Module directory 2020-21

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2020-21. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • A Queen Mary student looking for information on QMUL Model modules and their availability.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

Please go to myQMUL for further information on the QMUL Model.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.
  • For the QMUL Model, we cannot always guarantee your first choice of module selection.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesQMUL ModelDescriptionThemeAvailable to
German Thought II: Political Thought in the Twentieth CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6005Semester 16YesNo

German Thought II: Political Thought in the Twentieth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Angus Nicholls
Overlap: GER6005
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate some of the major developments and tendencies in twentieth-century German thought, paying particular attention to political thought and its relation to twentieth century German history and cultural production. Key subjects studied may include a selection of the following: German-Jewish thought and Zionism, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Phenomenology, Philosophical Anthropology, Constitutional Theory. Texts will be studied in translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6006Semester 26YesNo

Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: FRE6006
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module centres on narratology, the structural study of fictional narrative. Narratological analysis addresses questions such as: How can we talk about the selection of detail in fiction? What are the implications of having characters narrate their own stories? You will study a major work of narratology, and apply its principles to some classic French literary texts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century, studied in translation. Creative writing work, based on the set texts - rewriting passages, composing additional episodes, etc. - plays an important part in the module, developing your understanding of texts and techniques as well as your skills in written expression.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Avant-Garde Theatre in EuropeLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6007Semester 26YesNo

Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: CAT6007, HSP6007
Prerequisite: Any level 5 literature module

Description: Why should characters behave illogically on stage or not exist at all? How can image rival plot? And what is the point of shocking audiences?
This module introduces some fundamental styles and plays from European avant-garde theatre and sets them within an artistic and socio-political context. Futurism, Dada, Expressionism and the Theatre of the Absurd are included. We will at all times try to see texts as excuses for performance and use other aspects of culture to understand the challenges of this new drama.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON5066Full year5NoNo

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON5061
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a lower Intermediate level (CEFR level A2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON5067Full year5NoNo

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON5062
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a CEFR level B1in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read more complex and challenging texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and more challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at an intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Sound Recording and Production TechniquesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS749PSemester 17NoNo

Sound Recording and Production Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mathieu Barthet

Description: The module develops the students' skills and understanding of contemporary audio production techniques. It will give the students a good grounding in the theoretical aspects of audio production, from the functionality of audio interfaces to the signal processing within audio effects, as well as providing practical experience in the use of all audio equipment to which the theory applies. The students will learn the implications of audio digitisation, through which they will gain an understanding of the various means by which digital media is disseminated in the modern age.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Economics and Management of Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN433Semester 27NoNo

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module will equip you with the fundamental tools of economics and management principles. You will learn about their application to conventional and sustainable energy conversion powerplants; systems and their components; and life cycle analyses of energy systems. In addition to understanding the key aspects of international energy supply and demand economics, (and their effect on fuel prices and energy sources), you will also consider the effects of national and international energy policy and emissions regulations on the overall energy scene, analyse developments in the energy markets, and assess the overall impact on environmental issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Renewable Energy SourcesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN438Semester 17YesNo

Renewable Energy Sources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Huasheng Wang

Description: The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the global energy scene and the impacts of energy production and consumption on the environment. The module provide the students with an understanding of the origin and nature of various renewable/sustainable energy resources, the assessment of their ability to meet our future energy demands, and the design of renewable energy systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Engineering ChemistryEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4401Semester 14NoNo

Engineering Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: In this module we build a basic understanding of physical and organic chemistry relevant to chemical Engineering, with particular emphasis on atomic and molecular structure, molecular shape, and chemical bonding. It further builds an understanding of organic chemistry and organic reaction mechanisms with an appreciation for the influence of acids, bases and pH.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Student Centred Learning for Chemical EngineersEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4402Full year4NoNo

Student Centred Learning for Chemical Engineers

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: This module provides the essential scientific, practical and design skills for Chemical Engineers. The module material is delivered by means of a combination of brief lectures, hands-on lab sessions, design exercises and group-based problem based learning tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Engineering Mechanics: DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4108Semester 24NoNo

Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Folashade Akinmolayan

Description: This module provides an introduction to the modelling and analysis of one-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. It includes analysis of the motion (kinematics) of particles. It then goes on to deal with the forces causing these motions (kinetics) by the application of Newton's laws of motion. After this methods for the solution of the differential equation describing the equation of motion and one-degree-of-freedom vibrations will be studied and this will be applied to the description of vibrations of onedegree-of-freedom mechanical systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Vehicular CrashworthinessEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN411Semester 27NoNo

Vehicular Crashworthiness

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fabian Duddeck
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN331

Description: The module aims to provide an in-depth description of all aspects related to the design of vehicles with respect to their crashworthiness. Here within are included technical aspects, social aspects and economical aspects, which are finally placed in the context of the total product development processes of current industries. Main parts are: history of crashworthiness, crash tests, structural aspects, material selection and modelling, numerical methods for crash, biomechanics, restraint systems and special aspects related to aerospace and automotive.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Surgical Techniques and SafetyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN412Semester 17NoNo

Surgical Techniques and Safety

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su

Description: This module introduces students to a wide range of equipment for use in surgery. It looks at the importance of electrical safety within the medical environment, and the rules governing equipment. It also aims to cover the principles of operation of a number of important monitoring devices and some of the major electronic equipment used within a surgical environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN4122Semester 14NoNo

Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Folashade Akinmolayan

Description: This module provide students with knowledge of basic mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are matrices, linear equations, differentiation, integration, complex numbers and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Students are introduced to command prompt applications of the numerical and symbolic toolboxes of Matlab.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 9.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 16.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7335Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6335
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4121 and take DEN4108

Description: The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Membrane Science and TechnologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7401Semester 17NoNo

Membrane Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Conventional separation processes account for 40-70% of both the capital and operating costs in industry. Membrane processes are often used to concentrate and purify both aqueous and organic liquid solutions as well as gases. Membrane based separations are spread in various industries such as pharmaceuticals, oil and gas, wastewater treatment and desalination. Membrane science has experienced a significant growth in recent years. Membranes are able to separate molecules with no phase change requiring a great deal less energy than thermal processes. Membrane separation is listed among the Top 5 technologies contributing to the sustainability of industrial production. Hence, it is of great importance to add Membrane Science and Technology in the toolbox of chemical engineering graduates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Utility SystemsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7402Semester 27NoNo

Utility Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Recent increases in the costs of fuels and power and new restrictions on fuel related emissions (both legislative and financial), have provided additional incentives to examine the provision of heat and power for industrial processes. New and advanced practical tools are now available for targeting, design and operation of utility systems (including cogeneration). This course examines the design and operation of fuel consumers (such as furnaces, boilers and gas turbines) and power generators (such as steam turbines and gas turbines) in the context of the provision of heat and power to a variety of end users. Models and tools are developed that can be easily applied in the design and operation of utility systems in order to minimise operational costs and, where appropriate, to maximise the effectiveness of capital expenditure. In addition methods and tools are available to examine and optimise these systems in the context of the overall and changing requirements of process users and generators, thereby maximising effectiveness, flexibility and profitability of total sites.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7405Semester 27NoNo

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6405
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5242

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Middle AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5210Semester 15NoNo

Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Middle Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval
Overlap: COM511
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module studies the development of autobiographical writing and the concept of the self in the Middle Ages. It will explore a series of texts ranging from late antiquity to the late Middle Ages, produced by men and women, and concerned with the life of the religious and the lay. Key texts, studied in translation, include: Augustine of Hippo's Confessions, Peter Aberlad's Story of His Misfortunes, Guibert of Nogent's Memoirs, Margery Kempe's The Book of Margery Kempe, and Leonor López de Córdoba's Memorias.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON4067Full year4NoNo

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON4062
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for false beginners in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a basic level with the language required to cope effectively with a range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at A2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read simple texts in Chinese Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand simple spoken texts and have a basic general discussion about a variety of topics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IILanguages Linguistics and FilmCON5060Full year5NoYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for low intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language .

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN4123Semester 24NoNo

Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4122

Description: This module builds on DEN4122 Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 1 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basic vector algebra, sequences and series, functions of several variables, ordinary differential equations and multiple integration. Students are introduced to programming techniques using Matlab.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN419Full year7NoNo

Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN327 and take DEN329

Description: Students will be engaged in a self-initiated project of some weight; evolving their own practice and producing new and meaningful design work. Students will be expected to produce design work, which is appropriately contextualised and also produced to high professional standard. The student will experience the critical decision making in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also demonstrate project management skills and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Advanced Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN420Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN320

Description: This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Whole System Design in Sustainable EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7433Semester 27NoNo

Whole System Design in Sustainable Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module examines the nature of sustainability and various sustainability models before examining the role of national and international government agencies on environmental management. The role of technology is examined, primarily through life cycle analysis, and includes design of products, energy supply, and personal consumption. A particular emphasis will be placed on life cycle analysis of wind, solar and nuclear.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Energy Storage EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7600Semester 27NoNo

Energy Storage Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Jorge Sobrido

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Introduction to Solar EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7601Semester 27NoNo

Introduction to Solar Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Digital Humanities: the Computational Study of LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5213Semester 25YesNo

Digital Humanities: the Computational Study of Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Benjamin Holgate
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is a critical introduction to the new tools and techniques that are being developed to study literature at a vastly greater scale. Although the field in general is often referred to as the digital humanities, or cultural analytics, this course focuses on the computational analysis of literature. Students learn how the use of big data - and small data - is challenging conventional modes of research and theory in literary studies. No previous experience in programming is required.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Constellations: Online Anthology Group ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6002Full year6NoYes

Constellations: Online Anthology Group Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kiera Vaclavik
Overlap: COM7002
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.
  • Students will be able to justify approaches they have taken when participating in module based enterprise projects and/or situations.Students will be able to critically evaluate how they have enhanced their knowledge, understanding and self-awareness of an enterprising perspective.

Description: Working in groups, students will design and build an online anthology on a theme (or other organisational principle) of their choosing. Students will analyse existing anthologies in both academic and commercial contexts, and receive necessary IT training before going on to create their own anthology. This will include an introduction, a series of extracts in a range of media and commentaries on those extracts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON5061Full year5YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON5066
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for low intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON5062Full year5YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture II (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON5067
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.Students will be able to analyse the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts upon aspects of their discipline.

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for intermediate learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a growing foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN426Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN326

Description: This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Gas TurbinesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN427Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN306

Description: Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306 for the first six weeks. In the last 5 weeks (weeks8-12) the lectures will cover the Land-Based Power-Generation Systems (gas turbine based, steam turbine based and combined cycle based), the use of steam tables for steam engine performance calculation. Power Plant Performance Analysis and Optimisation and mechanical aspects of turbomachinery design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Biomedical Engineering in UrologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN430Semester 17NoNo

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight

Description: The course explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, catheters, pads and implantable devices and materials. Initially the course covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including NHS clinical engineerings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace VehiclesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM001Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Aerospace Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM003Full year7NoNo

Aerospace Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Computational EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM004Semester 17NoNo

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen

Description: This is advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aero and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Biomedical Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM006Full year7NoNo

Biomedical Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Computational Fluid DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM010Semester 27NoNo

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ahmed Ismail

Description: Following on from an introduction to CFD in DEN331, in this module we deepen our knowledge in various areas. We learn to analyse the properties of discretisations and apply these to simple model equations. We discuss the various aspects of modelling turbulence. In the accompanying laboratory, we learn to generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems on these meshes and perform the relevant analysis of the quality of our simulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5122Semester 15NoNo

Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4122 and take DEN4123

Description: This module builds on DEN4122/4123 Mathematics and Computing 1/2 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basics of vector calculus, vector and scalar fields, gradient of scalar fields, optimisation, div and curl of vector fields, vector integration, integral theorems, curvilinear coordinates, application to derivation of the Navier-Stokes Equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Control Systems Analysis and DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5200Semester 25NoNo

Control Systems Analysis and Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guang Li

Description: This module is focused on the basic principles of control systems analysis and design and its application to engineering systems in relation to mechanical, medical, electro-mechanical and aerospace systems. The students will acquire the skill of designing a control system for a particular application. They will also gain practical experience in analysis and design of a typical control system with MATLAB using the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures and problem solving sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics IEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5208Semester 25YesNo

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4101

Description: The role of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics in materials science. The module will begin wilth derivation and description of some fundamental kinematics and thermodynamic phenomena such as Gibbs free energy, rate equations, equilibria etc. The effect of variables such as temperature and pressure will be examined. The module will go and to demonstrate with examples how these can be applied to solve problems for gas, solution, and solid phase scenarios with a particular emphasis on polymer synthesis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Aerothermodynamics of Fluid FlowsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5242Semester 15NoNo

Aerothermodynamics of Fluid Flows

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4101 and take DEN107

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows, formation of waves, Mach number and Mach Wave, Shock-Waves, effect of area change and back pressure on the flow of gases and its application to jet engines and wind tunnels, flow measurement and flow visualization in compressible flows. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of compressible aerodynamics and its implication in aerospace engineering. The second part of the module provides students with a basic knowledge of viscous flows and boundary layers and drag.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
European Literature and its ContextsLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4205Full year4YesNo

European Literature and its Contexts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "This module introduces students to a variety of key literary and cultural figures, periods and movements that have influenced the development of literature and culture across Europe over the centuries. We begin in the first semester with classical Greece, before moving on, via the medieval period, the renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, to the enlightenment and Romanticism. In the second semester, the focus is upon twentieth-century developments in particular: Modernism, Existentialism, feminism, Structuralism and post-modernism. Through the study of texts from a wide range of genres (philosophical writings, short stories, poetry, drama, essays and film) and originating not only from a variety of eras but also locations (for example, Greece, France, Germany, Portugal, Spain, England, Russia), an overview of the contexts and developments of European literature will be provided."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
European Literature and its ContextsLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4205ASemester 14YesNo

European Literature and its Contexts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to a variety of key literary and cultural figures, periods and movements that have influenced the development of literature and culture across Europe over the centuries. We begin in the first semester with classical Greece, before moving on, via the medieval period, the renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, to the enlightenment and Romanticism. In the second semester, the focus is upon twentieth-century developments in particular: Modernism, Existentialism, feminism, Structuralism and post-modernism. Through the study of texts from a wide range of genres (philosophical writings, short stories, poetry, drama, essays and film) and originating not only from a variety of eras but also locations (for example, Greece, France, Germany, Portugal, Spain, England, Russia), an overview of the contexts and developments of European literature will be provided.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
The East in the WestLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM608Semester 26YesNo

The East in the West

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This course module will survey and analyse key aspects of the interaction between Russian and East European émigré and exilic cultures and Western culture and thought in the 20th century (French, German, American). Particular fields to be considered include the fine arts, literature, cultural history, and social and political thought. Drawing on works by a range of Russian and East European artists and thinkers, we will explore the legacy of these key figures in their fruitful dialogue with Western culture and thought, and how Western culture responded to the challenges and opportunities of this encounter.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Comparative Literature Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6201Full year6NoNo

Comparative Literature Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Angus Nicholls
Overlap: Students are not permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: At least 2:1 average attainment up to final year

Description: Entry to this module will not be automatic. All students wishing to take this module must meet the entry requirements, present an approved topic and have an agreed supervisor. It is designed to enable suitably qualified final-year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual or group research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. Introductory group sessions on research methods will be followed by individual supervision. You should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON6071Full year6YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: CON6076
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2/C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectives
RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM011Semester 27NoNo

Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module introduces robotics as an integral part of modern automation, provides an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems. It also provides an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, actuators and sensors, principles and roles in robotics. It introduces various aspects of robot modelling and control and problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM012Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton

Description: This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research Methods and Experimental Techniques in EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM014Semester 17NoNo

Research Methods and Experimental Techniques in Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DENM114

Description: The module introduces MSc students to design of research projects, use of equipment and analysis of the collected data. After a completion of the module the students will be able to devise and plan research projects, conduct research of their own and achieve optimal results from the equipment in use. The link between mathematical models, experimental design, experimental results and validation tests will be made clear

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Avant-Garde Theatre in EuropeLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6007PSemester 27NoNo

Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: CAT6007, HSP6007
Prerequisite: None

Description: Why should characters behave illogically on stage or not exist at all? How can image rival plot? And what is the point of shocking audiences?
This module introduces some fundamental styles and plays from European avant-garde theatre and sets them within an artistic and socio-political context. Futurism, Dada, Expressionism and the Theatre of the Absurd are included. We will at all times try to see texts as excuses for performance and use other aspects of culture to understand the challenges of this new drama.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Mexican Revolution and its AftermathLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6009Semester 16YesNo

The Mexican Revolution and its Aftermath

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patricia D'Allemand
Overlap: HSP6009
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: This course examines the historical background to the Revolution and the profound impact that this first major revolution of the twentieth century (1910-1917) had on the society and culture of modern Mexico. It focuses on the ways in which Mexican artists, writers and intellectuals responded to and engaged with the processes the revolution unchained. The course will look at Mexican Muralism and the writings of authors such as José Vasconcelos, Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Elena Poniatowska and Carlos Fuentes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian Novel: Dysfunctional FamiliesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6019Semester 26YesNo

Russian Novel: Dysfunctional Families

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Schonle
Overlap: COM5019, RUS5019 and RUS6019
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1917. We will focus on novels about the disintegration of the family under the pressure of raging ideological and moral debates in Russia following the Great Reforms of the 1860s. The core readings will be Turgenev's Fathers and Sons, Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov and Bely¿s Petersburg (one of the greatest Modernist novels). Themes include the relation between fiction and ideology, religion and modernity, social models and revolutionary ferment, Russia and the West, and the distinctiveness of the Russian novel.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON6061Full year6YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON6066
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and growing mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B1/B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
MSc Advanced Research ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS7500PFull year7NoNo

MSc Advanced Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Karen Shoop

Description: This module draws together the knowledge and skills from the taught component to address a research challenge of significant scope to be undertaken independently, under supervision. It focuses on the technical, project management and communication skills needed to successfully execute academic- and/or industry-oriented research. The project entails to apply research methods to solve original problems of fundamental or applied nature. The module is assessed by oral examination and a thesis produced at the end.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Chemical Engineering: Principles and PracticeEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4404Semester 24NoNo

Chemical Engineering: Principles and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: An introduction to the principles and practical techniques of chemical engineering will be provided in this module. This includes dimensional analysis, conservation equations, constitutive relations, component mass balances, membrane separation, chemical reactor design, energy balances and overcoming equilibrium limitations. In addition, we will study design and control problems, using tank drainage as important example. We will cover applications including renewable energies and clean fossil fuels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Engineering Materials for DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5002Semester 25NoYes

Engineering Materials for Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT4002 or take ECS426U

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: This module provides an introduction to engineering materials, providing the student with an understanding of how the structure of materials (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites) influences their properties and performance when used in products and how these properties can be improved. It will cover how to structure business and financial plans and how to produce them, as well as providing an understanding of project management methodologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Design For ManufactureEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5101Semester 15NoNo

Design For Manufacture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah

Description: This module will develop strategies to identify product requirements, identify design constraints, think creatively, solve problems and identify solutions. It will examine how 3D CAE can be used to create detailed design drawings, create simple assemblies, manufacture prototypes, real parts and also how analytical models such as finite element analysis can be used to evaluate designs. A wide range of different processing techniques will be examined. Various strategies such as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) that can be used to evaluate the design risk, will be described to determine 'safe' design. The role of inspection and statistical process control techniques in ensuring a robust design and manufacturing process will be examined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Biomedical Engineering in UrologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM016Semester 17NoNo

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight

Description: The course explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, catheters, pads and implantable devices and materials. Initially the course covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including NHS clinical engineerings..

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM021Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali

Description: This module covers fundamentals and applications of combustions in automotive engine. Topics covered in the module include the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations, as well as additional directed advanced reading material in energy use in power plants, combustion modelling and life cycle analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Gas TurbinesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM022Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306, but there will be additional directed reading on this module, to enable students to tackle a substantial piece of coursework. This will concern the energy use in power and propulsion systems and the optimisation of land-based power-generating gas turbines in combined cycles with steam plant or similar project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Economics and Management of Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM023Semester 27NoNo

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module describes the global energy scene including a historical review of energy supply and demand trends, fossil fuels and climate change, what is renewable energy and a review of sustainable energy sources. It describes Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, accounting and management principles, the free market structure, cartels, barriers to entry, and example applications in the energy field. Applications related to energy vectors and technologies for power plants are included. Policy and climate change issues are discussed, including the emissions regulations. A thermo-economic analysis of various conventional and renewable power plants and their components is included.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
SurrealismLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6029Semester 16YesNo

Surrealism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: FRE6029
Prerequisite: None

Description: This interdisciplinary module focuses on the art, literature, politics and theory of Dada and Surrealism. Students will study surrealist painting (Dali, Magritte, Kahlo), collage (Ernst), photography (Man Ray, Cahun), film (Dalí and Buñuel, Artaud, Dulac), poetry (Desnos, Eluard), and politics (Breton). Topics to be studied include: art and psychoanalysis, art and politics, art and revolution, gender identity, and representation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Twentieth-century French Thought: Language and CreativityLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6035Semester 26YesNo

Twentieth-century French Thought: Language and Creativity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kirsteen Anderson
Overlap: FRE6035
Prerequisite: None

Description: is module explores how imagination and language work together in French literature and thought from the late nineteenth- to the late twentieth-century, a period of exciting experiment. It invites you to respond both as a literary critic and as a creative writer. You will study three significant writers - Stéphane Mallarmé ( a symbolist poet), Roland Barthes (a cultural critic interested in the myths and social structures which shape us) and Luce Irigaray (a philosopher and psychoanalyst trying to open up a new cultural space for women and men) - who all interpret their contemporary moment and their relationship to writing in innovative ways.
You will be able to experiment as a writer through a series of short written assignments in response to each of the texts studied (commenting on a poem or on the process of translating it; developing your own piece of cultural criticism; generating an exploratory text which links gender, language and thought).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 16.67% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 16.67% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 16.67% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Brecht and the DramaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6040Semester 16YesNo

Brecht and the Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: COM5040, GER5040, GER6040, COM6040P
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature or drama module

Description: It is generally acknowledged that Bertolt Brecht is one of the most important playwrights of the 20th century. However, his plays, his theatre work and his theories of the theatre are often misunderstood. The purpose of this module, which is also available to students who know no German, is to take some representative plays, put them into their historical and dramatic context, and examine how they work. We will also examine Brecht's pronouncements on the theatre and on individual plays.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON6062Full year6YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON6067
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Solid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5102Semester 25YesNo

Solid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vassili Toropov
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4102 or take MAT102

Description: This module further develops material taught in the first year with respect to stresses and strains in components and how they may be designed to prevent failure. It considers plane stress and strain conditions, using matrix notation to describe these conditions and the failure criteria that may be applied to these systems. It also considers complex bending conditions in asymmetric and composite beams and the stability of struts. Examples will be drawn from applications in aerospace, mechanical and medical engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Energy Conversion AnalysisEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5107Semester 15YesNo

Energy Conversion Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take DEN4006 or take DEN4404 ) and take DEN107

Description: This module will develop the ideas introduced in DEN4006 Energy Conversion Systems and study how energy conversion systems can be analysed quantitatively. To do this it will use many of the concepts and fundamental laws introduced in DEN107. It will also analyse reacting flows with particular reference to combustion and their application to the analysis of internal combustion engines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Engineering InstrumentationEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5109Semester 15NoNo

Engineering Instrumentation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hasan Shaheed

Description: This module is focused on transducers and their uses in engineering control systems. It studies methods of taking measurements, and motor and actuator theory, reviewing important transducer characteristics and the methodology for selecting an appropriate transducer. In relation to this, the module also covers methods of acquiring data from transducers, and effectively processing electronic signals. All aspects of the module content are brought together in a problem based learning exercise, involving the control of a robotic arm.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Clinical MeasurementsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM024Semester 27NoNo

Clinical Measurements

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su

Description: This module aims to provide an understanding of biopotentials and other biological signals, and identify mechanisms by which they can be measured. It also aims to provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental principals associated with transducers, and comprehensive review of the most widely used techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of disease states

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Numerical Optimisation in Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM026Semester 17NoNo

Numerical Optimisation in Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: 1. Introduction.
Motivating examples. Sizing, shape and topology opt, Local vs Global opt. Deterministic vs. stochastic opt, linear vs. non-linear, unconstrained vs constrained opt.

2. Deterministic Optimisation
* Unconstrained Optimisation.
Line search vs Trust region methods. Line search methods: Armijo and Strong Wolfe Conditions. Steepest descent algorithm. Search directions: nonlinear conjugate gradient method, Newton's method; Quasi-Newton methods.
* Constrained Optimisation
Penalty methods, interior point methods
* Computation of derivatives Finite-Differences, tangent linear models, adjoints, automatic differentiation

3. Stochastic Optimisation
* Population-based methods
Genetic algorithms, Evolutionary algorithms, Simulated annealing, Particle swarm methods, Multi-criteria evolutionary strategies
* Surrogate modelling
Design of Experiments, Response surface methods, Kriging, Regression models

4. Applications
* Parametrisation
Shape optimisation methods (CAD-based methods, surface and volume morphing, re-meshing techniques), Topology optimisation methods (negative / positive voxel methods)
* Industrial applications
FEM applications in structural opt of shape and topology, CFD applications in shape optimisation
* Overview of commercial software

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Schools for Scandal: Sexual Fictions from Venus in the Cloister to Venus in FursLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM606Semester 26YesNo

Schools for Scandal: Sexual Fictions from Venus in the Cloister to Venus in Furs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Will Mcmorran
Overlap: FRE304
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores a range of erotic, libertine and pornographic texts from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. It includes so-called 'whore dialogues' (Venus in the Cloister), best-selling novels (Fanny Hill, and Thérèse philosophe), and some well-known works by the Marquis de Sade, and Sacher-Masoch. It will examine the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality are represented within these and other texts from the period, and explore past and present constructions of pornography and literature. Warning: this module contains sexually explicit material.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Migration in Contemporary European Literature and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM607Semester 16YesNo

Migration in Contemporary European Literature and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Wilks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines contemporary works of literature and film revolving around the topics of migration and transcultural experiences. It is designed to familiarize students with some key themes and concepts in the field, such as displacement and diaspora, memory and belonging, language and identity, cultural hybridity and third space. By exploring texts and films originally produced in English, French and German , it will take a comparative stance, considering the differences and similarities between the migration experiences - and their artistic manifestations - in different western European countries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON6066Full year6NoNo

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON6061
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and growing mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B1/B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON6067Full year6NoNo

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture III (b)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON6062
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module is suitable for students with a low intermediate level (CEFR level B1) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency in speaking, accuracy in written expression, and mastery of Chinese characters. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal relatively comfortably, confidently and competently at an intermediate level (CEFR B2) with the language required to cope with a wide range of circumstances and situations. In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus which reflects the attainment criteria Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus. By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS750PFull year7NoNo

Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: The aim of the MSc project is to give students the opportunity to apply to a significant advanced project, the techniques and technologies, that they have learned in their lecture modules. Projects will either be significantly development based, or else have a research focus. All projects will be expected either to investigate or to make use of techniques that are at the leading edge of the field. Candidates will be asked to submit a project report on completion of the allotted project period (3 months full time). This report will be evaluated using the standard criteria for scholarly work. Projects will also include a viva where students will be required to demonstrate and defend their work.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Aerospace StructuresEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN307Semester 26YesNo

Aerospace Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen

Description: This module will provide the student with the basic tools of structural analysis including the structure idealization, analysis of the thin-walled cellular type of structure peculiar to the aircraft, stress calculations of composite structures, fundamentals of elasticity and buckling analysis of plate.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Third Year Project (BEng/MEng)Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN318Full year6NoNo

Third Year Project (BEng/MEng)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital

Description: The purpose of the project is to provide an in depth knowledge of a particular area of Engineering. The project may typically involve experimentation or computational modelling which will be carried out in an subject area developed together with an academic member of staff (the supervisor). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis, interpretation and discussion of the results or data obtained.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN319Semester 16NoNo

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nuria Gavara

Description: A 15 credit project specific to BSc(Eng) programmes. The purpose of the project will be to provide knowledge of a particular research area. There will be no set rules concerning format, which will depend on the nature of the subject and personal choice. The project will typically involve experimentation which will be carried out in an associated subject area chosen by a member of academic staff (supervisor).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN319Semester 26NoNo

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nuria Gavara

Description: A 15 credit project specific to BSc(Eng) programmes. The purpose of the project will be to provide knowledge of a particular research area. There will be no set rules concerning format, which will depend on the nature of the subject and personal choice. The project will typically involve experimentation which will be carried out in an associated subject area chosen by a member of academic staff (supervisor).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN320Semester 26NoNo

Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN420
Prerequisite: Must have a-level maths or equivalent

Description: The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the impacts of engineering activity on the environment. It provides them with the basic professional skills to recognise, analyse and minimise adverse impacts. The students will be made aware of the variety of impacts that pollution and engineering works can have upon the environment, e.g. air quality, water quality, waste disposal, noise and vibration, transportation. They will be able to analyse and construct predictive models of the processes which control the level and extent of these impacts. They will apply these, working either individually or in multi-disciplinary groups, to realistic case studies involving engineering problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN6208Semester 16NoNo

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7208
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5208

Description: This module covers more advanced topics in heat transfer, developing the ideas introduced in DEN5208 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 1. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; fins; heat exchangers; phase change; turbulent flows; compressible flow.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6305Semester 16NoNo

Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7305
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN233 and take DEN303

Description: This module is concerned the design and performance of a broad range of aerospace vehicles including fixed-wing aeroplanes (subsonic and supersonic), helicopters, hovercraft, airships, and launch vehicles.
Coursework and tutorial materials involve use of spreadsheets, but the module is primarily assessed by a written exam.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6311Semester 26NoNo

Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT4003

Description: This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature. The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage. It brings this together considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6335Semester 16YesNo

Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7335
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4121 and take DEN4108

Description: The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Latin America: Key ConceptsLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5012Semester 25YesNo

Latin America: Key Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patricia D'Allemand
Overlap: HSP5012
Prerequisite: None

Description: This course examines, from a global perspective, the historical processes that gave rise to modern Latin America and shaped its diverse societies. Focusing on a range of seminal texts, the module explores the intellectual debates that have accompanied the building of the nation-states we know today, and provides an insight into the multiple political, ethnic and cultural traditions that characterise the countries of the region. The course also provides key theoretical and analytical concepts specific to the study of Latin American cultural history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Russian Novel: Dysfunctional FamiliesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5019Semester 25YesNo

Russian Novel: Dysfunctional Families

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Schonle
Overlap: COM6019. RUS5019 and RUS6019
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1917. We will focus on novels about the disintegration of the family under the pressure of raging ideological and moral debates in Russia following the Great Reforms of the 1860s. The core readings will be Turgenev's Fathers and Sons, Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov and Bely¿s Petersburg (one of the greatest Modernist novels). Themes include the relation between fiction and ideology, religion and modernity, social models and revolutionary ferment, Russia and the West, and the distinctiveness of the Russian novel.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, NarrativesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5020Semester 15YesNo

Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, Narratives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Armstrong
Overlap: FRE5020
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: Belgium provides an ideal setting for comparative approaches to literature. Uniquely in the UK, this module explores the work of both French- and Dutch-speaking Belgian authors. It focuses on the treatment of identity in novels, short stories, and comics written between the mid-19th and the late 20th centuries, all studied in translation. Topics covered include war and colonialism; space and place; language; Catholicism; and identity as performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Epic Remakes: Ancient Hero(in)es and Modern SocietyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6212Semester 26YesNo

Epic Remakes: Ancient Hero(in)es and Modern Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Bryant Davis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate how some key Greek and Roman mythical figures have been adapted, from antiquity to today, to suit new contexts. How have these ancient Western characters been re-purposed to contemporary social debates? Drawing on artistic media, films, operas, children¿s magazines and even computer games, in addition to literary translations and adaptations, we will focus on characters, mortal and divine, from the Trojan War myths. These may include: Cassandra, Circe, Dido, Penelope, Helen, Briseis; Achilles, Ulysses, Patroclus, Aeneas, Thersites. Analysis will focus on issues of identity and representation, including from intersectional and postcolonial perspectives, and with the intention of raising awareness of how divergences between source and adaptation can perpetuate, or challenge, implicit bias and ideological assumptions.
All texts will be studied in English. However, there will be some linguistic support (no prior knowledge assumed) to enable students to engage with some of the choices regarding vocabulary, syntax, and poetic metre, so that translators' choices can be assessed with an eye to the original Latin and ancient Greek.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Epic Remakes: Ancient Hero(in)es and Modern SocietyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6212PSemester 27NoNo

Epic Remakes: Ancient Hero(in)es and Modern Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Bryant Davis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate how some key Greek and Roman mythical figures have been adapted, from antiquity to today, to suit new contexts. How have these ancient Western characters been re-purposed to contemporary social debates? Drawing on artistic media, films, operas, children¿s magazines and even computer games, in addition to literary translations and adaptations, we will focus on characters, mortal and divine, from the Trojan War myths. These may include: Cassandra, Circe, Dido, Penelope, Helen, Briseis; Achilles, Ulysses, Patroclus, Aeneas, Thersites. Analysis will focus on issues of identity and representation, including from intersectional and postcolonial perspectives, and with the intention of raising awareness of how divergences between source and adaptation can perpetuate, or challenge, implicit bias and ideological assumptions.
All texts will be studied in English. However, there will be some linguistic support (no prior knowledge assumed) to enable students to engage with some of the choices regarding vocabulary, syntax, and poetic metre, so that translators' choices can be assessed with an eye to the original Latin and ancient Greek.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
European Philosophy and the Representation of Consciousness in Modern LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6213Semester 26YesNo

European Philosophy and the Representation of Consciousness in Modern Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module initially focuses on the concept of consciousness in the philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche and its significance for the writing of authors such as Fyodor Dostoevsky, Knut Hamsun and Hjalmar Söderberg. It then examines the legacy of this early modernist thematic concern with interiority and subjectivity, considering the influence of Henri Bergson's philosophy on British literature by Samuel Beckett, who in turn influenced the work included in the course by B.S. Johnson and James Kelman. The final part of the module contrasts these writers' focus on memory and consciousness, with the postmodernist preoccupation with solipsism, apparent in novels such as Joseph Heller's 'Something Happened' (1974), and stories such as Lydia Davis's 'Break It Down' (1986) and David Foster Wallace's 'Good Old Neon' (2004), and considers the influence of Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialist philosophy on this fiction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
On the Subject of Sex II: Queen to QueerLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM626Semester 26YesNo

On the Subject of Sex II: Queen to Queer

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Queer offers exciting, challenging and virulently contested new ways of understanding sex, gender and sexuality. In this module we shall examine the phenomenon in its historical context, exploring in particular its relationship with gay and lesbian studies, feminism, and postmodernism, and tracing its influence in and through various cultural artefacts. We shall also be engaging with core texts of queer theory and seeking to apply its tenets to contemporary culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Fluid Mechanics of the Cardiovascular SystemEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5300Semester 25YesNo

Fluid Mechanics of the Cardiovascular System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rob Krams
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4101

Description: This module further develops material taught in the first year about fluid mechanics. It introduces more complex concepts including the role of the boundary layer and the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. It will describe the non-Newtonian nature of blood, haemodynamics and pulsatile flows. It will consider flow in the context of the human cardiovascular system, including the structure of the vascular network and blood vessels, the heart anatomy and cardiac cycle, flow through bifurcations and bypass grafts. It will consider the clinical relevance of the endothelial cell and their function.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Neuromuscular Bioelectricity and BiomechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5302Semester 15NoNo

Neuromuscular Bioelectricity and Biomechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su

Description: The module proposal results from a review of the Undergraduate Engineering programmes in Aerospace / Mechanical / Medical Engineering and is a compulsory module for the Medical Engineering programme. It broadens the programme with topics not previously disucssed at level 5, with the capacity available as a result of delivering more materials content in year 1 of the programme

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Chemical Reaction Engineering 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5401Semester 15NoNo

Chemical Reaction Engineering 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stoyan Smoukov

Description: This module introduces and develops an understanding of reaction rate kinetics of chemical systems and applies this understanding to design of a typical chemical reactor. The module discusses example application areas and basic definitions of Chemical Reaction Engineering, general mole balance for ideal reactors, rate laws and stoichiometry, theories of reaction rates, collection and analysis of batch reactor data, complex reactions, reactor design and sizing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Student Centred Learning for Chemical Engineers 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5402Full year5NoYes

Student Centred Learning for Chemical Engineers 2

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: This module provides the essential scientific, practical and design skills for Chemical Engineers. The module material is delivered by means of a combination of brief lectures, hands-on lab sessions, design exercises and group-based problem based learning tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
European Literature and its ContextsLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4205BSemester 24YesNo

European Literature and its Contexts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to a variety of key literary and cultural figures, periods and movements that have influenced the development of literature and culture across Europe over the centuries. We begin in the first semester with classical Greece, before moving on, via the medieval period, the renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, to the enlightenment and Romanticism. In the second semester, the focus is upon twentieth-century developments in particular: Modernism, Existentialism, feminism, Structuralism and post-modernism. Through the study of texts from a wide range of genres (philosophical writings, short stories, poetry, drama, essays and film) and originating not only from a variety of eras but also locations (for example, Greece, France, Germany, Portugal, Spain, England, Russia), an overview of the contexts and developments of European literature will be provided.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Introduction to ComparisonLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4206Semester 24NoNo

Introduction to Comparison

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: COM102
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: COM4207

Description: This module builds on the knowledge acquired in Introduction to Literature. It aims to familiarise you with Comparative Literature as an academic discipline and to help you develop key comparatist skills such as comparative commentary writing and passage selection. Drawing on a corpus of primary texts centring on Robinson Crusoe, the module aims to explore the various ways in which texts can be connected and compared, as well as the reasoning behind such endeavours. In addition to activities traditionally associated with Comparative Literature such as reception and influence studies, the module will also examine recent developments in the discipline, notably theories of intertextuality, translation studies and postcolonial/area studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
The Scene of LearningLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4207Full year4NoNo

The Scene of Learning

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Katarzyna Mika
Overlap: COM4201
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module considers a range of texts from across the globe (including novels, short stories, films and plays) produced in different times and places which explore the relationship between writing and learning. The module sets out to do two things. Firstly, it enables you to begin comparing and contrasting texts from different periods and cultural contexts to develop your skills of textual analysis, including close reading, essay writing, researching and referencing. This will be central to all of the other modules you will do in the course of your degree. Secondly, it gives you the opportunity to reflect on your individual status as learners and your own personal learning experiences. You will be considering your experiences to date as well as your expectations as to what a university education can offer and provide.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Comparative Modernisms: The Case of China and IndiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6203Semester 16YesYes

Comparative Modernisms: The Case of China and India

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adhira Nanda Mangalagiri
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Geography, School of History, School of English and Drama, and School of Languages, Linguistics and Film

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: 'Make it new!' Ezra Pound famously urged, coining a slogan for the literary movement of Modernism. As Western writers attempted to remake literature in the early 20th century, many turned East, to Asia, for innovation. At the same time, Asian writers also sought literary newness as they navigated changing socio-political tides. This module introduces Modernism as a comparative transnational movement, exploring imaginations of "China" and "India" in Euro-American texts alongside major Chinese and Indian works. Students will gain an understanding of Modernism, 20th century Chinese and Indian literatures, and theories of cross-cultural comparison and world literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesGEG_HST_ESH_DRA_SLF_456_A
Digital Arts DocumentaryElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS748PSemester 27NoNo

Digital Arts Documentary

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yi-Zhe Song

Description: This module focuses on the technical, creative and critical skills needed to produce a professional quality documentary. It introduces contemporary studio production techniques including digital recording and editing. Students, working in groups of three, will research and produce an arts-based video documentary of 12-15 minutes in length. This work will be a content-based research output which either itself implements an innovative digital production technique or reflects and explores an area of contemporary digital production practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON6076Full year6YesNo

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture IV (a)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: CON6071
Prerequisite: None

Description: The non-credit bearing module is suitable for students with an Intermediate level (CEFR level B2) in Mandarin Chinese.
Students are exposed to listening and reading items to develop their understanding, and they are involved in speaking and writing activities designed to develop their fluency and accuracy in both media. The overall desired outcome is for learners to deal comfortably, confidently and competently at a higher intermediate level with the language required to cope effectively with a wide range of circumstances and situations.
In order to do this, the course is based on a syllabus framework which reflects the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) descriptors at B2/C1 level. These descriptors describe levels of language proficiency in such a way as to be easily understood by the layperson and specialist alike.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic and original recorded and textual material, designed to enhance the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.
By the end of the module, students will be able to read complex and challenging texts in Mandarin (particularly related to current affairs), they will also be able to understand longer and challenging spoken texts and have a general discussion about a variety of topics at a higher intermediate level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Thermodynamics IEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN107Semester 24NoNo

Thermodynamics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Prerequisite: Must have a-level maths and physics or equivalent

Description: This module formally introduces the fundamental principles of general non-equilibrium thermodynamics; it examines applications of single-constituent fluids, and provides background for all applications in engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Studio Practice Year 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN126Full year4NoNo

Studio Practice Year 1

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Sems Eng

Description: This module seeks to investigate themes within design and engineering that relate to sociocultural and engineering analysis of 'Purpose and Performance'. It is intended to introduce students to important aspects of design and engineering as a starting point for the synthesis of ideas and innovations in design and engineering. The briefs set out a framework within which the students generate ideas, rather than being directed toward a conventional design outcome or specialist area. This module will run in parallel with the Context module, and encourage students to engage with and understand the value of discourse within design practice which is an interdisciplinary activity of technical and sociocultural creative thinking.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Industrial ChemistryEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5405Semester 15NoNo

Industrial Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: The module will cover aspects of Chemical Process Technology, Surfaces, Adsorption and Heterogeneous Catalysis, Polymeric Materials, Colloids and Surfactants.
An introduction to the History of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry will be given and a broad discussion of existing Hydrocarbon Recovery Methods, Refinery and Petroleum Products Technology, Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis and Kinetics, Gas Adsorption at Solid Surfaces and Advanced Reaction Kinetics.
Existing and emerging technology in Polymer Engineering will be covered, as well as Surface/Interface Science, Colloidal Science and Surfactants.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Mass Transfer and Separation Processes 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5406Semester 15NoNo

Mass Transfer and Separation Processes 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Petra Szilagyi

Description: The module will cover the fundamental concepts in mass transfer and separation processes.
Introduction to mass transfer: characteristics, the fundamental laws of transport phenomena. Comparison of mass transfer with heat transfer. Motion of molecules and diffusion. Mass transfer in the gas, vapour and liquid phases. Mass transfer in a boundary layer.
Liquid-liquid extraction: equilibrium data for immiscible and partially miscible systems. Stage calculations for single-stage, cross-flow and countercurrent systems. Binary distillation: continuous distillation (column configuration, condensers, reboilers).
McCabe-Thiele approach for binary systems. Total, minimum, and optimum reflux. Effect of feed thermal condition, product specifications and relative volatility. Sidestreams and multiple feeds. Binary batch distillation (single stage, multi-stage).
Evaporation: types of evaporators. Multi-effect evaporators and their arrangement. Evaporator sizing calculations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Integrated Chemical Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5410Semester 15NoNo

Integrated Chemical Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roberto Volpe

Description: The learning within this module has been structured around two sections, a first half of the module will be dedicated to general aspects of chemical engineering design and project management such as Health and safety, environmental and economical sustainability. The second half will consist of a 5 week design exercise that is related to the current energy technology challenges and in particular to the renewable energy field. The design exercise will provide students with direct opportunities to apply the concepts learnt during the first half of the module. Working in small groups, students will learn how to to integrate the experimental methods and simulations while training their critical thinking/problem solving, effective team-working, self-directed learning and communication skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Chemical Reaction Engineering 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5411Semester 25NoNo

Chemical Reaction Engineering 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radomir Slavchov
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4404

Description: This module builds on knowledge acquired in previous module 'Chemical Reaction Engineering 1' to deepen the theoretical knowledge into more complex real cases and add practical aspects of reaction design. The design of process reactors for homogeneous systems will be covered. Students will study reactions conducted in non-ideal set-ups. Elements of computational reaction control methods will also be taught.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Brief Encounters: Around The World In Short StoriesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4208Semester 14NoNo

Brief Encounters: Around The World In Short Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Annabel Cox
Overlap: COM4200
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to that most adaptable and global of literary forms: the short story. It explores stories from diverse cultures and traditions around the world, including Asia, Europe and the Americas. By reading short stories from across the globe, students will also be introduced to the idea of 'world literature' and some of the debates surrounding this idea.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and ArtLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5001Semester 25YesNo

Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martina Williams
Overlap: FRE5001
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module introduces you to French experiences of the 'annees noires' (the 'dark years') of the German Occupation of France and more especially to the ways in which these have been remembered, represented and interpreted in the art, film and literature of post-war France. It examines the reasons for this period's uneasy status as 'unfinished history' and explores some of the creative representations and reinterpretations of events that have been produced from the aftermath of war through to the present day. The module also involves the study of contemporary theories about cultural memory, from France and elsewhere. It considers how these theories have evolved and explores productive ways of drawing upon them to interpret the primary works studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Art in France: Manet to Early PicassoLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5003Semester 15YesNo

Art in France: Manet to Early Picasso

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: FRE5003
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores early modernist painting in France from Manet to the beginnings of Cubism. It focuses mainly on the works of Manet (from his Déjeuner sur l'herbe 1863), Monet, Morisot, Gauguin, Cézanne, and Picasso's early paintings (including Les Demoiselles d¿Avignon, 1906-7). Paintings will be discussed both as an aesthetic and a social practice. Topics studied include: the spectacle of the modern city, gender and representation, the dialogue between art and literature, the influence of non-European art forms, realism v modernism. No prior knowledge of art history is needed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
German Romanticism in its European ContextLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5004Semester 25YesNo

German Romanticism in its European Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
Overlap: GER4004, GER5004
Prerequisite: None

Description: Romanticism was one of the defining periods in modern cultural history. Religious, philosophical and (para-)scientific phenomena were hotly debated, psychology was established and an awareness of politics became a dominant fact of life. Given wide-spread censorship the literary journal and the salon emerged as most important fora for debate. Aesthetically, a particular attraction of Romanticism was the sharing of closely related artistic experiences, such as the affirmation of sensuality and the eternal yearning for temporary fulfilment, throughout Europe for some five decades.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Cybercapitalism and LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6207Semester 16YesYes

Cybercapitalism and Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Benjamin Holgate
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: The internet, electronic financial markets, the growth of finance, and the emergence of cybercapital behemoths like Alibaba, Airbnb, and Google have transformed economies around the world and, as a result, modern life and culture in the 21st century. This module investigates how literature reflects and interprets this dual economic and cultural revolution. The course explores the nexus between cyberspace and capitalism. As a result, the module emphasises the economic humanities as a methodology within comparative literature scholarship. Students are encouraged to think about key questions: Does economics shape culture or is culture independent of economic factors? How do writers portray the interconnection between economic forces and culture? What do we gain through interdisciplinary approaches to literary criticism and what are the problems? The course examines what authors mean when they refer to the `economy,¿ how people¿s imagination of the `economy¿ relates to the real thing, and what literature reveals about our assumptions. Students will primarily read novels from different language traditions and also non-fiction books, such as long-form business journalism and economic writings. In addition, the course investigates the literary aspects of economic discourse, including rhetoric, metaphor, and narrative.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL
Studio Practice Module Year 2 Human and MachineEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN212Full year5NoNo

Studio Practice Module Year 2 Human and Machine

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN126

Description: The second year studio practice 'Human and Machine' explores how the contemporary designer and engineer can negotiate a changing social, cultural, technological, environmental and political terrain to contextually locate their design activity. It encourages students to adopt a personal, ethical and ideological stance in tackling projects that place their concern within a design and an engineering territory. The module encourages the student to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules on the programme including; Studio practice, History and theories, Design and meaning, Aspect of engineering and analysis, Methods and processes and Technical studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Low Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN233Semester 25YesNo

Low Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: The module builds on the concepts introduced in Mechanics of Fluids I to study inviscid, incompressible flow over aircraft wings. The concepts of stream function, velocity potential, vorticity and circulation are developed and exact solutions of flow over some simple two-dimensional bodies are discussed. From this basis, methods are developed for calculating forces and moments on thin wing sections and finite-span wings in low-speed flow.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Stability and Control of AircraftEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN303Semester 16YesNo

Stability and Control of Aircraft

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4108 and take DEN4005

Description: The module introduces the classical theory for the stability and control of a conventional fixed-wing aircraft including both the static trim conditions and the dynamic response to symmetrical and asymmetrical control inputs and other disturbances. It provides the student with some of the analytic tools needed to contribute to the design of a safe aircraft.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Aircraft PropulsionEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN306Semester 26YesNo

Aircraft Propulsion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN427
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN107

Description: The aims of this module are to introduce the basic concepts of propulsion and to show how thrust and fuel consumption can be calculated for a variety of engines under design conditions. It will provide an understanding of the way in which materials constraints and aerodynamics limit gas-turbine and aero-engine performance, particularly of turbines and compressors and will introduce the basic principles of turbine, compressor and nozzle design

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Mass Transfer and Separation ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5412Semester 15NoNo

Mass Transfer and Separation Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Petra Szilagyi

Description: The module will cover the fundamental concepts in mass transfer and separation processes.
Fundamentals of phase changes, phase equilibria, and fluid mixtures (including real systems of gases and liquids) will be discussed and related to separation processes. Correlations and similarities between heat, momentum, and mass transfer will be discussed. The module will give a detailed discussion on mass flux and its role in diffusion and convection. A quantitative analysis of diffusion and convection in fluids will also be given.
Liquid-liquid extraction: equilibrium data for immiscible and partially miscible systems.
Binary distillation: continuous distillation (column configuration, condensers, reboilers).
McCabe-Thiele approach for binary systems. Total, minimum, and optimum reflux. Optimal feed placement, product specifications and relative volatility. Binary batch distillation (single stage, multi-stage).
Solid-liquid separation by filtration or drying.
Osmosis, pressure-retarded osmosis, reverse osmosis from theory to applications.
Analysis of psychrometric charts, including wet bulb temperature, and absolute and relative humidity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Engineering Industrial ExperienceEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN616Full year6NoNo

Engineering Industrial Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof James Busfield

Description: Students will be helped to secure a work placement through a range of new initiatives in a company appropriate to the programme. The work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful students with a placement will each be allocated a tutor, a SEMS academic in a relevant field, who will wherever practical visit the student twice in the year. Where a visit is not possible the tutor will ensure that there is email and telephone contact with the student. SEMS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer. This person is likely to be their line manager and will be expected to support as well as line-manage the student. Students completing the module will be required to work on a project that will allow them to follow a pathway toward CEng registration approximately three years after graduation; maintain a training diary to be reviewed by their tutor during and after the placement is completed; attend at least one Industrial Liaison Forum to share their experience with other SEMS students; deliver one seminar at QMUL to promote future opportunities at their sponsor; complete a final report on the placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
German Thought I: Marx, Nietzsche, FreudLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5008Semester 25YesNo

German Thought I: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Joshua Torabi
Overlap: GER5008
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature module

Description: This module introduces students to three of the major thinkers in nineteenth- and twentieth-century German thought, all of whom have exerted a global impact: Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud. Topics explored will include Marx's theories of political economy, ideology, and culture; Nietzsche's philosophy of language and his critique of religion; and Freud's ideas about the unconscious in their relation to both psychoanalytic practice and to broader theories of culture. Texts will be taught in English translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Literature and PhilosophyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM501Semester 25YesNo

Literature and Philosophy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Angus Nicholls
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: This module offers an introduction to the relationship between literature and philosophy in European thought. Students will begin by exploring debates in classical thought concerning the respective functions of literature and philosophy, with a particular emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. We will then examine the renewed interactions between literature and philosophy in early twentieth-century European literature, through reading examples of philosophically-influenced short fiction by Thomas Mann, Virginia Woolf and Albert Camus. No prior knowledge of philosophy will be assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and FootballLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5011Semester 25YesNo

Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and Football

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: CAT4011 and HSP4011
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Topics covered include: nationalism; the politics of language; the avant--garde art of Salvador Dalí and Miró; literature; football. There is no language requirement for this module; therefore it is suitable for students with no knowledge of Catalan and Spanish.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Literature on Screen: Representations of History in British and German Film and TelevisionLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6208Semester 16YesNo

Literature on Screen: Representations of History in British and German Film and Television

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Anderson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module will explore ways in which the past was represented in German and British television and film from 1980 to 1990, tracing tensions that run through the core of `European identity¿. Focusing mainly on adaptations from literature to screen, it will offer students a chance to examine key trends and developments in the depiction of the past at a time when the `heritage industry¿ was in its infancy and the seeds of today¿s new nationalisms were being sown.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The European City in Contemporary Literature and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6209Semester 26YesNo

The European City in Contemporary Literature and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Anderson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines trends in the depiction of European cities in literature and film from the 1980s to the present. It will explore the relationship between aesthetic representations and social-cultural contexts, paying attention to traditions of literary and cinematic urbanism while also engaging with contemporary questions concerning urban identity and culture. The module will provide students with the opportunity to pursue a substantial research project of their choosing, focusing either on one author¿s representation of more than one city, or on one city¿s representation by more than one author (/film-maker etc).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The European City in Contemporary Literature and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6209PSemester 27NoNo

The European City in Contemporary Literature and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Anderson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines trends in the depiction of European cities in literature and film from the 1980s to the present. It will explore the relationship between aesthetic representations and social-cultural contexts, paying attention to traditions of literary and cinematic urbanism while also engaging with contemporary questions concerning urban identity and culture. The module will provide students with the opportunity to pursue a substantial research project of their choosing, focusing either on one author¿s representation of more than one city, or on one city¿s representation by more than one author (/film-maker etc).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Postcolonial Studies TodayLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6210Semester 26YesNo

Postcolonial Studies Today

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module will examine the continued relevance of postcolonial studies in our globalized world. It will consider multiple explanations for the so-called crisis in postcolonial studies today. We will examine the views of scholars who have taken the field to task for its restricted canon and capitulation to the global marketplace (Lazarus, Huggan, Brouillette). In addition, we will study alternative models such as "world literature" (Moretti) and environmental studies (Nixon). Are these approaches more suited to address the economic, cultural and ecological disparities thrown up by globalisation? We will meditate these questions with the help of a range of postcolonial literary works. Possible authors studied include: Pramodya Ananta Toer, Mahasweta Devi and J.M. Coetzee, among others. Texts will be studied in translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Postcolonial Studies TodayLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6210PSemester 27NoNo

Postcolonial Studies Today

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module will examine the continued relevance of postcolonial studies in our globalized world. It will consider multiple explanations for the so-called crisis in postcolonial studies today. We will examine the views of scholars who have taken the field to task for its restricted canon and capitulation to the global marketplace (Lazarus, Huggan, Brouillette). In addition, we will study alternative models such as "world literature" (Moretti) and environmental studies (Nixon). Are these approaches more suited to address the economic, cultural and ecological disparities thrown up by globalisation? We will meditate these questions with the help of a range of postcolonial literary works. Possible authors studied include: Pramodya Ananta Toer, Mahasweta Devi and J.M. Coetzee, among others. Texts will be studied in translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Beyond Crisis and Catastrophe: Environmental Humanities Across Texts and CulturesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6211Semester 16YesNo

Beyond Crisis and Catastrophe: Environmental Humanities Across Texts and Cultures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katarzyna Mika
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Taking up the challenge of rethinking the relationship between culture, environment, and theory, this module investigates diverse approaches to and within environmental humanities. To this end, the module draws on narratives, cultural objects (including literature, film, and visual art), and critical-theoretical texts, putting them in dialogue with approaches found in other disciplines (e.g. disaster studies; geology; theology). Key subjects studied may include a selection of the following: `Anthropocene;¿¿ disasters; waste; energy; water; human/nonhuman relations; eco-theology; environmental justice, and futures. Texts will be studied in translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture ILanguages Linguistics and FilmCON4060Full year4YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON4065
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture.
The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language .

The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'.
The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner.
The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
International perspectives
Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCON4061Semester 14YesYes

Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture I (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Lihong Wei
Overlap: CON4066
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others.

Description: Designed for students who have an interest in Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture. The module emphasises the global importance of Mandarin Chinese language and culture and is intended for beginner learners. It develops students' ability to operate practically and effectively in the target language . The challenge of learning a language develops the greater cultural and political awareness, which is a crucial aspect of being an educated 'global citizen'. The overall aims for this Module are to help students to develop a sound foundation in Mandarin Chinese language alongside an ability to communicate in a confident and competent manner. The syllabus is liberally supplemented with authentic listening and reading material against a backdrop of a carefully designed and progressive grammar syllabus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
International perspectives
Licensing Intellectual PropertyLawCCLP078Semester 27NoNo

Licensing Intellectual Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans

Description: The module begins with an explanation of the principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing contracts. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution. The module will discuss current issues in the field of licensing including trade marks and selective distribution agreements; standard essential patents and FRAND (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory) licensing; as well as copyright licensing, news aggregation; and technological self-help measures including blockchain technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
EU and US Design LawLawCCLP081Semester 27NoNo

EU and US Design Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: Design rights are exclusive rights granted for the protection of a design that offers a new and individual appearance. This module deals with the rationales for and process of obtaining and enforcing design protection under the provisions of the European and US statutes, including infringement, defences, revocation and remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International and Comparative Law of Unfair CompetitionLawCCLP082Semester 27NoNo

International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Apostolos Chronopoulos

Description: The module aims at providing the students with a thorough account of the main legal theories of unfair competition in various jurisdictions with a particular focus on US, EU, UK, French and German law in light of the binding European and international legal frameworks. Legal problems are approached from a comparative perspective. At the same time, emphasis is placed on the practical problems that arise in the context of disputes that involve claims of unfair competition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE306PSemester 26NoNo

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell

Description: This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE306USemester 26NoNo

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE206A and take CHE206B

Description: This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules. The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Bioorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE307Semester 26NoNo

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE302U

Description: This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 1DentistryDIN4103Full year4NoNo

Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This 15-credit module will develop the themes of professionalism, team working & social responsibility through enhancing your values, attitudes and behaviours, which will underpin the science and practice of dentistry with professional ethics, healthcare law, sociology and psychology, team working and social responsibility to produce dental professionals for the future.These will link to the provision of patient care management. It will additionally encourage commitment to continuous life long learning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 1DentistryDIN4104Full year4NoNo

Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: Develop the themes of Global Health & Evidence Based Dentistry and introduce the principles of clinical and population epidemiology.
Develop critical appraisal skills and integrate evidence into the wider social context.
Engage critically with and commit to continuous learning (life-long learning).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Clinical SciencesDentistryDIN5101Full year5NoNo

Clinical Sciences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This module will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding of how systemic health or disease affects oral health, and how this may impact on the provision of dental care. This student will utilise this knowledge in order to provide safe dental care to a range of patients with complex medical histories. An understanding of pharmacology will be further developed and consolidated in relation to a patient¿s medical history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Clinical Practice 2DentistryDIN5102Full year5NoNo

Clinical Practice 2

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This module will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding of how systemic health or disease affects oral health, and how this may impact on the provision of dental care. This student will utilise this knowledge in order to provide safe dental care to a range of patients with complex medical histories. An understanding of pharmacology will be further developed and consolidated in relation to a patient¿s medical history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 2DentistryDIN5103Full year5NoNo

Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This 15-credit module builds upon knowledge and skills acquisition gained in Year 1 and continues to develop professionalism, teamworking, and social responsibility, with further development of the theme of complaints handling which will be integrated into Clinical Practice. Much of this module will be embedded into patient care, with some specific academic teaching in key
areas. Special Care Dentistry will become a key feature throughout this year and will continue through the year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 2DentistryDIN5104Full year5NoNo

Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: The course combines structured Evidenced Based Dentistry and Dental Public Health teaching; and will build on concepts introduced in Year 1. You will be encouraged to use your EBD skills (including asking structured questions, searching for research and critically-appraising the research) and apply it to your clinical practice.

You will focus on exploring national oral health trends and social inequalities in oral health in the UK. You will also be introduced to new concepts such as patient-reported oral health measures, the link between general health and oral health and oral health promotion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Principles and Applications of Medical ImagingEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN324Semester 26NoNo

Principles and Applications of Medical Imaging

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathleen Tanner

Description: This module provides a comprehensive review of the most widely-used methods of imaging in medical and biological science. After an introduction to the parameters that define image quality, modalities, such as MRI and Ultrasound, are considered from the viewpoint of (i) their basic principles (ii) associated instrumentation, (ii) the method of image extraction from the raw data and (iii) the information revealed about the object. A more detailed consideration of image reconstruction is then followed by a discussion of some specialist non-conventional imaging techniques

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Combustion in Automotive EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN326Semester 26YesNo

Combustion in Automotive Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN426

Description: This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Studio Practice Year 3 GDP Industry Related Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN327Full year6NoNo

Studio Practice Year 3 GDP Industry Related Design Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN212

Description: This module offers a live industrial project in industrial design. This design project is a crucial component of the programme which emulates the industrial context of design and engineering whilst exposing the student to the realities of the multidisciplinary group design project. This will provide the opportunity for the student to work alongside practising designers and engineers. The design project brief is generated in collaboration with industry and academic staff to deliver a realistic experience of the live project. The intention is to provide knowledge and understanding of the expectations of professional designers and the engineers, while simultaneously supporting the student in an academic context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 60.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Studio Practice Year 3 Individual Design Project Joie de VivreEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN329Full year6NoNo

Studio Practice Year 3 Individual Design Project Joie de Vivre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN212

Description: This module offers students the opportunity to work on a complex design project from the initiation of the project to completion of design proposal. The student will experience the critical decision making stages in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also learn project management and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Modelling and Control of Robotic SystemsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6336Semester 16NoNo

Modelling and Control of Robotic Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ketao Zhang
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7336

Description: This module builds upon the control and dynamics modules of earlier years to prepare the students for more advanced methods. Modelling of mechanical systems using the Euler-Lagrange and Hamiltonian methods is introduced. Holonomic and nonholonomic constraints are introduced and used in the modelling of mobile robots. Modern nonlinear control methods for mechanical systems are introduced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6405Semester 26YesNo

High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7405

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics , design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Intercalated Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6407Full year6NoNo

Intercalated Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury

Description: The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Industrial Robotics and MechatronicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6408Semester 26YesNo

Industrial Robotics and Mechatronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6409

Description: This is a comprehensive module covering the fundamental areas of mechatronics and robotics technology. The aims of this module are to introduce robotics as an integral part of modern automation, to provide an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems, to provide an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, to explain the actuator and sensor principles and roles in robotics, to introduce various aspects of robot modelling and control and to introduce problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Short Stories and Important People: The Nineteenth CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5029Semester 15YesNo

Short Stories and Important People: The Nineteenth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: RUS4029, RUS5029
Prerequisite: None

Description: This course examines the Russian short story as a genre that articulates the relationship between the self and society. We shall analyse the intrinsic narrative and thematic complexity of works by Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Andreev. Topics to discuss include self-fashioning and fate, grotesque visions of self-loss, the myth of St Petersburg, social and sexual otherness, history and individuality, love and death, time and memory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Colonial power and desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and BrazilLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5036Semester 15YesNo

Colonial power and desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and Brazil

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: POR4036
Prerequisite: None

Description: In this module you will study a range of texts problematising sexual, religious and racial domination within the context of the Portuguese Empire, starting with the epic The Lusiads (Camões, 1570). Desire in the epic will find a vocal expression in the report to the King of Portugal by the scribe of the first Portuguese expedition to Brazil (1500). Brazil¿s natives¿ oral narratives cast into film will later be seen to confront rape and religious imposition whilst the African slaves¿ agency against racial domination will surface in their testimonials embedded in biographies. A critique of the land concentration model, prominent in Raised from the Ground, a novel by the Portuguese Nobel Prize José Saramago, in turn, will find a vivid visual deployment in Brazilian Sebastião Salgado's photography. The agency of both slaves and the dispossessed will be seen to play out in the narratives of two major social movements in Brazil today: the quilombola¿s and the landless rural workers¿. All texts are available in English and Portuguese.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Constellations: Online Anthology ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7002Full year7NoNo

Constellations: Online Anthology Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kiera Vaclavik
Overlap: COM6002
Prerequisite: None

Description: "Students will begin by analysing existing anthologies in both academic and commercial contexts as well as examining selection processes in a range of other domains such as museum curation. There will be opportunities to meet professionals working in these domains. Having received the necessary IT training, students will then go on to create their own anthology which will include an introduction, a series of extracts in a range of media and commentaries on those extracts. Students will work independently, but will develop their teamworking and leadership skills by mentoring a team of undergraduates working on their own anthology."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Rise and Fall of the Hero(ine)Languages Linguistics and FilmCOM7035Semester 17NoNo

The Rise and Fall of the Hero(ine)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
Overlap: GER7035
Prerequisite: None

Description: From Ariosto¿s epos Orlando furioso to Mario Vargas Llosa¿s A discreet hero, modernism in literature and literary theory has been conditioned by critical appreciations of what might constitute the heroic. Today, in the age of the star-cult and media-assisted idolatry as secular forms of worship, questions about the status of the heroic in society and its artistic representation have again been raised by literary scholars, cultural theorists, sociologists, and psychologists alike. How appropriate a conception is the heroic in our time? Should in our time social engagement, Zivilcourage and bravery in military action be regarded as equally fit for being labelled `heroic¿. Likewise, modern discourses on the anti-heroic have dominated literature since the emergence of the fool as a credible protagonist in the Renaissance. The anti-heroic is often associated with the `crisis of subjectivity¿ and the disintegration of the Ich. This seminar is to examine exemplary texts and cultural phenomena linked with this dual approach to the heroic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Cultures of ComparisonLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7200Semester 17NoNo

Cultures of Comparison

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This core module looks at the history of the discipline, important debates during its existence, and recent interventions about its place in the Humanities today. Comparison leads to numerous questions of cross-cultural expression - literary, cultural and theoretical: the tensions of identity and difference, the nature of texts, the rôle of the author, mythology, post-colonial theory, gender studies, philosophical issues, translation studies, and other art forms such as music and fine art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and FluidsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN331Semester 16NoNo

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: This is an introductory module in computational modelling. It covers both computational solids and computational fluids. The most widely used methods such the finite element method are covered. The emphasis is on engineering applications with students being exposed to hands on experience of both solids and fluids commercial packages.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Exploring Aerospace EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4005Semester 14NoNo

Exploring Aerospace Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital

Description: The module aims to engage students in various topics closely associated with aerospace engineering with emphasis on the application of materials. These topics include development, flight testing, aerodynamics, structures, failure, reliability, control, propulsion, maintaining operations, environmental impact. Examples will be used from current and future activities within the aerospace sector. A number of group projects will be undertaken by the students to give them a practical understanding of some of the important aspects of aerospace engineering. Lectures delivered by specialists in the School and elsewhere will be given in many of the specialised topic areas listed above.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Energy Conversion SystemsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4006Semester 14NoNo

Energy Conversion Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali

Description: The module provides an introduction to the role of the Mechanical Engineer. It sets out the basic concepts of engineering science including statics, dynamics, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics and their application to simple engineering systems. It includes an introduction to energy generation from conventional and renewable / sustainable sources, methods of heating and cooling, and the application of the above ideas to an integrated engineering system (the automobile).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Computational EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN401Semester 17YesNo

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN331

Description: This is an advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aeronautical and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Medical Robotics TechniquesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6409Semester 26YesNo

Medical Robotics Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6408

Description: This module covers the fundamental areas of medical robotics techniques. The aims of the module are to introduce various medical robotic systems and their applications. These include surgical robots and robotic devices, prosthetics, assistive and rehabilitative robots and endoscopic robots. An insight into the engineering design, fabrication, control and comprehensive operation will be provided through this module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Integrated Chemical Engineering Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6410Full year6NoNo

Integrated Chemical Engineering Design Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: Students will work in teams of approx. 5. Each team will be responsible for the detailed design of a specific unit of larger plant, so that the class as a whole will ultimately be designing a chemical plant. Each team will interact with other teams, just as different units of a chemical plant interact with one another. This will make the exercise realistic and train students to work in an environment as close as possible to reality. Process Synthesis, Design of key elements of the unit, Unit control, Unit safety and Layout, Environmental impact and Economic evaluation will be the core elements of group work.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 5: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 6: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 7: 5.00% Practical
Level: 6
Particle Technology and Advanced Separation ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6413Semester 26NoNo

Particle Technology and Advanced Separation Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5412 or take DEN5406

Description: Fundamentals of particle technology including charaterisation of particle size, shape and size distribution, flow through packed beds and porous media; fundamentals of humidification, dehumidification, cooling and drying, particle formation processes, solid-liquid separation processes, membrane separations and chromatography, and Quantitative analysis of mass transfer problems in separation methodologies discussed in the 2nd year module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS751PFull year7NoNo

Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: A project can be proposed in any area of your specialisation (module). Industrially and commercially proposed topics are welcome. All work must be original and your own. Where you use ideas, structure or text from other sources you must always fully reference this. The project is probably the most demanding task that you have to undertake. It is very different from the taught modules. Although you will have a supervisor, you are on your own to a greater extent. The onus is on you to define the project boundaries, to review relevant literature, to devise the methods of investigation, to carry out the investigation, to assess your findings and to report your work in a scholarly manner. You will be introduced to many of these aspects during the Research Methods module. To be successful you will need to plan, estimate and manage your time and energy. The rest you will have to learn as you go along. You are required to produce three documents, on or before specified deadlines, as part of the project. The project specification is a short document; the Draft report is required one month before the end of the project; followed by the final report (the dissertation).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Reel or Real? Rio on the Global Stage and ImaginaryLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5037Semester 25YesNo

Reel or Real? Rio on the Global Stage and Imaginary

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: POR4037
Prerequisite: None

Description: What lurks behind a city¿s shifting sobriquets? The Cidade Maravilhosa (Marvellous City) mantra pays a tribute to Rio¿s elevation to the Post-War world screens for its `arresting combination of rock and water, white sand and emerald forest¿ within a metropolis. The duet Tom Jobim-Frank Sinatra projected internationally its sensual beach culture amalgamating the woman¿s and the city¿s beauty. `Gay Rio¿ brings out global intimacies through the city¿s striking Flamengo landmarks (1965) inspired by urban planner Lota M. Soares¿s long relationship with American poet laureate Elizabeth Bishop. `A mutilated poem¿ can be a metaphor for representations of Rio by national and international resident writers such as Angolan Agualusa on the pressures on the locals of international drug traffic. `Circus maximus¿ on the world¿s screen or desfavelamento (favela clearance) in emerging literature from the margins on bravura urbanisation for 21st century mega-events? Have the 2016 Olympic Games enabled this aspiring global city to reinvent itself symbolically in the world¿s imaginary beyond the screen mantra or the literary realism of social implosion? Comparisons will also be made to filmic and literary representations of São Paulo, Latin America¿s financial hub. Global South Studies underpin the module. All texts are available in English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Brecht and the DramaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5040Semester 15YesNo

Brecht and the Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: COM6040, GER5040, GER6040, COM6040P
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature or drama module

Description: It is generally acknowledged that Bertolt Brecht is one of the most important playwrights of the 20th century. However, his plays, his theatre work and his theories of the theatre are often misunderstood. The purpose of this module, which is also available to students who know no German, is to take some representative plays, put them into their historical and dramatic context, and examine how they work. We will also examine Brecht's pronouncements on the theatre and on individual plays.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Exilic Writing and the Making of World LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7201Semester 27NoNo

Exilic Writing and the Making of World Literature

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "This module introduces students to exile as one of the foundational discourses of modernity that interrogates memory, identity, and language. Today's notion of world literature is inseparable from a transnational and cosmopolitan perspective, which is intimately - and in a characteristically contradictory manner - linked to exilic experiences and the practice of exilic writing. In this course, we will analyse artifacts (literature, but also some paintings, two texts which fall in the genre of "philosophy of history", a play, and a film) by European, Indian, Japanese, and American authors in order to begin to think about how exile and exilic writing have been inscribed in the very notion of world literature with which we work today."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Culture, Memory and TraumaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7204Semester 17NoNo

Culture, Memory and Trauma

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores the place of the trauma and memory and analyses responses to and theorisations of trauma by writers, thinkers and visual artists. We consider theoretical treatments of memory, trauma and witnessing including Erll, Freud, Felman and Laub, Caruth, Agamben, along with historical case studies in literature and other media. These focus on depictions of the Holocaust, but also narratives of the Gulag, the post-colonial, 9/11 and other historical phenomena understood as traumatic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Comparative LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7206Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Comparative Literature

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: In coordination with a supervisor, students will select a topic for advanced study. They will collect and analyse the necessary literary texts and theoretical material. This will result in the writing of a 12-15,000 word dissertation. For this, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Computational Fluid DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN403Semester 27YesNo

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ahmed Ismail
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN331

Description: Following on from an introduction to CFD in DEN331, in this module we deepen our knowledge in various areas. We learn to analyse the properties of discretisations and apply these to simple model equations. We discuss the various aspects of modelling turbulence. In the accompanying laboratory, we learn to generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems on these meshes and perform the relevant analysis of the quality of our simulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Clinical MeasurementsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN406Semester 27NoNo

Clinical Measurements

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su

Description: This module aims to provide an understanding of biopotentials and other biological signals, and identify mechanisms by which they can be measured. It also aims to provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental principals associated with transducers, and comprehensive review of the most widely used techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of disease states

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN408Semester 27NoNo

Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5109 and take DEN5108 and take DEN5200

Description: The module introduces robotics as an integral part of modern automation, provides an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems. It also provides an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, actuators and sensors, principles and roles in robotics. It introduces various aspects of robot modelling and control and problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
AeroelasticityEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN410Semester 27YesNo

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Applications in RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6420Semester 26YesNo

Applications in Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS426U and take DEN5109 and take DEN5200

Description: This is a comprehensive module covering the fundamental areas of mechatronics and robotics technology and the application of robotics. The aims of this module are to introduce robotics as an integral part of modern automation, to provide an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems, to provide an understanding of path planning of robotic manipulators and mobile robots, to explain the actuator and sensor principles as pertinent for robotics, to
introduce various aspects of robot modelling and to introduce problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

This module covers the important area of robotics applications. The module will show how robotics can be employed to solve problems in a wide range of applications, in areas such as industry, space, extreme environments and healthcare. Application areas include surgical robots and robotic devices, prosthetics, assistive and rehabilitation robots , endoscopic robots, human-robot interaction in the factory floor, flexible work cells, automation through robotics in industry, space, lunar exploration, nuclear waste decommissioning, etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Implant DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6437Semester 26NoNo

Implant Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathleen Tanner
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5101 and take DEN4101 and take DEN4102 and take DEN5102 and take DEN331 and take MAT4002

Description: The module includes a review of the design process concept and its application to implantable medical devices, as well as reviewing materials for use in the body. Issues related to biomaterial evaluation will be covered including biocompatibility, material response to the physiological environment, matching the mechanical environment and preparation of devices for clinical use. It will consider the relevant stakeholders in the design of medical devices. It will use the design methods and evaluation tools appropriately in a hands-on approach for each of the key steps to support the overall design process of medical implants.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Advanced Safety EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6440Semester 26NoNo

Advanced Safety Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Petra Szilagyi

Description: This module introduces hazards encountered in industrial process plants. It offers students an opportunity to acquire basic skills in the main areas of Safety and Loss Prevention. The core lecture programme covers elementary stress analysis ('mechanics'), process safety and plant reliability; a parallel stream introduces fundamental concepts of corrosion, a particularly important hazard. Environmental impact is considered in DEN320 Environmental Engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Catalan Literature: An IntroductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5055Semester 15YesNo

Catalan Literature: An Introduction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: CAT5055, HSP5055
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: How did a language with so few speakers give rise to texts of world importance? Covering examples by well-known writers from the medieval period to the present, this module provides an overview of Catalan literature. Theatre, mystical prose, modern novels and postmodern short stories are analyzed and discussed on their own stylistic terms and in relation to historical and aesthetic developments. Love and war, as well as national and personal identity make for a potent literary mixture.
All texts are available in English and/or Spanish translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
European TragedyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM507Semester 25YesNo

European Tragedy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: Tragedy is one of the most vital and enduring European literary genres. Tragic dramas are often perceived as among the most significant achievements of different national literatures. Not only are there outstanding examples of the genre in the national literatures drawn on in this programme, tragedy has from antiquity been the object of intense theoretical reflection. It has been discussed by such major philosophers as Aristotle and Nietzsche; it has been treated by literary theorists of all schools. What do we gain from and why can we take a kind of pleasure in the spectacle of human misfortune? Are the benefits psychological, spiritual, intellectual? What kind of pleasure is produced? What kinds of misfortune produces the effect proper to tragedy? What can tragedy tell us about the cultures in which it flourishes? What kind of theoretical approaches (social, psychoanalytical, historical) are most fruitfully applied to it?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Colonial Literatures, Post Colonial PerspectivesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5200Semester 15YesNo

Colonial Literatures, Post Colonial Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent

Description: This module will introduce students to a selection of novels and short fiction written within the context of the European colonisation of South Asia, South East Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas (within any given year a maximum of three of these regions will be studied). The focus of the module will be upon non-European authors, and by extension upon the experience of colonialism from a non-European perspective. Texts will be contextualised in relation to the history of European colonisation within the relevant regions, and will also involve some consideration of post-colonial theory and its broader relevance to the discipline of Comparative Literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Advanced Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE404Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE304U

Description: Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal systems and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Fundamentals of Research MethodsDentistryDIN7011Full year7NoNo

Fundamentals of Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Tomlins

Description: This module is divided into two components: research process (including methods and ethics) and basic statistics. Students will learn about the research stages including conducting literature searches, setting research questions, selecting study designs and research methods, drafting research protocols and seeking ethical approval delivered in the form of lectures and practical seminars. The basic statistics component will introduce students to medical statistics and common statistical tests delivered in lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
Level: 7
Molecular Organisation of the Eukaryotic CellDentistryDIN7021Semester 17NoNo

Molecular Organisation of the Eukaryotic Cell

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Eukaryotic cell structure. Cytoskeleton. Extracellular Matrix. DNA, RNA to Protein. Transcription & Translation. Cell Receptors and Cell Signalling. Cell cycle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Techniques in Cell and Molecular BiologyDentistryDIN7022Full year7NoNo

Techniques in Cell and Molecular Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Antibody Discovery and Applications. Bioinformatics. Cell Culture. Fixation and Processing. Immunocytochemistry. Immunofluorescence. Staining. Molecular Biology. Proteomics. Stereology

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Biology of Oral TissuesDentistryDIN7023Semester 17NoNo

Biology of Oral Tissues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Anti-microbial peptides. Structure and function of oral mucosa. Bone pathologies. Cell biology of bone. Cytoskeleton. Desmosomes and cell attachment. Introduction to stem cells. Oral defence mechanisms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Cellular PathologyDentistryDIN7024Full year7NoNo

Cellular Pathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Introduction to pathology. Cell adhesion and migration. Genetics of oral cancer. Mechanisms of cell death. Mendelian inheritance. Hallmarks of cancer. Salivary gland structure, normal and inflamed mucosa.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Inflammation and Immunology (General and Oral)DentistryDIN7025Full year7NoNo

Inflammation and Immunology (General and Oral)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Introduction to immunology. Immune functions. Cells of the immune system. Mucosal immunology

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
European Telecommunications LawLawCCDM021Full year7NoNo

European Telecommunications Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: Communication systems and services remain a key part of the information society and the delivery platform for other sectors. How these are regulated impacts their take up and development. This module aims to teach you a key aspect of communications law: the European legal framework governing the markets for telecommunications equipment network and services. It should also help you to understand: the historical development of European telecommunications law within the broader context of European Union law and policy; as well as key principles, obligations and operational implications of the current EU regulatory regime for the markets in telecommunications equipment, services and networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM023Full year7NoNo

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM023Full year7NoNo

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM023Full year7NoNo

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
20,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM024Full year7NoNo

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
20,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM024Full year7NoNo

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
EU Data Protection Law                                                                LawCCLP209Semester 27NoNo

EU Data Protection Law                                                                

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: This module examines EU data protection laws and examples of the regulatory frameworks established in the Member States. It explores the key debates and commercial implications of the current regime under the Data Protection Directive and the new regime under the General Data Protection Regulation, including the challenges of particular developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Regulation on Media Reporting of the Legal System       LawCCLP218Semester 17NoNo

Regulation on Media Reporting of the Legal System       

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: One of the most fundamental concepts governing a legal system is not only that justice should be done, but that it should also be seen to be done. The modern notion of open justice sees the media encouraged to report on the court system in operation; indeed, the right to do so comes under the scope of Article 10. There are, however, situations in which limits must be put upon what may be reported, such as, for example, where the public interest lies in protecting the Article 8 privacy rights of an individual, or perhaps even where it is necessary for information identifying them to be withheld from publication lest it put their actual lives in danger, as was seen in regards to the Bulger killers, Thompson & Venables (UK). Prior to and during legal proceedings, it can be necessary to put limits on the manner in which the media report particular proceedings; in some circumstances, it may even be necessary to prevent certain key information from being able to be reported at all for the duration, as to do otherwise could pose a threat to the integrity of the proceedings, violating the Article 6 right. This module will undertake a comparative exploration of different legal approaches which seek to maintain the balance between open justice and media freedom of expression on the one hand, and the protection of vital interests in the integrity of the justice process on the other. Consideration will also be given to the challenges posed by the nature of the contemporary media: online, global, and instantaneous. Can traditional approaches in this area, designed in an era of professional journalists and defined boundaries, be adapted in order to really address the internet era of amateur commentators, online gossips, and international communication platforms with global reach?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
E-commerce TransactionsLawCCLP219Semester 17NoNo

E-commerce Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: This module investigates the difficulties posed by the problem of creating legally effective e-commerce transactions in a complex cross-border legal environment and potential solutions to those difficulties. It focuses on how e-commerce businesses are constrained to undertake and structure their online activities, and on how legal creativity might be used to reduce or eliminate legal uncertainties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Topics in Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE405Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE302U

Description: The module is designed to give you a detailed understanding of stereochemistry, an appreciation of the relevance of this topic to the activity and regulatory requirements of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, and a detailed knowledge of the methods available to generate single enantiomers of pharmaceutical relevance. Furthermore the module will provide you with an overview of the principles, practicalities and applications of contemporary catalytic methodology of relevance to drug discovery and manufacture within the pharmaceutical industry. The aim is to furnish you with sufficient knowledge that you will be able to appraise and develop synthetic strategies for the synthesis of complex organic molecules using catalytic methodology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration Theory and ContextLawCCDD201Full year7NoNo

International Commercial Arbitration Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an
insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration: Selected IssuesLawCCDD202Semester 17NoNo

International Commercial Arbitration: Selected Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an
insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Investment Treaty ArbitrationLawCCDD211Semester 27NoNo

Investment Treaty Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue a claim of, for example, alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour by a host State. Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles of state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the
commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners are aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes.

The course is divided into three main topics: International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution (2 sessions); ICSID (6 sessions); Bilateral Investment Treaties (3 sessions)

Course content: Introduction: International trade and investment disputes out of court; Regulatory and institutional framework; Basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to trade and investment; Applicable law issues; ICSID; Bilateral Investment Treaties; Enforcement of decisions and awards; Grey zone between substance - procedure / public - private international law; Case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
European Law of Trade MarksLawCCLP083Semester 17NoNo

European Law of Trade Marks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The emphasis is on European trade-mark law and, the relevant legal instruments and the extensive jurisprudence developped by the CJEU in that regard, with particular emphasis on the manner in which the latter is applied by UK courts. Trade-mark law has become an important driver of the economy, while brand loyalty, commercial reputation and goodwill are some of the most important assets a commercial entity might posses. These aspects will be covered in depth in relation to the trade-marks jurisprudence in Europe. Moreover, with the looming UK departure form the EU, the interplay between EU and UK trade-mark will be explored as it is of utmost importance to lawyers involved in pan-European transactions and litigation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Intellectual Property and the Life SciencesLawCCLP093Semester 27NoNo

Intellectual Property and the Life Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: The life sciences can be defined as the use of living organisms (biotechnology) and the protection or treatment of living organisms (medicine, veterinary medicine and plant protection). It comprises the science behind medicine, pharmacy and agriculture and their corresponding industries. The module will provide detailed knowledge of the role that intellectual property plays in providing investments for investment and incentives in the life sciences. It will also focus on the question of how to distribute the benefits of life sciences research fairly so that it benefits society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Trade SecretsLawCCLP096Semester 17NoNo

Trade Secrets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Hull

Description: Every intellectual property right starts life as a trade secret. Trade secrets and related intellectual assets are viewed as critical to the success of many businesses. But they are also uniquely fragile rights and so their protection under different legal systems requires close assessment. This module complements other IP modules by providing an opportunity to study the economic and legal foundations of these important rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Insurance LawLawCCLP140Semester 27NoNo

Insurance Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Philip Rawlings

Description: This module looks at particular types of insurance contract. It considers the impact on specific insurance contracts of the application of general principles of insurance contract, the terms that appear in different types of contract, their function and how they are interpreted by the courts, and how the applicable legislative environment varies with different types of insurance. Insurance is fundamental to a modern economy, allowing businesses and individuals to transfer the risk of loss, thereby facilitating investment and protecting wealth, and London is a world centre of the insurance industry. Students require no prior knowledge of insurance or English law. They will learn all they need to know as the module progresses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Bioorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE307PSemester 26NoNo

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE302P

Description: This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Analytical Chemistry and SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE308PSemester 26NoNo

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff

Description: This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Advanced Analytical Chemistry and SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE308USemester 26NoNo

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE104

Description: This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Topics in Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE309Semester 16NoNo

Topics in Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE202B

Description: This modules focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view. Background knowledge of biochemistry is not assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Dental Technology Research ProjectDentistryDIN7003Full year7NoNo

The Dental Technology Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This is a core module of all the Masters Programmes offered by the Institute of Dentistry. The research project undertaken in this course gives the student real insight into the philosophy of research as well as practical experience in the process of completing a piece of original work. This module involves the following content: Self-directed study; Research; Preparation of dissertation and presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
Level: 7
OcclusionDentistryDIN7004Full year7NoNo

Occlusion

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Jason Niggli

Description: This module introduces students to the occlusal concepts for Prosthodontics. Subjects covered in seminars are anterior/posterior occlusion, group function, balanced occlusions and conformative and re-organised occlusions. TMJ and managing occlusal changes and articulation. This module is based on the theory of occlusion, which will be applied to the technical practice cases carried out in the laboratory including: Setting up dentures; Occlusal splints; Diagnostic/occlusal waxing; Impressions, casts, facebows and mounting for analysis of cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to ImplantologyDentistryDIN7005Full year7NoNo

Introduction to Implantology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Science (MSc) in Dental Technology which is designed to ensure students are taught about the use of osseointegrated implants to stabilise or support fixed or removable prostheses.
Subjects covered are: History & Development of Implantology, Osseointegration Surface Topography; Patient Assessment and Restorative Driven Planning for Implant Restorations; Imaging & Implantology; Diagnostic Wax ups, Radiographic stent, surgical stents; Implants in Anterior Maxilla, Guided Bone Regeneration, Socket Preservation; Soft Tissue Augmentation; Surgical and restorative Procedures; Maintenance of Implants and Implant Restorations; Fixed/removeable implant construction.

Practicals:
Radiographic Tracing
Pouring working casts.
Making Provisional Restorations.
Customising Impression copings.
Implants restorations may be constructed as part of the technical practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Investment Arbitration: Substantive ProtectionLawCCDD212Full year7NoNo

Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue a claim of, for example, alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour by a host State. Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles of state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the
commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners are aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes.

The course is divided into three main topics: Major Treaty Systems - Fragmentation and new Regionalisation (two sessions); Case Law of and case studies relating to Substantive Protection (six sessions); Specific Policy issues (3 sessions)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
On-Line Banking and Financial ServicesLawCCDM008Semester 17NoNo

On-Line Banking and Financial Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: The aim of the module is to educate students in the law and regulation of banking and financial services with specific relevance to their provision on-line. It examines the law relating to on-line payment services and on-line investment, the consumer protection issues which arise, the authorisation and supervision of on-line financial activities and the legal issues of cross-border provision of financial services.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Online Dispute Resolution in e-CommerceLawCCDM010Full year7NoNo

Online Dispute Resolution in e-Commerce

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Online transactions present potential difficulties for enforcement: parties in different jurisdictions with different legal rules (and possibly languages); transactional amounts that often preclude cross-border litigation and; the use of technology to effect an offer and acceptance. This module examines the need for and use of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in the online environment in light of these challenges as well as the particular alternative dispute resolution framework, UDRP, that has evolved to address the problem of internet domain name disputes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Law and Ethics in the Energy SectorLawCCLP157Semester 27NoNo

Law and Ethics in the Energy Sector

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tibisay Morgandi

Description: Energy plays a central role for the existence and subsistence of human life on earth. The production, distribution and use of energy resources raise numerous ethical questions beyond legal and political issues. Such questions include: (a) who owns energy resources? (b) how can the interests of present and future generations in the enjoyment of resources be balanced? (c) what is the role of states in securing a reliable energy supply to their citizens? (d) what are the risks in entrusting multinational corporations with conducting exploration and exploitation activities? and (e) are states and multinational corporations adequately addressing anthropogenic phenomena, such as pollution or climate change, and doing so consistently with other political, social, economic measures? The module on Energy Law and Ethics will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the ethical implications of international laws, policies and practices in the energy sector. It will enable them to identify these implications and to apply a more comprehensive ethical view to energy law and policy. The Energy Law and Ethics module is concerned with the study of the ethical dilemmas arising in the energy sector. It aims to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to the analysis of these issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Oil and Gas Law and Contracts in the Energy TransitionLawCCLP161Semester 27NoNo

International Oil and Gas Law and Contracts in the Energy Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Carlos Bellorin Nunez

Description: Petroleum laws and contracts are the ultimate manifestation of policy and are the result of lengthy negotiation processes and have an unusual dynamic. According to the World Bank, between 1999 and 2010 more than 30 countries revised their petroleum contracts and made major amendments or completely changed their petroleum legal and fiscal framework. Several more countries have done the same since the 2014 oil price downturn in order to adapt themselves to the changes in the industry. This module will examine the main type of contracts used in the upstream petroleum industry (Production Sharing Agreements, Concessions and Service Agreements) and their most important legal and fiscal mechanisms and the reasons why these are so frequently changed. This course will also focus on the study of these contracts dynamics within the so-called energy transition, risk mitigation strategies in order to avoid the most common forms of legal and political risks: expropriations and contract renegotiation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Topics in Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE309PSemester 16NoNo

Topics in Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini

Description: This modules focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view. Background knowledge of biochemistry is not assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Professional Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE401Full year7NoNo

Professional Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen

Description: This module aims at developing students' awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as green chemistry, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Professional Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE401PFull year7NoNo

Professional Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen

Description: This module aims at developing students' awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as green chemistry, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE402Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE302U and take CHE307

Description: This module focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined critically. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
AestheticsDentistryDIN7006Full year7NoNo

Aesthetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Science (MSc) in Dental Technology which is designed to ensure students are taught the basic principles of the factors that affect aesthetics in Restorative Dentistry including;

Light, colour and shade selection, Basic restoration aesthetics (understanding and designing tooth shape and form and use of colour effects), Ethical aesthetics, Denture aesthetics, Maxillo facial aesthetics, Implant aesthetics.

Practicals;
Shade selection and designing a colour map.
Diagnostic waxing, Denture gingival staining, contouring/stippling techniques. Porcelain building techniques to achieve aesthetics.

Techniques may be taught one to one during the technical practice sessions to enable the student to complete their advanced case presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Technical PracticeDentistryDIN7007Full year7NoNo

Advanced Technical Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This module involves advanced laboratory Technical practice in order to produce a complex dental prosthesis for case submission. Students will tackle a multitude of Technical exercises in order to achieve this and will receive one to one teaching where necessary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Properties of Dental Materials IDentistryDIN7008Semester 17NoNo

Properties of Dental Materials I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mangala Patel

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Sciences (MSc) in Dental Technology, Oral Biology and Dental Materials (the latter jointly accommodated by the Institute of Dentistry, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and The School of Engineering and Materials Science). It is designed to enable students to gain a greater and more in depth understanding of the basic sciences knowledge that underpins the clinical uses of dental materials. Topics covered include chemical, mechanical, surface properties and other physical property tests used for dental biomaterials, as well as basic ceramic science, basic polymer science and basic metallurgy. Water absorption and the biocompatibility of dental materials are also covered in detail.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Properties of Dental Materials/Processing Methods IIDentistryDIN7009Semester 27NoNo

Properties of Dental Materials/Processing Methods II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mangala Patel

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Sciences (MSc) in Dental Technology and Dental Materials (the latter jointly accommodated by the Institute of Dentistry, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the School of Engineering and Materials Science). This module is designed to ensure students gain in depth knowledge of the composition and essential properties (eg physical, chemical and biological) of clinical dental materials based on metals, ceramics/glasses, and polymers. Application of clinical dental materials and appropriate processing techniques are also thoroughly examined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Intellectual Property Issues: Protection of Computer SoftwareLawCCDM013Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Intellectual Property Issues: Protection of Computer Software

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: The first chapter provides a technical overview of software, aimed at the non-technical reader. The law of confidential information and trade secrets is then examined, and it's suitability to the software industry is assessed. The module then deals with copyright law, considering the unique characteristics of computer programs as literary works and the consequences these characteristics bring about. Patent law is examined as a vehicle for software protection, and the main difficulties that arise from the unique nature of software are highlighted. Finally, there is an examination of the main forms of software licensing, including the non-IP alternative model of open source licensing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Intellectual Property: FoundationLawCCDM016Full year7NoNo

Intellectual Property: Foundation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov

Description: This module aims to give you a firm foundation in the law of Intellectual Property, as it relates to computer and communications law. It should assist you to gain the maximum benefit from other module modules. It should also help you to understand the basic principles of national and international Intellectual Property law; to establish why aspects of information technology and the Internet pose problems in the applications of these principles; and to be able to analyse critically the solutions which have been put forward at a national and international level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Information Security and the LawLawCCDM019Semester 17NoNo

Information Security and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: The security of important data, including personal, is of considerable concern to governments around the world as is the safety of critical infrastructure assets, systems, and networks (both public and private) that are considered so vital that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety. Concerns about former have led to growing legal obligations to ensure the security of information and the systems that transmit and store it. Whether as part of personal data protection regimes, sector-specific regulations (e.g., healthcare, banking and finance) private law or company law obligations, these present a growing source of potential corporate liability. Concerns about the latter have produced frameworks to enable oversight and cooperation needed to manage and mitigate risks to critical infrastructure. This course examines various EU and US legal frameworks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International Energy TransactionsLawCCLP162Semester 17NoNo

International Energy Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module provide students with a good understanding of the main types of energy transactions. International energy transactions are complex, large, incredibly high risk and very expensive. They involve many parties from hosts states, international oil companies, national oil companies, NGOs, IGOs as well as service providers. The course is focused on practical issues including specific contract provisions used in upstream contacts from PSC's to JOA's. The module also looks at the structure used in finance energy projects and reserve base lending. The unconventional and LNG value chain and increasing market is also covered. Nuclear power is still part of the energy matrix of many states being a low carbon process and ensuring energy security.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Arbitration and EnergyLawCCLP163Semester 17NoNo

International Arbitration and Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International arbitration proceedings in the energy sector have seen an important increase in recent years, both in terms of their numbers and their economic and political importance. This module provides students with the basis for understanding the particular issues of disputes in the energy sector, both in international investment and commercial arbitration. It gives students aiming to work in the arbitration area an important qualification in a very competitive market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Regulation and Governance of EnergyLawCCLP164Semester 27NoNo

International Regulation and Governance of Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will provide students with a good knowledge of the regulation and governance of the energy sector. It considers the issues impacting the continuing development of the sector as it relates to regulation with particular emphasis on the EU and the internal energy market it seeks to create. It will examine specifically, for example, energy regulation models, and the regulation and governance of specific markets such as oil and gas, electricity and alternate energy sources. It will explore issues such as the role of ACER as a transnational regulator, the European Target Model for the electricity and gas markets, market coupling and the likely shape of future energy markets as the Energy Union continues to take shape. It will encourage students to critically analyse the issues impacting regulation and to apply their knowledge to factual problems encountered by regulators and non-state actors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Information Technology Transactions: Management and DisputesLawCCLP206Semester 27NoNo

Information Technology Transactions: Management and Disputes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module covers information technology transactions, contracts and licences in a variety of areas, such as: system procurement contracts, commercial software licensing, outsourcing, cloud computing and free and open source software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE403Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact:

Description: This module will cover advanced topics in inorganic chemistry from the more traditional aspects to the latest trends. This will include the role that metals play in biological systems and in medical applications; also the more recent role of nanoparticles will be discussed, with a focus on inorganic nanomaterials, from synthesis to applications, including a comparison between 'nano' and 'bulk' properties. Electron transport in naturally occurring systems will be covered such as in the electron transfer chain of aerobic respiration, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Introduction to Literature: Texts and ContextsLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM101Semester 14NoNo

Introduction to Literature: Texts and Contexts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Will Mcmorran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: COM4207

Description: This module provides an accessible but challenging introduction to the study of literature. It offers students an opportunity to exploreboth literary texts and the critical and theoretical contexts that shape our interpretation of them. Through the close analysis of a whole range of short texts and extracts, this module considers the literary in relation to popular culture, and examines critical concepts such as genre, period, influence, and the canon. No language requirement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
The Scene of ReadingLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM200Semester 15NoNo

The Scene of Reading

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicola Thomas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM4207 or equivalent

Description: This module explores the theme of reading in literature, film, and the visual arts, and in theoretical writings past and present. Literary texts will range from the early modern to the post-modern novel, and will be taken from European and other literatures. The figure of the reader in film and the visual arts will also be examined, while recent theories of narrative, reading and reception will allow students to reflect upon their own processes as readers and spectators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
The Scene of WritingLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM300Semester 16NoYes

The Scene of Writing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: This module aims to acquaint students with a varied corpus of fictional and theoretical writings around the theme of the author. There are two main aims: to explore the ways in which authorship is thematized and represented in literature, film and the visual arts, and to examine changes in the ways authors have been perceived in critical and theoretical writings about literature and cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySLF_456_S
Corporate Social Responsibility and Business EthicsBusiness and ManagementBUSM175Semester 27NoNo

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar

Description: Corporate Social Responsibility will offer students an introductory and in-depth module unpacking the sensitive relationship between corporations and issues of social justice, environmental destruction (animal, climate, pollution, ecologies) and labour rights. At a time when globalisation is perceived as a threat to international business addressing inequalities across the global North and South, this module will provide postgraduate students with indispensable knowledge about key issues facing corporations today. The module will also address both philosophical issues that include ethical theories, moral debates and social scientific perspectives as well as a grounding in real life case studies and access to a local stakeholder engagement project with charities in Tower Hamlets and Poplar. Specific modules will cover a wide-range of subjects including: 'greening' management (reducing emissions, waste management, protecting biodiversity), workers rights (trade unions, ILO, outsourcing, supply-chains), sustainable consumption (ethical marketing, corporate lobbying, consumerism), and promoting democratic processes (governance, accountability, stakeholder engagement).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Innovation and Global CompetitionBusiness and ManagementBUSM177Semester 27NoNo

Innovation and Global Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang

Description: One of the core elements of entrepreneurship and economic leadership is competitive advantage via innovation by understanding the industry and firm dynamics of technological innovation. Issues within the context of globalisation, development and digitalisation are covered as a strategic process, beginning with assessing the context and moving on to the formulation and implementation of innovation strategies by examining strategic dilemmas within innovation (e.g. standards battles and design dominance, timing of entry, choosing innovation projects, collaborative innovation strategies and the benefits of protecting or opening up innovation for competitive strategy).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Graduate Professional and Academic SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUSM178Semester 17NoNo

Graduate Professional and Academic Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis

Description: The NCM (Non-Credit Module) will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). All these initiatives are expected to pave the way to a smoother transition to Post-Graduate setting and the expectation set by the University. The Module aims to boost the skills associated with quantitative analysis and computer lab exposures using both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and the LawLawCCDM047Semester 27NoNo

Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and the Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: While the use of robots creates arguably more efficient, precise and innovative outcomes, it also presents a number of questions with regards to liability, responsibility and legal personhood in criminal law, contractual obligations, and torts. The use of cognitive features allowing robots to interact with their environment inevitably raises issues of data protection and privacy.

The module covers both embodied artificial intelligent systems (robots) and non-embodied ones (intelligent agents). Distinction is also made between the behaviour of robots as tools of human interaction, and robots as independent agents in the legal arena and its legal ramifications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM090Full year7NoNo

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within an appropriate subject area. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM090Full year7NoNo

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within an appropriate subject area. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM090Full year7NoNo

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within an appropriate subject area. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM091Full year7NoNo

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Research Seminar

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM091Full year7NoNo

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Research Seminar

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation (10,000 words)LawCCDM092Full year7NoNo

Dissertation (10,000 words)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Dissertation (independent research), an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Computer and Communications Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE102ASemester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE102BSemester 24YesNo

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xacobe Cambeiro

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Fundamentals of SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE104Semester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen

Description: Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionised our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools in chemical research and in the development of the subject. This module aims to provide students with a coherent and rigorous introduction to the principles and applications of spectroscopic techniques, in a way that spans the traditional fields of chemistry. It covers the more common techniques, including IR, UV-VIS and NMR spectroscopy, and lays the foundations for more detailed coverage of spectroscopic techniques in subsequent years of the degree programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Drug Design and DevelopmentBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE406Semester 17NoNo

Drug Design and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini

Description: This module is designed for students in the fourth year of the F152 MSci programme in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and will be offered as an option. Pre-requisite 18 modules passed in F152. The aim of the module is to introduce you to the approaches currently employed in the pharmaceutical industry for drug discovery and development using a number of recent case studies as exemplars. The module will introduce you to the physical and chemical approaches used in the design and development of new drugs and will make them aware of the physiological/pharmacological issues that need to be considered before a drug can be used clinically.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Oral Pathology and MicrobiologyDentistryDIN7026Full year7NoNo

Oral Pathology and Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Carcinogenesis. Acquisition and metabolism of oral flora. Oral commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Dental plaque. Disease of the salivary gland. Microbiology and periodontal disease. The mouth as a microbial habitat. Oral defence mechanisms. Oral infections. Overview of infectious agents. Pathology of pre cancer. Overview of virulence.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Laboratory TechniquesDentistryDIN7027Semester 27NoNo

Laboratory Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: ELISA. mRNA extraction reverse transcription.PCR. Immunofluorescence staining. SDS PAGE. Western blot.
Cell culture. Introduction to microscopy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Research ProjectDentistryDIN7029Full year7NoNo

Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Angray Kang

Description: Laboratory based research project, thesis, poster, oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Applied Principles of Clinical DentistryDentistryDIN7090Full year7NoNo

Applied Principles of Clinical Dentistry

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This is an academic and practical module which introduces clinical concepts and approaches.

Teaching will be delivered in the form of lectures/seminars, journal clubs and problem-based and critical reasoning sessions. Students will also be expected to engage in independent study and reflection.

Topics covered will include: Patient examination and diagnosis; Treatment planning and patient management; Health promotion and disease prevention; Medical and dental emergencies; Anesthesia, sedation, pain & anxiety control; Periodontal therapy and management of soft tissues; Hard and soft tissue surgery; Non-surgical management of the hard and soft tissues of the head and neck; Management of the developing dentition; and Restoration and replacement of teeth.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
20,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM024Full year7NoNo

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Online Media RegulationLawCCDM028Semester 17NoNo

Online Media Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: A key element in the development of the world wide web over the past decade has been its increasing colonisation by commercial interests, including commercial provision of content online. In particular, the media has actively embraced the online world; for instance, the Newspaper Society estimates that in the UK alone, 90% of regional newspapers now have an online presence with at least some degree of archival material available via that route. As technologies converge, the web has become an integral part of content delivery, with not only newspapers but also organisations such as the BBC providing online content which supplements their other services. This module will examine the issues which arise when a number of traditional legal concepts are brought into this online context - in particular, it will consider the application of the law on libel, contempt of court, and copyright as relates to the online delivery of content by the media, as well as looking at the Press Complaints Commission self-regulatory system employed by the press in the UK, which applies equally to online press content. The module will primarily use UK / EU law as a case-study, however, where relevant examples from other jurisdictions will be considered for comparative analytical purposes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
English Contract LawLawCCLP601Semester 27NoNo

English Contract Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will cover the English law of contract, including the rules governing the formation, construction and interpretation of contracts (including the incorporation and implication of terms), the circumstances where contracts may be deemed to be vitiated, as well as the available remedies for breach of contract. This module will also give students insight into the workings of the common law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy)LawCCLP602Semester 27NoNo

International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International Arbitration is a more and more specialized area of law. In this module, students will learn the specific skill sets needed to become a successful arbitration lawyer. Oral and written advocacy, understanding of different cultural legal backgrounds and other skills will be taught on a 'learning by doing basis'. Students will take part in practical exercises, stepping in the shoes of arbitrator, counsel or clients. Applying the theoretical concepts of international arbitration in practice, students will lean the fundamental skills that will give students an important qualification in a competitive legal market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Law of Financial Crime: European and International PerspectivesLawCCLP603Semester 27NoNo

Law of Financial Crime: European and International Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Valsamis Mitsilegas

Description: This module will examine the European and International Law of Financial Crime. It will focus in particular on the development of legal responses to money laundering and terrorist finance, corruption and fraud (including fraud against the budget of the European Union). The synergy between European and international initiatives in developing a system of global governance in the field will be analysed and the impact of such system on domestic legal systems will be explored. The module will also place emphasis on the impact of new legislative initiatives in the field on fundamental principles of commercial and criminal law, as well as on the protection of fundamental rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Cloud Computing Law                                                                   LawCCLP604Semester 17NoNo

Cloud Computing Law                                                                   

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Millard

Description: This module will provide a foundation for understanding and analysing cloud computing structures and contracts for private and public sector cloud services, including standard terms and contract negotiations; the application of data protection law to the storage and other processing of information in cloud environments, including what is regulated, who is responsible, which laws apply and the circumstances in which law enforcement authorities access information; and the subsistence and ownership of proprietary rights in data stored, processed and generated in cloud environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Copyright Law - United Kingdom and United StatesLawCCLP605Semester 27NoNo

Copyright Law - United Kingdom and United States

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: This module focuses on the copyright systems applicable in leading common law jurisdictions - with particular reference to the United Kingdom and the United States. It aims to provide students with a broad understanding of those systems and a more detailed awareness of specific topical issues within UK and US copyright law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Chemistry Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE600Full year6NoYes

Chemistry Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Chemistry programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: Prerequisites: Students with an average of 60% or above (combination of first year and second year results) are eligible to register for this module. Overall the module is expected to involve students for approximately 18h/week, for 12 weeks, spent on laboratory and library work, plus additional time spent on data analysis and on writing the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
NetworkingCHE_6_S
Chemistry Investigative ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE601Full year6NoYes

Chemistry Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students on Chemistry programmes at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.

Description: Students work independently on topics set by their project supervisors. The work involves extensive searching, reviewing and critical evaluation of a specific area of the scientific literature. A final dissertation is prepared, based upon the investigative work that has been undertaken. Students are also required to present their work in a variety of other forms, including a poster and seminar appropriate for a specialist audience, and in an alternative format in which the topic is made more accessible to the general public.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
NetworkingCHE_6_S
Clinical Dental SkillsDentistryDIN7091Full year7NoNo

Clinical Dental Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This is an academic and practical module which provides students with hands-on experience which will include practice in taking radiographs using phantom heads. Teaching will be delivered in the clinical skills laboratory but there will also be seminars and small group discussions and problem based critical reasoning sessions. Students will have the opportunity to observe current UK dental practice via clinics in Oral Medicine, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontology, Paediatrics, Orthodontics, Sedation and General Anaesthesia.

Topics covered will include: Infection control; Patient examination; Diagnostic tools and techniques and their interpretation; anesthesiology and sedation techniques, basic life support (BLS); Accurate measurement of periodontal indices according to current deadlines

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Professionalism Management and LeadershipDentistryDIN7092Semester 37NoNo

Professionalism Management and Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This module is designed to ensure that students develop their management and leadership skills in the context of the ethical and legal framework within which a UK dental professional should practice. It will be conducted in the form of lectures and interactive sessions. Topics covered will include: Ethics, Law, Communication Skills and UK regulatory requirements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dental Manikin Practical SkillsDentistryDIN7093Full year7NoNo

Dental Manikin Practical Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This is an academic and core module which will provide students with hands on experience of undertaking dental procedures using typodont teeth set in a manikin head. This is a practically biased module that will cover intracoronal direct filling plastic restorations, extracoronal restorations, endodontics and removable prostheses. Teaching will be delivered using the dental phantom head facilities but there will also be seminars and small group discussions. Students will be expected to engage in independent study and reflection.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Dental Science Clinical Audit ProjectDentistryDIN7094Full year7NoNo

Dental Science Clinical Audit Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This is an academic module which will involve researching and analysing the literature pertinent and relevant to dental clinical sciences. Students will be expected to use library and on-line sources and will be supported and supervised by a dedicated teacher.
Students will undertake and complete a clinical audit and present their findings and conclusions. Students will be familiarized with the principles of clinical governance and training will be provided in designing and implementing an audit project. Students will have dedicated support and supervision and access to clinical resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM030Full year7NoNo

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Students are to prepare power point presentation on a topic with in the programme area and present this at the Residential Weekend.

In addition students will have to write a 5,000 word paper on the topic.

Students will be allocated a Supervisor to assist with the preparation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM030Full year7NoNo

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Students are to prepare power point presentation on a topic with in the programme area and present this at the Residential Weekend.

In addition students will have to write a 5,000 word paper on the topic.

Students will be allocated a Supervisor to assist with the preparation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Information and Communications Technology and Competition LawLawCCDM031Semester 27NoNo

Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: Information and communications technology industries are characterised by rapid change and the high costs of developing industry standard technology. Both are needed to tip the market in favour of the developer and capturing the market, is usually their goal. This, combined with the extensive use of intellectual property rights that are effectively limited monopolies, as well as new business models that change the traditional supply and distribution systems pose possible tensions with competition law and rules created over 100 years ago. This module explores the EU competition laws and enforcement and highlights their application to ICT.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Regulation of Cross-border Online GamblingLawCCDM038Full year7NoNo

Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: This highly topical Module analyses the conflicts between different regulatory regimes governing online gambling in the international context and how these affect the cross-border provision of online gambling. Online gambling is a key case-study for the regulation of cross-border activities on the internet. States fundamentally disagree on how to regulate gambling, for moral, religious and social reasons, and therefore regulatory regimes differ, ranging from the prohibitionist to the permissive. The Module examines the latest legislation and cases concerning online gambling by comparing different regulatory models. The
regulation of online gambling also has negative implications for the freedom to trade. Hence this Module covers international trade by making sense of the myriad of cases in the EU Internal Market and the WTO. It also explains conflict of laws issues, including which state or court is competent, which law is applicable, and what rules govern enforcement in cross-border egambling disputes. This Module represents a detailed examination of all international law issues of cross-border online gambling and thus provides an invaluable insight into internet regulation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Online TrademarksLawCCDM040Semester 27NoNo

Online Trademarks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov

Description: This module focuses trademark infringement on the internet and in particular the conflict between trademarks and domain names and the use of trademarks in the metatags of websites and the use of trademarks in keyword advertising (search engines, online marketplaces). This involves an overview of trademark law from a comparative perspective (English, EU, French, German and US Federal trademark law). The module assesses the function and role of trademarks and compares this to the use on the internet. It evaluates the different types of consumer confusion on the internet and their legal assessment. It examines the role of internet service providers such as search engines, marketplaces, advertisers and how they relate to the trademark use. The module assesses primary and secondary liability in the trademark context and the various immunities granted to internet intermediaries. The module examines the relevant jurisprudence before the English, French, German, US Courts and the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Legal Aspects of International FinanceLawCCLP606Semester 17NoNo

Legal Aspects of International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Philip Rawlings

Description: This module is concerned with the raising of large-scale finance by sovereigns, corporations and banks. it focuses on certain key financial transactions, such as syndicated loans, bonds and securitisation, but discusses them within the broader context of the legal issues that arise in the international capital and money markets. In particular, it looks at the various legal issues that shape how these cross-border transactions are structured.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Introduction to Competition LawLawCCLP607Semester 27NoNo

Introduction to Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The module will provide an introduction to competition law. The module will address the essentials of Article 101 TFEU (undertaking, agreement etc.), discuss various types of anticompetitive agreements, as well as the modern approach to the application of Article 101(3) TFEU in defending anticompetitive agreements. Then the module will look at Article 102 TFEU. The module will analyse the essential features of Article 102 TFEU i.e. the concept of dominance and the concept of abuse. Then the module will present some of the abuses (e.g. tying/bundling, exclusive dealing, price discrimination, refusal to supply). Finally, the module will analyse the assessment of mergers and acquisitions, focusing on substantive analysis. The content of the module is relevant for the competition enforcement by the European Commission, but also by National Competition Authorities of the EU Member States. The module will adopt a very practical perspective (case studies, quizzes) and will aim to equip students with the tools they need to assess/address infringements of national and EU competition law. Indicative topics include: ARTICLE 101: Agreements, concerted practices and decisions of associations of undertakings; Market Definition; Object or Effect; Article 101(3) Exemption; Sanctions, Settlements and Commitments. ARTICLE 102: Definition of Dominance; Concept of collective dominance; Concept of abuse; Abuses. MERGERS : Horizontal Mergers & Non-Horizontal Mergers; Remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Commercial LawLawCCLS905Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Commercial Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: "Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Commercial Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Chemical Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE700PFull year7NoNo

Chemical Research Project

Credits: 150.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell

Description: This module involves students carrying-out an original piece of experimental or computational research on projects agreed with their academic supervisor. Projects are in the areas of biological, organic, inorganic, physical, materials or theoretical/computational chemistry; or a combination thereof. The work also involves an in-depth and critical evaluation and dissemination of the relevant literature associated with the topic and methodologies employed.

A dissertation is prepared and defended in an oral examination (mid-September); students also present their work in the form of a ~15-20 min research seminar (mid-September).

The diversity of expertise of the chemistry and biochemistry faculty involved with the programme affords a wide range of project choice within the chemical sciences, in addition to facilitating identification of potential project supervisors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Dissertation
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Chemistry MSci Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE752Full year7NoNo

Chemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 75.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini

Description: Students work independently on chemical research topics set by their project supervisors. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of this advanced project. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field. The dissertation is defended in an oral examination; students also present their work in the form of a poster and as a short oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 7.50% Practical
  • Item 4: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 7.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry IDentistryDIN7132Full year7NoNo

Advanced Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry I

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Ferranti Wong

Description: This module continues from the Basic Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry module (DIN7131) which covers the basic knowledge required to provide dental treatments for children. The module will provide teaching on a more in-depth level in Paediatric Dentistry specifically on Oral Surgery, Oral Pathology, Oral Medicine and patients with Special Needs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry IIDentistryDIN7133Full year7NoNo

Advanced Knowledge in Paediatric Dentistry II

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Ferranti Wong

Description: This module covers the essentials in treating patients with medical compromised conditions and provide training on multidisciplinary approaches in providing treatments for these patients.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dental Hard Tissues and their MicroenvironmentDentistryDIN7151Semester 17NoNo

Dental Hard Tissues and their Microenvironment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Anderson

Description: Mechanisms and underlying principles and of the diseases of dental hard tissue loss, including calcium phosphate chemistry, chemical interaction with acids, and protective role of salivary proteins

How an understanding of these processes can contribute to the treatment, restoration, and ultimately prevention of these diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Minimally Invasive DentistryDentistryDIN7152Full year7NoNo

Minimally Invasive Dentistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The underlying biochemical and physicochemical mechanisms of clinical dental prevention methods

How protective mechanisms against hard dental tissues diseases exist in the oral environment and how these can be used to prevent the disease.

The progress of hard dental tissue diseases and learn about existing and novel detection methods.

How novel biomaterials are developed mimicking oral environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Oral MicrobiologyDentistryDIN7153Full year7NoNo

Oral Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Allaker

Description: The complex relationship between the resident oral microflora and the host in both health and disease.

The key issues that determine whether the microflora at a particular site within the oral cavity will have a beneficial or adverse relationship with the host.

How an understanding of these processes can contribute to the treatment and prevention of oral diseases with a microbial aetiology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM044Full year7NoNo

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: The student will be assigned or choose a research topic on which they will prepare a power point presentation followed by the submission of a 5000 words essay, under supervision. The student will be expected to give a 40 minute presentation followed by a question and answer discussion session for a further 20 minutes at the Residential Weekend. Students will also be required to listen to presentations from fellow students and engage in the discussion session.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Pre Sessional Legal Systems, Research Skills and Writing for IT LawLawCCDM045Semester 26NoNo

Pre Sessional Legal Systems, Research Skills and Writing for IT Law

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: This module will cover: Legal Systems (national law, EU law, international law; public-private law; common-civil law; law-making; layers & hierarchies of law), Legal Sources (eg different types of legislation and case-law; how to read a case; the system of precedents in the common law etc); Legal Research Skills (where & how to find legal sources; primary & secondary sources; how to use legal sources in an argument; how to quote legal resources in a dissertation); and Legal Writing (how to construct a legal argument; how to carry out an in-depth legal argument; definitions and concepts; how to interpret the law). This module will focus on the computer and communications law field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Cyber CrimeLawCCDM046Semester 27NoNo

Cyber Crime

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: Computers have made it possible for people to commit old crimes in new ways as well as new crimes such as hacking, the dissemination of computer viruses and other misuses of computers and networks. This module examines how the criminal law has had to adapt to both scenarios as well as the evidentiary and cross-border challenges that these present to law enforcement. The primary focus will be on UK law but the module will address the international response to such issues, as well as such jurisdictions as the US and Canada.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Essential Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE100Full year4NoNo

Essential Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Crespo Otero

Description: This module is intended for students studying on chemistry-based degree programmes (including F100, F103, 9A32, F152, 2L22 and F154).

This module is structured around three main key areas:

(1) Acquiring mathematical skills for problem solving in chemistry.
The module will explain how mathematics underpin chemistry and will support students in acquiring a variety of key mathematical skills used to solve problem in chemistry. The material covered in this module includes: basic numeracy skills, units and order of magnitude, simple mathematical calculations, introductory calculus (differentiation/integration), complex numbers, matrices, geometry, application of probability theory in chemistry and statistical analysis of data.

(2) Considering the role of Chemistry in the "real world" and Developing graduate skills.
Through personal investigation and series of talk of professional Chemists, students will be encouraged to consider the role of chemistry in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline. Students will also develop through this module, oral and written communication skills and some basic literature search technique.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional Chemists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Foundations of Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE101Full year4NoNo

Foundations of Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giorgio Chianello

Description: This module is appropriate to first-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training in the principles and practice of key techniques of practical chemistry - including analytical methods, synthetic procedures, methods of purification, and the use of a range of instrumental techniques. Topics such as good laboratory practice, health and safety in the laboratory, the preparation of laboratory reports amd data analysis techniques are also covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
AeroelasticityEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM032Semester 27NoNo

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE203ASemester 15YesNo

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE113 or take CHE114

Description: This module introduces key aspects of inorganic chemistry, including crystal chemistry, crystallography, electronic structure of solids and main group chemistry. Periodic trends in the p-block are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed, with emphasis on aluminosilicates and boron hydrides. In addition, characterisation techniques such as X-ray diffraction and multi-nuclear NMR are introduced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE203BSemester 25YesNo

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE113 or take CHE114

Description: This module introduces key aspects of transition metal chemistry. Periodic trends in the transition metals are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed in transition metal complexes. In addition, characterisation techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy are introduced, and d-d transitions and spectroscopic term symbols discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE204ASemester 15YesNo

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass

Description: This module introduces key concepts of quantum mechanics in a chemical context, explaining how the theories of quantum mechanics can be applied to atoms and molecules so as to rationalise the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of such entities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE204BSemester 25YesNo

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso

Description: This module considers the fundamental role of molecular symmetry in bonding and in determining molecular properties. A range of spectroscopic techniques are then considered in detail, with emphasis on developing understanding of the theoretical principles and the applications of the techniques in studying molecular structure and chemical reactivity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM311Semester 26NoNo

Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta

Description: This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature.
The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage.
It brings this together considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and FluidsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM331Semester 16NoNo

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: This is an introductory module in computational modelling. It covers both computational solids and computational fluids. The most widely used methods such the finite element method are covered. The emphasis is on engineering applications with students being exposed to hands on experience of both solids and fluids commercial packages.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM335Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM405Semester 27NoNo

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP086Semester 17NoNo

International Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the traditional competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, strategy as practice, scenario planning, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches, and the role of leadership. In particular, the emphasis on business ecosystems will allow students to appreciate the internal and transnational nature of strategic management with specific reference to the European context and European businesses. Nonetheless, throughout the course we will also examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Supply Chain ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP091Semester 27NoNo

Global Supply Chain Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Over the last few decades the business world has become more complex, fragmented, and geographically scattered. As firms outsource a growing portion of the activities and functions that were previously carried out in-house, they become one element of a multifaceted and intricate process of value creation and capture that cut across firms' and states' borders: the supply chain. As value-creating activities and functions are shared between ever more players their linkages increase as well as their interdependence. The study of global supply chains and their management looks at this scattered environment: the linkages and
relationships among firms, and among firms and other actors; and focuses on how leading firms attempt to drive this complexity in multiple ways, whether by increasing coherence, consistency and unity in the supply chain, or by shifting costs to other chain members and increasing competitive pressures among them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUSP100Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Intellectual Property and Global PolicyLawCCLM001Semester 27NoNo

Intellectual Property and Global Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: This module will focus upon the impact of international trade agreements on intellectual property and how that manifests itself at a domestic level with an emphasis on national law, policy and business activity. It will address intellectual property in a global context, focusing on multilateral, regional, and bilateral treaties that affect intellectual property. The way international intellectual property laws and other international legislation interact will be examined and the impact of additional domestic intellectual property requirements stemming from global agreements, namely TRIPS, will be scrutinized. There will be an assessment of various enforcement mechanisms utilized to protect intellectual property rights and the impact such enforcement, or lack thereof, may have on global trade. The various organizations and stakeholders which are involved in intellectual property policy will also be examined and the impact they have on influencing intellectual property law at an international and, consequently, a domestic level will be analyzed. This module will focus on the EU, taking into account other jurisdictions as they are relevant.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
The Regulation of Artificial Intelligence and Big Data Under Intellectual Property and Competition LawsLawCCLM002Semester 27NoNo

The Regulation of Artificial Intelligence and Big Data Under Intellectual Property and Competition Laws

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Maria Ioannidou

Description: We live in a world of unprecedented technological change. The way we live our lives today, with the most essential services being only a click away, has radically transformed our existence as consumers. On the face of it, markets are performing well, as the prices for services have radically decreased ¿ or are even provided for ¿free¿, that is, without monetary payment ¿ through the use of online platforms. We can shop for less money, compare products in real time, search virtually any question, hail a cab on our mobile phone, order any kind of food in an instant ¿ the list is seemingly endless. As such, these technological advancements have transformed consumers¿ choice, yet they have simultaneously created new causes of concern about competition in the marketplace and the role of consumers within it.

This course will critically examine how big data, algorithms and AI are transforming market dynamics, challenging the foundations of competition and IP law enforcement and raising new challenges for competition authorities, regulators, businesses and consumers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Intellectual Property and the Creative IndustriesLawCCLM003Semester 17NoNo

Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov

Description: This course addresses the major creative industries, the way they operate and their impact on the national global economy, with a particular focus on the interplay between intellectual property protection and the industries' business environment.
This module will analyze various contentious issues in the law surrounding the creative industries with a focus on intellectual property. A number of specific creative industries will be examined such as music, film and fashion as well as famous' persons rights over their name and image and the commercialization of such rights. It is an international and comparative law module, looking at a variety of jurisdictions according to significance and relevance to particular industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Open Policies and New TechnologiesLawCCLM004Semester 17NoNo

Open Policies and New Technologies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Guido Westkamp

Description: This module will address the legal implications surrounding artificial intelligence and consequently big data and deep learning. The module will examine artificial intelligence and the recent advances which have rendered it an essential part of the global economy. It will scrutinize the laws, both at the domestic, with a focus on the EU and UK, and international level which are currently in place to govern this sector. It will also focus on the underlying element of big data which has proven essential for deep learning and the growth of artificial intelligence. It will address the legal mechanism which oversee data collection, storage and use and how these mechanisms fit within the objectives of advancing artificial intelligence. This module will focus primarily on the intellectual property law concerns that arise from artificial intelligence but may also cover other legal aspects as seen necessary. This module will also examine the policy considerations necessary when regulating such a novel and pervasive technology, addressing stakeholder impact and domestic objectives for artificial intelligence.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLM911Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Understanding Culture: An Introduction to Cultural TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4202Semester 24NoNo

Understanding Culture: An Introduction to Cultural Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katarzyna Mika
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "Building on your knowledge of literature, art, history, and science - and at the same time expanding this knowledge and challenging its certainties - this course will give you insight into all the major approaches to culture since the nineteenth century. It analyses various definitions of culture and explores the historical contexts in which they were formulated and gained currency, always with an eye on current developments and issues. The course is highly interactive, taught as one two-hour unit per week (consisting of a lecture followed immediately by discussion)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Vehicular CrashworthinessEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM033Semester 27NoNo

Vehicular Crashworthiness

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fabian Duddeck

Description: The module aims to provide an in-depth description of all aspects related to the design of vehicles with respect to their crashworthiness. Here within are included technical aspects, social aspects and economical aspects, which are finally placed in the context of the total product development processes of current industries. Main parts are: history of crashworthiness, crash tests, structural aspects, material selection and modelling, numerical methods for crash, biomechanics, restraint systems and special aspects related to aerospace and automotive.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Renewable Energy SourcesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM035Semester 17NoNo

Renewable Energy Sources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Huasheng Wang

Description: The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the global energy scene and the impacts of energy production and consumption on the environment. The module provide the students with an understanding of the origin and nature of various renewable/sustainable energy resources, the assessment of their ability to meet our future energy demands, and the design of renewable energy systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Graduate Professional and Academic SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUSM178Semester 27NoNo

Graduate Professional and Academic Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis

Description: The NCM (Non-Credit Module) will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). All these initiatives are expected to pave the way to a smoother transition to Post-Graduate setting and the expectation set by the University. The Module aims to boost the skills associated with quantitative analysis and computer lab exposures using both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Selected Issues in Commercial and Company LawBusiness and ManagementBUSM179Semester 27NoNo

Selected Issues in Commercial and Company Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Min Yan

Description: This module will introduce students to those aspects of law that are relevant to business operations by examining selected issues and fundamental principles that underlie the law of contract and company law. In particular, this module will deal with creating commercial contracts, contractual terms, effect of exemption and unfair clauses, remedies for breach of contract, corporate personality & limited liability of shareholders, corporate constitution and corporate management, managerial accountability & directors' duties, shareholder rights & remedies and comparative corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM180Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Management Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Managing Yourself and Building Positive Relationships at WorkBusiness and ManagementBUSM182Semester 17NoNo

Managing Yourself and Building Positive Relationships at Work

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor

Description: Organisational behaviour theories and ideas from psychology provide insight on how individuals/groups behave in organisational settings. Various organisational models are analysed for future HR practitioners to enhance self-awareness and interpersonal skills. Individual differences, managing group dynamics, communicating with impact, influencing and persuasion skills, working across differences, managing workplace politics constructively, building nurturing relationship for professional growth and career progression are examined. Self-development through practical and experiential activities are embedded in weekly sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation (10,000 words)LawCCDM092Full year7NoNo

Dissertation (10,000 words)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Dissertation (independent research), an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Computer and Communications Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation (10,000 words)LawCCDM092Full year7NoNo

Dissertation (10,000 words)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Dissertation (independent research), an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Computer and Communications Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Legal Principles and Concepts in Computer and Communications LawLawCCDM116Full year6NoNo

Legal Principles and Concepts in Computer and Communications Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: This Module will provide non law students with the fundamental principles and concepts of the core legal subjects of tort, contract, criminal law, administrative/constitutional and property law. The Module will introduce these subjects to the students and also explain the connections and differences between different areas of law (eg private-public law) and the wider legal system (eg the national and international layers; civil law and case law). The principles and concepts will be explained by using examples and cases from the Computer and Communications Law field. The students will learn to apply and critically analyse the legal principles in these fields to the subject area of computer and communications law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Law and EconomicsLawCCLF001Semester 17NoNo

Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This module investigates the intersection of law and economics. This module discusses how economics has been used to analysis different areas of the law (e.g., contract law). This module discusses how the law impacts the economic analysis. The module looks at the neoclassical economic model, market failures, behavioural economics and their application to the law. The module looks at how laws shape economic models. The module looks at variety of laws (e.g., corporate law) and their applications to economic reasoning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
States of Matter and Analytical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE108Semester 24YesNo

States of Matter and Analytical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the properties of the different phases of matter (gases, liquids and solids), and to the theory and practise of analytical chemistry viewed from a physical and inorganic chemistry perspective. The module considers the various types of interactions that occur between atoms and molecules, and how these influence the molecular behaviour and the characteristics of the various phases of matter. The review of solid structures includes an introduction to crystallography and diffraction. The introduction to analytical chemistry will cover topics such as sample preparation, qualitative tests, gravimetric and combustion analysis, electroanalytical chemistry, an introduction to mass spectrometry and the basics of separation science, including GC and HLPC.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE113Semester 14YesNo

Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to fundamental principles underpinning inorganic chemistry. The module will give detailed consideration to theories of atomic structure, the nature of bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the structure of inorganic complexes including consideration of their colour and magnetism as well as an introduction to symmetry operations and point groups. Emphasis is placed on developing understanding of concepts which can then be applied to more advanced topics in inorganic chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE114Semester 24YesNo

Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Palma

Description: An introduction to the thermodynamics of chemical systems: 1st Law; state functions and exact differentials, Internal energy, reversible and irreversible work of expansion of ideal gases; heat capacities; enthalpy, enthalpy changes of specific physical and chemical processes, and Hess's law; entropy and entropy changes accompanying specific processes, 2nd and 3rd law; spontaneous change, Helmotz energy, Gibbs free energy and equilibrium constants. An introduction to the kinetics of chemical reactions, including: differential rate equations, elementary and composite reactions, integrated rate equations,
experimental methods, effect of temperature, kinetics of multi-step reactions, catalysed processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Extended Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM100Full year7NoNo

Extended Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: The module is an intensive research module that spans all three MSc semesters. It draws together the knowledge and skills from the taught component to address a research challenge of significant scope to be undertaken independently, under supervision. It focuses on the technical, project management and communication skills needed to successfully execute academic- and/or industry-oriented research. The project entails to apply research methods to solve original problems of fundamental or applied nature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 70.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Engineering InstrumentationEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM109Semester 15NoNo

Engineering Instrumentation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hasan Shaheed

Description: This module is focused on transducers and their uses in engineering control systems. It studies methods of taking measurements, and motor and actuator theory, reviewing important transducer characteristics and the methodology for selecting an appropriate transducer. In relation to this, the module also covers methods of acquiring data from transducers, and effectively processing electronic signals. All aspects of the module content are brought together in a problem based learning exercise, involving the control of a robotic arm.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Engineering MethodsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM114Semester 17NoNo

Engineering Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DENM014

Description: There are distinct differences between academic and applied industrial research projects. This module will prepare students to work effectively as industrial engineers. The 36 hours of lectures will cover project management frameworks, problem-solving techniques, intellectual property, technology strategy and roadmapping, metrics and statistics, technical writing and ethical considerations. External experts will be invited to give talks. This module will be assessed using three elements of compulsory coursework, there is no final exam.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Essential Mathematics Skills for EngineersEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM122Semester 14NoNo

Essential Mathematics Skills for Engineers

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts

Description: This module provides students with knowledge of basic mathematical skills that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basic logic, sequences and series, limits, differentiation and integration, partial derivatives, complex numbers, basic vector calculus, matrix algebra and an introduction to ordinary differential equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Services ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM183Semester 27NoNo

Services Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: The services sector has become one of the most important sectors from both an economic and a managerial point of view. Besides pure services providers an increasing number of 'new' services providers emerge, usually offering hybrid offerings that include goods and services components. This module provides students with an overview of important aspects of services management; outlines relevant frameworks, concepts, tools, and processes to improve the understanding of service design, management and commercialisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation for MSc Accounting and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM184Full year7NoNo

Dissertation for MSc Accounting and Finance

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou

Description: BUS184 Dissertation is a significantly lengthy (7,500 words) piece of independent work on a theme chosen by the student. Each Dissertation must fulfil certain topical areas, which are supported with the guidance of a Dissertation Supervisor, and involves an extended period of research and writing (two to three months). The Dissertation supports the BUSM143 Research Methods Module. Assessment submission is at the end of the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
International Investment AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM185Semester 27NoNo

International Investment Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia

Description: The module focuses on investment analysis and aims to develop an understanding of how securities and portfolios investment fits with the international financial markets. It will introduce students the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing Theory, multi-factor model, bond valuation, equity valuation, Financial Statement analysis, option valuation and portfolio performance evaluation. This module is particularly useful for students considering a career in finance, investment management, investment banking, investment consultancy or asset management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Strategic EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUSM186Semester 17NoNo

Strategic Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang

Description: This module introduces concepts, theories and practices that are shaping our thinking about creating and scaling new ventures in a fast-moving environment with great uncertainty. It addresses strategic (e.g. how to design a business model and entrepreneurial strategy) and practical issues (how to write a business plan and make a pitch to win funding). Students will not only be introduced to the principles of business model design, but also how to deal with uncertainty in the entrepreneurial process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
European ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP001Semester 27NoNo

European Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will explore aspects of the European political, economic, social and cultural context that are relevant for managers doing business in Europe. It will begin with an introduction to Europe's institutional framework, and the history of European integration. It will then introduce students to key features of Europe's business environment such as the Single European Market, competition policy, labour policy and monetary union. Case studies will explore these trends in particular industries such as transport, energy and high tech. Students will also be engaged in discussions over Europe's place in the world and future structural changes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Law and EconomicsLawCCLF002Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This module further dives into the intersection of law and economics. First, this course looks at the theory of the firm: why firms are formed, financed, etc. Second, this course looks at the economics of antitrust through market definition and merger and acquisitions. Third, this course looks at how intermediaries like credit agency attempt to address information asymmetries and discusses signalling theory. Finally, this course looks at the rational agent hypothesis by looking at the empirical literature on criminal law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Law and EconomicsLawCCLF003Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant issue within the academic fields of Law and Economics or Law and Finance. The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor. It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis. The group presentation is complementing, integrating and applying lecture material, is the small group project. The presentation is designed to develop a wide range of technical and analytical skills prior to the submission of dissertation proposal and also organizational and communication skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in Law and FinanceLawCCLF004Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Law and Finance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant issue within the academic fields of Law and Finance

The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor.

It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Professional Placement in ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE200Full year5NoNo

Professional Placement in Chemistry

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the "Year in Industry/Research" programmes in the field of chemistry offered by SBCS.
Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.
Successful applicants are supported by the School's placement coordinator and an academic tutor, who will keep in contact with students throughout the placement. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance.
It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 25.00% Practical
Level: 5
Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE202ASemester 15YesNo

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones
Overlap: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE102A and take CHE102B

Description: This module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: enolate chemistry, introduction to radical chemistry, oxidation and reduction reactions. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE202BSemester 25YesNo

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis
Overlap: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE102A and take CHE102B

Description: This course aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: reactivity of conjugated systems, pericyclic reactions and introduction to heterocyclic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM208Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDENM209Semester 16NoNo

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: This module covers more advanced topics in heat transfer, developing the ideas introduced in DEN5208 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 1. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; fins; heat exchangers; phase change; turbulent flows; compressible flow.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Advanced Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM305Semester 17NoNo

Advanced Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: This module is concerned with the design and performance of a typical aircraft. It covers mission based subsonic aircraft design methodology, areodynamic design, engine design, and noise in propeller and jet driven aircraft, structural design and materials selection.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Advanced Aerospace StructuresEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM307Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Aerospace Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen

Description: This module provides students with the basic tools of structural analysis including the structure idealisation, analysis of the thin-walled cellular type of structure peculiar to the aircraft, stress calculations of composite structures, fundamentals of elasticity and buckling analysis of plate. This specialisation covers theory, computations, experiments and implementation issues, as well as the study of specific cutting edge aerospace vehicles. In this module, four case-studies in aerospace manufacturing will be designed/
delivered during the tutorial sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
LeadershipBusiness and ManagementBUSP002Semester 27NoNo

Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will investigate and discuss how change is lead in organisations from theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will learn how to critically reflect on organisational change processes and apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. The module will focus on theories and concepts of leading change, how to lead change in different cultural environments, the nature and practice of responsible leadership, and followers' roles in and contributions to organisational change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Global Governance and International OrganisationsBusiness and ManagementBUSP068Semester 27NoNo

Global Governance and International Organisations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: ¿his module examines the emerging structure of global governance and the role of international organisations, looking at the roles played by Western states and international agencies in setting norms for good governance and for managing trade, labour and the environment. Students will acquire a solid historical and critical understanding of key developments and concepts such as the role of international financial institutions and the United Nations, "good governance" and "global civil society", and a comprehension of policy making at the global level.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSP069Semester 17NoNo

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organizational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, ethics, group dynamics, patterns and negotiation practices which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviour both at individual, group and organisational levels. Students will gain an awareness and knowledge of contemporary issues and
approaches to organisational change and development facing organizations. Beyond providing theoretical frameworks, the module will augment skills to prepare students for the work place through communication and team management skills, and through analytical and critical thinking skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Arbitration: Regulation and InfrastructureLawCCLP043Semester 27NoNo

International Arbitration: Regulation and Infrastructure

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last sixty years by the increased use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central important in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Arbitration: Applicable Laws and ProceduresLawCCLP044Semester 27NoNo

International Arbitration: Applicable Laws and Procedures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last sixty years by the increased use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central important in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE304USemester 16NoNo

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the properties of interfaces and the behaviour of molecules at interfaces, and experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems. This will include discussion of topics such as the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, the structure of solid surfaces and experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Computational ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE305PSemester 26NoNo

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass

Description: This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Computational ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE305USemester 26NoNo

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass

Description: This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Principles and Applications of Medical ImagingEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM029Semester 26NoNo

Principles and Applications of Medical Imaging

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathleen Tanner

Description: This module provides a comprehensive review of the most widely-used methods of imaging in medical and biological science. After an introduction to the parameters that define image quality, modalities, such as MRI and Ultrasound, are considered from the viewpoint of (i) their basic principles (ii) associated instrumentation, (ii) the method of image extraction from the raw data and (iii) the information revealed about the object. A more detailed consideration of image reconstruction is then followed by a discussion of some specialist non-conventional imaging techniques

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Integrated Clinical CareDentistryDIN4008Full year6NoNo

Integrated Clinical Care

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This core module develops upon teaching and learning undertaken in the Plaque Related Diseases module. This is a fundamental aspect of the clinical practice of being a dental therapist and a significant element of the module will be in providing patient care to adults to ensure that students are competent and confident clinicians with the knowledge and skill to treat teeth affected by dental disease as outlined in the General Dental Council&s Scope of Practice guidance document. It will enable the students to apply a detailed knowledge and to develop clinical skills using a holistic approach in management and provision of restorative treatment for adult patients. The range of procedures increases in complexity as the module and the student progresses. Assessment is through a range of different methods, namely written examination, case study and presentations, and a range of clinical procedures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Paediatric DentistryDentistryDIN4009Full year6NoNo

Paediatric Dentistry

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Sarah Redwood

Description: This compulsory module provides the structure for learning about the deciduous and permanent dentition, and the development and management of diseased and healthy teeth. Students then develop the clinical skills required for the full range of clinical procedures for children and adolescents as outlined in the General Dental Council&s Scope of Practice guidance document.Much of this module will be undertaken within the Dental School with some being undertaken in a paediatric outreach environment within the locality. Assessment is by a range of methods, namely a written examiation, case study and presentation and clinical procedures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Basic Clinical SciencesDentistryDIN4101Full year4NoNo

Basic Clinical Sciences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This 30-credit module is designed to provide an in-depth, scientific understanding of the structure and function of the human body systems in health and disease (e.g. musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory), including Oral Biology (consisting, Head & Neck, Oral Cavity, Immunology & Pathology) and Dental Materials, in order to provide appropriate health promotion advice and clinical intervention in the promotion of optimal oral health.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Clinical Practice 1DentistryDIN4102Full year4NoNo

Clinical Practice 1

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This 60-credit module has been designed to encompass total patient care, and through this, a philosophy of continual learning & layering of information gained from engagement and delivery of dental care for patients. Clinical Practice will be delivered as a continuum in stages commencing with the acquisition of skills during Year 2 in the clinical skills laboratory and transition from the laboratory to the clinic prior to treating patients.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Catalan IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT6200Full year6YesYes

Catalan III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Bolo
Overlap: CAT601
Prerequisite: CAT512,CAT5200

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is for students who have completed Catalan II Intensive. The focus will be on fluency, expansion of vocabulary, grammatical accuracy, advanced oral and reading comprehension, and development of writing skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - ArbitrationLawCCDD200Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - Arbitration

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - ArbitrationLawCCDD200Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - Arbitration

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration Theory and ContextLawCCDD201Semester 17NoNo

International Commercial Arbitration Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an
insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE206ASemester 15YesNo

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Fornili
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE102A and take CHE102B

Description: This module provides an introduction to the action of medicinal drugs. The topics covered include receptors, concentration-response relationships, drug disposition and pharmacokinetics and elementary structure-activity relationships.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE206BSemester 25YesNo

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE206A

Description: Major classes of drugs, and their mechanism of actions in treating disease, are reviewed in this module. Prototypical drugs and those developed to refine the properties of earlier examples are also considered. The rationale for developing, or prescribing, a particular drug is presented. Undesireable effects of drugs and drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Essential Skills for Chemists IIBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE210Full year5NoNo

Essential Skills for Chemists II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell

Description: Career Plans and Gathering Evidence for CV; CV and Cover Letter writing; Developing and Recognising Graduate Attributes; Scientific literacy and plagiarism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE211Full year5NoNo

Practical Chemistry

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE101

Description: This module is designed for second-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training at an intermediate-level in the principles and application of techniques of practical chemistry, and spans the traditional disciplines of organic, inorganic, physical and theoretical chemistry. Students will gain experience in a range of analytical methods, synthetic procedures, instrumental techniques and computational techniques. The module also includes training in the preparation of laboratory reports and data analysis techniques, as well as aspects relating to health and safety in the laboratory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Applications in RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM420Semester 27NoNo

Applications in Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This is a comprehensive module covering the fundamental areas of mechatronics and robotics technology and the application of robotics. The aims of this module are to introduce robotics as an integral part of modern automation, to provide an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems, to provide an understanding of path planning of robotic manipulators and mobile robots, to explain the actuator and sensor principles as pertinent for robotics, to
introduce various aspects of robot modelling and to introduce problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

This module covers the important area of robotics applications. The module will show how robotics can be employed to solve problems in a wide range of applications, in areas such as industry, space, extreme environments and healthcare. Application areas include surgical robots and robotic devices, prosthetics, assistive and rehabilitation robots , endoscopic robots, human-robot interaction in the factory floor, flexible work cells, automation through robotics in industry, space, lunar exploration, nuclear waste decommissioning, etc.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Whole System Design in Sustainable EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM433Semester 27NoNo

Whole System Design in Sustainable Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module examines the nature of sustainability and various sustainability models before examining the role of national and international government agencies on environmental management. The role of technology is examined, primarily through life cycle analysis, and includes design of products, energy supply, and personal consumption. A particular emphasis will be placed on life cycle analysis of wind, solar and nuclear.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Energy Conversion AnalysisEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM510Semester 15NoNo

Energy Conversion Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali

Description: This module will develop the ideas introduced in DEN4006 Energy Conversion Systems and study how energy conversion systems can be analysed quantitatively. To do this it will use many of the concepts and fundamental laws introduced in DEN107. It will also analyse reacting flows with particular reference to combustion and their application to the analysis of internal combustion engines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM512Semester 15NoNo

Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts

Description: This module builds on DEN4122/4123 Mathematics and Computing 1/2 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basics of vector calculus, vector and scalar fields, gradient of scalar fields, optimisation, div and curl of vector fields, vector integration, integral theorems, curvilinear coordinates, application to derivation of the Navier-Stokes Equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSP107Semester 17NoNo

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module addresses a range of interconnected topics such as: The evolution of the accounting conceptual framework and the centrality of managers reporting to investors, shareholders and government; The range of financial statements (as specified by IAS1): income, cash, changes in equity and balance sheet; Comprehensive income statement (recognizing holding gains); Applications of Cost Volume Profit Analysis on Management Accounting and implications on decision making; Cost Allocation using Traditional methods and Activity Based Costing ; Strategic Investment Decisions: How companies use accounting information in order to make important decisions; Budgeting and Variance Analysis; Performance Evaluation: How business evaluate business units¿ performance; Presentation of different techniques, Performance Evaluation: EVA vs Balanced Scorecard.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Management ConsultingBusiness and ManagementBUSP111Semester 27NoNo

Management Consulting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what management consultancy is, the variety and types of consulting firms and the markets they serve. We will examine a range of approaches to consultancy as a process of diagnosing management and organisational problems, designing implementing and evaluating organisational interventions. We will examine studies of some of these interventions and case studies we will examine how consultants present their knowledge and
expertise, the claims they make for its efficacy and the role of ethics in this. We will examine and explore different kinds of organisational context where management consultancy has been used: firms, public institutions, voluntary organisations and other organisational forms. We will also practise skills critical for consultancy such as diagnosis, intergroup facilitation and evaluation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Marketing ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP137Semester 17NoNo

Marketing Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module is meant to provide an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. It is providing students on the MSc in Management a with a theoretical foundation of theories and concepts of marketing management which allows them in their subsequent studies to understand and situate more specialised aspects of marketing (e.g. consumer behaviour, social and political marketing, or business relationships and networks). Special emphasis is given to understanding current academic debates in the field. This means students are expected to read articles independently in leading marketing journals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLM911Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Securities and Markets RegulationLawCCLP001Semester 27NoNo

Securities and Markets Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: This module covers the most important pieces of EU legislation applicable to capital markets. These include the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive and Regulation (MiFID and MiFIR), the Transparency Directive and the UCITS and AIFM Directives, which discipline collective investment funds and alternative investment funds managers. Particular attention will be given to the study of market venues as well as the European and International institutional framework governing their supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
International Banking RegulationLawCCLP007Semester 17NoNo

International Banking Regulation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: This module provides students with an in depth and thorough understanding of the legal and supervisory framework covering the entire life-cycle of a bank, from its inception to its failure. It also considers the economic and legal rationale for regulating banking institutions. The module covers both the regulatory and the supervisory framework in the UK and the EU. However, reference to international standards and the activities of international standard setters, such as the Financial Stability Board and the Basel Committee of Banking Supervision, is made throughout the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Mergers and AcquisitionsLawCCLP010Semester 27NoNo

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in corporate finance. The module will focus on issues such as: the use of debt and equity; why merge or acquire a business; due diligence, acquisition/sale agreements and contractual governance; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, US and the EU and the protection of minority shareholders through the regulation of this bid process; the role of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Ethics and Governance in Business and FinanceLawCCLP011Semester 17NoNo

Ethics and Governance in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: This module analyses unethical practices arising in business and in the financial sector and links them with corresponding corporate governance problems. The module then provides a critical evaluation of the relevant regulatory and supervisory framework which strive to address them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Applied SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE215Semester 25NoNo

Applied Spectroscopy

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE104

Description: Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionized our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools across all areas of Natural Science. This module is designed for second-year students on Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry degree programmes where its main purpose is to reinforce, integrate and extend existing knowledge of spectroscopic techniques, particularly relating to multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in relation to structure determination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Advanced Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE300Semester 16NoNo

Advanced Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xacobe Cambeiro
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE211

Description: A module of practical work designed to familiarise chemistry students with modern experimental methods and techniques in inorganic and organic chemistry. This module will build upon the practical skills acquired during the first two years. A report based on a literature search will also form part of the module, and instruction in the technique of searching the literature will be provided.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Organic SynthesisBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE302PSemester 17NoNo

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray

Description: This module covers the techniques used to plan the syntheses of organic compounds, together with a selection of reaction types that may be used in organic synthesis. The aim is to provide you with sufficient knowledge and experience to analyse and evaluate the design of syntheses of molecules of pharmaceutical relevance. The second half is specifically designed to give students an understanding of advanced heterocyclic chemistry, again covering examples that are appropriate to the pharmaceutical industry. The aim here is to enable you to design syntheses of a range of types of heterocyclic compounds and to predict the reactivity of these compounds with a variety of common reagents.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Energy Storage EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM600Semester 27NoNo

Energy Storage Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Jorge Sobrido

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 40.00% Practical
Level: 7
Introduction to Solar EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM601Semester 27NoNo

Introduction to Solar Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: Solar Energy is an important aspect of Sustainable Energy Engineering. The understanding of key processes within solar energy will provide students with the knowledge needed to progress further within the relevant industry. The module will focus on the following aspects of solar energy: solar insolation, physical background for semi-conductor materials, photovoltaic devices and applications , photocatalysis, learning from nature and photosynthesis, future solutions. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lectures from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Medical Ethics and Regulatory AffairsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM702Semester 27NoNo

Medical Ethics and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Lee

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied medical ethics and law related to the development of new products in the field of bioengineering. It provides knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of approval of products for clinical use in the UK, the EU and the US, risk management and design processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research Methods for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSP145Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods for Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to put together a research proposal, how to draw out objectives of research, how to undertake literature reviews, how to assess suitable research methods to use. In terms of research methods, the course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students will know how to put together their own research proposal and will have done some preliminary analysis of
literature, assessment of data required and methods to be used.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in Medieval IberiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4003Semester 14YesNo

Men, Women, and Song: Love Poetry in Medieval Iberia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval
Overlap: HSP4003
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to medieval literature through the study of poetry in Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, and Spanish. Taking love as a unifying theme, it will explore a series of genres (traditional lyric, song-books), time periods (from the 13th to the 15th century), and themes within medieval literary culture (translation and multilingualism). It will also serve as an introduction to the critical analysis and study of poetry as a literary form more generally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and FootballLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4011Semester 24YesNo

Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and Football

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: COM5011 and HSP4011
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Topics covered include: nationalism; the politics of language; the avant--garde art of Salvador Dalí and Miró; literature; football. There is no language requirement for this module; therefore it is suitable for students with no knowledge of Catalan and Spanish.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Introductory CatalanLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4200Full year4YesYes

Introductory Catalan

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Bolo
Overlap: CAT110
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module should be chosen by students wishing to take a full academic year of Introductory Catalan. Successful students will complete Level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Language (CEFRL). Teaching materials are selected with a view to introducing students to Catalan culture and society. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. They must attend five hours of teaching per week and expect to spend a further five hours per week on private study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Corporate Rescue and Cross-border InsolvencyLawCCLP013Semester 27NoNo

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This course is premised upon the notion that the student of insolvency law ought to develop a sound understanding of the dynamics of insolvency and debt restructuring, including available options, methods and techniques in the light of regulatory theories, applicable legal framework, shareholders capitalism and public policy objectives. The course will provide a critical and insightful view of current international legal developments and trends with the aim of identifying the most salient legal issues involved in insolvency and debt restructuring in the context of an increasingly complex financial phenomena and global markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Lawyer NegotiationsLawCCLP039Semester 17NoNo

Lawyer Negotiations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Debbie De Girolamo

Description: The course will explore negotiation through various theoretical approaches including strategic bargaining, cognitive theories, processual analysis, for example. The focus will be on the lawyer as negotiator and the intent is to blend theoretical analysis with practical application. Lectures will be delivered in combination with role-play simulations and exercises. Students will be expected to participate in exercises and simulated roleplays each class.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
International Construction Contracts and Dispute ResolutionLawCCLP042Semester 27NoNo

International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stavros Brekoulakis

Description: International construction contracts have by their nature special features, which affect the methods of resolving disputes arising from them. The module, conducted through series of seminars, examines in detail the nature of international construction contracts, the typical clauses included in the standard form of FIDIC conditions, the parties to construction contract (and in particular the role of the Engineer and the Contractor), their structure, and the types of disputes that arise under them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Organic SynthesisBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE302USemester 16NoNo

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE202A and take CHE202B

Description: The module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: theory and application of retrosynthetic analysis, modern heteroatom chemistry, reactive intermediates & aromatic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will be embedded within the course. The module builds upon the knowledge of structure and reactivity of organic molecules gained in CHE202.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE303PSemester 16NoNo

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE303USemester 16NoNo

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE113 and take CHE203B

Description: Prerequisites: Atomic, Molecular and Ionic Structure (CHE111), Transition Metal Chemistry (CHE312). This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 5.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE304PSemester 16NoNo

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the properties of interfaces and the behaviour of molecules at interfaces, and experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems. This will include discussion of topics such as the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, the structure of solid surfaces and experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.50% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 12.50% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Health and IllnessDentistryDIN4006Full year5NoNo

Health and Illness

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Leon Bassi

Description: This compulsory module develops the health and illness continuum. By gaining knowledge of the manifestations of human disease and disorders, how these impinge on dental treatment, and how they are of relevance to the management of patients, the dental hygienist and therapist will become competent in providing the appropriate intervention and care. The student will utilise this knowledge in order to provide safe dental care to a range of patients with complex medical histories. An understanding of pharmacology will be further developed and consolidated in relation to a patient&s medical history. The student will be taught to recognise oral conditions and know when and how to refer appropriately.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Clinical PeriodontologyDentistryDIN4007Full year5NoNo

Clinical Periodontology

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This is a compulsory module taught as a peer group developing upon knowledge and skills undertaken in the Plaque Related Diseases module. The focus will be on the implementation of non-surgical periodontal therapy based on the varying factors affecting the disease in the individual patient. This is a fundamental aspect of the clinical practice of being a dental hygienist and dental therapist and a significant element of the module will be in providing patient care on adults and children to ensure that students are competent and confident clinicians in the management of periodontal diseases.Underpinned by an evidence based approach, the range of procedures develops in complexity in the management and provision of periodontal treatment for adults and children. Other key skills such as communication, anxiety management and dealing sensitively with patients will be enhanced. An important element of this module is preparing the student for working independently, within the General Dental Council&s Scope of Practice guidance documentation. Assessment is by a written paper, case study and presentation, and a range of clinical procedures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Catalan Literature: An IntroductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT5055Semester 15YesNo

Catalan Literature: An Introduction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: COM5055, HSP5055
Prerequisite: None

Description: How did a language with so few speakers give rise to texts of world importance? Covering examples by well-known writers from the medieval period to the present, this module provides an overview of Catalan literature. Theatre, mystical prose, modern novels and postmodern short stories are analyzed and discussed on their own stylistic terms and in relation to historical and aesthetic developments. Love and war, as well as national and personal identity make for a potent literary mixture.
All texts are available in English and/or Spanish translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Catalan II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT5200Full year5YesYes

Catalan II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Bolo
Overlap: CAT512
Prerequisite: CAT4200 knowledge of Catalan equivalent to CEFRL level A2?

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is aimed at students who already have a basic knowledge of Catalan. Its focus is on developing oral fluency, improving aural and reading comprehension skills, learning new structures and vocabulary, and writing skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Avant-Garde Theatre in EuropeLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT6007Semester 26YesNo

Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: COM6007, HSP6007
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature module; knowledge of Catalan equivalent to CEFR level C1

Description: Why should characters behave illogically on stage or not exist at all? How can image rival plot? And what is the point of shocking audiences? This module introduces some fundamental styles and plays from European avant-garde theatre and sets them within an artistic and socio-political context. Futurism, Dada, Expressionism and the Theatre of the Absurd are included. Special attention is paid to Catalan drama. We will at all times try to see texts as excuses for performance and use other aspects of culture to understand the challenges of this new drama.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Drama and EducationEnglish and DramaDRA361Semester 26NoYes

Drama and Education

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Margaret Inchley

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the Department of Drama at Level 7

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • International perspectives
  • Enterprising perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.
  • Students will be able to justify approaches they have taken when participating in module based enterprise projects and/or situations.

Description: In what ways might we teach about and through Drama? How and why is learning through Drama so powerful? What are the cultural, ethical and political contexts of Drama education? You will learn about the key thinkers on teaching and learning through Drama, the history of Drama as a school subject and extra-curricular activity, and the current state of play regarding the position of Drama in UK school, youth theatre and university contexts. The module will involve the practical development of pedagogically grounded ideas and activities, and include a school-based or youth theatre research placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectives,Enterprising perspectivesDRA_6_A
DissertationEnglish and DramaDRA7000Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton

Description: "This independent research project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words. Working with the support of a supervisor, students pursue their own independent investigation of the theory and practice of performance. Research development is also encouraged by a dissertation colloquium in late May/early June, in which students present their research in progress and receive feedback from academic staff and other graduate students. Recent dissertation topics have included studies of illness and performance, performance and second language acquisition, the performance of rural spaces and identities, contemporary performance and relational aesthetics, circus performance in Victorian Britain, cultural value and performance and performance and social conflict."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Econometrics 1Economics and FinanceECN224Semester 15YesNo

Econometrics 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarolta Laczo
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5120
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 ) and take ECN121

Description: This module builds on students' basic understanding of statistics acquired in their first year to introduce them to the basic theoretical and practical principles of econometrics analysis. There are two main goals: to strengthen and widen students' knowledge and understanding of statistical analysis, and to provide a solid grounding of the theory and practice of simple and multiple regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Econometrics 2Economics and FinanceECN225Semester 25YesNo

Econometrics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stepana Lazarova
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN224 or take MTH5120

Description: Econometrics 2 builds on Econometrics 1 module, providing students with the knowledge of further econometrics methods in standard use in current applied econometrics. Topics covered include: nonlinear regression functions, instrumental variables regression, stationary and nonstationary time series, panel data and regression with binary dependent variable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Capital Markets 1Economics and FinanceECN226Semester 25YesNo

Capital Markets 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS306
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 or take MTH4101 ) and take ECN111

Description: The aim of this module is to provide a rigorous training in the theory of investment and capital markets and a good understanding of its central concepts. More specifically, its purpose is to show how firms, individuals and institutions take decisions about optimal investment, and to examine the behaviour of the capital markets in which these decisions are taken.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Topics in Financial EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECOM073Semester 27NoNo

Topics in Financial Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Liudas Giraitis

Description: The module will reaffirm the student's understanding of the classical techniques of regression analysis, which will be extended to encompass financial data modelling. The module will also cover the techniques of time series modelling. It will begin by analysing classical linear stochastic models that are formulated in discrete time. It will proceed to analyse models in continuous time that are a feature of modern financial analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Macroeconomic PolicyEconomics and FinanceECN355Semester 16YesNo

Macroeconomic Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Tatsuro Senga
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206

Description: This module presents the theoretical underpinnings of modern macroeconomic policy, providing a critical understanding of the policy debate and knowledge of the tools of the trade. Topics covered include: fiscal policy, temporary vs. permanent tax changes, policy sustainability, money creation, seignorage, inflation, monetary policy rules, UK monetary arrangements, and liquidity traps.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Labour EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN356Semester 26YesNo

Labour Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Raute
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: Topics include: The supply of labour; the demand for labour; labour market equilibrium; human capital and signalling; labour market discrimination; trade unions; compensating wage differentials; incentive pay; labour mobility; unemployment; labour market policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 6
Futures and OptionsEconomics and FinanceECN358Semester 26YesNo

Futures and Options

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Mouabbi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN226

Description: Topics include operation of forward and futures markets; arbitrage and its application to forward and futures prices; hedging. Options - use of options in hedging and speculation; price bounds and putcall parity; elements of stochastic calculus and its application to the Black-Scholes model; delta hedging; binomial pricing models, early exercise and exotic options. Regulatory issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced MicroeconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN361Semester 16YesNo

Advanced Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Tyson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This module aims to help you to bridge the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate economics. It is strongly recommended for all students who are considering continuing to a taught Master's degree in Economics. The module will attempt to develop your capacity for strategic reasoning via the translation of economic stories into simple models, spelling out every step of each argument in detail. Topics covered include individual decision making, efficiency of competitive market economy and causes of market failure, social choice and welfare, and information economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Teaching English in Professional and Academic SettingsLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7209Semester 27NoNo

Teaching English in Professional and Academic Settings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Weronika Gorska-Fernando
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "This optional module provides a focused route for students who wish to develop advanced knowledge and skills in teaching both English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP). The module starts with the exploration of theoretical approaches and key research as well as pedagogical developments in the fields of ESP/EAP in the UK and across other national and international contexts. This in-depth introduction then moves on to the discussion of the principles of ESP/EAP course design, placing particular emphasis on practical knowledge of syllabus content/structure, material development and assessment methods."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Methods of Text and Corpus AnalysisLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7210Semester 17NoNo

Methods of Text and Corpus Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelya Koteyko
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "Corpus linguistics provides methods for the study of collections of electronic texts. It has had a growing impact within linguistics since 1970s, and also has spawned diverse applications in language teaching, media studies and communication research. Corpus-based studies of discourse in these areas have offered precise, systematic and reliable insights in a variety of registers and settings. This module will introduce students to this new and innovative field of enquiry called corpus-assisted discourse analysis. The module consists of two parts. The first part of the module will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects underlying discourse analysis. The second part will introduce students to the key principles and theoretical constructs developed within corpus-assisted discourse analysis, as well as to some of the most widely used software and electronic corpora."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation for English Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7211Semester 17NoNo

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation for English Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation for English Language Teaching is an optional module in the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. The module initially focuses on aspects of curriculum design, including language policies and pedagogies, by exploring: historical perspectives; environmental and situational analysis; needs analysis. The module also examines the relationship between curriculum ideology and learning outcomes and how this impinges on syllabus design, the role of teachers, and materials development. The second focus of the module is to present students with an overview of language program evaluation discussing at length: approaches to evaluation; evaluation practice and research; materials evaluation and multimedia materials evaluation. The module develops and deepens students understanding of issues in curriculum development by providing practice in evaluating language curricula and language teaching materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Multimedia Materials Development for English Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7212Semester 27NoNo

Multimedia Materials Development for English Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to provide an introduction to the pedagogical applications of multimedia in the language classroom. The course will focus on key issues and developments in the field of language teaching with multimedia and will explore practical approaches to exploiting, creating, adapting and developing multimedia materials for language teaching purposes. Participants will be given opportunities to develop practical lesson ideas and materials and will be encouraged to pursue their particular interests in the subject area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary Economic IssuesEconomics and FinanceECN105Semester 24YesNo

Contemporary Economic Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guglielmo Volpe
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN102 and take ECN113

Description: This module will provide students with an opportunity to explore contemporary economic issues, debates and policy. The module builds on the insights provided by the first semester Principles of Economics, World Economy and Economics (and Finance) in Action modules to develop in students an ability to: identify and apply the appropriate economic approaches to explain real world economic issues; to be able to engage in both written and oral form with the critical analysis of current economic issues; to be able to understand, interpret and write journalistic discussions of economic issues and to be able to contribute to the policy debate concerning the contemporary issues under investigation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Macroeconomics IEconomics and FinanceECN106Semester 24YesNo

Macroeconomics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Lee
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS108 or take BUS128 or take BUS137
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN113
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN111

Description: The module is an introduction to macroeconomics. It addresses how goods, labour and financial markets interact to determine aggregate output, employment, interest rates and the price level. The topics covered include: definitions and measurement of aggregate variables, equilibrium on each market in isolation (partial equilibrium) and on all markets (general equilibrium) both in the short and in the medium run, the impact of fiscal and monetary policy on aggregate variables.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Microeconomics IEconomics and FinanceECN111Semester 24YesNo

Microeconomics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN113
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN106

Description: This module is the first in a sequence of three modules intended to provide students with a thorough introduction to microeconomic theory. This module will cover: introduction to microeconomic modelling; producer theory: technology and costs, competitive supply, monopoly supply; consumer theory: the budget set, preferences and utility, competitive demand, price and income effects, and intertemporal choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Principles of EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN113Semester 14YesNo

Principles of Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nick Vriend
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS017 or take BUS018 or take BUS128 or take BUS137

Description: This module will be an introduction to economic reasoning and analysis. No prior knowledge of economics is necessary. The module will cover standard topics such as: demand, supply and price in consumer markets; demand, supply and price in labour markets: returns to education, the New Deal; competitive equilibrium: optimality; trade; market power; price discrimination, oligopoly, government policy; externalities and the environment; public goods, taxes and free-riding; globalisation; growth.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Bond Market StrategiesEconomics and FinanceECOM074Semester 27NoNo

Bond Market Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Darren Cullen

Description: Bond markets are a critical part of the global financial system. This module explores global bond markets from a practitioner perspective. The module is designed to help students learn key bond market mathematics, identify value and understand the key risks. The module will explore how bond market strategies can be employed to capture value, create portfolios and meet specific investment objectives. The course also links core material with topical issues in global bond markets, showing students the critical importance of bond markets for the banking system, the wider financial system, the economy and government policymaking.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
DissertationEconomics and FinanceECOM075Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Carriero

Description: Dissertation

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Alternative InvestmentsEconomics and FinanceECOM076Semester 27NoNo

Alternative Investments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte

Description: This thirty-hour optional module provides a thorough overview of recent developments in investment strategies including a description of the peculiarities of alternative asset classes. The main emphasis will be on the various complementary investment vehicles, methods and industries, namely commodities, real estate and hedge funds. The first part of the course concentrates on commodities, metals, energy and agriculture. The second part of the course focuses on alternative real estate financing and investment vehicles. The third part of the course offers an analysis of hedge fund strategies. The final part of the course provides an overview of additional alternative investments such as socially responsible funds, microfinance funds and other alternative investments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
ValuationEconomics and FinanceECOM105Semester 17NoNo

Valuation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Goncalo Faria

Description: Valuation is at the heart of many areas of finance such as value­based investing, mergers and acquisitions and initial public offerings. This course introduces students to company valuation. Starting with the estimation and forecasting of free cash flows it shows students how to value a company as the present discounted value of its future cash flows. It will also introduces other valuation tools such as use of multiples and real options. The course strongly emphasizes practical applications of these valuation tools.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
CFA TrainingEconomics and FinanceECOM106Semester 37NoNo

CFA Training

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module gives students training and revision tools required to undertake the CFA level 1 exam. The training, supplied by Fitch Training, will include lectures and e­resources and is designed to prepare students for the December CFA exams (i.e. the December after graduated from the MSc). The module aims to supplement and broaden students understanding of topics covered in the rest of the MSc with a more vocationally-focussed approach and support student employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
DissertationEconomics and FinanceECOM107Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Thomai Filippeli

Description: This 45 credit dissertation will replace the existing 30 credit dissertation. The dissertation is expected to have a 7000 word length limit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Applied Econometrics (Macro and Finance)Economics and FinanceECOM108Semester 27NoNo

Applied Econometrics (Macro and Finance)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Haroon Mumtaz

Description: The aim of this module is to provide students rigorous training in econometric methods that are heavily in use in empirical research on Macroeconomics and Finance. The module covers models that are used to estimate dynamic relationships between variables, models with time­varying parameters and stochastic volatility, regime switching models and dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models. Each topic is introduced from a theoretical perspective and then students are trained in the application of these methods using software like Eviews and Matlab. The course introduces students to recent applications of these methods in Economics and Finance and trains them in the practical aspects of carrying out advanced empirical research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
History of Economic ThoughtEconomics and FinanceECN379Semester 16YesYes

History of Economic Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniela Tavasci
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN106 and take ECN211

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: This module aims to provide a critical overview of the evolution of economic theory since Adam Smith. The module focuses on how different schools of thought/economists have addressed a number of themes including where value comes from, pricing and distribution theories, the relation between finance and the real economy, the role of the government. Each school of thought/economist is critically analysed by focusing on assumptions, methods and techniques, economic problems and policy prescriptions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Computational Methods in MacroeconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN380Semester 26YesNo

Computational Methods in Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francesc Xavier Mateos-Planas
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN223

Description: This module introduces students to computational methods for solving and simulating economic models. The student will learn basic results and techniques in numerical analysis, acquire working knowledge of Matlab (or equivalent) as a programming language, and learn how to apply these tools to analyse quantitative implications of known macroeconomic dynamic models. On completion of the module, the student will have a good appreciation the relevance of computational analysis in economics, understand basic techniques, and be able to write intuitive algorithms and clear computer code.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Study Abroad YearEconomics and FinanceECN400Full year5NoNo

Study Abroad Year

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Economics and Finance programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass this module in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. The requirement to pass a year abroad module of this type shall be to take 120 and pass minimum of 105 QMUL academic credits in the assessments set by the partner institution, and to achieve a minimum year average mark of 40.0. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module wii be zero-weighted. Students can take modules both in and outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 5
Labour and Public PolicyEconomics and FinanceECOM028Semester 27NoNo

Labour and Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marco Manacorda

Description: This module will give you an understanding of some of the issues in contemporary labour economics, with an emphasis on the empirical side of the discipline. You will cover a mix of theoretical economic, data analysis and econometric techniques. This eflects the nature of a discipline which is eclectic and constantly 'on the move'. This illustrates how economists uncover the effect of policy reforms and changes in opportunities and constraints in the labour market using micro-data. This module is designed to appeal to both prospective researchers and those wishing to pursue a career in government, international institutions and consultation with public and private bodies. This module is not intended to be an exhaustive survey of all of the relevant issues in labour economics. The topics chosen are selected in order to illustrate the varieties of questions labour economists ask themselves, and how they proceed to solve them. Topics covered include: introduction to empirical labour economics; human capital and returns to education; school quality; changes in the wage structure; changes in employment structure; US vs. Europe; the employment effect of minimum wages; labour supply; immigration; crime; neighbourhood effects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Econometrics BEconomics and FinanceECOM032Semester 27NoNo

Econometrics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Emmanuel Guerre

Description: This module is designed to provide you with a general knowledge and the basic methods used in the current practice of macroeconometrics. The module covers the following lecture topics: a brief history of macroeconometrics and current methodological issues in macroeconometrics; the main characteristics of macroeconometrics and fundamental tools. It examines two important aspects: dynamics and interdependence; and interpretation of econometric results: expectation and exogeneity. It then goes through basic models with co­integrated time series and discusses how to link macroeconometric models to macroeconomic theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM035Semester 27NoNo

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francis Breedon

Description: Foreign exchange is not only the most heavily traded of all financial assets, it has the clearest interface between macroeconomics and finance. In this module you'll get an introduction to the main theoretical models used to understand FX markets as well as in­depth analysis of how they work in practice. Topics include: understanding global imbalances, models of exchange rate determination, the structure of the FX market and how trades are priced, FX derivatives markets, foreign exchange intervention and reserves, and currency regimes and crises. Each week the key lessons of the lecture are illustrated through an analysis of current economic events such as the problems in the Euro­area, China's foreign exchange rate policy and the role of the dollar as a global reserve currency. We also price and monitor foreign exchange trades suggested by course participants to see how good you are at FX trading!

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Staging Modern IrelandEnglish and DramaDRA227Semester 15YesNo

Staging Modern Ireland

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Mckinnie

Description: This module investigates problems in modern Irish theatre, with a particular interest in how theatre has engaged the contemporary conflict in Northern Ireland (commonly known as the "Troubles"). Issues examined will include the theatrical representation of Irishness, the historical relationship between performance and social change in Ireland, the intersection of political sovereignty and identity in Ireland and the relationship between Ireland and the United Kingdom. The module will also examine the strategies used by plays to represent Ireland theatrically, and will consider how these representations shape audiences' conceptions of both the history and future of the island.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Dance TheatreEnglish and DramaDRA237Semester 25YesNo

Dance Theatre

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton

Description: The history of both modern and post-modern performance practice has been marked by performances which have troubled the distinction between 'dance' and 'theatre'. However, dance and theatre have often been supposed to have radically different aesthetics and to cater to different audiences. This module will consider dance as a theatrical practice, and more specifically, performances and practitioners of 'dance-theatre' - why might we consider them in terms of this hyphenated category? The module will draw on a wide range of international examples, but will also require you to attend contemporary performance in London.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Critical Thinking and Writing for Modern Foreign LanguagesLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL4202Semester 14NoNo

Critical Thinking and Writing for Modern Foreign Languages

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Alan Hart
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is offered at level 4 and responds to students' linguistic and discipline specific needs in terms of developing analytical skills, critical reading and note-taking skills, argument construction and incorporation of sources, citation and referencing, essay structuring and organisation, written English as necessary (grammar and vocabulary), and editing and proof-reading skills. Students joining this module are both L1 and L2 speakers of English and are studying the modern foreign language degrees in SLLF namely French, German, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Russian.

These workshops help students to deliver what is expected from them in their essays. After consultation with their subject tutors and agreement on the academic skills needed to succeed in their degrees, the content is itemised and will be presented in strands of 'study skills', `reading and demonstrating knowledge', and `critical thinking and writing¿. Students will be given the tools to manage their time efficiently and plan their work accordingly. They will be guided through the process of understanding and successfully delivering assignments, in view of the implications their immediate context bestows upon them. Students will be encouraged and expected to reflect upon their own practice, and will be provided with formative feedback to ensure the learning outcomes are achieved.

The module is needs driven and therefore the syllabus is necessarily flexible and the content delivered in workshop format.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 4
Performance Art in the 1970sEnglish and DramaDRA266Semester 25YesNo

Performance Art in the 1970s

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dominic Johnson

Description: This module introduces the study of performance art in the 1970s -- arguably the first decade of its emergence as a major cultural phenomenon. You will learn about a range of internationally significant artists and groups active in the US, Europe, and elsewhere. You will explore key themes including presence, representation, disappearance, documentation and archives, as well as emotion, difficulty, and risk, towards a fuller understanding of the politics and aesthetics of performance art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Performing Illness and DisabilityEnglish and DramaDRA267Semester 25YesNo

Performing Illness and Disability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin O'Brien

Description: This module investigates the representation of illness and disability in performance. It focuses primarily on contemporary performance and live art practices by artists with illnesses or disability but is contextualised by the history of disability performance, e.g. in the Victorian freak shows. You will be introduced to ways of understanding discourses of disability and illness, and the ways in which they become manifest in performance. The module enables you to discuss issues of representation, lived experience and agency as they relate to disabled and unwell bodies in performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Voice, Gender, PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA268Semester 15YesNo

Voice, Gender, Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Molly Mcphee

Description: How do people use their voices, and what does this reveal or conceal about their gendered identities? How do gendered voices intersect with other aspects of identity, such as region, class, nation and race? Drawing on theoretical material from a range of disciplinary fields, including cultural philosophy, sociolinguistics, film studies, and psychology, this module will consider the voicing of gender in a variety of different physical spaces and discursive spheres - from the playground to Parliament - and through a range of media, including theatre, internet, TV, film and music.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Management of the Fractured MandibleDentistryDIN7251Semester 17NoNo

Management of the Fractured Mandible

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "The module discusses fractures of the mandible and condyle using a variety of techniques which underpin the totality of facial trauma management. Building on presented anatomical principles, the module will build a strategy which will enable the student to diagnose and treatment plan a wide variety of simple and complex injury patterns. Different types of bone fixation are discussed together with principles of intermaxillary fixation. Fractures of the mandibular condyle and their management are discussed with an evidence based rationale for decision making. Edentulous (fragility) mandibular fractures are discussed in terms of management options and prognostic indicators."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Management of Fractures of the Lateral MidfaceDentistryDIN7252Semester 27NoNo

Management of Fractures of the Lateral Midface

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module will focus on injuries of the lateral face to include the orbit, zygomatic bone, and soft tissues of the region. A summary of the relevant anatomy and physiology of the region will build to diagnostic principles, urgent management, treatment planning followed by surgical management. Principles of surgical access, methods of production and fixation, and both autogenous and alloplastic reconstruction of this anatomical area. More advanced techniques including surgical navigation are discussed, together with the use of CAD CAM imaging and prosthesis fabrication."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Management of Fractures of the Central Middle ThirdDentistryDIN7253Semester 27NoNo

Management of Fractures of the Central Middle Third

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: The module discusses the management of complex middle third of the face injuries with special reference to the naso orbital region. Surgical management of fractures of the midface is discussed both in terms of anatomical reconstruction and sequencing of repair of the region and adjacent anatomical subunits within the middle third - upper and lower thirds of the craniofacial skeleton. The importance of the integrity of the medial canthal region is discussed and management of ligament reconstruction is discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Health EconomicsDentistryDIN7709Semester 37NoNo

Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: The Health Economics module is an elective module in the Year 2 of the distance-learning MSc in Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership course. This module will introduce students to the concepts of health economics and how it specifically relates to oral health care and public health interventions. It will cover the five methods used in economic evaluation. Students will use case-studies to explore the application and limitations of using Health Economics in dentistry by critically analysing papers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 45.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Oral Health in the Global ContextDentistryDIN7710Semester 37NoNo

Oral Health in the Global Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: The Oral Health in the Global Context is a Year 2 elective module available to MSc students taking the distance learning Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership course. It will cover global oral health surveillance systems, development theories and the concept of universal health coverage. Students will also explore the role of advocacy, networking and communication. Students will then demonstrate their applied knowledge by preparing a position statement and giving an online 30 minute conference-style oral presentation as a summative assessment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research Project for Dental Public Health, Policy and LeadershipDentistryDIN7711Full year7NoNo

Research Project for Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: The research project module will allow students to develop both an understanding of the research processes and the skills required to undertake a supervised project. It has two components worth 60 credits. The written report is a synopsis of a research project worth 90% of the module assessment (maximum 20,000 words). Students will have the option of carrying out a systematic or scoping review, a primary research study with fieldwork carried out in their home country or submit a full research grant proposal or a publishable academic public health report. Students will answer questions about their research project in a 20-minute oral presentation (viva) via Skype worth 10% of the module mark.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
London/Culture/PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA114Semester 14YesNo

London/Culture/Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie

Description: London/Culture/Performance has four key aims: 1. To equip you with skills for analysing performance (as distinct from written text) (keyword: performance); 2. To facilitate your critical and productive engagement with London and the vast cultural resources, history and global connections it has to offer (keyword: London); 3. To introduce you to some current issues in cultural politics and critical ways of approaching them (keyword: culture); 4. To develop your critical skills in reading, research, writing, referencing, fieldwork and presentations. This module provides opportunities for you to explore the performance resources available in London and to develop your skills in using, understanding and responding critically to them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
InterventionsEnglish and DramaDRA120Semester 24YesNo

Interventions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: Interventions examines the intersections between performance and activism. You will be introduced to work by a range of performance practitioners and theorists across live art, applied theatre and site-specific performance. Throughout the module, you will explore how performance practices can provoke, argue, and advocate for social change. The module draws on international case studies, and you will undertake fieldwork rooted in the economic, historical and political contexts around our campus. Emphasis is also placed on developing your skills in communicating to audiences in, and beyond, the university.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Engaging Critically with Writing 1Languages Linguistics and FilmEAL4750Semester 14YesNo

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr William Tweddle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop writing in different genres by studying the grammatical structures and lexis in context. Students examine varieties of English from a historical and cultural perspective. Students develop their writing in different genres including cyber communication, work-related texts and print media. They read and discuss texts and analyse the relationship between audience, purpose and content. Students also examine issues of fluency, clarity and correctness. This leads to personal and work-related writing tasks both in and out of class. There is regular feedback from the class tutor and from peers.

This module is aimed at ERASMUS, Study Abroad and International students (non-native speakers of English only).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
MSc by Research ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS754PFull year7NoNo

MSc by Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: This substantial individual research project, worth 8 units, is taken as part of the MSc by Research offering from the Department of Computer Science. Candidates undertake an extended period of research embedded in an appropriate Departmental Research Group. Regular supervision and feedback sessions, combined with active engagement in departmental research seminars support students individual learning and development of research skills. Students will normally be expected to have authored an academic paper as part of the module. Assessment is by written thesis and viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Experience in Economics and FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN227Full year5NoNo

Experience in Economics and Finance

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte

Description: It is anticipated that during the work placement the students will undertake a wide range of activities to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students will be expected to write a reflective report during the placement and they must present this report at the end of the placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 5
Morphology of British CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL5600Semester 25YesNo

Morphology of British Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: SML208
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is intended to develop students' cross-disciplinary academic literacy in English via the medium of Cultural Studies. It introduces participants to British cultural history and commentary from the late Victorian era to the present day, examining discourses surrounding Empire, post-colonial culture and contemporary discourses of 'Britishness' in the light of increasing cultural diversity, globalization, devolution and developments in relation to the European Union. The interactive mode of teaching and assessed spoken component of the module ensure that participants have the opportunity to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others. Participation in the full range of learning tasks fosters multi and inter-disciplinary critical thinking through the study of texts and other comparable cultural artefacts across a range of areas beyond the boundaries of the participants¿ main degree programmes. Students also have the opportunity to explore how far their developing problem-solving techniques or approaches can be generalised or applied in a broader context and are encouraged to explore and evaluate perspectives from different disciplines, genres and media.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Technical Writing for the Global WorkplaceLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL6202Semester 26YesNo

Technical Writing for the Global Workplace

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module develops your professional writing skills for communicating the technical and specialist areas in your science and engineering discipline. Through discussions of professional scientific and technical reports in small group workshops, you will understand and build up the principles of effective scientific writing. Feedback is given on short practice writing about computer applications, medical procedures, environmental regulations, online help systems, product specifications, release notes and other genres that you identify as important for your chosen career path. The role of new media and technologies in communicating about science are explored, as well traditional print-based end-user documentation. The module aims to train you in the skills you need for employment in scientific and technical fields, with a focus on creating a professional portfolio to enhance your job-seeking skills to prepare you for the global professions in science and technology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Description of LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL6207Semester 16NoNo

Description of Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: EAL7207
Prerequisite: None

Description: Description of Language (Level 6) provides an overview of the nature and extent of linguistics and enables you to understand and apply the systems of syntax, lexis, practical phonetics, and discourse to the language learning classroom. From your subsequent understanding of language, you then explore and evaluate the range of language learning materials and the sequencing of parts of speech for language teaching and learning. The module allows you to apply this knowledge of language and materials to the language learning classroom, both through micro-teaching in a peer environment, and through observation of language teaching in either English or another language.
The module is delivered through lectures and seminars, where the content of the module is further explored, and language learning materials and ELT textbooks are evaluated and their application in the classroom is discussed.
The module provides you with a solid understanding of language, which will prepare you to study related areas of English language learning and teaching in your second year of the MA in English Language Teaching (2-year).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Offstage LondonEnglish and DramaDRA333Semester 26YesYes

Offstage London

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module explores the political and artistic aims and effects of non-theatrical performance in the twentieth century and contemporary urban environment. It explores how the city is sometimes conceived as a dystopian site of potentially enormous social oppression. And it examines everyday, artistic and activist performative responses to this potential subjection, responses which imagine the city as, instead, a utopian site of personal and social liberation. We contextualise and historicise our analysis through studying various theoretical analyses of urban experience (e.g. Baudelaire, Benjamin, Debord, Lefebvre) as well as a variety of artistic practices (e.g. everyday interventions, activism, public art). Throughout the module, we work to map the ideas and practices we encounter, many originally grounded in Paris, in our own experiences of London. The module concludes by imagining what performance might do next to contest the particular challenges of living in the city now and to explore and exploit its opportunities. Please note that in addition to the weekly 2-hour seminar there will be regular 3-hour field-trips and/or screenings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL
Contemporary Theatre and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA7001Semester 17NoNo

Contemporary Theatre and Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie

Description: "What is contemporary theatre and performance doing? What are its benefits and problems? What does it tell us about contemporary culture? How is it particularly well suited to articulating and influencing cultural change? This module identifies trends in recent theatre/performance and its analysis, and considers what we might understand to be those trends' value - be it aesthetic, political, social, emotional - as well as what they articulate about contemporary culture. Trends examined might include: postdramatic theatre, relational aesthetics, performative public activism, and responses to contemporary contexts such as ecological activism or globalisation. Study is grounded in critical reading and current and recent theatre, performance and art events, especially in London."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary Theatre and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA7001Semester 27NoNo

Contemporary Theatre and Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie

Description: "What is contemporary theatre and performance doing? What are its benefits and problems? What does it tell us about contemporary culture? How is it particularly well suited to articulating and influencing cultural change? This module identifies trends in recent theatre/performance and its analysis, and considers what we might understand to be those trends' value - be it aesthetic, political, social, emotional - as well as what they articulate about contemporary culture. Trends examined might include: postdramatic theatre, relational aesthetics, performative public activism, and responses to contemporary contexts such as ecological activism or globalisation. Study is grounded in critical reading and current and recent theatre, performance and art events, especially in London."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Independent Practical ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA7002Semester 27NoNo

Independent Practical Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Lois Weaver

Description: "This module requires students to devise an individual project that focuses on a chosen area of performance practice. The aim of the module is for each student to raise a series of research questions that are addressed as a result of and through their practical work. This could encompass playwriting, applied drama, directing, dramaturgy, acting, new technologies, site-specific performance and live art. Working under the supervision of the module convenor and a mentor, each student will craft a professional project that also provides an opportunity for critical reflection on the processes of performance practice. Whilst the work developed on the module will be undertaken within the confines of academia, and subsequently critically rigorous, the importance of the public economy in which performance takes place will not be overlooked. In order to give focus to both creative and theoretical investigation, the module will produce a series of in-progress presentations that will be open to the public, who will be invited to follow the development of the work as it progresses. This is intended not only to invite critical commentary from the public as well as the module tutors, but also to anchor the importance of public presentation as part of artistic creation. The final assessed presentation will be produced in the context of a public festival of new work during the exam term and each student will design and create a portfolio of documentation to accompany the presentation. Both assessments (presentation and portfolio) are designed to provide public platforms for the dissemination of rigorous practice-based research while maintaining an emphasis on high standards of professional performance making."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International TradeEconomics and FinanceECN228Semester 25YesNo

International Trade

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alessandra Bonfiglioli
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 ) and take ECN111

Description: This course covers the basic theoretical tools to understand what determines international trade (the flow of goods across countries) and international economic relations more generally. Some of the topics covered by the module are: Labor productivity and comparative advantage: the Ricardian model; Resources and Trade: the Heckscher-Ohlin model; External economies of scale and the international location of production; Firms in the global economy: export decisions, outsourcing, and multinational enterprises; The instruments of trade policy; The political economy of trade policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Economics of Social IssuesEconomics and FinanceECN231Semester 15YesNo

Economics of Social Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN111 and take ECN113

Description: This is a module in the applied microeconomic analysis of social issues of topical importance in and outside the UK. Issues such as crime, addiction and wellbeing would seem to be the main research domain of social sciences such as psychology, health, sociology and politics. However, in recent years economics has provided valuable theoretical and empirical insights that have contributed to add the current debates on these issues. Students will have the opportunity to look at these various social issues not only from the point of view of various social sciences but, in particular, from through the lenses of the economics approach.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 5
Health EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN369Semester 16YesYes

Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: This module covers the application of economic principles to the study of health. Topics will include the demand for health care and its supply; issues in health care finance, including uncertainty, insurance, and the rationale for public and private provision; the extent to which welfare economics can be applied to health, including definitions of inequality and the links between inequalities in income and health; overview of reforms of the health care sector; and evaluation of health care treatments (cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Development EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN370Semester 16YesYes

Development Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Hampus Sebastian Gunnar Axbard
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN211

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is concerned with the analysis of economic problems faced by developing countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It focuses, on the one hand, on the meaning, measurements and comparability of growth and development across countries (ie income per capita, income distribution and poverty) and, on the other, on the availability and characteristics of resources (ie labour, land, capital, savings), and the problems with their use in the context of developing countries vis-a-vis OECD countries. The above is presented in the analytic context of (historical) alternative development models and globalisation issues. Although the module does not demand advanced mathematics it does require the use of some mathematics and a fair amount of reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesSEF_6_A
Research Methods in Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7213Semester 27NoNo

Research Methods in Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelya Koteyko
Overlap: EAL7205
Prerequisite: None

Description: The module examines the various approaches to research and research design, providing guidance as to the appropriateness of certain methodologies in differing research scenarios. The module will provide an overview of key approaches with a critical discussion of the quantitative/qualitative divide and convergence. In the first part of the module we focus on quantitative methods and SPSS-based analysis. The second part focuses on qualitative methods and software-assisted coding. By the end of the module, and in readiness for their Masters dissertation, students should be able to understand the main research methods employed in Applied Linguistics for data collection and be able to input and analyse quantitative data using SPSS and qualitative texts using NVivo.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Assessment in English Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7214Semester 17NoNo

Assessment in English Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elaine Boyd
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Assessment in English Language Teaching is an optional module for the MA in English Language Teaching (MAELT). It provides you with a comprehensive overview of the principles, practice and impact of assessment in English Language as well as the analytic skills to critique external language tests and design assessments relevant to the classroom. It consists of a weekly one-hour lecture and a two-hour seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Teaching Languages: Approaches and MethodsLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7300Semester 17NoNo

Teaching Languages: Approaches and Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "Teaching Languages: Approaches and Methods" is the first of two compulsory modules on the MA in Language Teaching. You will undertake a comprehensive overview of the main approaches and methods in language teaching. The areas to be covered include:
- Early approaches and methods: Grammar-Translation Method, Direct Method, Oral Approach, Situational Language Teaching, and Audiolingual Method
-Current Approaches and Methods: Communicative Language Teaching, Task-Based Language Teaching, Text-based Instruction, Content-Based Instruction, Content and Language Integrated Learning, Competency-Based Language Teaching; Post-method and principled eclecticism
- Teaching the four skills across contemporary approaches and methods
- Standards and the Common European Framework of Reference
- Testing, Evaluation and Assessment.
You will also study a language as part of the module and be required to maintain a critically reflective diary each week.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Learning Languages: Second Language AcquisitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7302Semester 27NoNo

Learning Languages: Second Language Acquisition

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Agnieszka Lyons
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "Learning Languages: Second Language Acquisition" is the second of two compulsory modules on the MA in Language Teaching. You will undertake a comprehensive overview of theories and current research into second language acquisition. In addition, you will have opportunity to put language learning strategies into practice by studying a language which is not your own. You can choose from: French, Spanish, German, Arabic, Japanese or Mandarin (subject to availability and timetabling). Proficiency in the chosen language is not assessed, but you are required to reflect on the learning strategies that you use while studying the language.
The module explores: the history of language learning; goals of language teaching; the L2 user and the native speaker; individual learner differences; motivation and aptitude; learner strategies; multiple intelligences and multi-competences; group dynamics; general models of L2 learning; the interaction approach; socio-cultural SLA theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dissertation in Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7303Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in Language Teaching

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: In coordination with a supervisor, students will select a topic for advanced study. They will collect and analyse the necessary data. This will result in the writing of a 10,000 to 12,000 word dissertation. For this, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Mathematical Methods in Economics and FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN115Semester 14YesNo

Mathematical Methods in Economics and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis

Description: This module provides a detailed introduction to the core mathematical techniques and concepts that are necessary for the study of economics and finance. Topics covered include: linear and non-linear functions; differentiation; integration; constrained and unconstrained optimisation; vectors and matrices; difference and differential equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Elements of AccountingEconomics and FinanceECN120Semester 24YesNo

Elements of Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS021
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: This module will offer you a grounding in financial accounting from basic book keeping to the preparation of financial statements for sole traders and limited companies and an understanding of the way in which accounts are analysed using accounting ratios. You will also learn the basic concepts of accounting and international accounting standards.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Statistical Methods in EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN121Semester 24YesNo

Statistical Methods in Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guglielmo Volpe
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4100 or take MTH4107 or take MTH4216 or take MTH5129 or take BUS135 or take BUS229
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: The module is an introduction to Probability and Statistics. Topics include: Descriptive statistics and linear regression; Probability theory; Random variables and probability distributions; Sampling distributions; Estimation; Confidence intervals; Hypothesis testing. The objective of this module is to give students a grounding in the use of data for description and inference. Topics include descriptive statistics; probability theory; random variables and probability distributions; sampling distributions; properties of estimators; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 4
Microwave and Millimetrewave ElectronicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS752PSemester 17NoNo

Microwave and Millimetrewave Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rostyslav Dubrovka

Description: The module covers: RF SPECTRUM: Revision of basic RF spectrum. Radio transmission bands. Regulatory considerations. MODULATION & DEMODULATION: AM & FM modulation principles; basic modulation & demodulation circuits. Digital modulation principles; basic digital modulation & demodulation circuits. BEHAVIOUR OF ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AT RF: Behaviour of R, L and C at RF; use of reactance plots and reactance charts. Transistor equivalent circuits for RF applications. COUPLING NETWORKS & FILTERS: The design of RF coupling networks; design of basic Low Pass, High Pass, Band Pass and Band Stop filters. AMPLIFIERS: Revision of basic amplifier circuits. Multi-stage small-signal linear amplifiers. Class B & C amplifiers; switching amplifiers. R.F. & wideband amplifiers. Noise in amplifiers. Principles of feedback & feedforward. Frequency response. MIXERS & OSCILLATORS: Mixer and oscillator theory; basic mixer and oscillator circuits. L.C. tanks, quartz crystals and ceramic resonators. Phase Locked Loops & Frequency Synthesizers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Applied Wealth ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM079Semester 27NoNo

Applied Wealth Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis

Description: The module looks at modern wealth management. Students will study the regulatory framework governing firms and individuals in the wealth management industry. The various asset classes (such as money markets, bonds, equities, property, hedge funds etc) will be examined and how they can be combined in wealth portfolios. The utilisation of pensions and insurance solutions will also be discussed as well as the areas of philanthropy and ethical investing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Development EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECOM081Semester 27NoNo

Development Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Hampus Sebastian Gunnar Axbard

Description: This course consists of two parts. The first part provides a short overview of economic development from a macro perspective using both theory and empirics. The main part of the course will then discuss some of the determinants and consequences of development from a microeconomic perspective. This part will emphasize currently active research topics in the field. Topics covered include: climate, conflict, institutions, corruption, health, education, credit markets and firm structure in developing countries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
MRes DissertationEconomics and FinanceECOM090Full year7NoNo

MRes Dissertation

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Tyson

Description: This module constitutes the dissertation component of the MRes Economics and MRes Finance programmes. Students are required to produce a piece of original research under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Competition Policy and RegulationsEconomics and FinanceECOM109Semester 17NoNo

Competition Policy and Regulations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This course aims to familiarise students with the key motivations that underpin market interventions by regulatory and competition authorities, the economic analysis that is used to inform the need for intervention, and the considerations (grounded in IO theory) that these authorities must make to ensure that their remedies to the problems of market failure are welfare enhancing. This course is delivered by Frontier Economics, one of Europe's largest economics consultancies, and so also gives students an introduction to the world of economic consulting. Students who attend this module are also eligible to apply for one of the summer internships offered by Frontier for QMUL students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Topics in EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECOM110Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Carriero
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECOM126 or take ECOM127

Description: This module covers active research areas in theoretical and empirical finance, such as: advanced corporate finance, market microstructure, high-frequency data, and behavioural finance. In any particular year the topics covered are at the discretion of the convenor.

Advanced Topics in Financial Economics is required for the MRes Finance and optional for the MRes Economics (each candidate must select two of the four Advanced Topics modules), and registration is normally restricted to students on these programmes. Successful completion of the module will equip students to conduct publishable research in theoretical or empirical finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Topics in Financial EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECOM111Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Topics in Financial Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jason Sturgess
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECOM128 or take ECOM129

Description: This module covers active research areas in theoretical and empirical finance, such as: advanced corporate finance, market microstructure, high-frequency data, and behavioural finance. In any particular year the topics covered are at the discretion of the convenor.

Advanced Topics in Financial Economics is required for the MRes Finance and optional for the MRes Economics (each candidate must select two of the four Advanced Topics modules), and registration is normally restricted to students on these programmes. Successful completion of the module will equip students to conduct publishable research in theoretical or empirical finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Macroeconomics AEconomics and FinanceECOM001Semester 17NoNo

Macroeconomics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gino Gancia

Description: This module deals with the long-run growth of GDP and its short-run fluctuations. You will start by analysing the traditional models of economic growth theory, ie the Solow-Swan model and the Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans model. Within the framework of these models you will study the central questions of growth theory as well as the effects of government expenditure on macroeconomic variables. You will then discuss the most important ideas of endogenous growth theory, including research and development, human capital formation, and knowledge creation. The second part of the module deals with two classes of theories of aggregate fluctuations, ie, real-business-cycle theories and Keynesian theories. Whereas real-business-cycle theories assume flexible prices and market clearing, Keynesian theories proceed from the assumption of nominal stickiness and market failure. We discuss possible reasons why prices and wages are sticky and analyse the implications of this fact.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Microeconomics AEconomics and FinanceECOM002Semester 17NoNo

Microeconomics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alp Atakan

Description: Microeconomic Theory provides the basic conceptual tools of economic analysis. In Microeconomics A, we will cover the standard economic models of individual decision making, models of consumer behaviour and producer behaviour under perfect competition, the Arrow­Debreu general equilibrium model and the two fundamental welfare theorems. At the end of the course students should be able: to analyse decision making with and without uncertainty, derive individual and market demand curves and explain the concept of market equilibrium and its welfare properties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Econometrics AEconomics and FinanceECOM003Semester 17NoNo

Econometrics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Carriero

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with the necessary tools for formalising a hypothesis of interest and testing it, writing a simple econometric model, estimating it and conducting inference. The module starts with a review of the classical linear model. We then analyse finite sample and asymptotic properties of ordinary least squares, instrumental variables and feasible generalised least squares, under general conditions. Classical tests, as well as general Hausman tests, and moment's tests are covered. The case of dependent stationary observations is also covered. Finally nonlinear estimation methods, and in particular the generalised method of moments, are covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Quantitative TechniquesEconomics and FinanceECOM037Semester 17NoNo

Quantitative Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof George Skiadopoulos

Description: The course offers an introduction to Econometrics in the context of quantitative financial analysis. Basic econometric tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained. These will be accompanied by a number of applications in the fields of asset management and risk management. The two variables regression model will first be used to present the topics of estimation and hypothesis testing. Then, the standard regression model will be generalized to the multiple variables regression model. Next, an introduction to time series analysis and forecasting will be undertaken. Depending on time constraints, topics such as volatility forecasting and principal components analysis will be explained. We will assume that you have knowledge of basic statistics and mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Behavioural FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM038Semester 27NoNo

Behavioural Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asen Ivanov

Description: Behavioural finance studies irrationalities in savings and investment decisions as well as puzzles on financial markets. Some key topics are saving for retirement, insurance, predictability of returns, and bubbles. Knowledge of behavioural finance provides students with a deeper and more realistic understanding of finance than is offered by the mainstream approach alone. Such knowledge will hopefully make students less susceptible to common mistakes when they make financial decisions in their personal or professional lives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Asset Pricing and ModellingEconomics and FinanceECOM044Semester 27NoNo

Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Zachariadis

Description: The aim of this module is to provide students with the analytical tools of advanced finance theory. The module will give an introduction to stochastic calculus, optimal control and martingale methods, and will cover dynamic asset pricing models, optimal consumption and portfolio theory, equilibrium models of the term structure of interest rates, option pricing of interest rates and stocks based on arbitrage and general equilibrium models, incomplete markets and portfolio optimisation in incomplete markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Commercial and Investment BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM049Semester 17NoNo

Commercial and Investment Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis

Description: The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of the international financial system and its associated risks given the ever evolving regulatory regime.On successful completion, students should be able to critically understand, evaluate and question the operations of banks and of non­bank financial institutions, the process of deposit creation, the term structure of interest rates, the supply and demand of loanable funds, and the role of Central Banks. More importantly students should be competent in the analysis, interpretation and assessment of all facets and aspects of financial risk and its management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Group Practical ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA242Semester 25NoNo

Group Practical Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie

Description: Group Practical Project exposes you to key academic and practical skills relevant to the study and making of theatre and performance. The module asks you to reflect and act critically and creatively on the kinds of performance outcomes you want to work on. It also asks you, through group practice, to work collaboratively towards developing your specialist expertise. Through practical workshops, writing, documentation and a process of research, group rehearsal and performance, you will consider what theatre and performance studies mean to you as individuals and as a group, and the kinds of creative, critical and practical work that your degree might lead to.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 65.00% Practical
Level: 5
Action DesignEnglish and DramaDRA245Semester 15YesNo

Action Design

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Julian Deering

Description: This module provides a practical and theoretical introduction to technical production for performance. Looking closely at specific examples though the 20th century to the present day, you will develop a theoretical understanding of the design systems of (among others) Edward Gordon Craig, Josef Svoboda, Jaroslav Malina, Robert Lepage, Robert Wilson, Maria Franková and Es Devlin, for example, and develop an appreciation and active practical response to the term¿ scenography¿ and various design movements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Culture, Power and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA273Semester 15NoNo

Culture, Power and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: This module examines the power relations of theatre and performance, focusing on how artists engage with the politics of representation and identity formation. The module builds on the introduction to the semiotics and histories of theatre from your first year, while developing your skills in performance analysis and research. Discussions and readings will draw from key academic and political debates, which could include queer theory, post-colonial studies, critical race theory, feminism, disability studies, Marxism, etc. Through study of a wide range of play texts and performance traditions, you will examine how formal and aesthetic innovations in theatre relate to the social and economic conditions from which they emerge.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Theatre, Experiment and RevolutionEnglish and DramaDRA274Semester 25YesNo

Theatre, Experiment and Revolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

Description: This module introduces students to a range of theatre and performance practices that offer radical challenges to the established theatre of European bourgeois modernity.
These theatre practices involve experiments with theatre as an art form, as well as attempts to involve theatre in revolutionary political projects.
This historical survey of experimental and revolutionary theatre-making might, in any given year, range from Brecht¿s communist education, to avant-garde experimentation in twentieth-century Mexico; from socialist theatre in 1980s Scotland to voguing in New York, via butoh in post-war Japan and minimalist dance; from the formation of a national theatre in twentieth-century Dakar, to the post-migrant theatre of early twenty-first century Turkish Berlin.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Culture, Performance and GlobalisationEnglish and DramaDRA304Semester 16YesNo

Culture, Performance and Globalisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Faisal Hamadah

Description: This module considers how performance responds to the many transformations of culture, politics and economics wrought by globalisation. You will be introduced to and explore key debates in theatre and performance studies as they engage with fields including critical race theory and subaltern studies. The performances you study, which draw on international genealogies in theatre and live art, will offer you historical perspective on key shifts in global capital, from twentieth century decolonisation struggles to new forms of imperialism. In addition to tracking histories of cultural conflict and exchange, the performances and cultural events studied in class will provide you the opportunity to examine how local performances engage with contemporary issues affecting the entire world like the refugee crisis and climate change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Management of Craniofacial FracturesDentistryDIN7254Semester 17NoNo

Management of Craniofacial Fractures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module discusses the interface between the neurosurgical and craniofacial management of upper third facial injuries. The management of the frontal sinus and frontal bone fractures with particular emphasis on timing of surgical intervention and anterior skull base reconstruction. Diagnostic principles are discussed with reference to both hard and soft tissue treatment planning. The anatomy of the upper third of the facial skeleton and skull base are discussed, as well as neurosurgical implications of these injuries. Surgical approaches to the region are classified and discussed and surgeon choice based on a risk benefit analysis. Choice of plating strategies are discussed and an evidence based algorithm based on complexity is presented."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Management of Acute Facial Soft Tissue InjuriesDentistryDIN7255Semester 17NoNo

Management of Acute Facial Soft Tissue Injuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module deals with all aspects of acute facial soft tissue management from intial wound care and correct surgical technique for primary wound closure through to complex soft injuries involving tissue loss and motor nerve loss. The module will also discuss the soft tissue management of major tissue loss and gross contamination in acute gunshot and major avulsive injury. Applied neck anatomy is discussed with reference to penetrating neck trauma, and the management of major neck neurovascular injuries is discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Hard Tissue)DentistryDIN7256Semester 27NoNo

Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Hard Tissue)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module will address the differences between the management of acute hard tissue injuries and those presenting late - either after no treatment or failed management. This is an extremely challenging area and requires a methodical and systematic approach to diagnose and treatment plan. Three dimensional diagnosis of secondary defects uses the latest digital technology and this is discussed with reference to malunions of the orbit, zygoma, maxilla and mandible."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Soft Tissue)DentistryDIN7257Semester 27NoNo

Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Soft Tissue)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module will address the differences between the management of acute hard tissue injuries and those presenting late - either after no treatment or failed management. This is an extremely challenging area and requires a methodical and systematic approach to diagnose and treatment plan. Soft tissue scar management together with manipulation of the superfical musculoaponeurotic system, deep and superficial tissue suspension is discussed. The role fat grafting techiques together with rhinoplasty is discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Beyond ActingEnglish and DramaDRA121Semester 24NoNo

Beyond Acting

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton

Description: Acting is perhaps the dominant mode of performance that many audiences routinely expect in the theatre, particularly in an Anglo-American context. However, acting is only one among various ways of performing. Beyond Acting explores what you can carry out on stage by thinking critically about what acting involves, or how it might be questioned, refused, or exceeded. You will study how performance makers since the 1960s have performed onstage (and elsewhere) without the conventions of pretence, impersonation, or character. You will explore new ways of performing plays, scores and other texts, including through physical theatre, live art, experimental theatre, and other forms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Spectatorship: Time, Place, PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA122Semester 24YesNo

Spectatorship: Time, Place, Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aoife Monks

Description: This module investigates histories of spectatorship across a range of cultural and historical contexts. We¿ll consider how we can analyse theatre going, audiences and spectatorship in other times and places, and use this historical investigation to reflect on the various forms that spectatorship has taken over time. We¿ll explore these issues through field trips, examination of archival and other primary sources, and by engaging with critical debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Power PlaysEnglish and DramaDRA123Semester 14NoNo

Power Plays

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Mojisola Adebayo

Description: Power Plays explores how power dynamics, especially in relation to race, gender, disability and cultural identity, have been examined through play texts, performance and critical debates. We will explore these issues through practical workshops, developing your skills in play text analysis, performance and technical theatre skills. The module also aims to develop your critical vocabulary for analysing power and aspects of identity, and skills in reading, research and writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
Level: 4
Approaches and Methods in English Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7200Semester 17NoNo

Approaches and Methods in English Language Teaching

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Approaches and Methods in English Language Teaching is a compulsory module on the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students are presented with a comprehensive overview of the main approaches and methods in language teaching, and have the opportunity to put these into practice: each week there is a lecture/interactive seminar to discuss the theoretical underpinnings of language teaching, followed by a practical session in which students will try out the different approaches in a peer/micro-teaching learning environment. Students will receive practical and formative feedback on their teaching sessions from both teachers and peers. The areas to be covered include: common assumptions of language teaching; the natural, oral and audio-lingual approaches; situational language teaching; social and cognitive construction; communicative language teaching; content-based Instruction; and task-based teaching.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 90.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Second Language AcquisitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7202Semester 27NoNo

Second Language Acquisition

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Diana Ben-Aaron
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Second Language Acquisition is a compulsory module on the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students are presented with a comprehensive overview of theories and current research in second language acquisition; in addition, students have opportunities to put language learning strategies into practice by being required, as part of this module, to learn a language which is not their own. Students can choose from: French, Spanish, German, Arabic, Japanese or Mandarin (depending on timetable constraints). Proficiency in the chosen language is not assessed, but we ask you to reflect on the learning strategies that you use while following your language course. The module explores: the history of language learning; goals of language teaching; the L2 user and the native speaker; individual learner differences; motivation and aptitude; learner strategies; multiple intelligences and multi-competences; group dynamics; general models of L2 learning; the interaction approach; socio-cultural SLA theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Practice-based Research ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA344Semester 26NoNo

Practice-based Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Julia Bardsley

Description: This module facilitates the development and production of a practice-based research project that is proposed individually, in pairs or a small group . You will formulate a project proposal outlining research questions, thematics, aesthetics, contexts, touchstones and methodologies that will be developed through independent research, peer support mechanisms and tutor mentoring. Through weekly workshops and student-led practice sessions you will be introduced to a range of performance-making approaches, research strategies, tools and techniques, and will be encouraged to devise your own research methodologies for generating performance materials and processes. Through the module you will explore, interrogate, test, develop and focus your research project, conducting on-going documentation of your research, working towards mid-module work-in-progress showings and culminating in a Festival of Performance in May.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
Level: 6
Theatre and the SupernaturalEnglish and DramaDRA349Semester 16YesNo

Theatre and the Supernatural

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

Description: The dead live. In a range of different theatre and performance cultures, performers and spectators either embody or come face to face with the dead. In this module we will explore how this happens in different historical moments and in different cultures, including, for example, the ghosts, witches and magicians of early modern European drama, spirit possession in Haitian Vodou, spiritualist séances in Victorian England. Through the comparative study of these cultural forms we will consider how different conceptions of the natural and the supernatural have been shaped by theatre and performance practices.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Verbatim, Testimonial and TribunalEnglish and DramaDRA350Semester 16YesNo

Verbatim, Testimonial and Tribunal

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Noah Birkstead-Breen

Description: This module explores the traditions and practices of verbatim, testimonial, documentary and tribunal forms of theatre. Raising complex issues such as what it means to 'have a voice' in theatre, notions of authenticity and realness, and of representation and rights, it explores the shaping and framing of material from various sources, including interviews, media, archives and documents.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Functional ProgrammingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS713USemester 17NoNo

Functional Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paulo Oliva

Description: Recent approaches to systems programming frequently involve functional programming either overtly in the sense that they use modern functional programming languages for rapid prototyping, or more covertly in that they use techniques developed in the functional setting as a way of lending greater structure and clarity to code. This module gives a structured introduction to programming in modern industrial functional languages such as Haskell and F# and to techniques such as map-reduce and monadic programming.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Econometrics for FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM141Semester 17NoNo

Econometrics for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The module will cover fundamental methods for the empirical analysis of financial data. Some prior knowledge of general econometrics will be assumed, and the focus will be on building an understanding of the ideas behind, and the application of, those methods that are most heavily relied upon in the empirical analysis of financial data. A majority of the topics treated will be related to empirical asset pricing and portfolio choice, although other areas of finance will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
InvestmentsEconomics and FinanceECOM142Semester 17NoNo

Investments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This is a standard compulsory introductory finance module which is organized over two parts. The first part of the module (5 lectures and 5 classes) is taught at FGV Sao Paulo. It focuses on Risk and return; Portfolio Theory; Optimization and allocation between risky and risk-free assets; Single index model; Asset and Portfolio Performance Assessment; CAPM. This first part gives an emphasis to international diversification also from the perspective of emerging market.
The second part of the module (5 lectures and 5 classes) is taught in distance learning by QMUL by webminar and lectures will also be recorded. This part is further divided into two broad sections: the first one complete the standard financial theories after the CAPM including APT and multifactor models; Market efficiency; Introduction to Behavioral Finance; Stock Analysis and Pricing; Fixed income Analysis and Pricing; Introduction to derivatives, options and futures. The second one focuses on banks' new regulation, their desire to minimize their cost of capital in the face of new requirements as a strategic objective. Banking regulation has therefore been one of the highest growing sectors in finance over the last decade and arguably the least likely to have been negatively affected by cyclical (housing bubbles) and structural (Brexit) winds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Corporate StrategyEconomics and FinanceECN302Semester 16YesYes

Corporate Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.

Description: This module provides an overview of corporate strategy in a global context and will enable you to become familiar with the core concepts of: External environmental analysis; models of internal and external analysis, analysis and management of resources; analysis of corporate strengths and weaknesses; knowledge management; development of strategic choice; elements influencing implementation of strategy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Topics in EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECN322Semester 16YesNo

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stepana Lazarova
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN225

Description: This module develops the knowledge of econometric methods that are useful in the analysis of economic phenomena and financial markets. The module is suitable for students with interest in theory and empirical applications of econometrics and for students considering master studies. The topics considered may differ over years. Candidate topics are maximum likelihood estimation, GMM estimators, panel data, limited dependent variable models, ARCH and GARCH models, structural change and time series.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Economics Project IIEconomics and FinanceECN325Full year6NoNo

Economics Project II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anna Raute
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN326
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 or take ECN211

Description: An expansion of Economics Project I ECN326. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not available to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Economics Project IEconomics and FinanceECN326Semester 16NoNo

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Raute
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN325
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 or take ECN211

Description: Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Economics Project IEconomics and FinanceECN326Semester 26NoNo

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Raute
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN325
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 or take ECN211

Description: Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Behavioural EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN374Semester 26YesNo

Behavioural Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Franklin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This module explains how the study of economic behaviour in the controlled environment provided by laboratory experiments allows us to examine and to deepen our understanding of economic theory (both microeconomic and game theory). As an integral part of the module, a number of experiments will be conducted and evaluated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Political EconomyEconomics and FinanceECN375Semester 26YesNo

Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrea Tesei
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN214

Description: This module introduces students to the study of political institutions through formal models. It covers some of the major topics studied in Political Economy and Formal Political Theory: The aggregation of preferences from individual preferences to social preferences, voting, electoral competition and electoral systems, collective action, public goods, legislature voting and separation of powers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Finance of Emerging MarketsEconomics and FinanceECN376Semester 16YesNo

Finance of Emerging Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniela Tavasci
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN226 and take ECN206

Description: The module is addressed from the perspective of an investment manager (responsible for investment portfolios of institutional investors including banks, pension funds, insurance companies, mutual funds, endowment funds, and personal trusts) who invests in various securities in emerging markets.

Certain policy issues concerning emerging markets are discussed, including, investment, market institutional development, political risk, speculative craze, and performance measurement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Microwave and Millimetrewave Communications SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS758PSemester 27NoNo

Microwave and Millimetrewave Communications Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Donnan

Description: The module covers: Introduction to microwave systems, bands and applications.
Two conductor transmission media; coaxial, stripline and microstrip.
Use of transmission line transformers in matching.
The Smith chart; derivation, representation of admittance and impedance, normalisation.
Stub matching.
One-port devices; Schottky barrier diodes, PIN devices.
Gunn and IMPATT devices; simple negative resistance oscillator design.
Two-port devices; use of S-parameter analysis, passive two-port devices, the network analyser.
The MESFET. Simple microwave amplifier design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
General Linguistics for Language TeachersLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7307Semester 17NoNo

General Linguistics for Language Teachers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This option module is suitable for students on the MA for Language Teaching who have little or no knowledge of linguistics. Students will acquire basic knowledge about languages and linguistics. You will be introduced areas such as: Phonetics and Phonology; Morphology; Word Classes; Syntax; Semantics; Language in the Social world; Language Change; Language Contact.
You will have an opportunity to compare different languages and consider examples from languages throughout the world. PLEASE NOTE: This module is NOT available for students with prior knowledge of Linguistics. If you are in doubt about this, please contact the module organiser before registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Teaching Languages for Specific PurposesLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7309Semester 27NoNo

Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Weronika Gorska-Fernando
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This optional module provides a focused route for students who wish to develop advanced knowledge and skills in teaching Languages for Specific Purposes (LSP). The module starts with the exploration of theoretical approaches and key research as well as pedagogical developments in the field of LSP in the UK and across other national and international contexts. This in-depth introduction then moves on to the discussion of the principles of LSP course design, placing particular emphasis on practical knowledge of syllabus content/structure, material development and assessment methods.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation for Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7311Semester 17NoNo

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation for Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This optional optional module provides advanced knowledge in three key areas of teacher development, namely curriculum design; materials development; program and materials evaluation. The first half of the module focuses on aspects of curriculum design, including language policies and pedagogies, by exploring: historical perspectives; environmental and situational analysis; needs analysis. The module also examines the relationship between curriculum ideology and learning outcomes and how this impinges on syllabus design, the role of teachers, and materials. The second half of the module presents an overview of language program evaluation with a focus on: approaches to evaluation; evaluation practice and research; materials evaluation and multimedia materials evaluation. The module develops and deepens students' understanding of issues in curriculum development by providing practice in evaluating language curricula and language teaching materials.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Multimedia Materials Development for Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7312Semester 27NoNo

Multimedia Materials Development for Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to provide an introduction to the pedagogical applications of multimedia in the language classroom. The course will focus on key issues and developments in the field of language teaching with multimedia and will explore practical approaches to exploiting, creating, adapting and developing multimedia materials for language teaching purposes. Participants will be given opportunities to develop practical lesson ideas and materials and will be encouraged to pursue their particular interests in the subject area.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Assessment in Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7314Semester 17NoNo

Assessment in Language Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elaine Boyd
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Assessment in Language Teaching is an optional module for the MA in Language Teaching (MALT). It provides you with a comprehensive overview of the principles, practice and impact of language assessments as well as the analytic skills to critique language assessments for learning and achievement purposes. It consists of a weekly one-hour lecture and a two-hour seminar.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Career Success for Economics and Finance StudentsEconomics and FinanceECN002Full year3NoNo

Career Success for Economics and Finance Students

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Serena Spoendlin

Description: The module provides students with the opportunity of developing an understanding of the careers paths offered by their degree and of the steps required to maximise their ability to secure a career by the end of their studies. The module will cover topics such as: work experience and internships, the application process with impact, interview skills, careers options, application of economics in the labour market, career confidence and reflection on own progress and achievements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 3
Cases in Corporate FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM143Semester 27NoNo

Cases in Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte

Description: Cases in business finance is an innovative module based on case method teaching. The module aims to foster the ability to write a structured financial analysis of a business within the context of its market(s) of operation. In terms of learning process, the module makes use of real cases, including, for example, Apple and Boeing vs. Airbus.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Database SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS519USemester 15YesNo

Database Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Doyle

Description: This module is an introduction to databases and their language systems in theory and practice. The main topics covered by the module are: the principles and components of database management systems; the main modelling techniques used in the construction of database systems; implementation of databases using an object-relational database management system; the main relational database language; Object-Oriented database systems; future trends, in particular information retrieval, data warehouses and data mining.There are two timetabled lectures a week, and one-hour tutorial per week (though not every week). There will be timetabled laboratory sessions (two hours a week) for approximately five weeks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Creative Group ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS520USemester 25NoNo

Creative Group Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pat Healey

Description: The module will be practice-based where students work in a team to produce a creative system for audio-visual content production or interactivity. Students will work in a team to identify the elements in a product development cycle; develop an audio, video, multimedia product with particular attention to its aesthetics, usability and marketability; analyse and present results in qualitative and quantitative measures; report and present findings in a clear and coherent manner.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Dissertation
Level: 5
Interactive Media Design and ProductionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS521USemester 15NoNo

Interactive Media Design and Production

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Qianni Zhang

Description: This module will introduce you to the fundamental aspects of the applied research and development work of hypermedia analysis and comprehension.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 5.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 5.00% Practical
Level: 5
Credit RatingsEconomics and FinanceECOM091Semester 27NoNo

Credit Ratings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiota Koulafeti

Description: This module provides an overview of credit ratings, risk and analysis. It explains the role of rating agencies and goes though the rating process; how credit ratings are assigned and monitored. It provides knowledge of both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of credit analysis. It presents credit rating methodologies and an overview of securitisation and structured finance technology. The module puts considerable emphasis on practical applications. It explains how a transaction is put together by an investment bank as an arranger. Then goes through the steps of how it gets rated by the rating agencies and finally distributed in the markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Short DissertationEconomics and FinanceECOM093Full year7NoNo

Short Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Thomai Filippeli

Description: For MSc Finance students opting to take the CFA training pathway, this 30 credit dissertation will replace the standard 60 credit dissertation. The short dissertation is expected to take about half the time to complete and has a 4000 word length limit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Mergers and AcquisitionsEconomics and FinanceECOM095Semester 27NoNo

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jesse Mcdougall

Description: This module provides an overview of mergers and acquisitions from the point of view of an industry practitioner who has worked in both M&A advisory (Corporate Finance Advisory) and Merger Arbitrage Trading.

The module explains the role of Corporate Finance practitioners and the modelling tools they use to value companies and advise clients. The module also explains the role in the markets for traders and portfolio managers at hedge funds and other asset management firms who specialise in trading announced merger transactions and other corporate actions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
OIder Population and Oral Health with Minimally Invasive StrategiesDentistryDIN7159Full year7NoNo

OIder Population and Oral Health with Minimally Invasive Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The population of older people in the developed world is increasing significantly and nowadays older population retain more of their teeth. This module will deal with the special knowledge, attitudes and clinical with technical skills in the provision of oral health care for older people.

The module is 15 credits. There will be closely supervised clinical sessions throughout the programme in parallel to the seminars.
3 hour clinical exposure for 9 weeks = 27 hours
2 hour lecture/seminar every week over 9 weeks = 18 hours
1 hour revision seminar during the last week = 1 hour

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Oral Health Management for Children by Implementing MI TechniquesDentistryDIN7161Full year7NoNo

Oral Health Management for Children by Implementing MI Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The population of younger people in the developed world is increasing significantly. Paediatric Dentistry with MI approach is therefore becoming an essential part of the clinical dentistry which deals with the special knowledge, attitudes and clinical with technical skills in the provision of oral health care for children.

The module is designed to develop understanding and knowledge through a structured and developmental series of topics in Paediatric Dentistry in relation to Minimally Invasive approaches.

3 hour clinical and Clinical Skills laboratory exposure for 9 weeks = 27 hours
2 hour lecture/seminar every week over 9 weeks = 18 hours
1 hour revision seminar during the last week = 1 hour

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Research ProjectDentistryDIN7162Full year7NoNo

Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: Data derived from research projects will provide evidence for the future clinical applications in Clinical Dentistry and will close the gap within the literature related to Minimally Invasive Dentistry.

The module will initially provide students with a introduction to the research, including qualitative and quantitative paradigms, methodology, validity and reliability and support them to choose their research projects which are in the areas of Minimally Invasive approaches in all clinical dental disciplines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Applied Science of EndodontologyDentistryDIN7170Full year7NoNo

Applied Science of Endodontology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This module is an academic module focussing primarily on the basic science of endodontology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Macroeconomics BEconomics and FinanceECOM009Semester 27NoNo

Macroeconomics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Giulio Fella

Description: Together with Microeconomics A, this module will give you a firm grounding in modern microeconomic theory. Topics to be covered in the second term include: games in strategic and extensive form; Nash equilibrium and its refinements; games with incomplete information; repeated games; adverse selection, signalling, and screening; the principal­agent problem; incentive theory and mechanism design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Microeconomics BEconomics and FinanceECOM010Semester 27NoNo

Microeconomics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marco Mariotti

Description: This course aims to help students to develop advanced analytical and theoretical skills. The course will attempt to develop students' capacity for strategic reasoning via the analysis of game theoretic tools and mechanism design. Topics to be covered in the second term include: games in strategic and extensive form; Nash equilibrium and its refinements; games with incomplete information; repeated games; adverse selection, signalling, and screening; the principal­agent problem; incentive theory and mechanism design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Time Series AnalysisEconomics and FinanceECOM014Semester 17NoNo

Time Series Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Liudas Giraitis

Description: The module aims to provide a foundation in time series analysis in general and in the econometric analysis of economic time series in particular, offering theory and methods at a level consonant with an advanced training for a career economist. Topics include: An Introduction to Time Series Analysis for Econometrics and Finance; Linear Time Series Models; Seasonal Time Models; Estimation and Forecasting; Unit Roots and Co­integration; and ARCH and GARCH Time Series models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Graphical User InterfacesElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS522USemester 25NoNo

Graphical User Interfaces

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Julian Hough
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECS401U

Description: Computers are tools that people interact with and through for work and pleasure. Nowadays computers are ubiquitous and are fundamental to all sorts of devices such as washing machines, cars, mobile phones, airplanes, televisions, and musical instruments. However, it is still very difficult to design user interfaces which are simple, intuitive, and easy to use; you only have to look at the number of help books (eg the proliferation of books with titles such as 'the idiots guide to') to realise that designers often simply fail to make interfaces usable. This module introduces you to basic concepts of psychology and communication, which inform the way in which interfaces should be designed. The centre of the module is the hands-on coursework undertaken in small teams where you will design, prototype, and evaluate interactive user interfaces for a specific set of user requirements. The module comprises lectures, problem classes, and lab sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Theatre for Young People: Pedagogy in PracticeEnglish and DramaDRA7204Semester 27NoNo

Theatre for Young People: Pedagogy in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

Description: This module offers a group placement within a young people's theatre company or other relevant arts organisation working with young people. The organisations offering the group placement will normally be working with young people in mental health contexts, or with young people who have experiences of social and mental health issues. It offers the opportunity to observe, learn and develop arts-based teaching methodologies with and for young people and to explore the social, mental and creative benefits of the arts for young people.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Practice-Based DissertationEnglish and DramaDRA7711Full year7NoNo

Practice-Based Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Dominic Johnson

Description: This independent research project offers the opportunity of a practice-based dissertation consisting of a sustained piece of practice-based research that is documented in a submittable format, and a critical analysis (or written reflection) of 4,000-6,000 words. The form and scope of the practice is to be agreed between you and the supervisor and the MA Live Art convener. The documentation may accompany a live performance; or may document or otherwise consist of practice taking another form, including but not limited to performances with incidental audiences, one-to-one performances, performance for video or camera, online interventions, organising, or curating. Research development is enabled and supported by participation in a Dissertation Colloquium and Festival in May/June, in which you will present your research in progress and receive feedback from academic staff and other postgraduate students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
South African Theatre and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA249Semester 15YesNo

South African Theatre and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Genna Gardini

Description: This module explores the intellectual, creative and political forces that have shaped South African Theatre, focussing on theatre and performance produced in the 1980s and beyond. We will examine work that reflects and challenges the country's changing political and social landscape, and engages variously with African traditional storytelling and contemporary theatre-making techniques. We'll consider plays and performances produced both pre- and post-apartheid, and analyse them in relation to their cultural and historical contexts and key critical debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Advanced Applied Science of EndodontologyDentistryDIN7171Full year7NoNo

Advanced Applied Science of Endodontology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This module is an academic module focussing primarily on the clinical basis of endodontics and its interface with other aspects of dentistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 7
Feeling It: Emotion and Sensation in the TheatreEnglish and DramaDRA307Semester 16YesYes

Feeling It: Emotion and Sensation in the Theatre

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

QMUL Model Available to: All HSS students from the following Schools: School of English and Drama and School of History.

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: Who feels what in which theatre? From theories of catharsis in tragic theatre to the predicament of the spectator in postmodern performance, this module takes a critical, historical and theoretical look at how emotion and sensation have been experienced in the theatre and relate practices, which could include live art, video and film. We will work with records, documents and memories of performance, to consider what it might mean to feel real feelings and sense real sensations in relation to events and experiences that we may not think of as being real. Theoretical texts about performance and emotion will be examined in relation to historical accounts and contemporary experiences of performances. We will investigate what different cultures and traditions understand by emotion, and what different kinds of theatre and performance imagine they are doing with people's feelings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesESH_DRA_HST_456_L3
Performance CompositionEnglish and DramaDRA310Semester 26NoYes

Performance Composition

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Oliver

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the Department of Drama

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.

Description: Independent performers are responsible for the entirety of their work. This includes conceiving the idea, writing the text, composing the score and/or choreography, designing the visuals, securing equipment, mastering the technology, locating the venue, producing and marketing the event and finally performing the piece. This module provides practical skills and experience in each of these aspects of independent performance. As well as producing, performing and publicising the work, the group will be required to set up and run the performance space for the Performance Nights that will be held weekly during the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
NetworkingDRA_456_A
DissertationDentistryDIN7258Full year7NoNo

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "The students are required to build upon the knowledge acquired in the masters program to produce a dissertation. The coursework is presented in anatomical blocks which then build to an interrelated understanding which will be augmented by an independent project. The project will link clinical practice within the student's practice and the coursework. The project will take the form of a clinical audit of outcome or process which will include case selection , database design, data collection, analysis and publication of results. The student will then be mentored to develop the work both for publication in the literature and presentation to a scientific meeting. The dissertation will enable the student to reflect on their own clinical practice, and signpost further opportunities for further independent research."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Dental Public Health and PolicyDentistryDIN7701Semester 17NoNo

Dental Public Health and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: The Dental Public Health and Policy module is the first module in the distance-learning (online) Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and MSc course. This module covers the fundamental principles of Public Health, Dental Public Health and policy making. Teaching is delivered online over nine weeks using a range of interactive e-learning tools, videos, key readings and tasks for students to complete on a weekly basis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Assessing Oral Health and Diseases in PopulationsDentistryDIN7702Semester 27NoNo

Assessing Oral Health and Diseases in Populations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: The Assessing Oral Health and Diseases in Populations module covers oral epidemiology, measures of oral diseases and the study designs used to assess the prevalence and causes of oral diseases in populations. It will introduce students to the epidemiology of common oral diseases. Students will also learn how to interpret data from epidemiological studies. The teaching delivered online over nine weeks will use a range of interactive e-learning tools, videos, key readings and weekly tasks for students to complete.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Live Art HistoriesEnglish and DramaDRA7712Semester 17NoNo

Live Art Histories

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Dominic Johnson

Description: 'Live Art Histories' explores histories, social contexts, and genealogies of live art in the UK and internationally after 1960, in its emergence from visual art, as well as from intersections with other histories including those of theatre, dance, video, installation and activism. Key histories and case studies may include solo and autobiographical, endurance and durational, intimate and one-to-one, interventionist and collaborative performances, among other forms of live art practice. The module reflects upon the aesthetic, methodological, historiographical and other implications of encountering live art in its live manifestations and through documentation (such as scores, photographs, videos or oral accounts). In addition, the module will introduce you to key research methods and provide essential research training you will need on the rest of the programme. Teaching will include archival research at a venue such as the Live Art Development Agency, Tate Archives or Whitechapel Gallery Archive.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
International FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN209Semester 25YesNo

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergio Vicente
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN111 and take ECN206

Description: Topics include balance of payments; definitions; international consumption smoothing; nominal and real exchange rates; interest rate parity; elasticity approach to the trade balance; macroeconomic policy in an open economy; Exchange rate determination under flexible and sticky price and exogenous and endogenous expectations; Exchange rate regimes and speculative attacks; optimal currency areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Microeconomics IIEconomics and FinanceECN211Semester 15YesNo

Microeconomics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anja Prummer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 or take MTH4101 ) and take ECN111

Description: This is the second in a sequence of three modules intended to provide students with a thorough introduction to microeconomics. The course focuses on general equilibrium including exchange economies, the fundamental welfare theorems, externalities and public goods. Additionally, it provides an introduction to information economics with the expected utility model, choice under risk, adverse selection, moral hazard and market signalling.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Games and StrategiesEconomics and FinanceECN214Semester 25YesNo

Games and Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Tyson
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 or take MTH4101 ) and take ECN211

Description: This module provides an introduction to game theory, a framework for studying situations of strategic interdependence. You will be shown how to describe such situations formally, how to analyse them using concepts of dominance and equilibrium, and how the theory can be applied to questions arising in various social sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Exploring Spoken EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL4760Semester 14YesNo

Exploring Spoken English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is designed for students who want to extend their knowledge of the range and diversity of English spoken in the world today. Participants analyze and produce spoken language in different settings and genres by taking part in structured activities that examine the importance of audience, purpose and various communicative strategies. The examination of both global and local linguistic phenomena provides a context for participants to discuss diverse socio-cultural values and practices with others. Students have the opportunity to participate in practical workshops in which they are involved in activities such as discussions, role-plays and presentations. Assessment tasks include the research, recording and production of a collaborative video report and the live presentation of the research project in a seminar context. These tasks enable students to develop skills that support their ability to network effectively by enhancing their communication and interpersonal skills through designing and presenting group-generated project work in different media. This groupwork component also encourages and enables students from different disciplines to build a broader knowledge base and strengthen their ability to work with others with different perspectives. There is also scope for community engagement and the integration of both local and international perspectives in the design and execution of the students' project work. The individual QMPlus portfolio assessment complements these and offers the student a step-by-step developmental experience of the application of a range of theoretical paradigms in the exploration of spoken English over the full duration of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Exploring Spoken EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL4760Semester 24YesNo

Exploring Spoken English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is designed for students who want to extend their knowledge of the range and diversity of English spoken in the world today. Participants analyze and produce spoken language in different settings and genres by taking part in structured activities that examine the importance of audience, purpose and various communicative strategies. The examination of both global and local linguistic phenomena provides a context for participants to discuss diverse socio-cultural values and practices with others. Students have the opportunity to participate in practical workshops in which they are involved in activities such as discussions, role-plays and presentations. Assessment tasks include the research, recording and production of a collaborative video report and the live presentation of the research project in a seminar context. These tasks enable students to develop skills that support their ability to network effectively by enhancing their communication and interpersonal skills through designing and presenting group-generated project work in different media. This groupwork component also encourages and enables students from different disciplines to build a broader knowledge base and strengthen their ability to work with others with different perspectives. There is also scope for community engagement and the integration of both local and international perspectives in the design and execution of the students' project work. The individual QMPlus portfolio assessment complements these and offers the student a step-by-step developmental experience of the application of a range of theoretical paradigms in the exploration of spoken English over the full duration of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Data Driven Vocabulary BuildingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL5200Semester 25YesNo

Data Driven Vocabulary Building

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to expand their subject specific vocabulary in English. Using online tools, the students will investigate different aspects of the writing and speaking practices of their disciplines and research areas. Using corpora is introducing data driven learning (DDL) through which students can investigate the language of their research papers and articles, thereby raising their understanding of the academic registers and contextual and semantic fields of their discipline, which will help them to continue to learn autonomously beyond the classroom. Using Lawrence Anthony's freeware corpus analysis toolkit for concordancing and text analysis, AntConq and AntCorgen students will learn to analyse texts from their reading lists in order to study the vocabulary that they need to develop their own discipline specific word and phrase bank for use in their essays, assignments and dissertations. Students work under teacher supervision, individually, in small groups and pairs, and project work allows them to expand their vocabulary according to their own disciplines and professional choices.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Final Mark
Level: 5
Dissertation in English Language Teaching / Standard (Research) PathwayLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7203Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in English Language Teaching / Standard (Research) Pathway

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "This module is one of the two possible core modules in the MA in applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. With your supervisor's guidance, you will select a topic for advanced study. You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your ability to justify the topic, to synthesise knowledge from the modules you have studied during the programme, to narrow your topic to research questions following a close reading of literature, to design and implement a research plan, to collect quantitative and/or qualitative data and to analyse and interpret this data in order to answer your research questions. You will also be able to demonstrate your ability to structure an extended piece of written work, and to construct an argument which supports your conclusions. Your dissertation will be 10,000 to 12,000 words, and you will be supported by guidance from your supervisor on a one-to-one basis."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation in English Language Teaching (Professional Qualification Pathway)Languages Linguistics and FilmEAL7204Full year7NoNo

Dissertation in English Language Teaching (Professional Qualification Pathway)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: "This module is one of the two possible core modules in the MA in applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students who wish to attend the Level 5 Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) course or Trinity Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CertTESOL) course will be given the opportunity to critically reflect on their learning in a 10,000 to 12,000 word dissertation. Students may choose this option at their own additional expense, and at an institution of their choice, but the CELTA/CertTESOL must be studied after the end of the second semester modules. Students will not be assessed on the professional qualification but will be assessed on their ability to write and reflect on their own teaching and learning: the teaching practice they have gained in the professional qualification course and the micro-teaching opportunities provided on the MA programme, together with the learning experiences they have gained on the MA programme as learners of another language, both integrated with the theories, concepts and methodologies they have discussed in the subject areas studied in the MA programme."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Performance in the GalleryEnglish and DramaDRA355Semester 16YesNo

Performance in the Gallery

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin O'Brien

Description: This module looks at performance in relation to visual art. It examines what it means to develop performance work within a gallery context and how the 'white cube' functions as different from but related to the 'black box' of the theatre. We will work practically to explore the possibilities of performance art as a form emerging from the histories of the visual arts, and to experiment with form and the potentials of the gallery as a place of performance. The module will address practices such as durational performance and endurance art, action art, performance photography, performance to camera, installation-performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 6
Choreographic PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA358Semester 26YesNo

Choreographic Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton

Description: 'Choreography' has come to describe the arrangement and movement of bodies, objects and ideas more widely, although it has historically been attached to the organisation and presentation of dance. Dance is a crucial means by which choreographic thinking might be articulated and can be found in theatrical, gallery and public performances. In this module, we will examine how these diverse practices might enable a variety of means of thinking through and about movement. No prior training or experience in dance is necessary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Show Business: Theatre and CapitalismEnglish and DramaDRA360Semester 26YesYes

Show Business: Theatre and Capitalism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Mckinnie

QMUL Model Available to: All HSS students from the following Schools: School of English and Drama, School of Politics and International Relations, School of Business and Management, and School of Economics and Finance.

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: What kind of business is show business? This module explores the relationship between theatre and capitalism. It examines key economic problems as they arise in the theatre (e.g. "star" performers, box office, theatre as entertainment, theatre as a "creative industry," theatre and real estate). It also considers how performance offers a distinctive lens through which to think about broader practices and relations (e.g. neoliberalism, globalisation, urban development) that have become central to our everyday lives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarityESH_DRA_POL_SBM_SEF_456_L6
Principles of AccountingEconomics and FinanceECOM058Semester 27NoNo

Principles of Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Luca Larcher

Description: This module aims to introduce students to the fundamentals of accounting and financial reporting: the conceptual and regulatory framework of accounting; and the interpretation of financial statements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Applied Risk ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM059Semester 27NoNo

Applied Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giles Spungin

Description: The module addresses one of the most important ¿hot topics¿ in the post­financial crisis financial industry ¿ the identification, measurement and management of risks faced by financial institutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Applied EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECN336Semester 26YesNo

Applied Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrea Tesei
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN225

Description: This module provides you with hands-on environment in which you will learn how to analyse real economic data by applying economic theories and econometric methods in combination. The module also aims to develop your abilities in data collection, information gathering from a wide range of reading and critical evaluation of what is taught in textbooks. The module is assessed by coursework only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 20.00% Practical
Level: 6
Economics of Technology and InnovationEconomics and FinanceECN344Semester 26YesNo

Economics of Technology and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Aniol Llorente-Saguer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This course studies the interrelation between, market structure, firm behaviour, innovation and technology. Topics covered will include competitive markets, monopolies, pricing and marketing tactics, networks and technological standards, cartel formation, implicit collusion, antitrust enforcement, differentiated products, advertising, patents and intellectual property rights, among others.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Business CyclesEconomics and FinanceECN346Semester 26YesNo

Business Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roman Sustek
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 ) and take ECN206

Description: The module aims to evaluate how business cycle theories perform when confronted with business cycles stylised facts. The theories are presented based on a micro-founded intertemporal model of the economy that provides understanding on how different types of shocks cause macroeconomic fluctuations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Environmental EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN351Semester 16YesNo

Environmental Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: Sustainable and unsustainable development; the economic determinants of population growth; strategies of population control; intertemporal resource management; renewable and exhaustible resources; global warming, ozone depletion and acid rain externalities and the control of pollution; economic management of forest resources; the exploitation of the sea.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Public EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN352Semester 26YesNo

Public Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarolta Laczo
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This module aims to show how economic theory can help us to design and evaluate public policy. The main focus of the module is to familiarise you with basic notions, models and results of Public Economics. Primary attention will be given to the expenditure side of the economy, especially to externalities, public goods, social choice and local public goods. We take examples from environmental and tax policy as well as the analysis of projects and inequality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International Financial StrategyEconomics and FinanceECN377Semester 26YesYes

International Financial Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergio Vicente
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS353
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN378

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: The focus of the course is on understanding how the global environment affects the decision making of managers in corporations. Students will develop a strategic understanding of key financial decisions faced by organizations by putting them into an international context. While the module discusses the theoretical basis on the various issues and topics, it also mixes in empirical evidence and discussion of firms' actual behaviors and for that reason lectures will be also based on case studies of multinational corporations.

Students will use prior knowledge of International Finance and valuation methods to build upon ideas in global financial markets and foreign investment decisions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
International perspectivesSEF_6_A
Corporate FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN378Semester 16YesYes

Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomai Filippeli
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS225 or take BUS341
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN226

QMUL Model Available to: All students in the School of Economics and Finance at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.

Description: The module is organized around two key questions in corporate finance. In a first part dedicated to the investment choices made by firms: the students will understand how investments affect the value of the firm and will be exposed to the analytical tools necessary for evaluating real and financial assets. In a second part of the course we will study how firms design their capital structure, as well as the corporate governance mechanisms they put in place in order to ease their access to external financing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Artificial IntelligenceElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS759PSemester 17NoNo

Artificial Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Tzimiropoulos

Description: This module provides an overview of techniques used in Artificial Intelligence including agent modelling, problem formulation, search, logic, probability and machine learning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 12.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 13.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Personal and Career Development Plan 1Economics and FinanceECN004Full year4NoNo

Personal and Career Development Plan 1

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Serena Spoendlin

Description: The module aims to get students started on their career journey by highlighting the importance of gaining work experience during university, as well as the various opportunities available. All students will meet one-on-one with the careers team to create a competitive CV, as well as applying to at least two first year opportunities and taking a psychometric test. The overall theme of this module is discovery and getting ready.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
World EconomyEconomics and FinanceECN102Semester 14YesNo

World Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: The aim of this module is to introduce the basic concepts and methods that economists employ to analyse economic growth and international trade. It will review and analyse the current macroeconomic issues and events from the perspective of the business community and policymakers, including: strategies for growth; causes of trade deficits; consequences of government deficits; short- and long-term effects of monetary policy; and the globalisation of financial markets. The module will feature examples from both developed and developing countries to enhance knowledge of the world economy and skills in solving practical problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Principles of FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN103Semester 14YesNo

Principles of Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radoslawa Nikolowa
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS201 or take BUS245 or take BUS340
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN115

Description: The module is an introduction to the core concepts in finance and covers the economic principles underlying the working of national and international financial institutions. It introduces the theory and operation of financial systems from an economist¿s viewpoint. The stress is on financial instruments and markets in which they are traded. Students are expected to gather a good understanding of the functioning of the financial system. They are expected to learn applying an economics perspective to the study of financial assets and institutions, and to form a coherent view of the disparate variables in financial activity, markets, and their governance as well as to understand these in the context of financial crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
InvestmentsEconomics and FinanceECOM065Semester 17NoNo

Investments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Zachariadis

Description: This course introduces students to the key principles in asset pricing and investment management. It covers risk, return and portfolio construction, focussing on equity, bond and derivatives markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Econometrics for FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM072Semester 17NoNo

Econometrics for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Haroon Mumtaz

Description: The module will cover fundamental methods for the empirical analysis of financial data. Some prior knowledge of general econometrics will be assumed, and the focus will be on building an understanding of the ideas behind, and the application of, those methods that are most heavily relied upon in the empirical analysis of financial data. A majority of the topics treated will be related to empirical asset pricing and portfolio choice, although other areas of finance will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Performing ShakespeareEnglish and DramaDRA205Semester 15YesNo

Performing Shakespeare

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Penelope Woods

Description: How to perform Shakespeare has been one of the most enduring and ideologically fraught struggles in modern British theatre production. This module builds on the historiographical and cultural studies work of year one, providing a practical laboratory in which you will learn and explore modes of performance that will illuminate the theatrical work in performance while preserving its historical strangeness. Drawing variously on our contemporary understanding of the conditions of English Renaissance production and on performance techniques associated with experimental theatre artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, you will work on text from Shakespeare plays, making use of, for example, rhetorical gesture, improvisation, flirting and showing off, talking to the audience, audio feeds, part-scripts, textual muddles, obscenity and cross-dressing. The emphasis will be on finding viable and intellectually rigorous modes of performance that challenge the dominant 'naturalistic' modes that operate in most British theatre production.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Theatre WritingsEnglish and DramaDRA218Semester 15YesNo

Theatre Writings

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Mojisola Adebayo

Description: This module is intended to develop your writing for and about the stage. Each week you will be set creative writing tasks that will help you develop your own skills in writing. Over the semester, you will build up a portfolio of creative pieces and be required to analyse the work of other students. In addition, we will be looking at plays in performance and on the page, and we will practice effective ways of writing about theatre as well as for it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Portfolio Construction TheoryEconomics and FinanceECOM097Semester 27NoNo

Portfolio Construction Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mirko Cardinale

Description: This module looks into the major asset classes and how these are combined to form investment portfolios. Different asset allocation strategies are also examined along with the ways to measure and attribute portfolio performance. Furthermore, portfolio specific issues such as ethical investing and behavioural finance are also studied. The course shows how financial products are used in modern day banking.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Strategic Asset AllocationEconomics and FinanceECOM100Semester 27NoNo

Strategic Asset Allocation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mirko Cardinale

Description: Almost all investment management firms make a distinction between strategic and tactical asset allocation. Strategic allocation focuses on broad asset classes, longer term trends and portfolio constraints whilst tactical allocation tends to be shorter term and focused on allocation between individual assets rather than asset classes. This course focuses on the process of Strategic allocation introducing concepts such as smart beta and asset liability management as well as detailed models like Black­Litterman that are used in this type of allocation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 7
Behavioural EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECOM101Semester 17NoNo

Behavioural Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asen Ivanov

Description: There is mounting evidence that people violate many of the "rationality" assumptions of mainstream economics. Behavioural economics studies such violations and proposes theories to explain them. Some key topics are bounded rationality, overconfidence, prospect theory, dynamic inconsistency, and implications of human irrationalities for public policy. Knowledge of behavioural economics provides students with a deeper and more realistic understanding of human decision­making than is offered by the mainstream approach alone. Such knowledge will hopefully also make students less susceptible to common mistakes in their own decisions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Applied Corporate FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM104Semester 17NoNo

Applied Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giles Spungin

Description: This module provides you with the necessary skills to interpret and analyse accounting reports when making business decisions. Topics include valuation of equity of debt instruments, ratio analysis, fundamental analysis, and earning management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Laboratory Endodontic SkillsDentistryDIN7172Full year7NoNo

Laboratory Endodontic Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This module is a practical module essential for the development of the skills required for competency in endodontic techniques. Students will need to demonstrate satisfactory completion of this module as a pre-requisite for the clinical module which follows this module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 50.00% Practical
Level: 7
Clinical Skills in EndodonticsDentistryDIN7173Full year7NoNo

Clinical Skills in Endodontics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This core module comprises supervised clinical patient treatment sessions. At the end of this module, students are required to submit two clinical case reports of patients they have treated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Literature Review in Relation to Endodontic PracticeDentistryDIN7174Full year7NoNo

Literature Review in Relation to Endodontic Practice

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: In this module, the students will build on skills in conducting a search and appraisal of the literature on an agreed endodontic topic. At the end of this module, students will be required to produce a literature review report.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Dissertation
  • Item 4: 10.00% Practical
Level: 7
Audit Project in Endodontic PracticeDentistryDIN7175Full year7NoNo

Audit Project in Endodontic Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: In this module, students will build on the principles and protocols for audit and/or research. The students will select an agreed endodontic topic, design a strategy, collect relevant data and analyse the findings. At the end of this module, students will be required to produce a report of their project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Dissertation
  • Item 3: 20.00% Practical
Level: 7
Initial Presentation and AssessmentDentistryDIN7250Semester 17NoNo

Initial Presentation and Assessment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: This module provides the basic understanding behind the whole course in terms of the types of injury caused by the various mechanisms of trauma commonly seen in clinical practice. Background pathophysiology required to understand healing processes and surgical manipulation with respect to both bone and soft tissue elements underpin all of the following modules. Emergency assessment relevant to both the primary and secondary trauma survey are discussed together with treatment delivered in this phase of treatment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
Level: 7
Corporate FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM015Semester 17NoNo

Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radoslawa Nikolowa

Description: This course provides a broad introduction to the key issues in understanding corporate financial policy. In particular, we will investigate how companies should finance their activities by issuing securities (debt, equity and convertible claims) and the interaction of business policy with corporate financial policy. Special consideration is given to tax issues, the possible costs of financial distress, the incentives behind financial decisions and the signalling impact of those for financial market participants. The final part of the course covers some specific topics in corporate finance: dividend policy, the decision to go public, mergers and acquisitions and possibly corporate governance issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Financial EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECOM025Semester 27NoNo

Financial Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module discusses econometric methodology for dealing with problems in the area of financial economics and provides students with the econometric tools applied in the area. Applications are considered in the stock, bond and exchange rate markets. Students will cover the following issues: asset returns distributions; predictability of asset returns; econometric tests of capital markets efficiency and asset pricing models; inter-temporal models of time-varying risk premium; nonlinearities in financial data; value at risk; pricing derivatives 6 MSc Finance and Economics, MSc Finance and Econometrics with stochastic volatility (or GARCH) models; modelling non-synchronous trading; and numerical methods in finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Financial DerivativesEconomics and FinanceECOM026Semester 27NoNo

Financial Derivatives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Patrick Boyle

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with an overview of the theory and practice of pricing and hedging derivative securities. These include forward and futures contracts, swaps, and many different types of options. This module covers diverse areas of derivatives, such as equity and index derivatives, foreign currency derivatives and commodity derivatives, as well as interest rate derivatives. This module also addresses the issue of how to incorporate credit risk into the pricing and risk management of derivatives. All the relevant concepts are discussed based on the discrete time binomial model and the continuous time Black­Scholes model. The extensions of the Black­Scholes model are also discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Making Contemporary TheatreEnglish and DramaDRA220Semester 15YesNo

Making Contemporary Theatre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton

Description: This module examines processes, techniques and modes of expression used by contemporary theatre-makers to create a variety of forms. We examine how the performance-making processes of significant practitioners function analytically, creatively, and practically. We consider how practitioners strategically deploy methodologies, conventions and techniques to produce particular outcomes. We consider how process is informed by content, genre, mode of representation, theatrical convention, and ideological and cultural context. We learn methods of workshopping and performing that can create stimulating and engaging theatre. Theatre makers examined change from year to year; please contact the convenor for further details.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Making Contemporary TheatreEnglish and DramaDRA220Semester 25YesNo

Making Contemporary Theatre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Mojisola Adebayo

Description: This module examines processes, techniques and modes of expression used by contemporary theatre-makers to create a variety of forms. We examine how the performance-making processes of significant practitioners function analytically, creatively, and practically. We consider how practitioners strategically deploy methodologies, conventions and techniques to produce particular outcomes. We consider how process is informed by content, genre, mode of representation, theatrical convention, and ideological and cultural context. We learn methods of workshopping and performing that can create stimulating and engaging theatre. Theatre makers examined change from year to year; please contact the convenor for further details.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Disciplines of Live ArtEnglish and DramaDRA7713Semester 27NoNo

Disciplines of Live Art

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: 'Disciplines of Live Art' explores the material conditions and social infrastructures for live art as a practice and an object of study. You will consider the institutional pressures and considerations that shape performance, while giving special attention to the cultural politics of live art specifically. In addition, you will study how the practice of live art relates to other disciplines of art making- such as visual art, theatre, music, and more - and how research into live art requires engagement with multiple academic disciplines ¿ such as Art History, Performance Studies, Musicology and more. The module examines how artists, curators and researchers negotiate funding structures, engage with cultural policy, and seek to intervene into a range of political and cultural issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
London Performance NowEnglish and DramaDRA261Semester 15YesNo

London Performance Now

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lewis Church

Description: London is one of Europe's most exciting theatrical cities with a range of productions on offer at any given time. This module will examine a range of live productions to explore strategies for reading live performance that recognize the importance of where performances take place. As a group we will visit the National Theatre, the Barbican, and the Royal Court as well as 'fringe' or alternative venues in examining how we read the performance event. You will be expected to engage with critical reviews of performances, examine the role of press and marketing and explore the targeting of specific productions to particular audience groups

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
London Performance NowEnglish and DramaDRA261Semester 25YesNo

London Performance Now

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Mojisola Adebayo

Description: London is one of Europe's most exciting theatrical cities with a range of productions on offer at any given time. This module will examine a range of live productions to explore strategies for reading live performance that recognize the importance of where performances take place. As a group we will visit the National Theatre, the Barbican, and the Royal Court as well as 'fringe' or alternative venues in examining how we read the performance event. You will be expected to engage with critical reviews of performances, examine the role of press and marketing and explore the targeting of specific productions to particular audience groups

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Performing PersonaeEnglish and DramaDRA262Semester 25NoNo

Performing Personae

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Julia Bardsley

Description: Performing Identities explores a wide spectrum of performing/acting, from the performance of self to the performance of various types of other. It includes investigations into and the creation of personae, alter egos, characters (already existing and newly made), avatars, impersonations, disguises, archetypes, faux celebrities, monikers, for example. We will also look at phenomenas of channelling, possession and mediumship (i.e. being taken over by another). The central questions guiding our investigations are: Who are you when you are performing? and Who are you when you are on stage or in front of an audience? We will work with technical aspects of presence, points of concentration and psychological gesture in order to find practical mechanisms for performing along the identity spectrum.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 55.00% Practical
Level: 5
Race and Racism in PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA263Semester 25YesNo

Race and Racism in Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: This module explores how race is performed in theatre, art, and popular culture. Of particular interest are performances that trouble how we think or talk about race, especially as it intersects with other identity categories like gender, class, sexuality and disability. Why are race and structural racism such difficult topics to discuss, especially in the context of performance? What does it mean to label a performance racist, and how can we as artists develop anti-racist performance practices? The topics this seminar covers could include histories of blackface minstrelsy, debates over "colour-blind" casting, the politics of cultural appropriation in pop culture for example.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Shakespeare After ShakespeareEnglish and DramaDRA316Semester 26YesYes

Shakespeare After Shakespeare

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Penelope Woods

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module examines how Shakespeare has been adapted and appropriated in a variety of performance contexts. We will address and debate issues such as cultural and textual authority, authorship, gender, sexuality, national identity, ethnicity, adaptation and appropriation. Possible topics, contexts and texts through which these issues will be addressed may include, but are not limited to: authorship; decolonisation, postcolonial and settler cultures; queering Shakespeare; feminist performance; heritage and tourism; festivals; translation; popular culture; education. We will engage critically with Shakespeare's play texts, performances 'after Shakespeare' and critical writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL
Madness and TheatricalityEnglish and DramaDRA323Semester 16NoNo

Madness and Theatricality

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

Description: This module explores madness and mental illness in recent and historical performance. It asks questions about how a society's constructions of madness are reflected in and produced by performance, and about the versions of subjectivity or selfhood that emerge when we play mad. The module is taught through practice-based case studies of ancient Greek, English Renaissance and twentieth/twenty-first century European texts and performances. It examines the versions of madness and mental illness produced in historical performance, and the ways in which these have been reinterpreted and rewritten to reflect current constructions and concerns of and about madness. It explores recent constructions of madness and its 'treatment' on stage.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Written Research ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA329Semester 26NoNo

Written Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Catherine Silverstone

Description: This module guides you through the process of choosing a research topic, researching that topic, framing appropriate research questions, structuring an argument and writing a dissertation in the expanded field of Drama, Theatre and/or Performance Studies. You will develop your project through independent research supported by a programme of seminars/workshops and supervision with your supervisor and seminar leader, addressing areas of research methodology and presentation such as: research ethics; planning and executing research, including book/journal-based, electronic, archival and interview-based research; selecting research methodologies; approaches to critical writing; and giving a research presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 90.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Description of LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7207Semester 17NoNo

Description of Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Diana Ben-Aaron
Overlap: EAL6207
Prerequisite: None

Description: "Description of Language provides you with an overview of the nature and extent of linguistics and enables you to apply the systems of syntax, lexis, practical phonetics, and discourse to the language learning classroom. From your understanding of language, you then explore and evaluate the range of language learning materials and the sequencing of materials for language teaching and learning. The module allows you to apply your newly acquired knowledge of language and materials to the language learning classroom, both through micro-teaching with your peers, and through opportunities to observe language teaching in either English or another language."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Evidence Based DentistryDentistryDIN7703Semester 27NoNo

Evidence Based Dentistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Easter Joury

Description: This module will equip students with (i) applied knowledge of evidence-based dentistry; (ii) the skills to enable them to critically appraise research and; (iii) strategies that allow them to apply and implement evidence in practice. The nine-week online teaching will use videos, existing publicly available resources, key readings and interactive task to build critical appraisal skills. Library skills teaching developed in collaboration with the School of Medicine and Dentistry librarian will equip students will database searching skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 45.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Prevention and Oral Health PromotionDentistryDIN7704Semester 37NoNo

Prevention and Oral Health Promotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Donatella D'Antoni

Description: The Prevention and Oral Health Promotion module is the fourth module in the distance-learning (online) Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and MSc course. This applied and consolidated module covers oral health promotion, oral health promotion strategies, how to use behaviour change theories and models in oral health promotion, and how to use planning models to design, implement and evaluate oral health promotion activities. The module will enable students to design oral health promotion activities, and learn how to evaluate them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Research MethodsDentistryDIN7705Semester 17NoNo

Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: This compulsory module will be delivered in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning postgraduate Diploma and MSc courses. It will start by giving students the theoretical basis for research. They will then journey through the stages of planning a research project including setting research questions, designing a study and acquiring ethical approval. The nine weeks of teaching will culminate in students submitting a research protocol and defending this in an oral presentation as a summative assessment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 35.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Primary Dental CareDentistryDIN7706Semester 27NoNo

Primary Dental Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: This module will be delivered in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning postgraduate Diploma and MSc courses. Students will explore working relationships, skill-mix and practice management approaches in primary dental care. They will learn how to identify and design a quality improvement project that they can use in their own practice environment. Students will reflect on their role as professionals in the wider healthcare workforce and create a oral presentation aimed at other health professional audience.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Leadership and Planning in Health and Public ServicesDentistryDIN7707Semester 37NoNo

Leadership and Planning in Health and Public Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: This module will be delivered in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning postgraduate Diploma and MSc courses. The Institute of Dentistry and the School of Business and Management will deliver this collaborative module. It will cover dental service planning including planning models, needs assessments, priority setting and action planning. Students will explore leadership theories and critically reflect on leadership challenges in case studies. They will evaluate their own leadership styles and skills by completing a summative personal leadership e-Portfolio.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Qualitative Research MethodsDentistryDIN7708Semester 37NoNo

Qualitative Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: This elective module will be available for students to complete in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning MSc course. It will start by giving students the theoretical basis for qualitative research. They will then journey through the stages of planning a qualitative study: setting research questions, selecting an appropriate study design and sampling strategy, gathering, analyzing and interpreting data and writing up findings. Students will learn how to critically appraise qualitative research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Selected Topics in MacroeconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN223Semester 25YesNo

Selected Topics in Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francesc Xavier Mateos-Planas
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN211

Description: Topics include: Consumption: life-cycle and permanent-income hypothesis; Inflation: causes and effects of inflation, disinflation, seignorage, dynamic inconsistency, hyperinflation; Debts and deficits: the government budget constraint, Ricardian equivalence, fiscal policy and output stabilisation. In addition to these three topics, the module may cover additional topics such as basics of monetary policy (eg money targets versus interest targets); Rational expectations (eg policy ineffectiveness, Lucas critique); Investment; The Euro; Globalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Morphology of British CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL5600Semester 15YesNo

Morphology of British Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: SML208
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module is intended to develop students' cross-disciplinary academic literacy in English via the medium of Cultural Studies. It introduces participants to British cultural history and commentary from the late Victorian era to the present day, examining discourses surrounding Empire, post-colonial culture and contemporary discourses of 'Britishness' in the light of increasing cultural diversity, globalization, devolution and developments in relation to the European Union. The interactive mode of teaching and assessed spoken component of the module ensure that participants have the opportunity to discuss socio-cultural values and practices with others. Participation in the full range of learning tasks fosters multi and inter-disciplinary critical thinking through the study of texts and other comparable cultural artefacts across a range of areas beyond the boundaries of the participants¿ main degree programmes. Students also have the opportunity to explore how far their developing problem-solving techniques or approaches can be generalised or applied in a broader context and are encouraged to explore and evaluate perspectives from different disciplines, genres and media.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Digital Media and Social NetworksElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS757PSemester 27NoNo

Digital Media and Social Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk

Description: Introduction to Online Social Networks (OSN)
Characteristics of OSNs
Basic Graph Theory
Small World Phenomenon
Information propagation on OSNs
Influence and Content Recommendation
Sentiment Analysis in Social Media
Privacy and ethics

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGeographyGEG6223Semester 16NoNo

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG5223

Description: The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGeographyGEG6223PSemester 16NoNo

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines

Description: The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Ancient Human Occupation of BritainGeographyGEG6225Semester 16YesNo

Ancient Human Occupation of Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

Description: Who are we and where do we come from? These frequently-asked questions are addressed through an examination of the archaeological record and the rich Palaeolithic record in Britain. The British evidence is considered in the context of dispersals of hominin groups from Africa into Europe over the last two million years. Major climatic fluctuations, repeated advance and retreat of ice sheets and major geographical and environmental changes provide the backdrop for this exploration of the ancient human occupation of Britain.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Ancient Human Occupation of BritainGeographyGEG6225PSemester 16YesNo

Ancient Human Occupation of Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

Description: Who are we and where do we come from? These frequently-asked questions are addressed through an examination of the archaeological record and the rich Palaeolithic record in Britain. The British evidence is considered in the context of dispersals of hominin groups from Africa into Europe over the last two million years. Major climatic fluctuations, repeated advance and retreat of ice sheets and major geographical and environmental changes provide the backdrop for this exploration of the ancient human occupation of Britain.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Aestheticism and Fin de Siecle LiteratureEnglish and DramaESH7030Semester 17NoNo

Aestheticism and Fin de Siecle Literature

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Maxwell

Description: "This module introduces students to developments in the literature of the late Victorian period with an eye to its possible influences on modernist writing. Students are encouraged to explore such issues as the construction of the self and personality, representation of the body, the role of the artist with reference to gender and sexuality, Decadence, and the 'New Woman', as well as making a more general survey of aesthetics, style, and the visual and literary imagination in the writings of the period. Students study a variety of different kinds of writing including poetry, drama, art and literary criticism, and the novel. Writers included are Swinburne, Pater, Wilde, and Hardy, and lesser known figures such as Vernon Lee and Charlotte Mew."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Reading Shakespeare HistoricallyEnglish and DramaESH7040Semester 27NoNo

Reading Shakespeare Historically

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gwilym Jones

Description: "One of the central skills required of a postgraduate in Renaissance and Early Modern studies is to be able to put texts in historical contexts. This module aims to help Masters students acquire this skill by examining a range of ways in which Shakespeare's plays can be contextualised. Although there may be occasion to talk critical trends such as new historicism, the new bibliography, interdisciplinarity, intertextuality, genre criticism, Bakhtinian dialogism, psychoanalysis, rhetoric studies, material culture, intellectual and cultural history (well, maybe not all of them!), the principal objective is not to arm students with labels. It is to test various models of contextualisation against specific plays, as well as to provide contexts from the secondary literature that students can themselves begin to apply."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Scriptwriting: Adaption and Original ScriptLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM205Semester 25NoNo

Scriptwriting: Adaption and Original Script

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eugene Doyen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Enrolment on Film Studies degree programme

Description: This is a level five module offered as an option for single honours and joint honours Film
Studies students only. The module offers the opportunity to study practice and techniques
related to both script adaptation and original scriptwriting and their inter-relationship is
an important step for anyone wishing to establish their creative writing skills above a
foundation level. Both types of scriptwriting will be given equal weight as topics and
assessed accordingly.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
German Film 3: Contemporary German CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM302PSemester 17NoNo

German Film 3: Contemporary German Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: FLM302
Prerequisite: None

Description: his module will allow you to analyse the state of contemporary filmmaking in Germany, exploring film cultures in the GDR and FRG immediately prior to unification, as well as the issues surrounding the re-establishment of a single national cinema after the fall of the Wall. The module encourages you to study developments in recent German cinema in the context of the increasing globalisation of media industries and images. You will explore the dynamics of recent German filmmaking, including its relationship to Hollywood and other European cinemas, its approach to questions of transnationalism and transculturalism, particularly concerning the emergence of Turkish-German filmmaking, its approach to the representation of politics, history and the national past, of gender and sexuality, and also its use of genre and popular commercial film styles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary French CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6205Semester 16YesNo

Contemporary French Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Hannah Paveck
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Through a detailed examination of a number of recent and contemporary French films this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped French film production since major changes to cultural policy were implemented in France by the socialist Mitterrand administration in 1981. We will profile some of the ways in which French cinema reflects and interacts with French culture and society, and evaluate this in the light of social, political and cultural shifts in late 20th and 21st century French life. The module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which students will select a film of their own choice, and across three written assignments they will progressively develop material about the film that situates it within its historical, industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, EconomyGeographyGEG6130Semester 16YesNo

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rory Rowan

Description: Subsequent to the introductory lecture, the module is divided into three sections. The first main section provides an historical and political overview of the 'war on terror' in relation to thinking about other types of wars. It considers how the prosecution of the war on terror has come to shape not only military, but also legal and governmental discourse and practice in the post 9/11 era. The second section invites students to consider ideas and practices of security as a central feature of this. It will consider the rise of private military contracting, immigration, humanitarianism, urban geopolitics, and the overlap between health and security concerns. The third section focuses on the political-economic underpinnings of many of these developments and challenges students to think of conflict as an embedded social phenomenon: as much a part of contemporary discourses on the economy as it is something with merely economic implications. The final, concluding lecture will examine alternatives to the dominant framings of modern conflict that have been put forward and critiqued thus far.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GeographyGEG6132Semester 16NoNo

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG5102 or take GEG5144

Description: This module explores advanced issues in relation to the principles, techniques and applications of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) within the wider geographical remit (e.g. advanced spatial analysis, location-allocation models, interoperability and exchange of data between different systems, etc.). It complements the GIS training offered in levels 4 and 5 of and provides an opportunity to students to consolidate and expand their knowledge about GIS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geography, Technology and SocietyGeographyGEG6134Semester 16NoNo

Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden

Description: This module will develop students' critical engagement with the geographies of knowledge, technology and society. The module will discuss the theoretical and conceptual fabric of geographies of science, paying close attention to its development through studies in the history and sociology of science and Science & Technology Studies (STS). It will then apply these theoretical and conceptual tools to understanding a select number of case study examples of hubs of scientific innovation in the life sciences and Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Visual EssayLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5208Semester 15NoNo

The Visual Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Film Studies single hons only: FLM403 required
Corequisite: FLM5203

Description: The Visual Essay is a single-semester module (15 credits) which interrogates the links between the essay form and visual media. The module explores how film, still and moving image work can be constructed to produce arguments, debates, and other rhetorical forms. The module allows students to develop a short moving-image or video essay, focusing on its visual elements to create an essay, argument or other poetic form. Students will also acquire a broader historical and theoretical understanding of the essay form, in text, photography, illustration, film, video and digital media. Beginning with the essays of Montaigne, students will be introduced to the visual essay as a hybrid form that navigates the personal and the political, expression and argument, feeling and reason, in cinematic language. The module forms part of the production pathway for Single Honours Film Studies, and as a result requires students to have undertaken production modules at Level 4.

As a module it will be available to students registered on degree programmes involving Film Studies only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Contemporary Russian FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6017Semester 16YesNo

Contemporary Russian Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: RUS5017, RUS6017
Prerequisite: None

Description: Through the analysis of films produced since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union and creation of Russia, this course aims to equip students to be able to comment on contemporary Russian films as they are released. Teaching and assessment focuses on identifying key industrial, thematic and genre trends and issues in contemporary Russian cinema, with a focus on the intersection of the national and transnational. Those without Russian will be able to participate fully in this course, although a reading knowledge can be useful for working on less well-known films. The secondary reading is in English, and all key films are subtitled.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Film PhilosophyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6020Semester 16YesNo

Film Philosophy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucy Bolton
Overlap: FLM7020, FLM6204
Prerequisite: FLM5203 or equivalent

Description: This module explores the relationship between film and philosophy by examining how films raise philosophical questions. We will learn what philosophers have to say about cinema, and how filmmakers incorporate philosophical perspectives, but we will also explore how films can inform the ways we think about ourselves and understand the world around us. From how we experience cinema in our minds and bodies, to what scares us and how we assess right and wrong, this module will address the question of how films do philosophy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
German Narrative Fiction in Text and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6027Semester 26YesNo

German Narrative Fiction in Text and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Wilks
Overlap: GER6027, FLM5027, GER5027
Prerequisite: Any level 4 film or literature module

Description: What are the specific qualities of the media film and novel? How is a story changed when it moves from one medium to the other? Is it even still the same story?
Using texts from the German canon, students will explore what happens to the parameters of prose fiction when they are transferred to the medium of film. This includes not only the way the plot is realized, but many other factors which affect the intellectual and emotional responses elicited.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
German Narrative Fiction in Text and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6027PSemester 27NoNo

German Narrative Fiction in Text and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Wilks
Overlap: GER6027, FLM5027, GER5027, FLM6027
Prerequisite: Any level 4 film or literature module

Description: What are the specific qualities of the media film and novel? How is a story changed when it moves from one medium to the other? Is it even still the same story?
Using texts from the German canon, students will explore what happens to the parameters of prose fiction when they are transferred to the medium of film. This includes not only the way the plot is realized, but many other factors which affect the intellectual and emotional responses elicited.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Film ArchaeologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM604Semester 16YesNo

Film Archaeology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: FLM604P
Prerequisite: None

Description: The origins of cinema, key moments of transformation and recent challenges to its form in the wake of digital technologies are the subjects examined in this module. Far from being simply a conflict between the magical tradition of Méliès and the documentary account of the Lumière brothers, cinema archaeology reveals the connections between various nineteenth century inventions concerned with movement, perception and transmission, and the advent of cinema. The course explores the various cultural influences that have contributed to the idea of 'cinema' at a particular time, such as those from painting, literature and theatre. Perhaps more significant are the moments of crisis brought about by the prospect of adding to film, such as the qualities of sound and colour. Most illuminating of all is film's competitive relation to its 'rivals': television, video, digital production and youtube. The course examines the question of whether film is a specific medium with enduring qualities, or whether its component parts are remade with every decade.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Montage Across the Arts: Aesthetics, Modernity, PoliticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6042Semester 26YesNo

Montage Across the Arts: Aesthetics, Modernity, Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mario Slugan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module starts off by investigating whether montage appears as a general artistic principle across the arts approximately at the same time or whether we can identify a single art medium as its birthplace. Drawing on pinnacles of modernist art including futurist and dada collages and photomontages, film city symphonies, and city novels the module will analyze stylistic, narratological, and perceptual aspects of montage in different media and their relations to broader cultural formations such as urban modernity and radical politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the MuseumLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6045Semester 26YesNo

Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the Museum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM5203 or equivalent

Description: This module explores the relationships of cinema (as an institution, as a space, and as a concept) to the institutional, spatial and conceptual contexts of the museum. The museum has in recent years become a respository for film as a museum object in its own right; however, film has haunted the corridors of museums since its earliest invention. In this module, we explore the connections and disconnections between cinematic and museal spaces, using theoretical concepts of immersion, spatial dynamics, the archive, exhibition and curatorial theory to make sense of the plurality of film and the moving image in museums, and indeed the 'museum' in the moving image. Making use of London as an ideal base for interrogating some of these encounters between cinema, the moving image, and museums, the module will also explore the interventions of film across other disciplines, including Art History, Museology, Anthropology and the Digital Humanities. We will explore both actual and virtual museums, through a range of film material from Europe, North America, the Middle East, drawing upon concepts such as 'film as a virtual museum', 'cinematic exhibition practices', 'film as museology', and 'the ethics of ethnographic film'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Film ArchaeologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM604PSemester 17NoNo

Film Archaeology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: FLM604
Prerequisite: None

Description: The origins of cinema, key moments of transformation and recent challenges to its form in the wake of digital technologies are the subjects examined in this module. Far from being simply a conflict between the magical tradition of Méliès and the documentary account of the Lumière brothers, cinema archaeology reveals the connections between various nineteenth century inventions concerned with movement, perception and transmission, and the advent of cinema. The course explores the various cultural influences that have contributed to the idea of 'cinema' at a particular time, such as those from painting, literature and theatre. Perhaps more significant are the moments of crisis brought about by the prospect of adding to film, such as the qualities of sound and colour. Most illuminating of all is film's competitive relation to its 'rivals': television, video, digital production and youtube. The course examines the question of whether film is a specific medium with enduring qualities, or whether its component parts are remade with every decade.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Contemporary French CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6205PSemester 17NoNo

Contemporary French Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Hannah Paveck
Overlap: FLM507, FLM6205
Prerequisite: None

Description: Through a detailed examination of a number of recent and contemporary French films this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped French film production since major changes to cultural policy were implemented in France by the socialist Mitterrand administration in 1981. We will profile some of the ways in which French cinema reflects and interacts with French culture and society, and evaluate this in the light of social, political and cultural shifts in late 20th and 21st century French life. The module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which students will select a film of their own choice, and across three written assignments they will progressively develop material about the film that situates it within its historical, industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Russian Documentary FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5030Semester 25YesNo

Russian Documentary Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: FLM6030, RUS5030, RUS6030
Prerequisite: None

Description: You will examine the ways in which documentary film has been used in Russia both to record life and to shape it. You will trace the use of documentary film to trace and interpret revolution and industrialisation in the 1920s and 1930s, World War Two, the disintegration of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet life, paying particular attention to how filmmakers from Vertov to Sokurov have exploited the genre's formal possibilities: framing, editing, various aspects of sound, including music, voice-over commentary, noises, and the interview.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Brazilian Cinema: The Social TraditionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5034Semester 15YesNo

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: POR5034
Prerequisite: None

Description: Why would a Brazilian director depict not the guerrilla Che Guevara but the young doctor developing his social awareness? Walter Salles's Motorcycle Diaries will set the tone for the discussion of Brazil's emphasis on the social agenda as its major contribution to world cinema. This course will approach the evolution of this genre, beginning with Cinema Novo, the shift towards the commercial film (Pixote, Central Station), the development of a new aesthetics (City of God) and of recent radical experimentations such as prisoners and favela (shantytown) inhabitants making their own film. Discussions will include the tensions between aesthetics and ethics, the achievement of the commercial film and of the documentary as social action, and film as a tool for the empowerment of the marginalized.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Memories of the Holocaust and Colonialism in French CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM508Semester 15YesNo

Memories of the Holocaust and Colonialism in French Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores how memories of the Holocaust and colonial crimes - two of the most extreme instances of violence in modern history - have circulated and sometimes overlapped in French-language cinema, including landmark films such as Alain Resnais's Night and Fog, Chris Marker's The Pier, Claude Lanzmann's Shoah and Michael Haneke's Hidden. It investigates the capacity of cinema to act as witness to atrocity, to mediate testimony, to model psychic trauma and repression, to challenge myths about the national past, and to probe the connections between seemingly disparate types of violence. Students will also gain an understanding of critical debates about these issues in French and wider contexts. All films will be available in subtitled versions and all key reading will be in English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200Full year4YesYes

French I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE411
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to consider the role of their discipline in diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200ASemester 14YesNo

French I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE411
Prerequisite: None

Description: Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French FoundationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4201Full year4YesYes

French Foundations

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Edward Hughes
Overlap: FRE468
Prerequisite: A-Level French or equivalent

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate connections between different theoretical perspectives within your discipline.

Description: This is a two-semester module designed to offer an introduction to various aspects of French studies. These include ideas/philosophy, linguistics, literature, visual culture, and political and cultural issues. Each year, four of the aspects listed above will be studied in half-semester blocks, with teaching consisting of a combination of lectures and seminars. The module aims to enable you to develop a broad understanding of (i) French texts, both verbal and visual, in their context, and (ii) socio-cultural and linguistic topics, and to develop your linguistic proficiency in written and spoken French. You will also acquire skills in analysing the texts and topics studied, as well as more general skills in presentation and communication; these will be of value to you not only within the academic institution but also in your future career. In addition, the module will help you get to know a number of members of staff of the French department, and to find out more about your own interests and strengths so that you can build on these in future years of study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Art in France: Manet to Early PicassoLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5003Semester 15YesNo

Art in France: Manet to Early Picasso

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: COM5003
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores early modernist painting in France from Manet to the beginnings of Cubism. It focuses mainly on the works of Manet (from his Déjeuner sur l'herbe 1863), Monet, Morisot, Gauguin, Cézanne, and Picasso's early paintings (including Les Demoiselles d¿Avignon, 1906-7). Paintings will be discussed both as an aesthetic and a social practice. Topics studied include: the spectacle of the modern city, gender and representation, the dialogue between art and literature, the influence of non-European art forms, realism v modernism. No prior knowledge of art history is needed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, NarrativesLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5020Semester 15YesNo

Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, Narratives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Armstrong
Overlap: COM5020
Prerequisite: FRE4201 or equivalent

Description: Belgium provides an ideal setting for comparative approaches to literature. Uniquely in the UK, this module explores the work of both French- and Dutch-speaking Belgian authors. It focuses on the treatment of identity in novels, short stories, and comics written between the mid-19th and the late 20th centuries. You will study French texts in the original language, and Dutch texts in translation. Topics covered include war and colonialism; space and place; language; Catholicism; and identity as performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Translation into FrenchLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5200Semester 25NoNo

Translation into French

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE4203
Prerequisite: FRE4200 or equivalent

Description: The module provides an introduction to translation into French. Through weekly translation exercises based both on sentences and on texts, students will learn to think systematically about language structure and language use in French (and English), and acquire a more in-depth understanding of register, style, idioms and cultural specificity, and the ways in which arguments are constructed. The module is not available to Erasmus students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Language and Society in the French-Speaking WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6200Semester 16YesYes

Language and Society in the French-Speaking World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Leigh Oakes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE468 / FRE4201 or LIN4200, plus knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL level B1+

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to how they can help to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.Students will be able to model a holistic approach to knowledge which draws on a range of appropriate disciplines.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module focuses on questions of language and society in the French-speaking world, both from the macro and micro sociolinguistic perspectives. Topics include: the emergence of French as the national (standard) language of France; the expansion of French abroad and the notion of la Francophonie; so-called language policy and planning, including policies towards other (minority/regional) languages spoken in France; varieties of French spoken in regional areas and in other countries (e.g. Canada); French-based creoles (e.g. Mauritian Creole); and social and stylistic variation in French according to factors such as age, register and social class.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSLF_456_S
Past Environmental ChangeGeographyGEG5229Semester 25NoYes

Past Environmental Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take GEG4209

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.

Description: This module investigates the nature and causes of the major climatic fluctuations of the last 2.5 million years at global to local scales and from million year to decadal timescales. The module explores the varied records of past environmental change, the evidence used to reconstruct and understand past environments and the response of the terrestrial, ocean and ice sheet systems and biota - including humans - to climate change. It integrates perspectives from different disciplines such as sedimentology, palaeontology, oceanography and archaeology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Research Project by Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6211Full year6NoNo

Research Project by Film Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood
Overlap: Students are not normally permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: FLM403

Description: Working individually or in small collaborative groups (by arrangement), students will devise, develop, plan and complete a dissertation by film practice. Research activity will be conducted in close consultation with allocated supervisors and through a process of drafting & revision. The form of the film practice can be either: documentary, cinematic essay, expanded cinema, artists¿ moving image, fiction, experimental fiction, or a combination of these.
Students are asked to locate their proposed film within an existing field of practice. How will the film respond to, criticize, challenge, or contribute to that field? Students are asked to consider all aspects of their filmmaking as driven by research aims, methods, processes, and, where applicable, questions. Filmmaking will follow specific research lines of activity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Film PhilosophyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7020Semester 17NoNo

Film Philosophy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucy Bolton
Overlap: FLM6020, FLM6204
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores the relationship between film and philosophy by examining how films raise philosophical questions. We will learn what philosophers have to say about cinema, and how filmmakers incorporate philosophical perspectives, but we will also explore how films can inform the ways we think about ourselves and understand the world around us. From how we experience cinema in our minds and bodies, to what scares us and how we assess right and wrong, this course will address the question of how films `do¿ philosophy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Forms of Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7038Semester 17NoNo

Forms of Film Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood
Overlap: FLM6038
Prerequisite: None

Description: Mainstream narrative cinema has always benefitted from the formal innovations taking place at the margins of film practice. The formal, aesthetic and technical experiments conducted by the avant-garde were soon appropriated by the commercial film industry. Risks taken in the documentary field have led to new attitudes towards truth and actuality. This module focuses on what forms film practice can take beyond fiction and storytelling. The module aims to broaden the students' skills-base by focusing on documentary filmmaking and artists' moving image, encouraging formal experimentation and an active critique of the ways in which mainstream cinema and conventional televisual formats construct meanings and representations.

The module covers a range of practices, production procedures, technologies and techniques for concept development, and is structured to develop creative thinking, collaboration, crew dynamics and practical abilities. It is designed to ground the student in appropriate research and development methods along with practical and aesthetic skills to produce a short documentary or experimental film. Students choose from two short film project options: either a documentary portrait of a person, place or event, or a film that engages with process, concept and aesthetics, rather than with explicitly narrative content. In parallel, students produce an essay consisting of a close reading of a filmmaker or filmmakers working in a mode that relates to their short film production.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Montage Across the Arts: Aesthetics, Modernity, PoliticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7042Semester 27NoNo

Montage Across the Arts: Aesthetics, Modernity, Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mario Slugan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module starts off by investigating whether montage appears as a general artistic principle across the arts approximately at the same time or whether we can identify a single art medium as its birthplace. Drawing on pinnacles of modernist art including futurist and dada collages and photomontages, film city symphonies, and city novels the module will analyze stylistic, narratological, and perceptual aspects of montage in different media and their relations to broader cultural formations such as urban modernity and radical politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 75.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Geographical Research in PracticeGeographyGEG5103BSemester 25NoYes

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester B, students attend weekly tutorials that introduce key qualitative research techniques, research design, and common approaches to secondary data used in the discipline. In consultation with their tutor, students conduct a literature review around a research problem of interest and then design a proposal for an independent piece of geographical research intended to evaluate this problem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
History of Political ThoughtHistoryHST5614Full year5YesNo

History of Political Thought

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Georgios Varouxakis

Description: How has the meaning of `democracy¿ changed over the centuries? Where did the language of rights come from? How have slavery and empire been justified - and criticised? Beginning with some of the earliest examples of political theorising in the ancient world, and ending in the twentieth century, this module introduces students to some of the most important thinkers and debates in the history of political thought. Individual thinkers and major texts will be discussed each week, together with major debates and issues. Students will look at arguments and controversies as they unfolded in different historical circumstances, becoming familiar with the concepts, problems, and debates that have shaped political thought. They will acquire a solid grounding in the development of, and differences among, the various philosophical and ideological traditions that have shaped modern politics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
Level: 5
Colonial Lives and AfterlivesGeographyGEG5142Semester 15YesNo

Colonial Lives and Afterlives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff

Description: This module will encourage students to explore the continuing impact in the present of the long history and broad geography of empire and colonization. Via attention to both the historical geographies of empire (including the histories of slavery and of settler colonialism) and current social, cultural and political issues, the module will demonstrate how questions of race and power structure imperial lives and afterlives. By considering how the past is not dead, students will develop skills in historical geography and critical interpretation and understand how they can be applied for social change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GeographyGEG5144Semester 25YesNo

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5223

Description: This module provides an introduction to the basic principles of GIS and their application in modelling geographical realities. It is practically based and a requirement of the module is to become proficient in the operation and use of the GIS software - ArcGIS. The main components of the module include defining the key elements of a GIS, basic cartographic principles, elementary database management, error and data quality issues, statistical analysis of spatial data, and presentation and outputs from GIS.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Environmental Research MethodsGeographyGEG5212Semester 15NoYes

Environmental Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5213 and ( take GEG5214 or take GEG5214B )

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: This module provides training in key research methods for physical geography and environmental science, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. The training will focus on developing field techniques but will also include practice in laboratory techniques, data analysis and interpretation, and develop reporting skills. The module will be delivered through a residential field course, supported by lectures and workshops. With GEG5214 Research Design and GEG5213 Advanced Environmental Research Methods, it provides a foundation for Level 6 independent research projects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
An Independent Geographical StudyGeographyGEG6000Full year6NoYes

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis

QMUL Model Available to: Selected students in the School of Geography at Level 6

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.

Description: As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesGEG_6_S
Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and SocietyGeographyGEG6006Semester 26NoNo

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG6134

Description: The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module will allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society module by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geography, Technology and Society sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG4002Full year4NoNo

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor

Description: This module aids the transition to university by developing basic learning skills including reading and essay-writing as well as field observation and recording, through lectures and small-group tutorial work. In the Green London Project students explore urban environmental management in London, developing their social capital by working in small groups, becoming part of the community of geographers and environmental scientists at QMUL and learning how research, including "citizen science", can impact on organisations that are managing green spaces in London.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 55.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Geography in the WorldGeographyGEG4003Semester 14NoNo

Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash

Description: This module focuses on academic geography and the application of geographical knowledge and skills by academic geographers and students in their future careers. It provides an understanding of academic geography as engaged with the world and situated within wider society. We address key geographical practices, explore the relevance and application of academic geography, and consider new developments in citizen science and activist, participatory and public geography. The module includes a field trip to the Royal Geographical Society and employability lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental ScientistsGeographyGEG4004Full year4NoNo

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos

Description: This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Environmental PollutionGeographyGEG6226Semester 26NoNo

Environmental Pollution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell

Description: The module introduces students to the sources, pathways and effects of a range of inorganic and organic pollutants in soils, sediments and aquatic environments. It will address current methods of pollution control, focusing on risk-based methods of pollution management and appropriate management strategies for different pollutant types. Developing a process-based understanding of contaminant cycles through the catchment-coast continuum, students will learn how to apply this to environmental management scenarios using case study material. The module includes a one-day site or field visit.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Future CoastsGeographyGEG6228Semester 26NoNo

Future Coasts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer

Description: This module features a residential fieldtrip to the delta cities (e.g. Rotterdam) and coasts of NW Europe which are highly populated, low-lying and at risk from sea level rise, storm surges and flooding. It will introduce students to coastal threats associated with climate change and develop understanding of key coastal processes. Restoration and management schemes will be explored to understand how cities and coasts can adapt to and mitigate climate change impacts. Students are required to pay for the cost of the fieldtrip (a subsidy may be available).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Volcanoes, Climate Change and SocietyGeographyGEG6229Semester 26YesNo

Volcanoes, Climate Change and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Dept Of Geography

Description: Volcanic eruptions can influence earth systems on a number of scales, from individual landforms to landscape development and global climatic change. Volcanic hazards can have global-scale social impacts and directly threaten the approximately 800 million people that live within 100 km of an active volcano. This module will provide students with knowledge about volcanic environments, the hazards they pose on many scales and potential benefits to societies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Volcanoes, Climate Change and SocietyGeographyGEG6229PSemester 26YesNo

Volcanoes, Climate Change and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rhys Timms

Description: Volcanic eruptions can influence earth systems on a number of scales, from individual landforms to landscape development and global climatic change. Volcanic hazards can have global-scale social impacts and directly threaten the approximately 800 million people that live within 100 km of an active volcano. This module will provide students with knowledge about volcanic environments, the hazards they pose on many scales and potential benefits to societies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Queer Theory and Contemporary FictionEnglish and DramaESH7057Semester 27NoNo

Queer Theory and Contemporary Fiction

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sam Mcbean

Description: This module will offer an opportunity to study key thinkers and debates in the field of queer theory, while also exploring how sexuality is narrated in contemporary culture. The module will be grounded in theoretical material but alongside this theoretical grounding, the module will consider a number of literary and visual cultural texts. Throughout, we will consider the relationship between cultural texts, politics, and theory, asking: What kind of object is sex and sexuality? What is 'queer' about queer theory? How is queerness narrated in contemporary literature and cultural texts? The module will be structured as four blocks: 'Gender Trouble', 'Queer Temporalities/Queer Histories', 'Queer Affect', and 'Queer Liberalism?'. Beginning with foundational texts by Eve Sedgwick and Judith Butler, we will cover topics including queer performativity, female masculinity, queer history, queer affect, homonormativity and homonationalism, queer intersectionality, and trans* theory. This module offers an opportunity to engage in debates central to queer theory, while also develop skills in literary and cultural analysis of contemporary fictions of sexuality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Romanticism and GenreEnglish and DramaESH7061Semester 27NoNo

Romanticism and Genre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof David Duff

Description: Studying a wide range of texts from 1760 to 1830, this module examines the formal innovations of Romantic literature but also the fascination with archaic genres such as ballad, epic and national song, whose revival and transformation made Romanticism a 'retro' movement as well as a revolutionary one. The module analyses Romantic theories of genre alongside historical examples, while investigating too the 'poetics of the book': the publishing processes and paratextual practices through which experiments with form and format took concrete shape.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Kingdoms, Empires, and Colonisation in African HistoryHistoryHST5610BSemester 25YesNo

Kingdoms, Empires, and Colonisation in African History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Reuben Loffman

Description: This module considers the construction and contestation of power relations in modern African history. It does so thematically and chronologically in a manner that is at once accessible and challenging. The module is arranged in four sections. The first deals with African history up to 1885 and covers key themes and case studies like the emergence of African empires and kingdoms and the impact of slavery. The second section, dealing with the period 1885-1920, considers key aspects of the European occupation of Africa and the European/African colonial encounter, including cultural imperialism and primary resistance. The third part is devoted to the study of inter-war Africa, focussing on issues such as the entrenchment of direct and indirect colonial rule, as well as `soft' power in the form of missionaries and schooling. The final section deals with the experience of global conflict in Africa, the rise of modern African nationalist movements, modernity, decolonisation and independence. The module is designed to cater to the interests of students who are interested in African, imperial, and global history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
British Cinema from the 1960's New Wave to the Arrival of Channel 4Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM307Semester 26YesNo

British Cinema from the 1960's New Wave to the Arrival of Channel 4

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines the hybrid and diverse nature of the British cinema from the New Wave of the early 1960s to the collapse of Goldcrest in 1987.The module will explore two key themes in the British cinema's long quest for a sustainable model of film-making: the tensions between the indigenous and the international; and the recurring pattern of boom and bust in British production. Topics covered include: the emergence of the New Wave and the Swinging London films of the 1960s; the relationship between British cinema and Hollywood; the British film renaissance of the early 1980s; state of the nation cinema in the Thatcher era; the advent of Channel 4; British auteur film-makers (Peter Greenaway, Derek Jarman, Terence Davies, Bill Douglas); and British genre from horror to heritage.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
British Cinema from the 1960's New Wave to the Arrival of Channel 4Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM307PSemester 27NoNo

British Cinema from the 1960's New Wave to the Arrival of Channel 4

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines the hybrid and diverse nature of the British cinema from the New Wave of the early 1960s to the collapse of Goldcrest in 1987.The module will explore two key themes in the British cinema's long quest for a sustainable model of film-making: the tensions between the indigenous and the international; and the recurring pattern of boom and bust in British production. Topics covered include: the emergence of the New Wave and the Swinging London films of the 1960s; the relationship between British cinema and Hollywood; the British film renaissance of the early 1980s; state of the nation cinema in the Thatcher era; the advent of Channel 4; British auteur film-makers (Peter Greenaway, Derek Jarman, Terence Davies, Bill Douglas); and British genre from horror to heritage.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Production SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM403Semester 24NoNo

Production Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Eugene Doyen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Film Studies single hons only

Description: A foundation in the technical, teamwork and planning skills required for production. The technical skills covered will include camera, lighting, sound and editing. The production skills will include shooting continuity footage, crewing and scheduling. The module will introduce you to the development of the continuity system from early cinema to the present day. You will be encouraged to reflect and evaluate your practice in relation to your teamwork, planning and production skills. The module will include formative assessments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Historical Geographies of Childhood and Youth 1800-presentGeographyGEG6143Semester 26YesNo

Historical Geographies of Childhood and Youth 1800-present

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claudia Soares

Description: This is an exciting, interdisciplinary module that explores key themes and issues that enable us to understand childhood and children's everyday lives in the context of social, cultural, political and environmental change over time, in the UK and on a global level. Engaging with the subdisciplines of historical geography and children's geographies, the module makes a case for the use of age as an important category of analysis in understanding individuals' engagement and participation in society and culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Latin American Debates: the politics of development and democratisationGeographyGEG6144Semester 26YesNo

Latin American Debates: the politics of development and democratisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Samuel Halvorsen

Description: Latin America has provided one of the most dynamic and exciting regions for debating paths of development and democratisation, two processes that have been widely disputed since the region emerged from the shadows of military governments in the early 1980s. This module examines the wealth of knowledges and the key fault lines that have emerged within and about the region since the 1980s, paying particular attention to the period of the so-called left turn (1998-2015).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Mapping Contemporary CinemasLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM603Semester 16NoNo

Mapping Contemporary Cinemas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guy Westwell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Running as a pilot in 2010-11, this new module is designed around a student-run editorial process that identifies, edits and develops work from other research- and contemporary cinema-based undergraduate modules in order for the best of that work to be published in a yearly edited collection and on a dedicated website. Students will also write editorials identifying key trends and issues in contemporary cinema, with a focus on the intersection of national and transnational trends. This module will be of interest to students who might be considering a career in academia, publishing, film journalism and so on. Numbers are capped at twelve and students considering taking this module must have confidence in their writing abilities, a strong 2:1 average, and will be askd to attend a short interview. It is also advised that they take either FLM308 Contemporary Hollywood Cinema or FLM302 Reading German Film 3: Contemporary German Cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Russian Documentary FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6030Semester 26YesNo

Russian Documentary Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: FLM5030, RUS5030, RUS6030
Prerequisite: None

Description: You will examine the ways in which documentary film has been used in Russia both to record life and to shape it. You will trace the use of documentary film to trace and interpret revolution and industrialisation in the 1920s and 1930s, World War Two, the disintegration of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet life, paying particular attention to how filmmakers from Vertov to Sokurov have exploited the genre's formal possibilities: framing, editing, various aspects of sound, including music, voice-over commentary, noises, and the interview.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving ImageLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM609Semester 26YesNo

Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving Image

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM5203 or equivalent

Description: Ecocinemas is a single-semester level 6 module focusing on the intersections between cinema and the natural world. The module explores film's embeddedness in the physical world from a number of perspectives: film as an environmental practice in its own right, as a vehicle for exploring the relationship between the human and the nonhuman world, and as a more-than-human projection. The module covers a diverse range of themes: the key role of nonhuman animals and the natural world in the development of the cinematic medium, the representation of animals and nature in film, cinema's environmental footprint, and film as an ecological advocacy tool.

The first part of the module looks at the history and theory of the visual representation of nature and animals, from pre-cinematic forms such as cave paintings, to photographic studies of animal locomotion and early scientific cinema. The subsequent blocks introduce students to the principal strands of eco-criticism and ecocinema via a variety of case studies, including the wildlife film, environmental and animal advocacy documentaries, and fictional representations of animals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving ImageLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM609PSemester 27NoNo

Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving Image

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Ecocinemas is a single-semester level 6 module focusing on the intersections between cinema and the natural world. The module explores film's embeddedness in the physical world from a number of perspectives: film as an environmental practice in its own right, as a vehicle for exploring the relationship between the human and the nonhuman world, and as a more-than-human projection. The module covers a diverse range of themes: the key role of nonhuman animals and the natural world in the development of the cinematic medium, the representation of animals and nature in film, cinema's environmental footprint, and film as an ecological advocacy tool.

The first part of the module looks at the history and theory of the visual representation of nature and animals, from pre-cinematic forms such as cave paintings, to photographic studies of animal locomotion and early scientific cinema. The subsequent blocks introduce students to the principal strands of eco-criticism and ecocinema via a variety of case studies, including the wildlife film, environmental and animal advocacy documentaries, and fictional representations of animals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6206Semester 16YesYes

Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Pate
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to analyse the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts upon aspects of their discipline.

Description: This module examines the Japanese yakuza-eiga (gangster film) in terms of its narrative form and ideological functions, including socio-political commentary on Japanese society from the 1930s to the present day. We will look at the work of such filmmakers as Ozu, Kurosawa, Suzuki, Fukasaku, Kitano and Miike to explore a range of issues, including the post-war occupation and 'democratisation' of Japan, its rapid industrialisation and the 'economic miracle', the mass migration from rural to urban areas and its social consequences, and the disengagement of large sections of society from the political, bureaucratic and business elite which runs the country. Students will also discuss such concepts as 'giri' (duty), 'ninjo' (honour) and 'jingi' (code) as facets of both the yakuza and national myth, and explore the themes of loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice, and the clash of traditional values with modernity. Finally, the module will consider the relationship between the Japanese and Hollywood gangster traditions through an examination of hybrid films which comment on the clash of codes and cultures.

Students will attend a weekly lecture and seminar; in addition there will be a scheduled screening of each week's main film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL
Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6206PSemester 17NoNo

Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Pate
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module examines the Japanese yakuza-eiga (gangster film) in terms of its narrative form and ideological functions, including socio-political commentary on Japanese society from the 1930s to the present day. We will look at the work of such filmmakers as Ozu, Kurosawa, Suzuki, Fukasaku, Kitano and Miike to explore a range of issues, including the post-war occupation and 'democratisation' of Japan, its rapid industrialisation and the 'economic miracle', the mass migration from rural to urban areas and its social consequences, and the disengagement of large sections of society from the political, bureaucratic and business elite which runs the country. Students will also discuss such concepts as 'giri' (duty), 'ninjo' (honour) and 'jingi' (code) as facets of both the yakuza and national myth, and explore the themes of loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice, and the clash of traditional values with modernity. Finally, the module will consider the relationship between the Japanese and Hollywood gangster traditions through an examination of hybrid films which comment on the clash of codes and cultures.

Students will attend a weekly lecture and seminar; in addition there will be a scheduled screening of each week's main film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 85.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Women's CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM510Semester 25YesNo

Women's Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucy Bolton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Women's Cinema' examines the specific issues raised by women's relationship with major aspects of cinema: authorship, production, performance, spectatorship, representation and criticism. The module will engage with the work of significant female filmmakers from Dorothy Arzner to Andrea Arnold, as well as exploring the ways in which film studies has approached the issues raised by the concept of 'women's cinema' and women's relationship to film. Examining the project of feminist film theory in the 1970s and 1980s, and the development of queer and post-colonial approaches to female spectatorship, this module will trace the development of feminist film studies from Molly Haskell to Alison Butler and look at filmmaking by women in a range of national and industrial contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Contemporary World CinemasLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5202Semester 15YesNo

Contemporary World Cinemas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ashvin Devasundaram
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module provides a diverse cinematic palette, focussing on films, filmmaking formulations and new aspects of non-Anglophone cinemas from regions outside Europe and America. Module sessions will cover multifaceted aspects of cinema creation, burgeoning film movements and industry dynamics whilst also studying established and emerging filmmakers. The broad geographic stretch will be combined with a specific focus on the current cinematic terrain of countries including Chile, Argentina, Senegal and South Africa. The module also investigates recent and ongoing transformations, such as the magnified visibility of female filmmakers from the Middle East and the rise of new Indian Indie cinema as a competitor to Bollywood.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM5203Full year5YesNo

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: FLM003, FLM5203A, FLM5203B
Prerequisite: FLM4200 or equivalent

Description: This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
French FoundationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4201AFull year4YesNo

French Foundations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Edward Hughes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-Level French or equivalent

Description: This is a module designed to offer an introduction to various aspects of French studies. These include ideas/philosophy, linguistics, literature, visual culture, and political and cultural issues. Each year, four of the aspects listed above will be studied in half-semester blocks, with teaching consisting of a combination of lectures and seminars. The module aims to enable you to develop a broad understanding of (i) French texts, both verbal and visual, in their context, and (ii) socio-cultural and linguistic topics, and to develop your linguistic proficiency in written and spoken French. You will also acquire skills in analysing the texts and topics studied, as well as more general skills in presentation and communication; these will be of value to you not only within the academic institution but also in your future career. In addition, the module will help you get to know a number of members of staff of the French department, and to find out more about your own interests and strengths so that you can build on these in future years of study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
French FoundationsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4201BFull year4YesNo

French Foundations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Edward Hughes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-Level French or equivalent

Description: This is a module designed to offer an introduction to various aspects of French studies. These include ideas/philosophy, linguistics, literature, visual culture, and political and cultural issues. Each year, four of the aspects listed above will be studied in half-semester blocks, with teaching consisting of a combination of lectures and seminars. The module aims to enable you to develop a broad understanding of (i) French texts, both verbal and visual, in their context, and (ii) socio-cultural and linguistic topics, and to develop your linguistic proficiency in written and spoken French. You will also acquire skills in analysing the texts and topics studied, as well as more general skills in presentation and communication; these will be of value to you not only within the academic institution but also in your future career. In addition, the module will help you get to know a number of members of staff of the French department, and to find out more about your own interests and strengths so that you can build on these in future years of study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
The Sounds of FrenchLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5201Semester 25YesYes

The Sounds of French

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Leigh Oakes
Overlap: FRE055
Prerequisite: FRE4201 AND FRE4200 or knowledge of French equivalent to at least CEFRL level B1

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.

Description: This module provides a foundation in the phonetics and phonology of the French language. Topics include: the relationship between spelling and pronunciation; the production of speech sounds in French (articulatory phonetics); processes such as liaison, elision and assimilation (phonology); and the functioning of stress, rhythm and intonation in French (prosody). You will also learn to transcribe utterances in French using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Providing you with a critical awareness of the sound structure of French, the module greatly enhances the knowledge and skills required for communication in French, supporting your ability to network effectively.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 25.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
NetworkingSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL_SLF
French IILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5202Full year5YesYes

French II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE239
Prerequisite: FRE4200 a knowledge of French equivalent to Level B1 CEFRL

QMUL Model Available to: All students in HSS

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate and demonstrate evidence of their skills to support networking and how these have influenced their practice, their subject discipline and their career aspirations.
  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.
  • Students will be able to reflect on socio-cultural values and skills within diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module develops French grammar, comprehension, oral, aural and analytical skills, with an emphasis on the appropriate use of register in both spoken and written French and preparation for the Year Abroad.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 40.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_POL_SLF
French IILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5202ASemester 15YesNo

French II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE239
Prerequisite: FRE4200 a knowledge of French equivalent to Level B1+ CEFRL

Description: This module develops French grammar, comprehension, oral, aural and analytical skills, with an emphasis on the appropriate use of register in both spoken and written French and preparation for the Year Abroad.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6202Full year6YesYes

French III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

QMUL Model Available to: All students

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is compulsory for final-year students of French, and provides advanced training in comprehension, composition, textual analysis and two-way translation as well as developing a high level of competence in written and oral French. Students are trained in the management of formal discussion in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 20.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 4: 20.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH
French IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6202ASemester 16YesYes

French III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Networking
  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
  • International perspectives

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to apply a critically reflective approach to how they have developed their subject, work-based and generic skills to support networking.
  • Students will be able to apply a critically analytical approach to an appropriate range of multi-disciplinary and/or inter-disciplinary approaches.
  • Students will be able to apply subject, work-based and general life skills in multi-cultural and global environments.Students will be able to demonstrate evidence of a personal ethic which is informed by a critical awareness of diverse cultural and global contexts.

Description: This module is compulsory for final-year students of French, and provides advanced training in comprehension, composition, textual analysis and two-way translation as well as developing a high level of competence in written and oral French. Students are trained in the management of formal discussion in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives
French IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6202BSemester 26YesNo

French III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE6202
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent knowledge of French

Description: This module is compulsory for final-year students of French, and provides advanced training in comprehension, composition, textual analysis and two-way translation as well as developing a high level of competence in written and oral French. Students are trained in the management of formal discussion in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 25.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the MuseumLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7045Semester 27NoNo

Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the Museum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module explores the relationships of cinema (as an institution, as a space, and as a concept) to the institutional, spatial and conceptual contexts of the museum. The museum has in recent years become a respository for film as a museum object in its own right; however, film has haunted the corridors of museums since its earliest invention. In this module, we explore the connections and disconnections between cinematic and museal spaces, using theoretical concepts of immersion, spatial dynamics, the archive, exhibition and curatorial theory to make sense of the plurality of film and the moving image in museums, and indeed the 'museum' in the moving image. Making use of London as an ideal base for interrogating some of these encounters between cinema, the moving image, and museums, the module will also explore the interventions of film across other disciplines, including Art History, Museology, Anthropology and the Digital Humanities. We will explore both actual and virtual museums, through a range of film material from Europe, North America, the Middle East, drawing upon concepts such as 'film as a virtual museum', 'cinematic exhibition practices', 'film as museology', and 'the ethics of ethnographic film'.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Final ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7200Full year7NoNo

Final Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Steven Eastwood
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Launching in semester two of your programme and running the course of the summer, the Final Project module guides you to deepen your research skills and realise an ambitious, high-production, festivals-ready documentary film drawing on the methods and modes given attention to over the duration of the MA. The documentary film production is supported by a research portfolio and an academic essay in giving detailed and theoretically informed context to the topic and the form of the film produced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Documentary Film - Theory and PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7201Semester 17NoNo

Documentary Film - Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Documentary in its simplest of forms is a recording of an act. The film camera is first and foremost a recording instrument, whether it captures 'life caught unawares' or a fictional scenario. This module examines the history of 'non-fiction' filmmaking in the 20th and 21 st century through the understanding of documentary styles and genre. Political, social, ethical and historical issues will be addressed through the engagement of theory and practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American CityGeographyGEG5125Semester 25NoNo

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens

Description: Boston is a city that has undergone a series of dramatic transformations over the past three centuries. From being a key site of the American Revolution's rejection of British colonial rule, to the mass migration of Irish, Black American and other groups to the city in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, through to more recent processes of economic decline and reinvention as a hub of biotechnology, it is a city that has been at the forefront of American political, economic and social change. This module focuses on the changing historical geographies of Boston from the colonial period to the present day examining key processes which have shaped the city. Teaching and learning begins in the classroom through a series of lectures and workshops examining aspects of the city's historical geography and the sources used to study them, and planning group-based project work. It culminates in a week-long field course in Boston at the end of the semester. Work in Boston involves visiting museums, walking heritage trails, exploring localities and neighborhoods and meeting with researchers, experts and heritage practitioners in order to complete group projects. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Cultural GeographiesGeographyGEG5126Semester 25YesYes

Cultural Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.

Description: This module provides an introduction to the field of cultural geography. It draws on examples both historical and contemporary, in the UK and beyond, to demonstrate how spaces, places and landscapes are laden with meaning. It shows that culture is not something that is fixed, but rather constructed through relations with different people, places, ideas, objects and practices. The module therefore helps student understand and interpret matters of culture critically, with careful attention to plurality, complexity and power. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: an introduction to cultural geography; landscape: meaning, power and identity; interpreting cultural representations; more-than-representational geographies; geographies of embodiment and mobility; cultural geographies of food; emerging cultural landscapes and politics; tensions and new directions in cultural geography.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Advanced Environmental Research SkillsGeographyGEG5213Semester 25NoNo

Advanced Environmental Research Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldene Wharton
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5212 and ( take GEG5214 or take GEG5214B )

Description: This module provides further training in selected research techniques, building upon GEG5212 Environmental Research Methods. To develop the skills they need for Level 6 independent research projects, students will select from a portfolio of "short course options" providing opportunities to learn and practice laboratory and field methods, based on research strengths within the School of Geography. Delivery is tailored to the specific needs of each short course and will typically involve small-group laboratory, computing and/or local fieldwork.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Research DesignGeographyGEG5214Full year5NoNo

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuditta Trinci
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5214B
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5212 and take GEG5213

Description: This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Research DesignGeographyGEG5214BSemester 25NoNo

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5214
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG4004
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take GEG5213

Description: This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Performance LabEnglish and DramaDRA7004Semester 17NoNo

Performance Lab

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin O'Brien

Description: This module is a studio-based research laboratory that focuses on and experiments with performance process. In tandem with these practical activities students formulate creative strategies for documenting and disseminating process. Through weekly workshops the group will be introduced to a range of performance-making approaches, tools and techniques, and will be encouraged to devise their own methodologies for creating performance languages. Each student raises a series of research thematics that are explored through practical group experiments, individual development of performative prototypes, critical analysis, evaluative writing and collaborative dialogue and feedback sessions. The module leads towards a Performance Lab Research Event where students present the practical and process-based outcomes of their research investigations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Independent Written ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA7005Semester 27NoNo

Independent Written Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Dominic Johnson

Description: "This module provides students with the opportunity to design and produce an independent written project under the supervision of a member of staff. This module enables students to work independently on topics not provided within existing modules, subject to the availability of a suitable supervisor. Entry on to the module is at the discretion of the module convenor and prospective students are required to submit a 300-word abstract outlining their proposed topic by Week 10 of Semester 1. Student should consult with a member of staff (ideally their proposed supervisor) in the module of preparing their abstract. Students will be notified by Week 12 of Semester 1 whether they have been accepted on to the module. This module may only be taken by students enrolled on the MA Theatre and Performance."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Theatre and Performance TheoryEnglish and DramaDRA7006Semester 27NoNo

Theatre and Performance Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

Description: "This module examines theoretical texts and ideas that have shaped our contemporary understanding of performance, theatre and culture. It offers a distinctive, performance-oriented route into looking at some work of wider theoretical, philosophical, and political importance. It aims to provide students with a diverse range of theoretical and historical starting points from which to consider the study of theatre and performance. It also offers students an historical frame of reference through which to situate the practice and study of theatre and performance in relation to other disciplines and social practices, and to submit the concept of performance and performance studies to critical and historical scrutiny."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
People and the EnvironmentGeographyGEG4005Semester 14NoNo

People and the Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines

Description: This module provides an introduction to key environmental issues from scientific, economic, social and cultural perspectives. The module encourages an appreciation of the complex and multifactoral nature of environmental problems; students will gain an understanding of the main global environmental systems and how these impact on and are impacted by human activity. They will also gain an appreciation of the range of approaches within geography that can be employed to study the relationship between people and their environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Cities and Regions in TransitionGeographyGEG4006Semester 24NoNo

Cities and Regions in Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joe Penny

Description: Cities and Regions in Transition will enable BA Human Geography students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of contemporary change in the UK. Key themes to be addressed in seminar discussion include neo-liberalism, the North-South divide, culture-led urban regeneration, urban heritage and identity, migration and urban health. Students will be assessed via (i) a learning log to demonstrate their critical engagement with reading in preparation for the seminars and (ii) an additional essay to be completed after the fieldtrip on GEG4106.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Advanced Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG6230Semester 16NoNo

Advanced Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Grieve
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG5144 or take GEG5223 or take GEG5102

Description: The analysis of geospatial data is the cornerstone of much physical geography and environmental science research. Building upon the knowledge acquired in GEG5223 students will be taught through a range of lectures and computer based practicals. Material covered will highlight recent developments from across the discipline, demonstrating the use of cutting edge Geographical Information Systems to solve problems from a range of physical geography and environmental science sub-disciplines. Time will also be devoted to the effective visualisation of geospatial data and analysis outputs, equipping students with key skills required in the workplace or for further study .

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Advanced Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG6230PSemester 16NoNo

Advanced Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Grieve

Description: The analysis of geospatial data is the cornerstone of much physical geography and environmental science research. Building upon the knowledge acquired in GEG5223 students will be taught through a range of lectures and computer based practicals. Material covered will highlight recent developments from across the discipline, demonstrating the use of cutting edge Geographical Information Systems to solve problems from a range of physical geography and environmental science sub-disciplines. Time will also be devoted to the effective visualisation of geospatial data and analysis outputs, equipping students with key skills required in the workplace or for further study .

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 45.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Nature-based Climate SolutionsGeographyGEG6232Semester 26YesNo

Nature-based Climate Solutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take GEG5224

Description: To what extent can climate change be mitigated by improved stewardship of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? In this module, we examine how conservation, restoration and improved management of ecosystems can increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions. We evaluate a range of ¿natural climate solutions¿ (NCS) for their feasibility, cost-effectiveness, environmental co-benefits and climate mitigation potential. You will take an active approach to learning through participation in lectures, small-group discussions and a non-residential field trip.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Nature-based Climate SolutionsGeographyGEG6232PSemester 26YesNo

Nature-based Climate Solutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea

Description: To what extent can climate change be mitigated by improved stewardship of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? In this module, we examine how conservation, restoration and improved management of ecosystems can increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions. We evaluate a range of ¿natural climate solutions¿ (NCS) for their feasibility, cost-effectiveness, environmental co-benefits and climate mitigation potential. You will take an active approach to learning through participation in lectures, small-group discussions and a non-residential field trip.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Flood Risk Management and ModellingGeographyGEG6314Semester 16NoNo

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw

Description: This module provides students with knowledge and skills related to flood risk management. It examines the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are explained and novel management options for reducing flood risk are critically reviewed. Potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are also explored. Practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1/2D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Reading the Middle EastEnglish and DramaESH7067Semester 27NoNo

Reading the Middle East

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Gregory Fox

Description: This MA module will introduce you to key texts (in translation), and key debates, from or about the Middle East (defined broadly to include Iran, Turkey and North Africa). The module aims to ask questions about the role of race, religion, regional geo-politics, sectarian and other violence, gender and sexuality. It will allow you to explore these and other topics though some of the most interesting, iconic, or controversial writing to come from, or engage with, the region in the 20th and 21st centuries. The question of translation (literal, cultural, metaphorical) is at the centre of the module's approach to these texts. At a time when it feels as though the Middle East and its people have never been so demonised, nor so victimised, this module seeks to interrogate the work that such texts do in the university and beyond to represent, challenge representations, or 'translate' their cultures of origin, and to shed light on the many prisms through which we analyse, understand, and perceive the Middle East, its people, languages and cultures today.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
What is World Literature?English and DramaESH7069Semester 17NoNo

What is World Literature?

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Van Der Vlies

Description: This module allows students to engage with key examples of texts that might be regarded as belonging to a notional nascent 'canon' of 'World Literature', as well as those that might trouble its boundaries. 'What is World Literature?' begs other questions: has the category displaced the postcolonial as a critical term, or reinforced its purchase?; how does the term engage questions of translation, let alone aesthetics (what is `Literature'), politics (whose `world¿), and philosophy (what, after all, is a 'world')? We will read excerpts from theoretical works that have helped stake a claim for--or critiqued--the field¿s constitution in an attempt to find some answers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Economics and Finance in ActionEconomics and FinanceECN126Semester 14NoNo

Economics and Finance in Action

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guglielmo Volpe
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS005
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: The module offers you the opportunity to apply economics ideas and methods to the investigation of current economics, finance and business issues. You will be involved in the running and management of projects designed to help you acquire a good understanding of descriptive statistics as well as develop specific excel skills and more general transferable skills such as team working, research and communication skills. You will be asked to reflect on the use of alternative analytical tools as well as on different theoretical perspectives in economics and finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 10.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 4: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
Money and BankingEconomics and FinanceECN205Semester 15YesNo

Money and Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomai Filippeli
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN106 and take ECN111

Description: The aim of this module is to study the role of money in the macroeconomy, the behaviour of interest rates, banks and other intermediaries, and the regulation of both money markets and the banking system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 15.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Macroeconomics IIEconomics and FinanceECN206Semester 15YesNo

Macroeconomics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Vladislav Skovorodov
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS330
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN106 and take ECN111

Description: This module looks at three main issues: open economy macroeconomics (as a continuation of the closed economy outlook taught in Macroeconomics I), growth theory (main approaches, their conclusions, and the check of evidence), and third, the supply of the economy (aggregate supply curve and Phillips curves, issues on stabilization policy and trade offs).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
MSc by Research ProjectElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS753PFull year7NoNo

MSc by Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Ms Jane Reid

Description: MSc by Research Project

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Dissertation
Level: 7
Historical Geographies of Medicine: From Imperial Hygiene to Global HealthGeographyGEG6145Semester 16YesNo

Historical Geographies of Medicine: From Imperial Hygiene to Global Health

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module explores the relationship between medicine and projects of European imperial expansion. Focusing on the period 1750 to the present, the module examines how European encounters with unfamiliar bodies, places, and diseases led to changes in the practice of medicine as public health increasingly became a 'tool of empire'. Informed by scholarship from medical and environmental history, students learn how a geographical perspective can be used to interrogate the histories and contemporary legacies of these encounters with difference. Key topics that will be considered include: disease and environment; the emergence of racial medicine; sexuality and gender; and the colonial legacies of contemporary global health.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Kinship: Geographical PerspectivesGeographyGEG6146Semester 26YesNo

Kinship: Geographical Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash

Description: This module offers a geographical approach to critically engage with ideas of kinship ¿ of who is related to whom and how ¿ and genealogical origins for understandings of human connection and difference (including ideas of global humanity, nation, ethnicity and race). It explores the cultures and science of genealogy, including family history, genetic genealogy and genetic accounts of the histories of national or ethnic groups, and addresses efforts to reconsider how kinship can be understood and practiced, including interspecies kinship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Geographies of Forced MigrationGeographyGEG6147Semester 16YesNo

Geographies of Forced Migration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza

Description: Refugees and forced migrants are central to global, regional and national debates. This module explores the varied and complex nature of these populations as well as the diverse responses to their mobility. Students will be introduced to different theoretical and methodological approaches that will enable them to understand the geographies of forced migration. By focusing on the interplay of different scales and levels where displacement is produced, embodied, governed and contested, the module explores the various experiences of forced migrants in the UK and across the world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
The Public Life of CitiesGeographyGEG6148Semester 26NoNo

The Public Life of Cities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch

Description: Focusing on the public life of contemporary cities, this module provides an engagement with urban geography and urban studies. Students will be introduced to a range of ideas, concepts and key thinkers that help to understand and analyse urban environments. Topics and case studies draw on cities from around the globe, centring on: matters of public space and publicness; urban transformation and social innovation; government and regulation; relations between social life and urban form; and the social production of space though encounters among people, objects, infrastructures and (im)material forces. Key questions examine how people manage common problems, share resources (or not) and organise different forms of collective culture. The aim is that students become better equipped to comprehend and weigh in on the problems and potentials of an increasingly urbanised world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 6
Environmental HazardsGeographyGEG6203Semester 16YesNo

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne

Description: Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 3: 10.00% Practical
Level: 6
Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6036Semester 26YesNo

Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: POR6036
Prerequisite: None

Description: Looking at cinema as an increasingly prominent medium for the transmission of historical knowledge (Deleuze, Sorlin, Landy, etc.), this module analyzes the representation of history in African Cinema in three key moments of the continent's history. It initially focuses on Mozambique's major post-independence audio-visual initiative, headed by Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Rouch and Ruy Guerra - the National Institute of Cinema - and the role of film in nation-building. It then addresses film representations of historical trauma and the reconstruction of shattered lives in the context of Civil Wars in Mozambique and Angola, contrasting them with Sebastião Salgado¿s photographic documentation of the impact of war on African children and civilians. It also analyzes Guinea-Bissau¿s post-independence engagement in dialogue with the West through the musical, for the projection of an African identity and the tensions between tradition and modernization. It finally addresses the dearth of images of slavery in African Cinema and the way resistance to power imbalances and the communities of run-away slaves finds space on the Brazilian screen and, more recently, in tri-continental co-productions. No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. All films have subtitles in English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6036PSemester 27NoNo

Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: Looking at cinema as an increasingly prominent medium for the transmission of historical knowledge (Deleuze, Sorlin, Landy, etc.), this module analyzes the representation of history in African Cinema in three key moments of the continent's history. It initially focuses on Mozambique's major post-independence audio-visual initiative, headed by Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Rouch and Ruy Guerra - the National Institute of Cinema - and the role of film in nation-building. It then addresses film representations of historical trauma and the reconstruction of shattered lives in the context of Civil Wars in Mozambique and Angola, contrasting them with Sebastião Salgado¿s photographic documentation of the impact of war on African children and civilians. It also analyzes Guinea-Bissau¿s post-independence engagement in dialogue with the West through the musical, for the projection of an African identity and the tensions between tradition and modernization. It finally addresses the dearth of images of slavery in African Cinema and the way resistance to power imbalances and the communities of run-away slaves finds space on the Brazilian screen and, more recently, in tri-continental co-productions. No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. All films have subtitles in English.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Creative ProductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6201Semester 26NoNo

Creative Production

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A Practical Film Making Module

Description: This is an optional module open to Film Studies students with an experience in practice (Production Skills and/or Directing Drama/Directing Fiction). It offers the opportunity to develop and build on knowledge of film making developed during the first two years of the degree, and the opportunity to make one short film in any style the student wishes to explore. The film is made by a group and not an individual. The module has a mixture of group meetings and whole class lectures and workshops.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Practical
Level: 6
Creative ProductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6201PSemester 27NoNo

Creative Production

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: FLM6201
Prerequisite: A Practical Film Making Module

Description: This is an optional module open to Film Studies students with an experience in practice (Production Skills and/or Directing Drama/Directing Fiction). It offers the opportunity to develop and build on knowledge of film making developed during the first two years of the degree, and the opportunity to make one short film in any style the student wishes to explore. The film is made by a group and not an individual. The module has a mixture of group meetings and whole class lectures and workshops.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80.00% Practical
Level: 7
Investment ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM050Semester 17NoNo

Investment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alfonsina Iona

Description: This offers a high level introduction to concepts related to investment analysis. Topics covered include valuation of financial securities; the principles of investment; portfolio analysis and management; financial market equilibrium; the CAPM and APT models; capital budgeting and risk; and market efficiency.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Quantitative Methods in FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM053Semester 17NoNo

Quantitative Methods in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Koutrompis

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied econometrics used to analyse financial problems. The material is presented through detailed examples with associated data and software, and hence should prove useful and interesting to students whether or not they have some prior exposure to econometrics. Basic statistical tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Risk Management for BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM055Semester 27NoNo

Risk Management for Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelson Camanho Da Costa Neto

Description: The module is designed to give an insight into the risk management process and how capital is allocated. We identify the main sources of risk experienced by financial institutions such as credit, market, liquidity, and operational risks. Methods for quantifying and managing risk are explored in detail with an emphasis on understanding factors affecting Value at Risk (VAR) calculations. Finally, we see how reporting standards, regulation and innovation have transformed the way financial institutions operate and what can we learn from recent risk management failures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Asset ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM057Semester 27NoNo

Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Goncalo Faria

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with a practical introduction to modern portfolio theory and asset pricing, including active portfolio management, portfolio performance evaluation, portfolio insurance, and international portfolio diversification. On the successful completion of the module students will know how to implement modern portfolio management strategies and will be familiar with the practical aspects of asset valuation. The course emphasises real world cases and real world investment and hedging strategies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Computer GraphicsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceECS762PSemester 17NoNo

Computer Graphics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Miles Hansard

Description: This course is concerned primarily with computer graphics systems and in particular 3D computer graphics. The course will include revision of fundamental raster algorithms such as polygon filling and quickly move onto the specification, modeling and rendering of 3D scenes. In particular the following topics may be covered: viewing in 2D,data structures for the representation of 3D polyhedra, viewing in 3D, visibility and hidden surface algorithms, illumination computations. Some attention will be paid to human perception of colour and interactive 3D such as virtual reality.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Examination (centrally administered)
  • Item 2: 6.00% Examination/Test (not centrally administered)
  • Item 3: 6.00% Practical
  • Item 4: 6.00% Practical
  • Item 5: 6.00% Practical
  • Item 6: 6.00% Practical
Level: 7
What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM5203ASemester 15YesNo

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: FLM003A, FLM5203
Prerequisite: FLM4200 or equivalent

Description: This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM5203BSemester 25YesNo

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: FLM003B
Prerequisite: FLM4200 or equivalent

Description: This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
Directing FictionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5204Semester 15NoNo

Directing Fiction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eugene Doyen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: FLM5203

Description: Directing Fiction involves developing a practical understanding of a range of approaches to film direction stemming from both mainstream and alternative film practices. The module will enable students to develop their creative skills within a context where their practice work is related to film studies theory. A number of approaches to directing will be covered and students will work in a group, preparing a production then making this production based on their specified conception of film direction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
Level: 5
Film CurationLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5205Semester 15NoNo

Film Curation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: FLM5203

Description: Film Curation is a one-semester module which enables students to explore the theory and practice of film curation and film programming. In small groups you will ultimately produce a curated programme of films with accompanying portfolio. Broadly themed around issues to do with collecting, curating, argument and interpretation, you will learn how to develop a thematic, question-based approach to film curation, developing an understanding of audiences and film communities. You will be able to make full use of the ample film culture in London, and will have the opportunity to explore rare and relatively unknown film material as you assemble your film curation project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 5
French I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4202Full year4YesNo

French I Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE4200
Prerequisite: GCSE French or knowledge of French equivalent to CEFRL level A2

Description: The module is aimed at students who hold a GCSE (or the equivalent level) in French language. It is intended primarily for students studying French as part of their degree (whether single honours or joint honours) and for other Queen Mary students following programmes within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences who want to study French language. The module entry level is A2 (Common European Framework of Reference for languages) and its exit level is B1/B1+. The module has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential French grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the French language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based tutorials and mixed-skills classes.

French I Intensive will be offered as a level 4 core module to 1st year post-GCSE students (or students with the equivalent level in French as assessed by the French language coordinator) taking single or joint Honours programmes in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 4
French I IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4202ASemester 14YesNo

French I Intensive

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE4200A, FRE4202
Prerequisite: A-Level or a knowledge of French equivalent to Level B1 of the CEFRL

Description: The module is aimed at associate students who hold GCSE in French language (or equivalent). The module entry level is A2 (Common European Framework of Reference for languages) and its exit level is A2+/B1. The module has been designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of essential French grammar and vocabulary and to develop four key language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. This module presents and covers all the basic elements of the French language, including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The course is well balanced between the presentation of the main grammatical concepts by the tutor in grammar classes and by activity-based tutorials and mixed-skills classes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Practical
Level: 4
Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE6006Semester 26YesNo

Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: COM6006
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or knowledge of French equivalent to at least level C1 of CEFR

Description: This module centres on narratology, the structural study of fictional narrative. Narratological analysis addresses questions such as: How can we talk about the selection of detail in fiction? What are the implications of having characters narrate their own stories? You will study a major work of narratology, and apply its principles to some classic French literary texts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. Creative writing work in French, based on the set texts - rewriting passages, composing additional episodes, etc. - plays an important part in the module, developing your understanding of texts and techniques as well as your linguistic skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 6
Making Theatre and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA124Semester 14NoNo

Making Theatre and Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Oliver

Description: In Making Theatre and Performance you¿ll work in a company, led by a tutor, to explore the performance-making strategies of a select practitioner, company and/or practice. We will investigate these strategies through research that is both text-based (reading, viewing, etc.) and practice based. You will develop select key practical skills to work in the mode of the practitioner, company and/or practice studied, adopting and critically adapting the theatre and performance-making strategies studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 60.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 4
Documentary Production ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7202Semester 27NoNo

Documentary Production Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sasha Litvintseva
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description: This module challenges some of the key tenets and ideas of documentary film (such as transparency, truth, reality, and representational practices) with a view to pushing the boundaries of the documentary form. We will explore different modes of documentary practice, including the performative documentary, artists' moving image documentary in the gallery, the animated documentary, archival and found footage film and the essay film. These non-traditional modalities of nonfiction are designed to enhance and reconfigure your own documentary practices, and enable you to test out new theoretical, aesthetic and rhetorical strategies in your production work.
To make the most of the module, you are encouraged to read extensively around documentary film theory and practice, thinking through the myriad formal, political and ethical ways the moving image encounters and represents the lived world. To broaden your horizons, please make sure to keep abreast of the extra-curricular suggestions for recommended viewing, and make the most of the artistic, cinematic, and socially engaged events Queen Mary University and the many communities of London have to offer. Please check your email and social media daily for updates.
Sessions will commonly be divided into two parts. In the first part, there will be a screening covering a particular mode of documentary film that challenges traditional approaches to documentary filmmaking, followed by a lecture and discussion of the film and the assigned reading material. The second part of the session will focus on the practical aspects of planning the production of your film - from concept to completion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70.00% Practical
  • Item 2: 30.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Activist FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7204Semester 27NoNo

Activist Film

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Fedda
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: SMLM035 or FLM7201

Description: This module examines films that can be considered activist - a body of work that engages issues of social and political significance. These varied films are driven by the activism of their filmmakers, their protagonists and through the films' direct participation in activism. Using artistic, ideological, socio-cultural, historical, technological, and practical frameworks to examine activist filmmaking this course will explore how the cinema and activism interact. This is a theory/practice module and will include the production of a short film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 70.00% Practical
  • Item 3: 15.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Production Design: History, Theory, CraftLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7207Semester 27NoNo

Production Design: History, Theory, Craft

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sue Harris

Description: This module examines the creative practice of production design in cinema, specifically in relation to architectural construction and set design. It takes a historical approach to design as an industrial practice shaped by technology, artistic and design movements, and the discipline of architecture. It proposes critical approaches founded in theory and practice to find ways of analysing film decor and identifying how it contributes to our understanding of film texts. The artistic and technical challenges posed by film design will be examined though close case study work and the completion of a 4,000 word essay.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
Level: 7
Society and SpaceGeographyGEG5127Semester 15YesYes

Society and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May

QMUL Model themes supported:

  • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

QMUL Model learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

Description: This module introduces students to the field of social geography, its theoretical perspectives and substantive concerns, centred upon an understanding of societies as products of uneven and always negotiated relationships of power. Drawing on a social constructionist approach, and using mainly UK examples, we consider intersecting constructions of social class, gender, race and sexuality, and how these constructions both shape, and are shaped by space at a variety of scales. The module includes a field walk assignment designed to develop skills of critical observation and interpretation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100.00% Examination (centrally administered)
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGeographyGEG5128Semester 25NoYes

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza

QMUL Model themes supported:

    QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      Description: This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions. These issues will be examined in different regions of the world, enabling students from different disciplinary backgrounds to analyze the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts on development theory and practice.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Economic GeographiesGeographyGEG5129Semester 15YesYes

      Economic Geographies

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Joe Penny

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

      Description: This module offers a broad introduction to key debates within Economic Geography. It explores: the geographies of production and global production networks; the recentering of Economic Geography through engagement with the Global South and development; the centrality of uneven development in capitalist economic social relations; the connections between globalisation and local socio-spatial relations; and 'alternative' or `diverse' economic practices that challenge neoliberalism. The module will challenge students to understand how economic processes of valuation, production, consumption and exchange play out in practice in time and place.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG5223Semester 25YesYes

      Geospatial Science

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
      Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take GEG5144
      Prerequisite: Before taking this module you are advised to take GEG4004

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

      Description: This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems. This knowledge is fundamental not only to research in Physical Geography, Environmental Science and many other disciplines, but provides a critical skill set used widely within a range of industries (including environmental management, local and national government, the utilities and the insurance sector).

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Geospatial ScienceGeographyGEG5223PSemester 25YesYes

      Geospatial Science

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

      Description: This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems. This knowledge is fundamental not only to research in Physical Geography, Environmental Science and many other disciplines, but provides a critical skill set used widely within a range of industries (including environmental management, local and national government, the utilities and the insurance sector).

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 5
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Ecosystem ScienceGeographyGEG5224Semester 15YesYes

      Ecosystem Science

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea

      QMUL Model themes supported:

      • Multi- and inter-disciplinarity

      QMUL Model learning outcomes:

      • Students will be able to evaluate perspectives from different disciplines.Students will be able to demonstrate how discipline-specific problem solving techniques or approaches may be generalised or applied in a broader context.

      Description: This module explores the fundamental environmental units: ecosystems. We use biological and physical science perspectives to examine the geographical distribution of ecosystems and to understand the principles and processes governing their structure and function. We study the exchange of materials and energy between biotic and abiotic ecosystem components, focusing on water, carbon and nutrient cycles. We engage with urban land managers in project work, and apply biogeoscience perspectives when interpreting how ecosystems change in response to internal system processes, environmental change, natural disturbance events and human activities.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 50.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 50.00% Examination (centrally administered)
      Level: 5
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      From the Postcolonial to the Global: Literature and TheoryEnglish and DramaESH7070Semester 17NoNo

      From the Postcolonial to the Global: Literature and Theory

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Dr Rachael Gilmour

      Description: Peripheral Modernities seeks to explore how entry to the modern world, or how exclusion from the modern world, is experienced, perceived and explained from the global peripheries. In so doing, it aims to reverse the usual perspective from which modernity itself is considered. The module opens by a conceptual consideration of how we might begin to theorize a 'peripheral' modernity. It is then followed by a range of texts which will focus (variously) on the Caribbean, South Africa/Africa, southern Asia, the Middle East and on those instances of peripheral modernities which underwrite the erstwhile metropolitan nations.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Performing Mental HealthEnglish and DramaDRA7010Semester 17NoNo

      Performing Mental Health

      Credits: 30.0
      Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

      Description: "This module explores the performance of mental health and mental illness as they have been defined across history, and in the contemporary moment. In particular the module asks how the social construction of mental health is reflected in and produced by performance. While the module focuses on the types of subjectivity and selfhood that have emerged in the history of theatre and performance, students are also encouraged to explore ways other creative practices engage these topics. Special attention is given to representations of 'madness' and `mental illness' produced in historical performance, as well as to how these representations have since been reinterpreted and adapted to reflect current constructions and concerns. In addition we will consider a variety of contemporary and collaborative performance practices that interrogate attitudes relating to normative concepts of mental health, and even try to intervene into policy and care. Students will be introduced to broad debates on mental health from within the Humanities and informed by the approaches of disability studies. "

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 2: 80.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Performance ResearchEnglish and DramaDRA7100Semester 17NoNo

      Performance Research

      Credits: 0.0
      Contact: Dr Martin Welton

      Description: This module provides you with opportunities to engage with theoretical and practical issues surrounding research in theatre and performance studies. It invites you to consider what might be at stake in conducting research in such fields, and about wider questions of research, disciplinarity, writing and research ethics. Through analysis of critical writing and completion of preparation tasks, the module aims to support your skills in devising research projects in the broad interdisciplinary fields of theatre and performance studies.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Research DesignEnglish and DramaDRA7103Semester 27NoNo

      Research Design

      Credits: 0.0
      Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

      Description: This module aims to help you build skills and methods in research design. Moreover, it helps to prepare you for your MA dissertation by providing guidance and skills in designing and completing research projects. Seminars will include discussions of assigned readings and research workshops. By the end of the semester, you will have prepared and submitted a final draft of your dissertation proposal if you're studying full time; if you're studying part time, you will have the option of submitting a final draft of your dissertation proposal or preparing a field statement.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 7
      Reinventing BritainGeographyGEG4106Semester 14NoNo

      Reinventing Britain

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Prof Jon May

      Description: This module examines geographical implications of changes across the economic, social, cultural and political landscapes of Britain over the last three decades, focused on a field trip North West England. Key themes include: Britain's long-standing North-South divide; uneven geographies of deindustrialisation; culture, heritage and regeneration; geographies of migration and identity; and health inequalities. The module is delivered through lectures and fieldwork, introducing and make connections between theoretical perspectives including economic, social, cultural, political and urban geographies.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 20.00% Assessed Coursework
      • Item 2: 20.00% Practical
      • Item 3: 60.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
      Global WorldsGeographyGEG4112Semester 24NoNo

      Global Worlds

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr Samuel Halvorsen

      Description: This module will introduce students to a range of core issues affecting the world around them from economic, cultural and social perspectives with a particular focus on the importance of global-local relations revolving around inequality and justice. It will explore a range of debates surrounding the interrelationships between globalisation and international development from historical and contemporary viewpoints as well as the nature and politics of identities in relation to nationalism, diaspora, landscape and exclusion . Students will also be introduced to the relationships between health, place and care.

      Assessment:

      • Item 1: 100.00% Assessed Coursework
      Level: 4
      Earth Surface ScienceGeographyGEG4209Semester 24YesNo

      Earth Surface Science

      Credits: 15.0
      Contact: Dr James Bradley

      Description: What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

      Assessment: