will use a series of case studies to bring these themes to life, including focusing on particular business sectors, commodity chains, countries, and corporate governance scandals. Each will be used to illustrate the intersections between business and legal systems. Students will learn to make oral and written presentations, and how to manage teamwork, as well as to work independently.

This module is offered only to the two following programmes, as a compulsory module for Year 1 students on the BSc Business with Law programme offered by the SBM and as a core module to the LLB Law with Business programme offered by the School of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
Membrane and Cellular BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO263Semester 25YesNo

Membrane and Cellular Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Mullineaux
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO161
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017). This module coves a range of topics: Membrane functions and subcellular organelles; lipid structures; membrane proteins; mobility in membranes and methods for its measurement; cell signalling.; membranes and cancer; endocytosis and exocytosis; protein import; building membranes; mitochondria and chloroplasts; oxidative phosphorylation; the chemiosmotic hypothesis; membrane transport; ion channels.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Metabolic PathwaysBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO265Semester 25YesNo

Metabolic Pathways

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO171
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017). This module covers a range of topics including: Chemical reactions - Biochemical logic. Biochemistry of some vitamin and coenzyme catalysed reactions. Glycogen synthesis and degradation. Pentose phosphate pathway. Gluconeogenesis. Amino acid metabolism and the urea cycle. Fatty acid synthesis and breakdown. Prostaglandin and steroid biosynthesis. Purine, pyrimidine and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Control and regulation of metabolism.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Techniques for Biological and Chemical SciencesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO269Semester 15YesNo

Techniques for Biological and Chemical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO161
Corequisite: None

Description: The module introduces the modern techniques used by the biochemist to study proteins and other macromolecules at the atomic level. The module is divided into the 3 broad themes: Techniques for purification and characterisation of macromolecules; Spectroscopic methods to study macromolecules; and Methods to determine 3D structures, crystallographic and NMR.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Marine and Animal DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO291Semester 15NoNo

Marine and Animal Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Le Comber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a basic marine biology course that covers the biology of the marine animals at the phyletic level. The course will equip the students with an understanding of the taxonomy, phylogeny and basic biology of species from over 20 invertebrate phyla that they will experience directly on the field course. The module will also touch on some marine vertebrates (eg pinnipeds [seals], cetaceans [whales and dolphins] and birds). The module is entirely taught on a 10-day field course, with lectures covering functional morphology and evolutionary relationships complementing the practical work focussing on identification, classification, anatomy, ecology and behaviour. The field course will take place in the September preceding commencement of the level 5 taught modules.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

Ecological Interactions IIBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO294Semester 25NoNo

Ecological Interactions II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Kratina
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO123, BIO234
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological practice and fieldwork, and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations and data collection. You will gain practical experience in the field and also observe researchers collecting scientific data for both terrestrial and freshwater aquatic ecosystems. This will build on, and relate to, the theoretical aspects covered directly in earlier ecology modules.

Assessment: 85.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

Biochemistry CommunicationBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO301Full year6NoNo

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guy Hanke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. The module will focus on types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review. Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Attendance at research seminars is required and a library workshop to developing literature search skills. Tutorials will require a high level of student participation. A number of essays and other course will set and assessment for the module will be Coursework (60%) Final Exam (40%).

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Understanding and Managing Human Resources for Global HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7180Semester 27NoNo

Understanding and Managing Human Resources for Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, students will be introduced first to working definitions of human resources for health (HRH), health system management and health policies, and their relevance for achieving Sustainable Development Goals. Drawing from health systems research, management and economic theory, an overview of health and labour markets concepts will usher the discussion of appropriate tools for planning and managing health workforces in low- and high-income settings. Models to forecast HRH demand and supply will be explained, as well as quantitative methods to analyse health personnel's geographical distribution across services. Training and education systems for health personnel will be considered; particular emphasis will be given in strategies to recruit and retain health personnel in undeserved areas.

Understanding and evaluating HRH performance will be the subject of the second part of the module, where issues such as HRH governance, remuneration and incentives will be discussed into details, making a link with the related topics from the Health Systems, Policy and Practice module. Practical elements of leadership, teamwork, psychological aspects of organisations and management will be explored as an introduction to management theory. The module will end with monographic lectures on current themes such as the crisis of the NHS workforce, HRH in low-income countries and fragile states, HRH migration, and theories of physician behaviour.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 7, 8, 9: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 7, 8, 9: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 10 am -11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Infection, Immunology & InflammationBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD269Semester 25NoYes

Infection, Immunology & Inflammation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olivier Marches
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115 or BIO111
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences and Psychology programmes at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.

Description: The module starts with an investigation of key characteristics of viruses, bacteria and other micro-organisms causing infections in humans. The mechanisms by which micro-organisms cause disease and evade the immune system are considered. It then explores the principle components of the immune system, describing the molecules and cells that protect against infection and cancer, and their contribution to innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of the immune system in disease is illustrated with examples of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarityBIO_PSY_5_S
The Business of PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD271Semester 25NoYes

The Business of Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christoph Thiemermann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD261, BMD265
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Biological Sciences programmes

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to recognise and prioritise areas for developing their own enterprising perspectives.Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate how they have enhanced their own learning through engaging in enterprising skills and behaviours.

Description: This module will bring together pharmacology knowledge and apply it in the context of commercialisation. Students will examine and compare small and start up enterprises, including University spin outs alongside larger pharmaceutical companies. This module will also introduce aspects of finance, intellectual property rights, business law and marketing for business development.

Assessment: 91.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 6 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Enterprising perspectivesBIO_4567_S
Clinical Pharmacology and the Assessment of Drug SafetyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD273Semester 25NoNo

Clinical Pharmacology and the Assessment of Drug Safety

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Atholl Johnston
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to the drugs that work on systems including the neurological, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular disorders and cancer and their mechanisms of action. It will also consider drugs of abuse including cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana and their harmful effects and post marketing safety of pharmaceuticals and pharmacovigilance. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Drug Target and IdentificationBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD275Semester 15NoNo

Drug Target and Identification

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115 or BIO111
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will cover the main drug targets including receptors, enzymes and transporters and molecular therapeutic drug targets such as DNA, rRNA and mRNA. Lecture content will include, topics such as receptor theory, GPCR structure and function, nuclear receptor structure and function, ligand-gated ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases, signalling pathways including Jak/STAT pathway, an overview of developmental signalling, hedgehog pathway, Wnt pathway, TGF beta/BMP, Notch and FGF pathways and crosstalk between these pathways. Lectures will be followed by interactive sessions in specialised areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers and reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Practical, 9.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 10: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Foundations of Intellectual Property Law and ManagementLawIPLM702USemester 27NoNo

Foundations of Intellectual Property Law and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: IPLM701U
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to both the legal foundations of intellectual property rights as well as to key aspects concerning IP management and exploitation. Students will be introduced (after and introduction into the main economic and moral justifications of IP rights and relevant domestic, European and international sources of law, including patent, copyright, trade mark and trade secret law as well as the basic legal rules concerning licensing and ownership. The focus will be, by way of example, on case studies relating to those rights that students from science subjects will most likely be confronted with in business, such as mechanical and chemical patents, software and database rights, confidentiality and licensing agreements, designs or aspects of brand protection in specific industries such as pharmaceutical industry. This is complemented by lectures explaining how IP rights portfolios are managed and how such rights may be enforced.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Data Analytics DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH797PFull year7NoNo

Data Analytics Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Each Data Analytics MSc student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out a Data Analytics MSc Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the Data Analytics MSc Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in data analytics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles and/or performing computation, simulations, or analysis. An MSc project may also involve collaboration with a collaborator based in industry. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Contemporary Legal Issues in Business ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS143Semester 14NoYes

Contemporary Legal Issues in Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fernando Barrio
Overlap: BUS142
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the perspectives or problem solving techniques of different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate connections between different theoretical perspectives within your discipline.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is designed to introduce students to the business contexts in which law operates and how law shapes and is shaped by business. It will encourage students to think critically about the intersections of law and a series of key themes in the study of business. Topics will include law and corporate governance (e.g. shareholder v stakeholder theories), law and business strategy (e.g. outsourcing, intellectual property), law and industrial organisation (e.g. global value chains), law and competition (e.g. mergers & acquisitions), the intersection of standard setting and regulation with law-making (e.g. the growing role of private standards and their role as 'soft' law), and law and sustainable development. In addition to exploring these thematic issues, the module will equip students with resources and skills for thinking critically about the operation, structures and functions of legal systems across countries with differing levels of economic development, and different historical trajectories of legal development and how both shape and are shaped by the world of business. We will use a series of case studies to bring these themes to life, including focusing on particular business sectors, commodity chains, countries, and corporate governance scandals. Each will be used to illustrate the intersections between business and legal systems. Students will learn to make oral and written presentations, and how to manage teamwork, as well as to work independently.

This module is offered only to the two following programmes, as a compulsory module for Year 1 students on the BSc Business with Law programme offered by the SBM and as a core module to the LLB Law with Business programme offered by the School of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
Professional and Academic Development (PAD)Business and ManagementBUS144Semester 14NoNo

Professional and Academic Development (PAD)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This NCM (Non-Credit Module) aims to enhance and develop certain aspects which are essential for the academic journey. The NCM will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). It also touches another aspect of professional development which is the familiarization with computerized analytical skills in the labs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Professional and Academic Development (PAD)Business and ManagementBUS144Semester 24NoNo

Professional and Academic Development (PAD)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This NCM (Non-Credit Module) aims to enhance and develop certain aspects which are essential for the academic journey. The NCM will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). It also touches another aspect of professional development which is the familiarization with computerized analytical skills in the labs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Fundamentals of ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS145Semester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS107
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide an introduction to Business Management and Administration. It offers an understanding of the external and internal business environment, the different contexts of business, an analysis of markets and issues within business management. The approach is informative but also seeks to provoke discussion and reflection and the desire to explore this area in depth. This module serves as a general introduction to the structure and functioning of business organisations. The internal and external environments of business are examined with particular emphasis on political, economic, sociological, technical, legal and ethical issues.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

The Invention of America: American Literature, 1630 to 1865English and DramaESH277ASemester 15YesNo

The Invention of America: American Literature, 1630 to 1865

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sam Halliday
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module surveys a rich array of American literature from the seventeenth century to c. 1865; in doing so, it traces American social, cultural and intellectual history from the earliest colonial settlements to the Civil War. Issues to be addressed include the nature of religious belief in the colonial period; attitudes towards Native American amongst colonialists; early environmentalist consciousness; 'Republican' or `patriotic' sexuality; slavery and ideas of `race.' Authors to be studied include Cooper, Emerson, Hawthorne, Douglass, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

The Invention of America: American Literature, 1870 to the Early Twentieth CenturyEnglish and DramaESH277BSemester 25YesNo

The Invention of America: American Literature, 1870 to the Early Twentieth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sam Halliday
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module surveys a rich array of American literature from (roughly) 1870 to the early 1900s; in doing so, it traces American social, cultural and intellectual history from the aftermath of the Civil War to the emergence of the United States as a continental, globally-influential power. Issues to be addressed include the contrasting novelistic philosophies and styles of Mark Twain and Henry James; the experience of Americans in Europe; antebellum 'race' relations; industry, immigration and the western frontier. Authors to be studied include Twain, James, James Weldon Johnson, Crane, Chopin, and Cather.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Mentoring and CoachingBusiness and ManagementBUS344Semester 26NoYes

Mentoring and Coaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Mcgurk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Business and Management at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: This model is a practical and theoretical introduction to coaching and mentoring in and around the workplace. Coaching is an intervention that helps management professionals' personal and leadership development in a sustainable way. Mentoring is an organisational practice that provides a support system whereby less experienced employees are partnered with more experienced employees to help them in their career development. The module will contribute to students' personal development as potential coaches and mentors drawing on multi-disciplinary approaches to leadership development practices.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

NetworkingSBM_6_A
Human Rights and Public HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7111Semester 27NoNo

Human Rights and Public Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Research Methods and Communication IIBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO309Semester 16NoNo

Research Methods and Communication II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nichols
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO209 (SBC264)
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module we look at advanced topics in experimental design, data analysis and science communication. Topics covered include the design of large-scale studies, advanced data analysis techniques in R, and statistics which build on Research Methods and Communications I from the year before. The tutorial component continues the theme from second year with further writing exercises, a mock exam essay and popular science writing practice.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5, 9: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5, 9: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 9: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Behavioural EcologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO311Semester 16NoNo

Behavioural Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Rossiter
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO113
Corequisite: None

Description: Prerequisites: The Diversity of Life (SBS005), Evolution (SBS110), Statistical Methods in Biology (SBS020) This module will cover concepts in animal behaviour which underpin ideas about more complex behaviours, including communication, ritualisation, homeostasis, instinct and learning. Decision-making and the evolution of adaptive strategies of individuals, optimal strategy sets and habitat selection are also included. Comparative socio-ecology including sexual and kin selection, reproductive strategies and social structure is considered. You will also look at resource patchiness, predictability and productivity as determinants of individual and social behaviour.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Human Genetic DisordersBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO324Semester 16NoNo

Advanced Human Genetic Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jayne Dennis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management. Although examples of Mendelian and complex conditions will be discussed, we will also look at further mechanisms of disease development (for example uniparental disomy and mitochondrial disorders) and the role of genetics in drug efficacy. Students will extend their knowledge and understanding of genomic technologies and the techniques used to identify genetic loci associated with human disease.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Human Genetic DisordersBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO324NSemester 16NoNo

Advanced Human Genetic Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jayne Dennis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SNU102
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management. Although examples of Mendelian and complex conditions will be discussed, we will also look at further mechanisms of disease development (for example uniparental disomy and mitochondrial disorders) and the role of genetics in drug efficacy. Students will extend their knowledge and understanding of genomic technologies and the techniques used to identify genetic loci associated with human disease.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Population and Chromosome GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO325Semester 16YesNo

Population and Chromosome Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Leitch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO113, BIO222 (SBS633)
Corequisite: None

Description: Pre-requisite: Transmission genetics OR Genes and Bioinformatics This module will introduce strategies and methods for identifying the molecular genetic basis of inherited human disorders and other traits in particular how linkage disequilibrium (LD) is used to identify the loci involved. It will use examples from the current literature to better understand genetic variation at a population and species level. It will examine quantitative traits in humans and other species; in particular the heritability estimates to infer the relative contribution of genes and the environment to important quantitative traits and disorders. Together the information will lead to an understanding of genetic drift and natural selection acting on the DNA sequence, the chromosome and genome organisation. The module will explore the evolution of genomic sequences and of chromosomes. Particular attention is paid to evolutionary processes observed at repetitive DNA sequences and the role of chromosomes in transmitting genetic material through mitosis and meiosis. It explores the role and evolution of sex chromosomes, the evolution of sex and of sexual selection. The course should students to achieve a critical understanding of thinking and research in the genetic processes of evolution.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Migrants, Inequality and the Cultural Politics of HealthSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM7181Semester 17NoNo

Migrants, Inequality and the Cultural Politics of Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giuliano Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite:

Description: This module examines a range of theoretical frameworks for studying migration, culture and health. While migration is one of the key drivers of globalisation and the transformation of contemporary societies, `migrants¿ health¿ is a topic that is central for understanding patterns of global health within and between origin and destination countries. The module examines the connections between different forms of migration and inequality and draws attention to the social and political relations within which migrants¿ health and healthcare are embedded.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem SolvingBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD301Full year6NoNo

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: B990 students only. The SBS320(X) modules comprise 6 Biomedical Science clinical case histories at both levels 5 and 6. The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour assessment sessions. The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS320(X) modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology, anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials. The module is examined in SBS320 year 3 and the 2nd year coursework marks will comprise 10% of the coursework marks for SBS320 3rd year.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Endocrine Physiology and BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD311Semester 16NoNo

Endocrine Physiology and Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers hormone definitions, including the range of structures and roles; methods in endocrinology; receptors, concept and significance of high affinity; hormone dynamics; hormone signalling; and modes of action. You will also look at mammalian endocrine glands and hormones: pituitary, thyroid, pancreas. The endocrinology of reproduction; the adrenal gland, and renin/angiotensin system; the paracrine and autocrine systems; growth factors; locally produced hormones; local regulation of hormonal action; and tissue differentiation are also covered. The relationship between hormones and cancer will be discussed.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Cellular Pathology and Blood ScienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD321Semester 26NoNo

Cellular Pathology and Blood Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Helen Rifca Le Dieu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to those students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: Tissue Biology (SBC101). This module provides an overview of basic pathological mechanisms including cell injury, wound healing, inflammation and cell adaptations. The process of neoplasia and the characteristics of major solid tumours will be covered including a review of the mechanisms of tumour spread. The Haematology component will cover basic haematopoiesis, anaemia, haemaglobinophathies, thalassaemia, myelodysplasia, haematological malignancies, haemostasis and bleeding and thrombotic disorders of haemostasis. An overview of the history and basis of blood transfusion and its complications will also be provided.The practical sessions will build on the earlier Microanatomy, Histology and Cytology Module in providing exposure to the histological and cytological interpretation of disease.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 6: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 6: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Infectious DiseasesBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD323Semester 16NoNo

Infectious Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lucinda Hall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD231
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module we select a few topics related to infectious diseases to cover in depth. These will include topics that are currently causing public interest or concern in the UK and internationally. Some lectures will cover principles that apply to many microorganisms, while others will look in detail at particular microbial species.

Two major themes will link lectures on different organisms:
1. Microbial pathogenesis
- How microorganisms damage and manipulate the host
- How microorganisms evade the immune response
- How we investigate microbial pathogenesis
2. Combatting infectious diseases
- Public health surveillance and epidemiology
- Molecular diagnostics and typing
- Drug development
- Vaccines

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 9: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Advanced ImmunologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD351Semester 16NoNo

Advanced Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Stagg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD251 (SBS803)
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will build on the second year immunology teaching, to provide in-depth knowledge of fundamental immuneprocesses, of the ways in which these interact as a complex system that provides protection against infection disease but can alsocause disease when dysregulated and of the importance of immunology in modern medicine. There will be emphasis onmolecular immunology and the key signalling pathways that underpin immunological mechanisms. Lectures in specialised areas of the subject will be given by experts in their field, providing a sense of the frontiers of their subject. In addition to formal
lectures, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-examine research papers. We also hope to offer laboratory practical sessions in which students will be able their own classic immunology experiments.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 27YesNo

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Franco Vivaldi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Level 6 background
Corequisite: None

Description: A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Economics for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS146Semester 24YesNo

Economics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cecilia Lanata Briones
Overlap: BUS137
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explains how firms, consumers and government interact in markets and how business decision-making is shaped by internal factors such as costs and by external market conditions. The unit examines the main concepts of economic theory and explores the importance of these within a business context, with emphasis on the applicability of economic theory to an understanding of the internal dynamics of business organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Financial InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUS201Semester 15YesNo

Financial Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Financial Institutions examines the function, characteristics and operation of various financial institutions e.g. banks, other deposit-taking institutions as well as non-deposit-taking institutions. This involves not only an examination of the nature and characteristics of their services or products they offer via different markets eg money markets, bond markets, equity markets, foreign exchange markets, derivative markets and the credit markets in order to meet the needs of different market participants, but also of why financial crises emerge in the operation of these markets.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUS204Semester 15YesNo

Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module employs five strategic categories to introduce students to the historical and theoretical foundations of contemporary strategy. Those five categories are the future, regulation, growth, leadership, and choice.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Business LawBusiness and ManagementBUS205Semester 15YesNo

Business Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fernando Barrio
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This unit provides an understanding of: the English legal system, the principles of the law of contract and of the tort of negligence as they apply to business. The unit also provides an understanding of the part law plays in enabling the conduct of business generally; its regulation, and the achievement of commercial aims.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Microeconomics for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUS208Semester 15YesNo

Microeconomics for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cecilia Lanata Briones
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module applies microeconomics to problems confronting managers, in particular general managers. It focuses on markets, prices and market structure in two different situations, those in which markets are generally competitive, being large, impersonal and anonymous, and those in which identities matter. Examples of the latter are large firms in which the identities of competitors, suppliers, and sometimes customers matter, and more personal economic relations such as that between employer and employee in which identities always matter. Analysis of markets in which identities matter involves a focus on topics such as information, reciprocity, credibility, reputation and transactions costs.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Global Law and GovernanceLawLAW6454Semester 16NoYes

Global Law and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthieu Burnay
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Law

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: 'Global Law and Governance' analyses from a multidisciplinary perspective the different roles played by regulatory structures and laws in the orchestration of global governance. The module investigates the history of ideas and legal doctrines that have shaped the construction of the global legal order in the last century; presents the plurality of actors, legal instruments, and values that shape an increasingly globalised legal landscape; and applies more conceptual knowledge to the areas of global security, trade, and environmental governance.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Multi- and inter-disciplinarityLAW_456_S
Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal SystemsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6011Semester 26NoNo

Brain and Mind, Disorders of Supraspinal Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adina Michael-Titus
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: History of neurology, challenges in drug discovery for neurological & psychiatric conditions, neuropathology of basal ganglia disorders, epilepsy, cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, stroke and head injury; Imaging and biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, genomics, proteomics and metabonomics; neurobiology of endocannabinoids; neurotransmitter release.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6012Semester 16NoNo

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: An overview of topics in cellular and molecular neuroscience that are fundamental to other BSc neuroscience course units. Neuron and glial organisation, synapses and circuits, signal transduction and neurotransmission, ion channel physiology, receptors, trophic factors, signalling pathways, neuroplasticity, neuro-inflammation and inflammatory damage to the nervous system, cell death, molecular biology of brain tumours, stem cell neurobiology.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Disconnected Pathways: Disorders of Spinal SystemsSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6013Semester 16NoNo

Disconnected Pathways: Disorders of Spinal Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Basic and advanced anatomy of peripheral nerve and spinal cord; acute and chronic pain, visceral pain, pain models, management of pain , trophic factors, peripheral nerve injury, neuronal and glial responses to injury, regeneration and repair of nerve injuries, basic and clinical sciences of spinal cord injury.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Experimental NeuropathologySchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6014Semester 16NoNo

Experimental Neuropathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jurgen Groet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases covering techniqiues such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects cover trauma, Alzheimers Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tautopathies.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

Economics of Social IssuesEconomics and FinanceECN231Semester 15YesYes

Economics of Social Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN111; ECN113
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Economics and Finance

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: This is a module in the applied microeconomic analysis of social issues of topical importance in and outside the UK. Issues such as crime, addiction and wellbeing would seem to be the main research domain of social sciences such as psychology, health, sociology and politics. However, in recent years economics has provided valuable theoretical and empirical insights that have contributed to add the current debates on these issues. Students will have the opportunity to look at these various social issues not only from the point of view of various social sciences but, in particular, from through the lenses of the economics approach.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_456_S
Corporate StrategyEconomics and FinanceECN302Semester 16YesYes

Corporate Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN214; ECN211
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: This module provides an overview of corporate strategy in a global context and will enable you to become familiar with the core concepts of: External environmental analysis; models of internal and external analysis, analysis and management of resources; analysis of corporate strengths and weaknesses; knowledge management; development of strategic choice; elements influencing implementation of strategy.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Topics in EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECN322Semester 16YesNo

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stepana Lazarova
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN225
Corequisite: None

Description: This module develops the knowledge of econometric methods that are useful in the analysis of economic phenomena and financial markets. The module is suitable for students with interest in theory and empirical applications of econometrics and for students considering master studies. The topics considered may differ over years. Candidate topics are maximum likelihood estimation, GMM estimators, panel data, limited dependent variable models, ARCH and GARCH models, structural change and time series.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Economics Project IIEconomics and FinanceECN325Full year6NoNo

Economics Project II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: ECN326
Prerequisite: ECN206; ECN211
Corequisite: None

Description: An expansion of Economics Project I ECN326. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not available to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Economics Project IEconomics and FinanceECN326Semester 16NoNo

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: ECN325
Prerequisite: ECN206; ECN211
Corequisite: None

Description: Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Economics Project IEconomics and FinanceECN326Semester 26NoNo

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: ECN325
Prerequisite: ECN206; ECN211
Corequisite: None

Description: Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Applied EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECN336Semester 26YesNo

Applied Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Reinhard Weisser
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN225
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides you with hands-on environment in which you will learn how to analyse real economic data by applying economic theories and econometric methods in combination. The module also aims to develop your abilities in data collection, information gathering from a wide range of reading and critical evaluation of what is taught in textbooks. The module is assessed by coursework only.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Public Health in PracticeSchool of Medicine and DentistryICM6108Semester 16NoYes

Public Health in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Randall
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students on the Global Health programme at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: In this module students will work with a staff member and community collaborator(s) on a global health project. Students will have the opportunity to apply their skills, knowledge and experience to a "real-life" public health problem. Working as a research team and being responsible for individual tasks, students will gain experience in delivering across the life cycle of the research process.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

NetworkingGLH_6_A
Data MiningElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS766PSemester 17NoNo

Data Mining

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Patras
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Data that has relevance for decision-making is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the Internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and electronic patient records. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist decision-makers to make intelligent use of these repositories. The field of data mining has evolved from the disciplines of statistics and artificial intelligence.

This module will combine practical exploration of data mining techniques with a exploration of algorithms, including their limitations. Students taking this module should have an elementary understanding of probability concepts and some experience of programming.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Object Orientated ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS769PSemester 27NoNo

Advanced Object Orientated Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jeremy Gow
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will introduce concepts associated with advanced object-oriented programming concepts, such as inheritance and polymorphism, creating templates, advanced working with exception handling, stream input/output management, associative containers, algorithms, stacks, queues and binary trees, different search and sort methods, namespaces, advanced string class methods, and working with libraries, e.g. boost and STL. It also explores some of the contexts in which these techniques are useful.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS770UFull year7NoNo

Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: A design, development or research project in the field of electronic engineering, to be taken by all final year MEng students registered for an MEng programme of study in Electronic Engineering. This module aims:
* to give students experience of managing their own time to complete a project in engineering design, development, or research which is initially specified only in terms of the final desired outcome
* to teach students to develop a professional approach in their project work and to develop their communication skills, both written and oral, to a standard expected by industry of a new graduate.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS771UFull year7NoNo

Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This individual project on a suitable subject under academic supervision will require an extensive literature review, good technical implementation and evaluation skills combined with the ability to undertake independent critical analysis. Assessment is by written report and viva. The value of this module is worth more than its nominal 30 credit weighting. The project is seen as an excellent indicator of a student's overall ability to carry out a serious piece of work, and consequently employers are likely to be impressed by competence shown. It will give you a topic of conversation at your job interview. Some professional organisations, such as IEE, only accept a degree as a valid precondition of membership if it includes a substantial individual project. This module is compulsory for the degree title G401 MSci in Computer Science. Online information is available from https://intranet.dcs.qmul.ac.uk/courses/coursenotes/projects/bsc/ Not open to Associate Students

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Bayesian Decision and Risk AnalysisElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS773PSemester 27NoNo

Bayesian Decision and Risk Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Neil
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will cover:

Introduction to information systems;
Types of information system; Uses of Information systems;
Information systems in e-commerce and e-business;
Information system design and development;
Case studies of business information systems;
The human factor in information systems;
Legal and ethical issues in Information systems.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

MSc Industrial Placement ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS774PFull year7NoNo

MSc Industrial Placement Project

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Claire Revell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The industrial placement project consists of 8-12 months spent working with an appropriate employer in a role that relates directly to your field of study. The placement is undertaken between the taught component and the project. This will provide you with the opportunity to apply the key technical knowledge and skills that you have learnt in your taught modules, and will enable you to gain a better understanding of your own abilities, aptitudes, attitudes and employment potential. The module is only open to students enrolled on a programme of study with integrated placement.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Professional Capability
Level: 7
Timetable:

Security EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS775PSemester 27NoNo

Security Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohammad Hossein Rezaei Khouzani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Cyber-security is an indispensable requisite of any IT-dependent enterprise and critical knowledge and skills in security is in increasing demand. This module emphasizes on cyber security engineering, and will cover a broad range of cyber security fundamentals, including major concepts, security requirements, practices, technologies and policies. Weekly labs will deliver a range of skills in enforcing security requirements, performing system evaluation and mitigating common vulnerabilities.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Econometrics BEconomics and FinanceECOM032Semester 27NoNo

Econometrics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Emmanuel Guerre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: (Macroeconometrics) This module is designed to provide you with a general knowledge and the basic methods used in the current practice of macroeconometrics. The module covers the following lecture topics: A brief history of macroeconometrics and current methodological issues in macroeconometrics; the main characteristics of macroeconometrics and fundamental tools. It examines two important aspects: dynamics and interdependence; and interpretation of econometric results: expectation and exogeneity. It then goes through basic models with cointegrated time series and discusses how to link macroeconometric models to macroeconomic theory. Prerequisites: ECOM 003 Econometrics A

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

International FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM035Semester 27NoNo

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francis Breedon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The process of financial globalisation has emphasised the importance of international capital flows for the understanding of exchange rate dynamic behaviour. For this purpose, the emphasis of the module will be on models for exchange rate determination which is an area of central importance to major financial institutions. The module will focus specifically on (purchasing power and interest rate) parity relationships, the use of the forward rate as an optimal predictor of the spot nominal exchange rate; the asset price view of exchange rate (using either flexible or sticky prices) with financial assets as perfect substitutes; the international CAPM and the (first generation) models of currency crises. Particular attention will be paid to the implementation of the Vector Autoregression Model (VAR) as an econometric methodology to test some of the theoretical models.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 6 pm - 7 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Quantitative TechniquesEconomics and FinanceECOM037Semester 17NoNo

Quantitative Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof George Skiadopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to provide you with the necessary tools for writing and estimating simple econometric models in the context of financial quantitative analysis. Basic statistical tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained. We will assume you have a minimal knowledge of econometrics and statistics.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 10, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 10, 12: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 10, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Behavioural FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM038Semester 27NoNo

Behavioural Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asen Ivanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The purpose of this module is to develop students understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of behavioural finance, the empirical research surveyed in this area and the implementation of investment strategies based on the behavioural finance approach. To compare and contrast the assumptions behind modern financial economics with behavioural finance. Prerequisites: ECOM 050 Investment Management

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Asset Pricing and ModellingEconomics and FinanceECOM044Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Zachariadis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The aim of this module is to provide students with the analytical tools of advanced finance theory. The module will give an introduction to stochastic calculus, optimal control and martingale methods, and will cover dynamic asset pricing models, optimal consumption and portfolio theory, equilibrium models of the term structure of interest rates, option pricing of interest rates and stocks based on arbitrage and general equilibrium models, incomplete markets and portfolio optimisation in incomplete markets. Prerequisites: ECOM043 Quantitative Asset Pricing

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 7 pm

Professional and Research PracticeElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS427USemester 14NoYes

Professional and Research Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Antonios Kaniadakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and how they impact on others.Students will be able to identify and discuss what their own role in their programme and/or subject discipline might mean to them for future educational endeavours.
  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module provides you with the opportunity to examine the role of engineering in society and the expectations of society for a professional engineer. During the module, you should develop and achieve a level of written and spoken communication expected of a professional engineer. You will also construct a personal development plan (PDP) and an on-going employability skills folder. The assessment of the module is 100 per cent coursework, broken down as follows: oral presentation: 25 per cent; in-class essay: 25 per cent; PDP folder: 25 per cent; employability folder: 25 per cent. Not open to Associate Students or students from other departments.

Assessment: 65.0% Coursework, 35.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Networking,International perspectives
Professional and Research PracticeElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS427WSemester 14NoNo

Professional and Research Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Rachel Appleton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. It covers the following topics: discipline topic tasters; finding, retrieving and evaluating information; ethics, science & technology; scientific and technical writing; skills for workplace context.

Assessment: 55.0% Practical, 45.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Skills for Electronic EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS428UFull year4NoNo

Skills for Electronic Engineering

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Luk Arnaut
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to support first year students in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science through the transition from school to university. It will provide students with the opportunity to work with others to develop and share basic practical skills that underpin many EECS first year modules, foster a sense of enquiry and intellectual curiosity, develop basic graduate attributes that underpin effective student learning, and prepare and encourage students to obtain some work / voluntary experience at an early stage in order to enhance their employability.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Organisational EnvironmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS429WSemester 14NoNo

Organisational Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eranjan Padumadasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only available to degree apprentices studying the BSc Digital and Technology Solutions programme. It provides a tailored opportunity for degree apprentices to investigate and analyse the relationships between their study and work contexts through a supervised individual project.

Assessment: 55.0% Practical, 45.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Computer Systems and NetworksElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS430USemester 14YesNo

Computer Systems and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Akram Alomainy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides you with a basic understanding of how a computer works and how programs are executed by the CPU at the machine level. As an introduction to computer architecture and systems software, this module presents the concepts needed to understand typical computers at the level of their ';machine-code'; instruction set. It covers Boolean algebra rules and terminology as well as logic gates. The module also examines the use of bits, bytes and data formats to represent integers, text and programs as well as looking at the conventional von Neumann computer architecture (CPU, registers, memory). Assembly language programming and system software are introduced.

Assessment: 65.0% Examination, 35.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

C ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS501USemester 15YesNo

C Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eliane Bodanese
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS401U
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces the principles of C Programming to students who already know how to program at a basic level in Java. It provides a knowledge of the theory of C Programming and also its practical use in real engineering systems. The focus is on microprocessor based systems.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Economics of Technology and InnovationEconomics and FinanceECN344Semester 26YesNo

Economics of Technology and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Aniol Llorente-Saguer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN211; ECN214
Corequisite: None

Description: This course studies the interrelation between, market structure, firm behaviour, innovation and technology. Topics covered will include competitive markets, monopolies, pricing and marketing tactics, networks and technological standards, cartel formation, implicit collusion, antitrust enforcement, differentiated products, advertising, patents and intellectual property rights, among others.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Communicating and Teaching Computing: the Undergraduate Ambassadors SchemeElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS641USemester 26NoNo

Communicating and Teaching Computing: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Students will typically begin by observing the teacher's handling of the class and progress from this classroom assistant stage through small teaching tasks to at least one opportunity to undertake whole class teaching, possibly for a short part of a lesson. They will represent and promote computing and related subjects more generally as a potential university choice.
Students will undertake and evaluate a special project on the basis of discussion with the teacher. This may involve a specific in-class teaching problem or an extra-curricular project such as a lunchtime club or special coaching periods for higher ability pupils. The student will keep a journal of their own progress in working in the classroom environment, and they will be asked to submit a reflective written report on the special project and other relevant aspects of the school placement experience. This format is standard within the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme (www.uas.ac.uk).

Assessment: 50.0% Practical, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Embedded SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS642USemester 16YesNo

Embedded Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS502U or ECS518U
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides a practice-oriented introduction to embedded real-time systems. The main topics are
(1) Modelling and simulation in UML and state-of-the-art tools; (2) Basic concepts of micro-controllers; (3) Real-time systems with interrupts and schedulers; (4) Real-time operating systems: processes and communication; (5) Energy aware design and construction; (6) Debugging and testing as part of software development processes.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Power ElectronicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS643USemester 16YesNo

Power Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kamyar Mehran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces the principles of power electronic systems, including: power components and devices (diodes, thyristors, triacs, diacs, transistors and regulators); power conversion systems (rectifiers, inverters, DC-to-DC converters, AC-to-AC converters); safety (crowbar protection, heat dissipation, soft switching).

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Microwave and Millimetrewave ElectronicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS644USemester 16YesNo

Microwave and Millimetrewave Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rostyslav Dubrovka
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module covers: RF SPECTRUM: Revision of basic RF spectrum. Radio transmission bands. Regulatory considerations. MODULATION & DEMODULATION: AM & FM modulation principles; basic modulation & demodulation circuits. Digital modulation principles; basic digital modulation & demodulation circuits. BEHAVIOUR OF ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AT RF: Behaviour of R, L and C at RF; use of reactance plots and reactance charts. Transistor equivalent circuits for RF applications. COUPLING NETWORKS & FILTERS: The design of RF coupling networks; design of basic Low Pass, High Pass, Band Pass and Band Stop filters. AMPLIFIERS: Revision of basic amplifier circuits. Multi-stage small-signal linear amplifiers. Class B & C amplifiers; switching amplifiers. R.F. & wideband amplifiers. Noise in amplifiers. Principles of feedback & feedforward. Frequency response. MIXERS & OSCILLATORS: Mixer and oscillator theory; basic mixer and oscillator circuits. L.C. tanks, quartz crystals and ceramic resonators. Phase Locked Loops & Frequency Synthesizers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Microwave and Millimetrewave Communications SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS645USemester 26YesNo

Microwave and Millimetrewave Communications Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Donnan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module covers: Introduction to microwave systems, bands and applications.
Two conductor transmission media; coaxial, stripline and microstrip.
Use of transmission line transformers in matching.
The Smith chart; derivation, representation of admittance and impedance, normalisation.
Stub matching.
One-port devices; Schottky barrier diodes, PIN devices.
Gunn and IMPATT devices; simple negative resistance oscillator design.
Two-port devices; use of S-parameter analysis, passive two-port devices, the network analyser.
The MESFET. Simple microwave amplifier design.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Dissertation - International Shipping LawLawQLLG007Full year7NoNo

Dissertation - International Shipping Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of International Shipping Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor(s).

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Image ProcessingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS776PSemester 27NoNo

Image Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pengwei Hao
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course gives students an introduction to image processing. Areas covered include image representation, and image transforms, image enhancement using point and spatial operations, image filtering, image restoration, image compression and image segmentation.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

ElectronicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS777PSemester 17NoNo

Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Donnan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will set out the fundamental principles of analogue electronics analysis and design, prior to studying applications of a range of electronics devices and subsystems, such as instrumentation amplifiers, active filters, low-noise amplifiers, feedback systems, isolation amplifiers, front-end amplifiers. Grounding and shielding and data acquisition systems will be briefly outlined. It outlines the operation of components such as diodes and transistors (BJTs and FETs) only briefly, while the main emphasis is on systems built and based on amplifiers.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced Control SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS778PSemester 27NoNo

Advanced Control Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Flynn Castles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces the advanced topics in control systems and the control engineering application in power electronic systems, automotive and robotics design. Topics include stability analysis of nonlinear systems, digital control systems, intelligent systems, model predictive control, adaptive control and variable structure control, estimator design and modeling and real-time simulation. This module will have labs either in the electronics lab, or in the ITL.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Computer ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS780PSemester 17NoNo

Computer Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to the principles of programming in the context of designing and constructing complete programs. Programming techniques will be introduced and practical work will form an integral part of the course and of the assessment of students. The first half of the course will concentrate on program structures. The second half will cover representation of abstract types such as lists and trees using the types such as records and arrays provided in imperative programming languages.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Cloud ComputingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS781PSemester 27NoNo

Cloud Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohammad Hossein Rezaei Khouzani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS401 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Cloud Computing has transformed how services and applications are delivered. Thanks to the rise of virtualisation technology and new programming paradigms, applications can quickly be delivered to a growing audience, without the need to physically own and configure the infrastructure. The Cloud Computing module will cover the main characteristics of Cloud Computing, including the enabling technologies, main software and service paradigms underpinning it, as well as related aspects, namely security, privacy, ethical concerns

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Introduction to IOTElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS782PSemester 17NoNo

Introduction to IOT

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stefan Poslad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides a comprehensive overview of the Internet of Things, also called machines, smart objects, smart devices and ubiquitous computers. These Things will support smarter interaction with physical environment things; smarter interaction with each other, virtual or cyber things and with humans. Form factors for smart devices will be based upon the form factors of Smart Tabs (Wearable centimeter sized devices, e.g., smart tags used to track good), Smart Pads (Hand-held decimeter-sized devices for personalised communication, e.g., tablets, smart phones), Smart Boards (Meter sized displays and surfaces for collaboration), and Smart Dust: MEMS (ICT devices can be miniaturised, cheaply manufactured, without visual output displays, ranging from mm to nm, that can be embedded into 2D & 3D surfaces or scattered into 3D spaces), Smart Skins (fabrics based upon light emitting, conductive, polymers, organic computer devices that can be formed into more flexible non-planar display surfaces and products such as clothes and curtains), Smart Clay (ensembles of smart dust and smart skins that can be formed into arbitrary three dimensional shapes as artefacts resembling many different kinds of physical object, including additive printing), and Smart Containers (use to house or transport goods or people. This module will define the core system architectures, including middleware to design single device and multi-device systems. It will also offer hands-on experience in labs to build smart device applications.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Commercial and Investment BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM049Semester 17NoNo

Commercial and Investment Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module students will study the role of money in the macroeconomy, the behaviour of interest rates, banks and other intermediaries, the regulation of both money markets and the banking system and the operations of central banks. The focus is on the practical aspects of money and banking as experienced by practitioners in financial institutions.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 6 pm - 8 pm

Investment ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM050Semester 17NoNo

Investment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alfonsina Iona
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This offers a high level introduction to concepts related to investment analysis. Topics treated include valuation of real and financial securities; the principles of investment; valuation of risky securities; portfolio analysis and bond portfolio management; financial market equilibrium; the CAPM and APT models; capital budgeting and risk; market efficiency.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 6 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 7 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 6 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 6 pm - 8 pm

Quantitative Methods in FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM053Semester 17NoNo

Quantitative Methods in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Panagiotis Koutrompis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied econometrics to financial problems. The material is presented through detailed examples with associated data and softwares and hence should prove useful and interesting to students whether or not they have some prior exposure to econometrics. Basic statistical tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 6 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Microprocessor Systems DesignElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS502USemester 15YesNo

Microprocessor Systems Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Tautschnig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the structure, applications and programming of microcontroller and similar devices. There will be practical work on using the devices as part of the module. Aims: * To impart an understanding of the architectures of microcontrollers microprocessors, and PIC devices.
* To impart an understanding of the design issues in using microcontrollers and similar devices.
* To enable students to make an informed choice of microcontrollers or similar device for a particular application.
* To enable students to use microcontroller devices in electronic circuits.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Electric and Magnetic FieldsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS504USemester 25YesNo

Electric and Magnetic Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tijana Timotijevic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers the basic laws of electric and magnetic fields, their application to elementary problems involving steady and time changing fields and currents, and an introduction to electromagnetic radiation. The Maxwell Equations, which explain the relationships between time varying electric and magnetic fields, will be introduced. The emphasis is on physical intuition and visualisation supported by mathematical modelling and analysis and labs.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

Software EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS505USemester 15NoNo

Software Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mustafa Bozkurt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS401U
Corequisite: None

Description: Software Engineering is concerned with applying engineering principles to the production of software. This module provides the management principles, theoretical foundations, tools, notation and background necessary to develop and test large-scale software systems. The practical part of the module consists of lab assignments in which students use a range of relevant tools (a Java programming IDE, unit testing tool, configuration management tool, UML design tool, and project planning tool).

Aims
To ensure students have the necessary understanding of the principles and tools needed to build and test large-scale software systems. In particular, it provides the necessary background for students to undertake a significant group project assignment in subsequent modules or employment.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Software EngineeringElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS505WSemester 15NoNo

Software Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Usman Naeem
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. It covers the following topics: engineering principles, management principles, theoretical foundations, tools and notation for development and testing of large-scale software systems; practical skills in using a range of relevant tools including a Java programming IDE, unit testing tool, configuration management tool, UML design tool, and project planning tool; exposure to industry-standard techniques and tools.

Assessment: 55.0% Practical, 45.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Software Engineering ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS506USemester 25NoYes

Software Engineering Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mustafa Bozkurt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS505U
Corequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at Level 5

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate their own attitudes, values and skills in the workplace and/or in the wider world.Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate how they have enhanced their own learning through engaging in enterprising skills and behaviours.

Description: Students in pre-assigned groups of approximately six will be presented with a significant software problem to solve. To meet the problem requirements and build a satisfactory system within the time constraints the students will have to apply the principles learnt in the Software Engineering module and will have to work effectively as a team. Each team must choose a project manager and assign appropriate roles to each member.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Networking,Enterprising perspectivesECS_5_S
Software Development and QualityElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS646USemester 16YesNo

Software Development and Quality

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eranjan Padumadasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module will cover the entire software development lifecycle from design through to deployment and maintenance, with an emphasis on quality, industry standards, and professional issues. Topics will include: software in business; software development processes and technologies; modelling, architecture and design; configuration, change, versioning and release management; implementation deployment and maintenance; legacy architectures, technologies and systems; software quality, standards and processes; project management, resourcing and control; project risk management; software documentation.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Software Development and QualityElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS646WSemester 16NoNo

Software Development and Quality

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eranjan Padumadasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS505U/W; ECS506U/W
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. The module will cover the entire software development lifecycle from design through to deployment and maintenance, with an emphasis on quality, industry standards, and professional issues. Topics will include: software in business; software development processes and technologies; modelling, architecture and design; configuration, change, versioning and release management; implementation deployment and maintenance; legacy architectures, technologies and systems; software quality, standards and processes; project management, resourcing and control; project risk management; software documentation.

Assessment: 55.0% Practical, 45.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Bayesian Decision and Risk AnalysisElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS647USemester 26NoNo

Bayesian Decision and Risk Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Neil
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The role of software is increasingly critical in our everyday lives and the accompanying risks of business or safety critical systems failure can be profound. This module will provide you with a framework for articulating and managing the risks inherent in the systems you will develop as a practitioner. Likewise, you will learn how to build decision-support tools for uncertain problems in a variety of contexts (legal, medical, safety), but with a special emphasis on software development. This module will make a distinctive offering that will enable you to bring a principled approach to bear to analysing and solving uncertain and risky problems. Module contents: Quantification of risk and assessment: Bayesian Probability and Utility Theory, Bayes Theorem and Bayesian updating; Causal modelling using Bayesian networks with examples; Measurement for risk: Principles of measurement, Software metrics, Introduction to multi-criteria decision aids; Principles of risk management: The risk life-cycle, Fault trees, Hazard analysis; Building causal models in practice: Patterns, identification, model reuse and composition, Eliciting and building probability tables; Real world examples; Decision support environments.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Data AnalyticsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS648USemester 26NoNo

Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anthony Constantinou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module focuses on the range of approaches, methodologies, techniques and tools for data analysis, and the use of data analysis findings to inform decision-making in an industrial / business context.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Electrical Machines and SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS649USemester 26YesNo

Electrical Machines and Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kamyar Mehran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces the principles of electric power generation, transmission and distribution. It also explains the operation of electric machines and simple power electronic systems.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm

Semi-structured Data and Advanced Data ModellingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS650USemester 16YesNo

Semi-structured Data and Advanced Data Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS519U
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module, student will learn to process XML (with XSLT and Java), to model data with XML (XML native, RDF), and to query XML data (XQuery). The module teaches many concepts of data modelling and knowledge representation that are beyond the syntactic issues of XML or RDF. The knowledge students acquire in the course is fundamental to the many data design and data analytics tasks occurring in todays IT and business landscapes. The second part of the module is dedicated to advanced DB concepts including active databases, mobile databases, spatial and temporal databases, triggers, performance tuning, distributed databases, indexing and query optimisation. The third part of the module covers the modern, agile world of data processing: NoSQL. It is about the processing of semi-structured data, transforming data streams into formats (triplets, JSON) to be processed by new DB systems (e.g. MongoDB, CouchDB). Overall, students will learn in this module to solve data and information management tasks as they typically occur in today's IT landscape.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Introduction to IOTElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS782USemester 17NoNo

Introduction to IOT

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stefan Poslad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides a comprehensive overview of the Internet of Things, also called machines, smart objects, smart devices and ubiquitous computers. These Things will support smarter interaction with physical environment things; smarter interaction with each other, virtual or cyber things and with humans. Form factors for smart devices will be based upon the form factors of Smart Tabs (Wearable centimeter sized devices, e.g., smart tags