Skip to main content

Module directory 2021-22

The Module Directory provides information on all taught modules offered by Queen Mary during the academic year 2021-22. The modules are listed alphabetically, and you can search and sort the list by title, key words, academic school, module code and/or semester. Full details about the module can then be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

The Directory of Modules can also show you a tailored list of modules depending whether you are:

  • A Queen Mary student looking for module pre-selection information.
  • An Associate student who is currently enrolled at a non-UK university, and who is planning to study at Queen Mary for one semester / one academic year only.

For full explanation of the module information for Associate students, please refer to the Associate guidance notes.

Please note:

  • You should always check if your module selection is compatible with the academic regulations and programme-specific rules.
  • While every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change; in particular assessment information is provisional at this time.
  • Timetable information will only be displayed once it is finalised.

Queen Mary Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory, please see the ARCS website.

Step 1 - I'm interested in...

Step 2 - Filter by:








N.B - Please ensure you clear filters between each search.

TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescriptionThemeAvailable to
Learning and Teaching in Higher EducationThe Learning InstituteADP7116Semester 17No

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Fuller

Description: This module is the first module of both taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Queen Mary Academy; Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP). The module runs over 1 semester. Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing their teaching.

The module is focused around key elements of designing an individual teaching session, in a range of modes of delivery (including face to face, online and blended). It also includes an introduction to theories of learning and focuses on the importance of active and student-centred learning approaches, including the flipped classroom. The module comprises seven core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching. Participants will undertake a microteaching session as part of the module, presenting a mini teaching session to course peers. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Microteaching session plan (1500 words or equivalent)
  • Item 2: 70% Reflection on microteaching session (2000 words or equivalent)
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in Higher EducationThe Learning InstituteADP7116Semester 27No

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Olumide Popoola

Description: This module is the first module of both taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Queen Mary Academy; Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP). The module runs over 1 semester. Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing their teaching.

The module is focused around key elements of designing an individual teaching session, in a range of modes of delivery (including face to face, online and blended). It also includes an introduction to theories of learning and focuses on the importance of active and student-centred learning approaches, including the flipped classroom. The module comprises seven core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching. Participants will undertake a microteaching session as part of the module, presenting a mini teaching session to course peers. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Microteaching session plan (1500 words or equivalent)
  • Item 2: 70% Reflection on microteaching session (2000 words or equivalent)
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in the DisciplineThe Learning InstituteADP7117Semester 17No

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Gallagher-Brett

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Queen Mary Academy. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake three teaching observations (one of a colleague and two as the observe) and reflect on the process of creating and delivering a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Presentation of created resource for learning teaching or assessment
  • Item 2: 60% Reflection on Teaching Observations (2000 words)
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in the DisciplineThe Learning InstituteADP7117Semester 27No

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Gallagher-Brett

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Queen Mary Academy. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake three teaching observations (one of a colleague and two as the observe) and reflect on the process of creating and delivering a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Presentation of created resource for learning teaching or assessment
  • Item 2: 60% Reflection on Teaching Observations (2000 words)
Level: 7
Curriculum DesignThe Learning InstituteADP7118Semester 27No

Curriculum Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Fuller

Description: This module is the third compulsory module on the PGCAP and runs over one semester. The module builds on the topics studied in the first two modules on the course. It supports participants to take a broader view of higher education and to work at a unit, module or programme level to engage in a piece of curriculum redesign, or in some cases a new piece of design. The module looks at theory and practice of curriculum design, and supports participants to review aims and ILOs, teaching profile, assessment and feedback strategies, evaluation plans, and to consider their course within broader contexts. There are seven compulsory topics and participants will choose from a range of optional topics those which are most relevant for their curriculum project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Curriculum design report
Level: 7
Curriculum DesignThe Learning InstituteADP7118Semester 17No

Curriculum Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Fuller

Description: This module is the third compulsory module on the PGCAP and runs over one semester. The module builds on the topics studied in the first two modules on the course. It supports participants to take a broader view of higher education and to work at a unit, module or programme level to engage in a piece of curriculum redesign, or in some cases a new piece of design. The module looks at theory and practice of curriculum design, and supports participants to review aims and ILOs, teaching profile, assessment and feedback strategies, evaluation plans, and to consider their course within broader contexts. There are seven compulsory topics and participants will choose from a range of optional topics those which are most relevant for their curriculum project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Curriculum design report
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7216Semester 17No

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Fuller

Description: This module is the first module of both taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the QM Academy; Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP). The module runs over 1 semester. Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing their teaching.

The module is focused around key elements of designing an individual teaching session, in a range of modes of delivery (including face to face, online and blended). It also includes an introduction to theories of learning and focuses on the importance of active and student-centred learning approaches, including the flipped classroom. The module comprises seven core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching. Participants will undertake a microteaching session as part of the module, presenting a mini teaching session to course peers. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Microteaching session plan (1500 words or equivalent)
  • Item 2: 70% Reflection on microteaching session (2000 words or equivalent)
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7216Semester 27No

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Olumide Popoola

Description: This module is the first module of both taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the QM Academy; Certificate in Learning and Teaching (CILT) and Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP). The module runs over 1 semester. Designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of learning and teaching in higher education, the module will help participants develop the practice of reflecting on and enhancing their teaching.

The module is focused around key elements of designing an individual teaching session, in a range of modes of delivery (including face to face, online and blended). It also includes an introduction to theories of learning and focuses on the importance of active and student-centred learning approaches, including the flipped classroom. The module comprises seven core teaching sessions which will be focused around planning, designing and reflecting on teaching. Participants will undertake a microteaching session as part of the module, presenting a mini teaching session to course peers. Participants will be in interdisciplinary groups and encouraged to exchange practice between disciplines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Microteaching session plan (1500 words or equivalent)
  • Item 2: 70% Reflection on microteaching session (2000 words or equivalent)
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7217Semester 17No

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Gallagher-Brett

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Queen Mary Academy. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake three teaching observations (one of a colleague and two as the observe) and reflect on the process of creating and delivering a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Presentation of created resource for learning teaching or assessment
  • Item 2: 60% Reflection on Teaching Observations (2000 words)
Level: 7
Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7217Semester 27No

Learning and Teaching in the Discipline (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Gallagher-Brett

Description: This module is the second module of all the taught routes to HEA Fellowship offered by the Queen Mary Academy. It takes place over one semester. Participants on the module will be divided into three streams: 1) Science, Maths & Engineering; 2) Medicine and Dentistry; 3) Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (those on the boundary between streams will be offered a choice). Within those streams students will be able to study small-group and large-group teaching, student support, assessment and resource creation as they pertain to their discipline. They will also be introduced to broader professional bodies and frameworks, such as the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements in their discipline and QMUL Graduate Attributes. Students will also undertake three teaching observations (one of a colleague and two as the observe) and reflect on the process of creating and delivering a teaching resource in their subject.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Presentation of created resource for learning teaching or assessment
  • Item 2: 60% Reflection on Teaching Observations (2000 words)
Level: 7
Curriculum Design (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7218Semester 17No

Curriculum Design (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Fuller

Description: This module is the third compulsory module on the PGCAP and runs over one semester. The module builds on the topics studied in the first two module on the course. It supports participants to take a broader view of higher education and to work at a unit, module or programme level to engage in a piece of curriculum redesign, or in some cases a new piece of design. The module looks at theory and practice of curriculum design, and supports participants to review aims and ILOs, teaching profile, assessment and feedback strategies, evaluation plans, and to consider their course within broader contexts. There are seven compulsory topics and participants will choose from a range of optional topics those which are most relevant for their curriculum project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Curriculum design report
Level: 7
Curriculum Design (Distance Learning)The Learning InstituteADP7218Semester 27No

Curriculum Design (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephanie Fuller

Description: This module is the third compulsory module on the PGCAP and runs over one semester. The module builds on the topics studied in the first two module on the course. It supports participants to take a broader view of higher education and to work at a unit, module or programme level to engage in a piece of curriculum redesign, or in some cases a new piece of design. The module looks at theory and practice of curriculum design, and supports participants to review aims and ILOs, teaching profile, assessment and feedback strategies, evaluation plans, and to consider their course within broader contexts. There are seven compulsory topics and participants will choose from a range of optional topics those which are most relevant for their curriculum project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Curriculum design report
Level: 7
Action (practitioner) Research Project (Distance learning)The Learning InstituteADP7219Semester 27No

Action (practitioner) Research Project (Distance learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Da Silva Cabral

Description: Designed to build on the first three modules, this module will help these non-research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in developing action (practitioner) research on their own teaching.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own teaching practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action (practitioner) research project to help them develop their own teaching further.

The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to plan and write an action (practitioner) research project proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Action (practitioner) research design proposal (500 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Action (practitioner) research design report (5000 words)
Level: 7
Action (practitioner) Research Project (Distance learning)The Learning InstituteADP7219Semester 17No

Action (practitioner) Research Project (Distance learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Da Silva Cabral

Description: Designed to build on the first three modules, this module will help these non-research-active participants to develop and strengthen their skills in developing action (practitioner) research on their own teaching.

The module will introduce participants to the principles, methodologies and approaches to conducting research and scholarship on their own teaching practice. Participants will be supported in selecting and planning their own action (practitioner) research project to help them develop their own teaching further.

The assessments are designed to be authentic and require participants to plan and write an action (practitioner) research project proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Action (practitioner) research design proposal (500 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Action (practitioner) research design report (5000 words)
Level: 7
Affective ComputingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU701PSemester 27No

Affective Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: This course is a guided exploration of affective computing, defined as computer systems that relate to, arise from, or deliberately influence emotion. It helps students examine how these systems detect human affect, how they respond to affect, and how they themselves express affect. The topics that are covered include but are not limited to definitions of affect, functions of affect, physiological manifestations of affect, affect data collection, affect model building, testing of affective interventions, and surveys of existing affect-sensitive systems. The student will survey literature in affect detection, response and expression. The student will learn to design and implement an affective computing experiment. This will include the collection of data, its analysis, and the writing of a report.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Entrepreneurship for Scientists and EngineersElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU702PSemester 27No

Entrepreneurship for Scientists and Engineers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: The course is an introductory course to entrepreneurship for scientists and engineers. The content was prepared by the Institute of Physics and is adapted for implementation in the Philippines setting. It provides scientists and engineers a glimpse into the world of business; particularly it introduces science and engineering students to the processes of innovation, generation and protection of intellectual property, technology transfer and commercialisation of inventions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Games and Game Design (Seminar)Electronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU703PSemester 27No

Games and Game Design (Seminar)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: This course is an introduction to the essential concepts behind game design. These concepts include the game development process from brainstorming a game idea and establishing the focus to getting the gameplay working and playtesting. Analysis of different games - PC and console games - of different genres is also discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Human-Computer InteractionElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU704PSemester 27No

Human-Computer Interaction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: This course familiarises students with principles of good user experience design and methodologies for arriving at good designs. It also acquaints students with quantitative and qualitative user experience testing methodologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Introduction to Mobile Application DevelopmentElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU705PSemester 27No

Introduction to Mobile Application Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: This is an introductory course in Mobile Applications Development, designed for both computer science and non-computer science majors. A particular mobile application development platform and environment (such as iOS and Xcode) will be employed for the course and students will be taught basic programming concepts and development techniques using the chosen platform. The course will also tackle interface design and project management concepts to enable students to develop complete applications. User experience is emphasised. Students are challenged to conceive, design, and develop mobile applications that are relevant to their intended users.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Introduction to Social ComputingElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU706PSemester 27No

Introduction to Social Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: Social Computing is a multidisciplinary course that provides a background on social psychology, understanding of online environments and online social networks; social mining and social network analysis to better understand our networked societies. This course covers key developments and tools in areas such as Big Data Analytics (Hadoop and NoSQL) and Massively Distributed Systems. Students study an online community, and conduct research related to social computing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
User Modelling and User Profiling for Adaptive SystemsElectronic Engineering and Computer ScienceAMU707PSemester 27No

User Modelling and User Profiling for Adaptive Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bobby Sturm

Description: This project-based course engages students in current, ongoing research on user modelling. Students in this course design user interaction experiments in which they will capture user interaction logs, human observations, videos and other forms of data. Students will use statistical and data mining techniques to create models of user affect and behavior.

A major portion of credit in this module comes from class participation, which includes recitation during discussions and participation in in-class activities. Examples of the latter in the case of HCI include a mock usability test and a mock eye tracking test. The purpose of these exercises is to familiarise students with procedures for collecting data. Class participation is graded based on frequency of participation and quality of contribution. In-class activities are graded based on actual attendance in the activity and answers to guide questions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Essential Skills for BiologistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Biologists

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Chris Faulkes

Description: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biologists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills. This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as essay writing, information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations.

(2) Considering the role of biological sciences in the "real world". Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biological sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways. Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay
  • Item 2: 50% Specific report
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Essential Skills for BiochemistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO101Full year4No

Essential Skills for Biochemists

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Mark Van Breugel

Description: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biochemists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills. This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as essay writing, information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations.

(2) Considering the role of biochemical sciences in the "real world". Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biochemical sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways. Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay
  • Item 2: 50% Specific report
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
EvolutionBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO113Semester 14Yes

Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone

Description: This module covers essential topics of whole-organism biology, introducing the theory and mechanisms of evolution and speciation, the fossil record and human evolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
CellsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO116Semester 14Yes

Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kenneth Linton

Description: This module provides an introduction to cell biology. Specifically, we consider cell structure , the history of cell biology and the basic mechanics of a eukaryotic cell. The structure and function of the cell membrane, organelles, nucleus and cytoskeleton will be explored. Finally, normal cell cycle, cell division and differentiation processes are examined alongside their dysregulation leading to cancer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
EcologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO123Semester 24No

Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone

Description: This module covers the essentials and fundamental concepts of population and community ecology as well as applied issues such as conservation. There is an one-week residential field course where students will study organisms in their natural environments, rather than in the laboratory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
PhysiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO125Semester 24Yes

Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anthony Michael

Description: This module provides an introduction to physiology. The structure and function of major systems including the nervous, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems are surveyed in a variety of different taxa and physiological functioning including homeostasis, temperature regulation, gas exchange, digestion and the endrocrine systems are all reviewed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Basic BiochemistryBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO161Semester 24Yes

Basic Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BMD123

Description: This module will cover amino acids, the fundamentals of protein structure, isolation and purification of proteins, modification of proteins, and methods of determining protein conformation. You will also cover the basics of enzyme catalysis and kinetics with specific case studies. Other topics include ion transport, and other transport proteins, and the utilisation of proteins and soluble cofactors to generate and store metabolic energy. You will cover the basics of metabolism in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, as well as ATP synthesis and membrane bound electron transfer in mitochondria. Chloroplasts in plants and algae, and molecular motors, such as muscles, that consume metabolic energy are also covered. A detailed module synopsis will be handed out in the first lecture, and summary outlines of subsequent lectures will be available on the school teaching website for guidance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 4
Molecular GeneticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO163Semester 14Yes

Molecular Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Patricia Munroe

Description: This module consists of an introduction to genetics, a description of the process by which genetic information is converted into the molecules that make up living things, and a review of the essential properties of those molecules. Genetics topics covered include DNA structure, classical and molecular genetics and genomics. We then examine how information flows from DNA to RNA and then to protein to give the recognisable phenotypic features of living things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Practical Molecular and Cellular BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO190Semester 14No

Practical Molecular and Cellular Biology

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr David Hone

Description: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for molecular and cellular biology. The module will start by introducing basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, it will then move on through DNA extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% In-course Practical & Statistical Analysis
Level: 4
Practical BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO192Semester 24No

Practical Biology

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran

Description: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biologists. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then moves on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and finally studies involving whole multicellular organisms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% In-course Practical & Statistical Analysis
Level: 4
Practical BiochemistryBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO198Semester 24No

Practical Biochemistry

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main

Description: This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biochemists. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then move on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and techniques of practical chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% In-course Practical & Statistical Analysis
Level: 4
Biochemistry CommunicationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO202Full year5No

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Duffy

Description: The module will focus on presenting science, types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review. Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Identify and discuss their own career aspirations or relevant skills and knowledge and develop skills to shape and influence their future career and life-long learning. Students will create a podcast on a Biochemistry topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Sem A-Essay+Plan
  • Item 2: 30% Sem B-Video Blog
  • Item 3: 30% Sem B-Calculations
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Research Methods and CommunicationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO209Semester 15No

Research Methods and Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sally Faulkner

Description: In this module we look at how to design experiments, how to analyse and present the data obtained and how to communicate those results to others. The lecture and workshop component includes the principles of experimental design, statistical analysis including t-tests, correlation and regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA and non-parametric tests and discussion of how to interpret and present data. The tutorial component consists of a series of writing exercises designed to teach how to structure an argument and how to communicate ideas effectively.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Reporting results/coding assignment (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (4 hours)
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Diversity of LifeBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO212Full year5Yes

Diversity of Life

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Hone

Description: In this module students will cover the huge diversity of life on Earth (with a particular emphasis on plants and animals) including their current and previous diversity (i.e. including extinct and fossil lineages), their relationships and key characteristics. Lectures will be supported by workshops and other teaching activities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-course Quiz 1
  • Item 2: 25% In-course Quiz 2
  • Item 3: 25% In-course Quiz 3
  • Item 4: 25% Written assessment
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Cell Biology and Developmental GeneticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO213Semester 25Yes

Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelika Stollewerk

Description: This module is designed to provide you with detailed up-to-date knowledge of cell biological techniques, the structural organisation, development and differentiation of eukaryotic cells as well as key processes in development that are based on cell-cell interactions and cell movements. In the practicals you will learn standard cell biological techniques in histology and immunohistochemistry and you will be familiarised with the preparation of cell material from living organisms. The module provides an invaluable foundation for genetics, biochemistry, molecular, neurobiological, physiological and biomedical programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Online test 1
  • Item 2: 30% Online test 2
  • Item 3: 20% Online test 3
  • Item 4: 30% Online test 4
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Infectious Disease BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO214Semester 15Yes

Infectious Disease Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take BIO163 or take BIO161 ) and ( take BIO113 or take BIO123 )

Description: This module divides into two sections.
1. Biology of pathogens, both multi- and unicellular, as viewed from a whole-organism perspective. There is a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the evolution/ ecology of pathogens and of the importance of pathogens on the ecology/evolution of their hosts.
2. Understanding the importance and pathologies associated with named infections and the mechanisms used by these pathogens to complete their life cycles. There will be an emphasis on the drugs used against these organisms from a molecular, biochemical and pharmacokinetic perspective with consideration given to the problems associated with these treatments (side effects, resistance etc).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Coursework
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Comparative & Integrative PhysiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO215Semester 15No

Comparative & Integrative Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maurice Elphick

Description: The following themes will be covered in this module:1). Comparative anatomy and evolution of nervous systems. 2). Molecular & cellular mechanisms of neuronal signalling. 3). Invertebrates as model systems for understanding mechanisms of neural control of behaviour. 4). An introduction to comparative endocrinology, including the evolution and functions of neuropeptides as regulators of physiological and behavioural processes. 5). Comparative physiology of muscle and connective tissue. 6). Comparative physiology of gas exchange. 7). Comparative physiology of circulatory systems 8). Comparative physiology of osmoregulation 9). Comparative physiology of excretion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-class test 1
  • Item 2: 25% In-class test 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Genes and BioinformaticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO223Semester 15No

Genes and Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Hurd

Description: Prerequisites:Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008) or Chromosomes and Gene Function (SBC210). Genes occupy most of a bacterial genome, but very little of the three million kb of DNA in the 23 pairs of chromosomes in the human genome, so what is a gene? This module provides a molecular view. Gene structure is illustrated in the context of how a gene is transcribed to produce RNA, how the RNA is processed and translated to produce protein and how these processes are regulated through other DNA sequences and proteins. An introduction to bioinformatics will explain how to recognise, compile and identify genes, and infer protein sequence, from DNA sequence, including procedures for interrogating public sequence databases and phylogenetic analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% Bioinformatics SAQ assignment
  • Item 3: 13% Online MCQ
Level: 5
Human Genetic DisordersBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO227Semester 15No

Human Genetic Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jayne Dennis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO163

Description: This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management. We will look at key examples of chromosomal abnormalities (i.e. Trisomy 21), monogenic disease (e.g. cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy) and common disease (e.g. coronary artery disease). Students will be introduced to methods and techniques for identifying genetic loci associated with disease (e.g. homozygosity mapping, genome-wide association studies, DNA sequencing). Finally, we will discuss issues around genetic screening, testing and counselling.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Microbial Physiology and GrowthBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO231Semester 25Yes

Microbial Physiology and Growth

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Mullineaux

Description: Prerequisites:EITHER General Microbiology (SBS758) OR Basic Biochemistry (SBS017) plus one Chemistry Year 1 option. Diversity of microbial metabolisms. Bacterial growth and replication, including organization and division of the chromosome, yield and responses to temperature and nutrient availability. Photolithotrophy, photoorganotrophy, chemilithotrophy and chemoorganotrophy. Fermentation and anaerobic respiration. Growth and extension metabolism of fungi. Nitrogen transformations by microorganisms in free-living and mutualistic settings. Microbiological standards in public health. Clean water processing and waste-water treatment. Practical work will cover prokaryote photosynthesis, bacterial fermentation, fungal digestion of wood and nitrogen transformations in sediments, and microbiological water quality. There will be a brief consideration of clean water processing and waste-water treatment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework
Level: 5
Ecological Interactions IBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO234Semester 15No

Ecological Interactions I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lee Henry

Description: In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological principles and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations. You will develop understanding of (i) distribution, growth and regulation of single species populations; (ii) interacting species pairs such as competition, predation, herbivory, parasitism; and (iii) structure and dynamics of multitrophic systems such as food webs, ecological communities and ecosystems. The topics will also cover spatial aspect of ecological systems in the metapopulation and metacommunity context, highlighting relationships between biodiversity, stability and ecosystem function.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-class test
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Membrane and Cellular BiochemistryBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO263Semester 25Yes

Membrane and Cellular Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Mullineaux
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO161 or take BMD123

Description: Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017). This module coves a range of topics: Membrane functions and subcellular organelles; lipid structures; membrane proteins; mobility in membranes and methods for its measurement; cell signalling.; membranes and cancer; endocytosis and exocytosis; protein import; building membranes; mitochondria and chloroplasts; oxidative phosphorylation; the chemiosmotic hypothesis; membrane transport; ion channels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework
Level: 5
Metabolic PathwaysBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO265Semester 25Yes

Metabolic Pathways

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO161

Description: Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017). This module covers a range of topics including: Chemical reactions - Biochemical logic. Biochemistry of some vitamin and coenzyme catalysed reactions. Glycogen synthesis and degradation. Pentose phosphate pathway. Gluconeogenesis. Amino acid metabolism and the urea cycle. Fatty acid synthesis and breakdown. Prostaglandin and steroid biosynthesis. Purine, pyrimidine and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Control and regulation of metabolism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class test
  • Item 3: 25% Practical
Level: 5
Techniques for Biological and Chemical SciencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO269Semester 15Yes

Techniques for Biological and Chemical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO161

Description: The module introduces the modern techniques used by the biochemist to study proteins and other macromolecules at the atomic level. The module is divided into the 3 broad themes: Techniques for purification and characterisation of macromolecules; Spectroscopic methods to study macromolecules; and Methods to determine 3D structures, crystallographic and NMR.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Coursework
  • Item 2: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Ecological Interactions IIBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO294Semester 35No

Ecological Interactions II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Kratina
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take BIO234

Description: In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological practice and fieldwork, and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations and data collection. You will gain practical experience in the field and also observe researchers collecting scientific data for both terrestrial and freshwater aquatic ecosystems. This will build on, and relate to, the theoretical aspects covered directly in earlier ecology modules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Presentation
  • Item 2: 30% MCQs
  • Item 3: 40% Field notebook
Level: 5
Biochemistry CommunicationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO301Full year6No

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guy Hanke

Description: Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. The module will focus on types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review. Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Attendance at research seminars is required and a library workshop to developing literature search skills. Tutorials will require a high level of student participation. A number of essays and other course will set and assessment for the module will be Coursework (60%) Final Exam (40%).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Written Assignment
  • Item 2: 40% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Behavioural EcologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO311Semester 16No

Behavioural Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Rossiter
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO113

Description: Prerequisites: The Diversity of Life (SBS005), Evolution (SBS110), Statistical Methods in Biology (SBS020) This module will cover concepts in animal behaviour which underpin ideas about more complex behaviours, including communication, ritualisation, homeostasis, instinct and learning. Decision-making and the evolution of adaptive strategies of individuals, optimal strategy sets and habitat selection are also included. Comparative socio-ecology including sexual and kin selection, reproductive strategies and social structure is considered. You will also look at resource patchiness, predictability and productivity as determinants of individual and social behaviour.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Scientific report 1
  • Item 2: 30% Scientific report 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Advanced Human Genetic DisordersBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO324Semester 26No

Advanced Human Genetic Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jayne Dennis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO227 or take SNU213

Description: This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management. Although examples of Mendelian and complex conditions will be discussed, we will also look at further mechanisms of disease development (for example uniparental disomy and mitochondrial disorders) and the role of genetics in drug efficacy. Students will extend their knowledge and understanding of genomic technologies and the techniques used to identify genetic loci associated with human disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Population and Chromosome GeneticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO325Semester 16Yes

Population and Chromosome Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Leitch
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO113

Description: Pre-requisite: Transmission genetics OR Genes and Bioinformatics This module will introduce strategies and methods for identifying the molecular genetic basis of inherited human disorders and other traits in particular how linkage disequilibrium (LD) is used to identify the loci involved. It will use examples from the current literature to better understand genetic variation at a population and species level. It will examine quantitative traits in humans and other species; in particular the heritability estimates to infer the relative contribution of genes and the environment to important quantitative traits and disorders. Together the information will lead to an understanding of genetic drift and natural selection acting on the DNA sequence, the chromosome and genome organisation. The module will explore the evolution of genomic sequences and of chromosomes. Particular attention is paid to evolutionary processes observed at repetitive DNA sequences and the role of chromosomes in transmitting genetic material through mitosis and meiosis. It explores the role and evolution of sex chromosomes, the evolution of sex and of sexual selection. The course should students to achieve a critical understanding of thinking and research in the genetic processes of evolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay
  • Item 2: 30% Synthesis excercise
  • Item 3: 20% Portfolio of documents
  • Item 4: 10% Group talks
Level: 6
Functional Genomics and EpigeneticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO327Semester 26Yes

Functional Genomics and Epigenetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Hurd

Description: This module is designed to provide students with an introduction into the variety of ways that genetics and genomics have been applied in biotechnology and functional genomics. The module covers a variety of topics including biotechnology, protein expression, microarrays, proteomics, systems biology, genome projects (assembly. annotation and comparison) and the identification and functional characterisation of non-coding sequences in vertebrate genomes

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Online MCQ
  • Item 2: 15% Bioinformatics In-class Test
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Professional Skills and Development for BiologistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO329Semester 16No

Professional Skills and Development for Biologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nichols

Description: In this module we look at science communication and conveying ideas effectively to different audiences and with different aims. It will include areas such as how to structure a scientific argument, evaluate sources of information and associated biases, and the importance of biological research and its futures trends in the wider world.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Careers passport
  • Item 2: 40% Precis of popular science article
  • Item 3: 40% Essay
Level: 6
Mammals and EvolutionBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO331Semester 26Yes

Mammals and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chris Faulkes

Description: Prerequisites: The Diversity of Life (SBS005). This module covers the following: the fossil record, origin and evolution of mammal-like reptiles. Evolution of monotremes, marsupial adpative radiation. Evolution and classification of eutherian mammals, cladistics, molecular approaches to phylogeny reconstruction. Adaptation in the main orders of eutherian mammals. Evolution of hominids. Evolution of reproductive strategies and social evolution: the origins of societies; kinds of societies; evolution of cooperation; mammal vs complex insect societies; skew theory as a unified approach to social evolution; genetic, phylogenetic and environmental factors and social evolution. Recent controversies in mammalian evolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Skull practical
  • Item 2: 25% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Neuroscience: from Molecules to BehaviourBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO333Semester 26No

Neuroscience: from Molecules to Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Preece
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO215 or take BMD261

Description: This module provides a detailed survey of the molecular components that mediate neurotransmission in the nervous system and confer plasticity on neurons and nervous systems (e.g. ligand-gated ion channels, NMDA receptors, G-protein coupled receptors, second messengers, gaseous signalling molecules such as nitric oxide). This leads on to the role of such components in various aspects of nervous system function and in control of whole-animal behaviour. Topics covered include: mechanisms of learning and memory; mechanisms by which drugs of abuse (e.g. cannabis) affect brain function; mechanisms of phototransduction, olfaction, touch and hearing in animals; genetic and neural substrates of circadian clocks that regulate rhythmic behaviours.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Reproductive and Development BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO337Semester 26Yes

Reproductive and Development Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelika Stollewerk

Description: This module reviews all aspects of reproductive and developmental biology (from molecular and cellular mechanisms to physiology, ecology and evolution). Topics to be addressed will include molecular gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, placentation, pregnancy, parturition, lactation, reproductive and parental strategies, reproductive suppression, courtship and sexual selection, and the evolution of reproductive-isolating mechanisms. The module will take a comparative approach to compare and contrast reproductive and developmental mechanisms across a range of vertebrate and invertebrate species.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 6
Climate Change and Conservation ChallengesBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO343Semester 26No

Climate Change and Conservation Challenges

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ozge Eyice-Broadbent

Description: The module will consist of lectures, group discussions, lab and computer-based practical sessions. These will cover aspects of climate change, ecosystem services and sustainability, impact of global warming on the ecosystems at different levels and the role of human activities. The students will also learn about the global conservation challenges such as deforestation and habitat fragmentation and modelling simulations in adaptation to climate change. Work will be both theoretical and practical, with emphasis on current research questions in global ecosystem conservation and methodologies in the primary literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Report (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Membrane ProteinsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO361Semester 16No

Membrane Proteins

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Ruban
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO263

Description: Prerequisites: Membrane Biochemistry (SBS908). This module covers a wide range of topics, including: A detailed study of structure and function of a selection of membrane proteins. Examples will illustrate different mechanisms by which proteins achieve vectorial electron transfer, ion transport and the generation of electrochemical gradients, the coupling of electrochemical gradients to ATP synthesis and transmembrane signalling. Electron transfer through proteins (e.g. cytochrome c). Structure and function of redox centres and the proteins that contain them. Membrane proteins studied will include respiratory chain complexes, light-harvesting pigment-proteins, photosynthetic reaction centres, bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin, ATP synthase, tyrosine kinase reception.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 6
Molecular Basis of DiseaseBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO363Semester 16Yes

Molecular Basis of Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Viles

Description: An introduction to a number of human diseases, with an emphasis on how these diseases are characterised at the molecular level. The module will include a study of the processes associated with the following amyloid formation in Mad Cow and Alzheimer's diseases, Bactorial Invasion, Flu, TB, Heart Disease, flavin deficiency and the role of metals in disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 6
Enzyme CatalysisBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO365Semester 26Yes

Enzyme Catalysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO265

Description: Prerequisites: Metabolic Pathways (SBS905). This module covers various aspects of enzyme catalysis including: enzymes as proteins; enzymes as catalysts; enzyme classification; and the role of molecular mobility in enzyme catalysis. You will also investigate the active site concept and the catalytic and substrate binding properties of amino acid residue sidechains. Binding energy, driving forces and free energy relationships; the use of kinetic analysis in the study of enzyme mechanism and inhibition; and recent theories on catalysis are also discussed. Several enzyme mechanisms will be described in detail to illustrate the applications of biophysical techniques (eg spectroscopy, crystallography) and site directed mutagenesis in the study of such mechanisms. you will be taught a number of important computer-based applications towards the study of enzymes, including the use of bioinformatics and molecular graphics programmes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 6
Protein Structure, Folding and AssembliesBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO367Semester 26Yes

Protein Structure, Folding and Assemblies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vidya Darbari
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO269

Description: In the first part this module will cover the processes of protein biosynthesis, folding and degradation, and assembly of large macromolecular complexes, as well as structure and function of the macromolecular complexes that are involved in these processes. These complexes include the nucleosome, the ribosome, chaperonins and the proteasome. The module will also cover the relationships between misfolding, formation of amyloid fibres and human disease. In the second part our present knowledge about structure and function of the following macromolecular assemblies will be presented: collagen, muscle proteins, and fatty acid synthase, as well as the different types of viruses.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Savannah Ecology and ConservationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO392Semester 16No

Savannah Ecology and Conservation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rob Knell

Description: In this module you will spend two weeks on field-location in Borneo. The module is designed to provide you with first-hand experience of ecological processes, biodiversity and conservation issues associated with humid tropical environments. Tropical rainforests are the most biologically diverse habitats on Earth and the loss of rainforest is of tremendous conservation concern, both due to loss of diversity as well as its consequences for global warming. You will spend time working in both terrestrial and aquatic systems, and there will be an emphasis on practical training in ecological survey and assessment methods. Topics will include: ecological processes in tropical rainforests and lakes including nutrient cycling, decomposition, pollination and seed dispersal; rainforest structure and defining characteristics and the importance of rainforests as centres of biodiversity; rainforest community ecology and tropical forests and lakes as centres of ecological diversification; practical training in survey methods for a range of terrestrial and aquatic taxonomic groups; anthropogenic factors affecting rainforests including disturbance, forest fragmentation, global warming, agriculture, development human-wildlife conflicts and wildlife management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Oral assessment or presentation
  • Item 2: 25% Field notebook (Portfolio)
  • Item 3: 25% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Essay 2 (1500 words)
Level: 6
Advanced Biochemical Research MethodsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO491Full year7No

Advanced Biochemical Research Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Peter Thorpe

Description: This module will provide an advanced training in techniques in biochemistry. In addition to lectures from members of staff and seminars from external speakers, there will be computer and practical workshops to teach methods in molecular biology, structural biology, biophysics and synthetic biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Protein Prep Report
  • Item 2: 25% Microscopy Report
  • Item 3: 25% Structure Report
  • Item 4: 25% Computer Lab Report
Level: 7
Advanced Biochemical Research MethodsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO491PFull year7No

Advanced Biochemical Research Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Peter Thorpe

Description: This module will provide an advanced training in techniques in biochemistry. In addition to lectures from members of staff and seminars from external speakers, there will be computer and practical workshops to teach methods in molecular biology, structural biology, biophysics and synthetic biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Protein Prep Report
  • Item 2: 25% Microscopy Report
  • Item 3: 25% Structure Report
  • Item 4: 25% Computer Lab Report
Level: 7
Biological Sciences Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO600Full year6No

Biological Sciences Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work and/or computational work in some aspect of Biological Sciences. The background, results and conclusions of the study to be reported in the form of an oral presentation (part-way through Sem B) and a dissertation (submitted toward the end of Sem B). The dissertation will not normally exceed 10,000 words, which includes a review of relevant literature, data presentation, analysis and discussion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Dissertation (10000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Presentation
  • Item 3: 20% Laboratory Work
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Project Skills in the Life SciencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO603Full year6No

Project Skills in the Life Sciences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sally Faulkner

Description: 30-unit project modules require prior SBCS approval. In this module students will: create a short, investigative project based on individual reading lists; give a presentation based on the above using Powerpoint; develop scientific writing and critical appraisal skills (referee a real but anonymous paper, write a referees report, redraft the paper); attend research seminars, research background to any two of them (by consulting web-site of speaker), and produce two reports discussing the research in non-technical language and explaining its likely significance for the layman. You will also have to either produce a website on a topical biological subject (eg environmental, health or ethical scientific issue), or produce a small portfolio of scientific images, either macroscopic or microscopic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Presentation (3 min)
  • Item 2: 10% Lay summary (250 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Media assignment (video or leaflet)
  • Item 4: 10% Self-reflection (1200 words)
  • Item 5: 15% Lay article
  • Item 6: 50% Dissertation (5000 words)
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Bioinformatics Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO702PFull year7No

Bioinformatics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant

Description: This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc Bioinformatics modules, by conducting a novel piece of bioinformatics work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at a partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Project Presentation
  • Item 2: 90% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO709PFull year7No

Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Leitch

Description: This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling or use of Kew's biological collections, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Students can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL and in RBG Kew. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that high quality supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in plant and fungal biology, ecology and evolution.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 10% Oral Presentation of results
Level: 7
Dissertation: Aquatic Ecology by ResearchBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO712PFull year7No

Dissertation: Aquatic Ecology by Research

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Christophe Eizaguirre

Description: The research project is a substantial piece of original research involving empirical laboratory and/ or field based studies. Students will be encouraged to choose a project from a diverse range of subjects closely aligned to existing cutting edge research
programmes in Aquatic Ecology (in its very broad sense) research groups of SBCS. Some may have ties to external agencies such
as the Environment Agency. Projects will involve a substantial component of lab and /or field data collection.

Students will be encouraged to identify advisors within the first half of semester 1 in order to start the heavy part of the research
project in January.

The preparation of the thesis will involve the majority of the following stages:
- considering an ambitious, suitable and achievable research topic
- discussion and preparing of a draft proposal in relation with academic advisor
- revision and finalization of the research goals and objectives
- write a literature review on the identified research topic
- field / lab work
- data analyses including up to date statistics
- writing thesis
- revision of the final text following supervisory comments
- oral presentation and viva.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Literature review (5,000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Work ethics - professional capability
  • Item 3: 60% Dissertation (10,000 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Presentation (20 min)
Level: 7
Genome BioinformaticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO721PSemester 17No

Genome Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yannick Wurm

Description: This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the analysis of DNA sequence data. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as sequence assembly, gene finding and genome annotation, phylogenetics, analysis of genomic variance among populations, genome wide association studies and prediction of gene structure and function. Practical exercises are used to gain experience with relevant existing bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-Class Test
  • Item 2: 80% Genome Analysis Task
Level: 7
Coding for ScientistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO723PSemester 17No

Coding for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant

Description: This module provides a hands-on introduction to computer programming (popularly known as coding) using scripting languages popular in the field. The focus is on producing robust software for repeatable data-centric scientific work. Key programming concepts are introduced, and these concepts are then brought together in scientifically relevant applications to analyse data, interact with a database and create dynamic web content. Good coding practice, such as the importance of documentation and version control, is emphasised throughout.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Programming Task (coursework)
Level: 7
Post-Genomic BioinformaticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO725PSemester 17No

Post-Genomic Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant

Description: This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the management and analysis of data produced by so-called post-genomic methods such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as the identification and quantitation of transcripts, proteins and metabolites, and analysis of the interactions between these key biological molecules. Practical exercises are used to gain experience with bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases that have been developed for this field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-Class Test
  • Item 2: 80% Data Analysis Task
Level: 7
Bioinformatics Software Development Group ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO727PSemester 27No

Bioinformatics Software Development Group Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant

Description: In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same written specification for a piece of software that must be delivered by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate software architecture and development plan, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real software development environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Software Development Project
  • Item 2: 20% Written Reflective Report (850 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Presentation
Level: 7
Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO733PSemester 27No

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yannick Wurm

Description: In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same genomic or transcriptomic data set that must be analysed by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate analysis pipeline, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real data analysis environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Software Development Project
  • Item 2: 20% Written Reflective Reports (850 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Presentation
Level: 7
Ecosystem Structure and FunctioningBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO737PSemester 17No

Ecosystem Structure and Functioning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer

Description: Ecosystems are under continued and growing threat from human activity. To preserve them we need to understand how ecosystems function and how their structure responds to either enforced or natural change. Key ecosystem functions (fluxes of energy, nutrients and organic matter), their services (freshwater, fisheries, climate regulation) and the consequences of local and global environmental changes (including predator loss, invasion of non-native species, eutrophication and climate warming) are assessed using contemporary population-ecological, biogeochemical, molecular-genetic and modelling methods. Empirical perspectives are complemented with an introduction to formal theoretical approaches to these problems that show how individual and population-level processes control structure and function of simple consumer-resource building blocks and complex ecological networks and the relationships between biodiversity, community structure and ecosystem stability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% MCQ
  • Item 2: 85% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 7
Science into Policy & ManagementBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO739PSemester 17No

Science into Policy & Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer

Description: Without knowledge, there can be no application. This module is designed to bring you 'face to face' with the regulators, policies and their science base, as these potential employers (e.g. CEFAS, Defra, the Environment Agency, Natural England) will give lectures on topical issues. The focus is on human impacts upon ecosystems, including pollution and habitat alteration and how these can be mitigated. National and international legislation and directives are considered (e.g. EU Water Framework Directive). Guest lecturers will also include consultants who will be able to advise on career paths. As a detailed case study, you will visit the River Communities Group based in Dorset for one week and investigate the link between successful science and policy: for example, contemporary aspects of the EU Water Framework Directive will be considered, including underlying methodology behind bioassessment and biomonitoring (e.g. RIVPACS). This will be closely linked to how the Environment Agency is working with Defra Test Catchments (DTCs).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (2000 words)
Level: 7
Plant Taxonomy and DiversityBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO741PSemester 27No

Plant Taxonomy and Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will provide an overview of global plant diversity, with a particular focus on flowering plants. It will be taught at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew by leading botanists, affording students the opportunity to explore the outstanding collections and facilities housed there. Topics will range from taxonomic principles and methodology, plant systematics and comparative biology (including morphology, chemistry and genomics), phylogenetics, biogeography and evolution. The module will have a practical component, providing excellent hands-on experience for students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Practical Exercise with Assessed Written Report
  • Item 2: 40% Written Assessment (2000 words)
Level: 7
Fungal Taxonomy and DiversityBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO743PSemester 17No

Fungal Taxonomy and Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will focus on fungal diversity and it will be taught at RBG, Kew by leading mycologists. Kew has the largest collection of fungal specimens in the world that will be available to the students during the course. The module will give an overview of the systematics and taxonomy of major fungal groups, of basic concepts in mycology, field collecting, and culturing and fungarium techniques. In addition, front-line research on the ecology of fungi (e.g., symbiosis, 'rotters and recyclers', pathogens), fungal biogeography, and fungal evolutionary genomics, will be explored through study of contemporary research. The module will have a practical component, providing excellent hands-on experience for students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Assessed Practical
Level: 7
Conservation and Ecosystem ScienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO745PSemester 27No

Conservation and Ecosystem Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will explore the role and application of plant and fungal science in integrated conservation and management of biodiversity, in the delivery of ecosystem services and livelihoods, and in the development of mechanisms for their maintenance and restoration in the context of a changing planet. Drawing on the exceptional breadth of expertise, collections and facilities across Kew's sites, and building on the fundamental understanding of plant and fungal taxonomy and diversity, it will provide an essential introduction to a range of technical approaches including policy development, species and habitat prioritisation, protected area management, conservation genetics, ecosystem service research, seed banking and propagation, application of traditional knowledge, and integrated conservation for biodiversity and livelihoods.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Assessed Written Exercise (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Research Plan
Level: 7
Research Frontiers in Biodiversity, Evolution and ConservationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO771PSemester 17No

Research Frontiers in Biodiversity, Evolution and Conservation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Buggs

Description: In this module you will be introduced to frontiers of knowledge in biodiversity, evolution and conservation research. You will learn how to read papers, write essays and give talks at a postgraduate level. After a series of lectures by experts in the field, you will choose a topic relevant to your field that is currently debated by scientists. You will research and discuss this topic, then write an essay about it.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Group presentation (20 min)
Level: 7
Statistics and Data AnalysisBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO773PSemester 17No

Statistics and Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rob Knell

Description: This module is focussed on teaching data analysis using the statistical programming language R. The module covers:
* The basics of using R
* Drawing publication standard graphs with R
* Experimental design,
* Exploratory data analysis,
* The fundamentals of statistical testing including t-tests and chi square tests,
* ANOVA and Regression
* Fitting and interpreting general linear models
*The basics of bioinformatics analysis in R.

The module is taught with a mix of theory and practice, with a typical day including roughly two hours of theory instruction in the morning followed by a practical session in the afternoon, often involving hands on analysis of real experimental data sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% MCQ
  • Item 2: 40% Stats assignment
  • Item 3: 40% Bioinformatics assignment
Level: 7
Biodiversity Loss - Challenges and SolutionsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO774PSemester 17No

Biodiversity Loss - Challenges and Solutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer

Description: Here students will study the direct and applied aspects of biodiversity loss and its mitigation across a range of ecosystems. Our rationale is simple and topical: Given the impact that human activity is having on biodiversity ¿ how, through science, can we understand the causes to biodiversity loss and find solutions to limiting this loss further and even reversing it? How can the science that students learn actually serve to improve the world we live in?

Students will be taught the reasons behind biodiversity loss, from the global to the local scale, looking at some of the causes in detail including climate change, land use change, pollution and the impacts of non-native species. Approaches to assessing quality of biodiversity data and measuring biodiversity loss will be covered including relevance of fieldwork survey and experimentation. Students will explore this topic through the writing of compelling research funding proposals.

Later in the module, students will examine the challenges facing science and policy development through a series of topical case studies including, for example, plastics in the environment, acidification of freshwaters, and illegal-trade in biodiversity. There will be interactions with practitioners working hands-on with threats to biodiversity and its conservation.

The rationale and ethos behind the module is the understanding of the scientific basis for assessing and halting biodiversity loss in a rapidly changing world and to appreciate how student's scientific knowledge can lead to opportunities and careers directly aimed at reversing biodiversity loss.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Research funding proposal exercise (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Case study summary (500 words)
Level: 7
Biodiversity and Conservation Field CourseBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO775PSemester 27No

Biodiversity and Conservation Field Course

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Rossiter

Description: The module focusses on developing field skills in topics related to biodiversity and conservation. Students will be trained for one of three field trip venues, depending on their MSc degree choices.

For those choosing to specialise in Ecological and Evolutionary Biology, the students will travel to Borneo, a biodiversity hotspot in a tropical forest, where students are particularly exposed to a wealth of animals. Topics will encompass aspects of taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, conservation and evolution. Specific areas of content will include ecological processes in tropical rainforests (decomposition, pollination and seed dispersal); rainforest structure and defining characteristics (including the importance of rainforests as centres of biodiversity) and anthropogenic factors affecting rainforests (including disturbance, forest fragmentation and agriculture). There will be strong emphasis on practical training, in particular, students will be trained in a range of survey methods covering diverse terrestrial and aquatic taxonomic groups. The module will also provide training in data collection, analysis and presentation

For those choosing to specialise in Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation, the students will travel to a biodiversity hotspot in Madagascar, where students are particularly exposed to a wealth of plant and fungal groups. This Madagascar Field Course Module will provide an introduction to practical field work, including botanical surveys and flowering plant identification and how they can be applied to solving practical problems of conservation management as well as biodiversity research. It will be taught by botanists from the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC) in Antananarivo. Several site visits to conservation projects and some taught case studies will give an over-view of conservation in Madagascar.

For those choosing to specialise in Freshwater and Marine Ecology, the students will travel to a marine biodiversity hotspot in Cape Verde, where students focus on the diversity, behaviour, ecology, physiology, conservation and management of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), and marine turtles. It covers such issues as the life history and migrations of turtles, their diving ability and behaviours, the social behaviour of dolphins, and the conservation of whales. It also includes (even though they are not mammals or reptiles!) a brief look at the sea-birds and sharks that will likely also be seen during field excursions. For part of the module students will be taught in the archipelago of Cape Verde, with boat trips for whales and shark observations, sea turtle monitoring.

We reserve the right to change the location of any of these field courses if advice on travel from the Foreign Commonwealth Office recommends it, or for logistical reasons it becomes impractical. Whilst the field trip is compulsory, if a student is unexpectedly unable to travel, an alternative method of assessment will be undertaken.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Field skills
  • Item 2: 70% Project work
  • Item 3: 5% Engagement
Level: 7
Ecology and Evolution Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO776PFull year7No

Ecology and Evolution Research Project

Credits: 105.0
Contact: Prof Christophe Eizaguirre

Description: This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in genomics, ecology and evolutionary biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Project presentation (10 min)
  • Item 2: 70% Thesis (10,000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Literature review (2000 words)
Level: 7
Statistics and BioinformaticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO781PSemester 17No

Statistics and Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rob Knell

Description: This module is focussed on teaching data analysis using the statistical programming language R. The module covers the basics of using R; drawing publication-standard graphs with R; experimental design; exploratory data analysis; the fundamentals of statistical testing including t-tests and chi-square tests; ANOVA and Regression; fitting and interpreting general linear models; the basics of bioinformatic analysis in R. The module is taught with a mix of theory and practice, with a typical day including roughly two hours of theory instruction in the morning followed by a practical session in the afternoon, often involving hands-on analysis of real experimental data sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% MCQ (15 questions)
  • Item 2: 40% Statistics coursework (5 pages)
  • Item 3: 40% Bioinformatics coursework (3 exercises)
Level: 7
Statistics for BioinformaticiansBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO782PSemester 17No

Statistics for Bioinformaticians

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Joseph Williamson

Description: This module is focussed on teaching data analysis using the statistical programming language R. The module covers the basics of using R; drawing publication-standard graphs with R; experimental design; exploratory data analysis; the fundamentals of statistical testing including t-tests and chi-square tests; ANOVA and Regression; fitting and interpreting general linear models; the basics of bioinformatic analysis in R. The module is taught with a mix of theory and practice, with a typical day including roughly two hours of theory instruction in the morning followed by a practical session in the afternoon, often involving hands-on analysis of real experimental data sets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% MCQ
  • Item 2: 40% Statistics coursework
  • Item 3: 40% Bioinformatics coursework
Level: 7
Problems and Analysis in Biodiversity, Evolution and ConservationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO788PSemester 27No

Problems and Analysis in Biodiversity, Evolution and Conservation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tom Fayle

Description: This essential module will teach students how to compile relevant information to prime their research project. They will work directly with their project supervisor who will guide them to i) develop their critical thinking with regards to the most up to date research in their field of expertise and ii) synthesise complex information in a coherent literature review, and (iii) write that up in the form of a literature review suitable for a international review journal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Report (5000 words)
Level: 7
Biodiversity Survey and Spatial AnalysisBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO789PSemester 17No

Biodiversity Survey and Spatial Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mike Fay

Description: Here you will learn how to work with genetic, geographical and biodiversity record data and how to draw conclusions about species distributions, status, and potential conservation approaches. There are three blocks of training:

The survey & spatial analysis block teaches the main approaches to vegetation surveying and securing good quality data on which to base analysis of species distribution and status. Assessment will include production of a species distribution map.

The conservation genetics block provides an introduction to theory and practice, and examines through case studies of plant & fungal diversity how genetic diversity information can inform conservation decisions. Conclusions are discussed in a group session.

The final red-listing block provides training in the requirements for assessing extinction threat in plant and fungal species. The assessment includes preparing a conservation report and a preliminary red list assessment for one species. This is a professional competency using IUCN endorsed materials and approaches.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Mapping exercise
  • Item 2: 50% Report
Level: 7
Biochemistry MSci Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO790Full year7No

Biochemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr John Viles

Description: Students work independently on a topic in biochemistry in which their supervisor is a recognized expert. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of this advanced research project. A thesis (dissertation) is written by the student describing the work undertaken, and placing it in context of other research in the field. The dissertation is defended in an oral examination, which includes a short oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework
  • Item 2: 70% Dissertation
Level: 7
Conservation and Restoration in PracticeBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO790PSemester 27No

Conservation and Restoration in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mike Fay
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take BIO789P

Description: Here you will learn the latest approaches to preserving plant diversity, the recovery of priority species, and restoration of habitats using UK and overseas case examples.
The first week teaches the biology & practice of seed banking and cryopreservation , and the use of ecological horticulture for species reintroduction and recovery.
The second week reviews the opportunities and approaches for restoring functional biodiverse habitats that will be resilient to climate change and will contribute to livelihoods and natural capital values.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Conservation & Recovery Plan
  • Item 2: 50% Habitat Restoration Plan
Level: 7
Biodiversity and Conservation Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBIO791PFull year7No

Biodiversity and Conservation Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Leitch

Description: This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in genomics, ecology and evolutionary biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Project presentation
  • Item 2: 90% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Essential Skills for Biomedical ScientistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Biomedical Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Szulgit

Description: This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biomedical scientists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills for Biomedical Sciences.
The module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as data and information handling, oral and written communication skills (including essay writing), experimental design, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations in the biomedical sciences. The module will explain how certain aspect of mathematics and chemistry underpin biomedical sciences and will support students in acquiring basic numerical and chemical skills (including SI units, order of magnitude, basic geometry, calculation of concentration and molarity, scales in time, linear and logarithmic equations and graphs). Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support biomedical sciences.

(2) Considering the role of biomedical sciences in the "real world".
Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biomedical sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Short written work
  • Item 2: 13% Poster
  • Item 3: 25% Essay
  • Item 4: 50% In-class test
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Human AnatomyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD113Semester 14No

Human Anatomy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Riches

Description: B990 students only. In this module you will cover human anatomy from a systems-based perspective. Human anatomy will be introduced through review of the major systems. You will study material relating to systemic anatomy, especially the lymphatic and integumentary systems. You will be introduced to comparative hominid anatomy, and the evolution of human anatomy, especially in relation to the skull, skeleton and dentition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Practical 1
  • Item 2: 25% Practical 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
CellsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD116Semester 14No

Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kenneth Linton

Description: This module provides an introduction to cell biology. Specifically, we consider cell structure and the microscopy techniques that enable visualisation of cell structures. The structure and function of the cell membrane, organelles, nucleus and cytoskeleton will be explored. Finally, normal cell cycle, cell division and differentiation processes are examined alongside their dysregulation leading to cancer.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Short written work
  • Item 2: 13% In-class test 1
  • Item 3: 13% In-class test 2
  • Item 4: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
The Microbial World and HumansBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD117Semester 14No

The Microbial World and Humans

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme The module is an introduction to microbiology and will provide a general knowledge of archaea, bacteria, fungi and protists. There are also selective discussions in greater detail, for example of motility, adherence and metabolic diversity, as well as the bases for methodologies for asepsis and infection control. Microbial ecology is presented as a discipline which explores the roles of microorganisms in natural processes and mutualistic associations. Practicals allow students to observe living bacteria, fungi and protists and to gain experience in the safe handling and culture of microorganisms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class MCQ 1
  • Item 3: 25% In-class MCQ 1
Level: 4
Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and IntegrationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD121Semester 24No

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and Integration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anthony Michael
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take BMD113 and ( take BMD115 or take BMD116 )

Description: This module provides an introduction to major non-cardiovascular/respiratory physiological systems involved in human homeostasis for students reading for the degree in Biomedical Science. Topics covered will include: microanatomy and histology of the major human tissues; feedback control, temperature regulation, cell exchange processes; function and integration of nervous, muscle, gastrointestinal, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. The module will describe some of the major human physiological diseases, disorders and dysfunctions of these systems, and some parasitic diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% In-class MCQ 1
  • Item 3: 35% In-class MCQ 2
Level: 4
Biomolecules of LifeBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD123Semester 24No

Biomolecules of Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Durham

Description: The module offers a grounding in a good range of biochemical topics including the structure function relationship of protein, carbohydrates and lipids; fundamentals of enzyme catalysis and kinetics; transport of molecules across biomembranes; biochemical reactions involved in the generation and storage of metabolic energy; in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle; mitochondrial electron transfer and ATP synthesis; and molecular motors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Practical report 1 (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 25% Practical report 2 (1 hr)
Level: 4
Exploring NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD161Semester 14No

Exploring Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Riddoch-Contreras

Description: This module introduces leading topics of interest in neuroscience, through study of which students will gain essential skills in academic and scientific writing, reading scientific literature and writing short reports. An introduction to research methods and statistics will also be provided. The module will aim to give a historical and scientific overview of neuroscience from early anatomists studying the nervous system to the significant contribution to the discipline made by Nobel laureates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Oral presentation
  • Item 2: 40% Written Report (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 30% Practical report (500 words)
Level: 4
Functional NeuroanatomyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD163Semester 24No

Functional Neuroanatomy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arturas Volianskis

Description: This module will introduce students to the development and anatomy of the nervous system. Topics will include the principles of nervous system development, axonal and dendritic growth. The anatomical organisation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including blood supply and functionally important neural circuits will also be covered. Lectures will be accompanied by practical workshops designed to encourage accurate observation and annotation skills and mastery of functional neuroanatomy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Practical report (500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
GeneticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD164Semester 14No

Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Patricia Munroe

Description: This module consists of an introduction to genetics, a description of the process by which genetic information is converted into the molecules that make up living things, and a review of the essential properties of those molecules. Genetics topics covered include DNA structure, classical and molecular genetics and genomics. We then examine how information flows from DNA to RNA and then to protein to give the recognisable phenotypic features of living things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Introduction to PharmacologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD171Semester 24No

Introduction to Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Egle Solito

Description: This module will introduce to the students the concept of the interaction of drugs and other exogenous chemicals with living organisms. It will introduce students to the basic pharmacological principles and concepts which will define drug activity within the body including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These introductory lectures will give students a broad overview into approaches used in drug discovery, medicinal chemistry, main drug targets, drug absorption and routes of administration, drug metabolism and elimination, phamacokinetics, drug treatment of major medical conditions and rationale for prescribing a particular drug, the role of biotechnology in drug discovery, preclinical pharmaceutical development, understanding of the use of animals in pharmacology and adverse drug reactions. Lectures will be delivered by experts in both academia and industry. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, we will provide practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Practical Report
  • Item 3: 25% Oral presentation
Level: 4
Research Skills for PharmacologistsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD175Semester 14No

Research Skills for Pharmacologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Nightingale

Description: This module will cover some basic laboratory skills including experimental design and hands-on experience of a range of laboratory practical (such as quantification of drugs in biological fluids) techniques enabling them to develop skills of working safely and accurately in the laboratory. This module will also provide a basic knowledge of the appropriate statistical ideas and methods to use in the collection, presentation and analysis of pharmacological data, and the use of statistical software. Students will also learn about Informatics (finding the correct information online), bioinformatics (how computers can be used to analyse genomes, genes and gene products), general scientific reading and writing skills (including how to avoid plagiarism), ethics and drug trial design as well as presentation skills in a scientific context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework essay
  • Item 3: 25% Oral Presentation
Level: 4
Tissue BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD181Semester 24No

Tissue Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Helen Rifca Le Dieu

Description: In this module you will be introduced to the embryological development of the major organs and study the nature of different cell types, the structure of different organs and the structure-function relationship of major organs. Your work will include studies on connective tissue, muscle, blood vessels, circulatory system, skin, respiratory system gastrointestinal system, liver and pancreas, urinary system, endocrine system, male reproductive system, female reproductive system, central nervous system, skeletal system, lymphoreticular system, cytology and embryology. In practicals you will be using microscopes to learn the identification of normal tissues and organs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class test 1
  • Item 3: 25% In-class test 2
Level: 4
Case-based Biomedical SciencesBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD202Full year5No

Case-based Biomedical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Durham

Description: In this module students will analyse and discuss cases in small groups using the Problem Based Learning (PBL) process, which resembles the PBL structure used in the medical curriculum. There will be two group meetings per case: the first meeting to establish the learning objectives through group discussions, the second meeting to exchange information gathered through self-directed learning.

Students will work both independently and in teams to develop thinking, communication and research skills through analysis of the clinical case histories.

The cases studied will be chosen from a bank of cases and may embrace the disciplines of human physiology, anatomy & development, metabolism, molecular biology & genetics and pharmacology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay 2 (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 25% Essay 3 (1000 words)
  • Item 4: 25% Essay 4 (1000 words)
Level: 5
Human Molecular BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD211Semester 15No

Human Molecular Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Krysov
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD111 or take BIO163

Description: In this module you will look at the following: Structure and organisation of eukaryotic genes; replication and repair of DNA; gene transcription; RNA processing; translation and post-translational processing; control of eukaryotic gene expression; generation of antibody diversity; recombinant DNA technology; basic principles of human molecular genetics; the Human Genome Project; pharmacogenetics and pharmagogenomics; transgenic and knockout mice; and gene therapy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Practical report 1
  • Item 3: 25% Practical report 2
Level: 5
Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and RespiratoryBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD221Semester 15No

Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and Respiratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Szulgit
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD121

Description: This module is for students who enter under the B990 programme only. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy (SBC102), The Human Cell (SBC100). This module provides an introduction to the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Topics covered will include: structure, function and regulation of cardiovascular activity and respiration. It will include descriptions of some of the major diseases, conditions, abnormalities anddysfunctions of the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems and problems associated with aerospace travel and diving.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In class test 1
  • Item 2: 30% In class test 2
  • Item 3: 35% Lab report
  • Item 4: 10% Peer marking
Level: 5
Essential Biochemistry for Human LifeBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD223Semester 25No

Essential Biochemistry for Human Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Thorpe
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD123

Description: This module is only open to students on the Biomedical Sciences degree programme. The module aims to provide biochemical information on selected specialised structural and functional bulk proteins including: selected human physiological processes; monosaccharide, fatty acid, steroid, amino acid and nucleotide metabolic pathways; regulation of metabolic pathways; tissue specialisation; and metabolic diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% In-class test
  • Item 3: 25% Practical
Level: 5
Biomedical PharmacologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD225Semester 25No

Biomedical Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Buckingham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD121 or take BIO125

Description: This module provides an introduction to the subject of pharmacology, the study of drug action on biological systems. Initial lectures focus on important general pharmacological principles, including a consideration of how drugs are absorbed, distributed and then removed from the body. Subsequent lectures focus on the therapeutic action of drugs on example disease states of specific physiological systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% In class test 1 (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 25% In class test 2 (1 hr)
Level: 5
Clinical MicrobiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD231Semester 25No

Clinical Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Wareham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD117

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: The Microbial World and Humans (SBC211). In this module you will acquire a basic understanding of modern medical microbiology. You will study the processes by which microorganisms cause human disease, how the pathogens can be identified, and what steps can be taken for the prevention and treatment of infections. There will be a particular emphasis on the development of observational, practical and analytical skills through laboratory work and demonstrations. Your topics will include: pathogens and their interaction with the human host, covering bacteria, protists and viruses and including mechanisms of infection, mechanisms of defense, antibiotic action and antibiotic resistance, the transmission of disease, including public health microbiology, the prevention of infection in hospitals and in the community, and a review of newly emerging diseases. You will be provided with a catalogue of microbial diseases, including infections of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, the nervous system and wounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% In class test (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 25% Poster
Level: 5
Basic ImmunologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD251Semester 25No

Basic Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mathieu-Benoit Voisin

Description: Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017), Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008), The Diversity of Life (SBS005). This module will cover the principles of innate and acquired immunity, as well as the structure and function of cells and organs of the immune system. Antigens, immunoglobins, complement, and immunoassays and the molecular basis of Bcell and Tcell responses are also covered. Other topics include major histocompatibility complex, antigen presentation, cellcell interactions and cytokines. Transplantation, tolerance, autoimmunity, infectious diseases, inflammation and hypersensitivity reactions are also considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% MCQ 1
  • Item 2: 20% MCQ 2
  • Item 3: 20% MCQ 3
  • Item 4: 40% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD261Semester 15No

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baker
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take CHE202A
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD123 or take BIO161 or take BMD161

Description: This module will develop students' understanding of electrical and chemical signalling in neurons and synaptic transmission. Students will learn about the mechanisms of excitability of nerve cells, voltage-dependent membrane permeability, ion channels and synaptic transmission. Neurotransmitters and their receptors will be covered and students will gain an understanding of intracellular signalling and synaptic modulation. The module will provide an critical understanding of the regulation of neuronal signalling, necessary for advanced study of neuronal circuitry/network function.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Practical report (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination
Level: 5
Systems NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD265Semester 25No

Systems Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arturas Volianskis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD261

Description: This module aims to provide an overview of integrated systems which control cognition and behaviour. Topics include the organisation and planning of movement, visual processing, smell and taste perception, cognition, learning and memory. Students will gain understanding of techniques used in systems neuroscience including tract tracing of interacting groups of neurons, immunohistochemistry and extra-cellular electrophysiology. Practical sessions and workshops will give students experience in designing experiments, using apparatus, collecting and interpreting data.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Practical report (500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination
Level: 5
The Business of PharmacologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD271Semester 25No

The Business of Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christoph Thiemermann

Description: This module will bring together pharmacology knowledge and apply it in the context of commercialisation. Students will examine and compare small and start up enterprises, including University spin outs alongside larger pharmaceutical companies. This module will also introduce aspects of finance, intellectual property rights, business law and marketing for business development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 16% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 9% Oral Presentation
  • Item 3: 75% Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 5
Clinical Pharmacology and the Assessment of Drug SafetyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD273Semester 25No

Clinical Pharmacology and the Assessment of Drug Safety

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rizgar Mageed

Description: This module will introduce students to the drugs that work on systems including the neurological, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular disorders and cancer and their mechanisms of action. It will also consider drugs of abuse including cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana and their harmful effects and post marketing safety of pharmaceuticals and pharmacovigilance. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Oral presentation
  • Item 2: 25% In-class MCQ test
  • Item 3: 50% Online Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Drug Target and IdentificationBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD275Semester 15No

Drug Target and Identification

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD115 or take BIO111 or take BMD116

Description: This module will cover the main drug targets including receptors, enzymes and transporters and molecular therapeutic drug targets such as DNA, rRNA and mRNA. Lecture content will include, topics such as receptor theory, GPCR structure and function, nuclear receptor structure and function, ligand-gated ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases, signalling pathways including Jak/STAT pathway, an overview of developmental signalling, hedgehog pathway, Wnt pathway, TGF beta/BMP, Notch and FGF pathways and crosstalk between these pathways. Lectures will be followed by interactive sessions in specialised areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers and reinforce the lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Exam (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Practical Report
  • Item 3: 25% Oral presentation
Level: 5
Endocrine Physiology and BiochemistryBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD311Semester 16No

Endocrine Physiology and Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leonardo Guasti

Description: This module covers hormone definitions, including the range of structures and roles; methods in endocrinology; receptors, concept and significance of high affinity; hormone dynamics; hormone signalling; and modes of action. You will also look at mammalian endocrine glands and hormones: pituitary, thyroid, pancreas. The endocrinology of reproduction; the adrenal gland, and renin/angiotensin system; the paracrine and autocrine systems; growth factors; locally produced hormones; local regulation of hormonal action; and tissue differentiation are also covered. The relationship between hormones and cancer will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay 1
  • Item 3: 25% Essay 2
Level: 6
Cellular Pathology and Blood ScienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD321Semester 26No

Cellular Pathology and Blood Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Helen Rifca Le Dieu
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD181 or take SNU213

Description: This module is only available to those students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: Tissue Biology (SBC101). This module provides an overview of basic pathological mechanisms including cell injury, wound healing, inflammation and cell adaptations. The process of neoplasia and the characteristics of major solid tumours will be covered including a review of the mechanisms of tumour spread. The Haematology component will cover basic haematopoiesis, anaemia, haemaglobinophathies, thalassaemia, myelodysplasia, haematological malignancies, haemostasis and bleeding and thrombotic disorders of haemostasis. An overview of the history and basis of blood transfusion and its complications will also be provided.The practical sessions will build on the earlier Microanatomy, Histology and Cytology Module in providing exposure to the histological and cytological interpretation of disease.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% In class test 1
  • Item 3: 25% In class test 2
Level: 6
Infectious DiseasesBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD323Semester 26No

Infectious Diseases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lucinda Hall
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD231

Description: In this module we select a few topics related to infectious diseases to cover in depth. These will include topics that are currently causing public interest or concern in the UK and internationally. Some lectures will cover principles that apply to many microorganisms, while others will look in detail at particular microbial species.

Two major themes will link lectures on different organisms:
1. Microbial pathogenesis
- How microorganisms damage and manipulate the host
- How microorganisms evade the immune response
- How we investigate microbial pathogenesis
2. Combatting infectious diseases
- Public health surveillance and epidemiology
- Molecular diagnostics and typing
- Drug development
- Vaccines

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-class Test 1
  • Item 2: 25% In-class Test 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Biomedical NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD325Semester 16No

Biomedical Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Buckingham
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD115 or take BIO125

Description: This module will use innovative teaching to equip you with an understanding of the workings of the nervous system and how it goes wrong in disease. You will also learn how to investigate problems with the nervous system and to form your own, novel lines of inquiry and points of view. You will learn how the brain uses sensory information, makes decisions and produces a controlled motor output. The module integrates an understanding of basic physiology with clinical applications, with a continual emphasis on what is meant to happen, what goes wrong in disease, and how such knowledge leads to treatment. You will cover major health issues such as drug addiction, mental illness and dementia. You will learn actively through a combination of simulations, lectures, seminars and workshops. These will teach you in the same way that practicing neuroscientists learn.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Data activity
  • Item 2: 30% Essay
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Advanced ImmunologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD351Semester 16No

Advanced Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Stagg
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD251

Description: This module will build on the second year immunology teaching, to provide in-depth knowledge of fundamental immuneprocesses, of the ways in which these interact as a complex system that provides protection against infection disease but can alsocause disease when dysregulated and of the importance of immunology in modern medicine. There will be emphasis onmolecular immunology and the key signalling pathways that underpin immunological mechanisms. Lectures in specialised areas of the subject will be given by experts in their field, providing a sense of the frontiers of their subject. In addition to formal
lectures, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-examine research papers. We also hope to offer laboratory practical sessions in which students will be able their own classic immunology experiments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Short written work
  • Item 2: 25% MCQ test
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Drug DesignBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD358Semester 26No

Drug Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Rayomand Khambata

Description: Students will be given a perspective on the history of drug discovery to the present challenges in drug design. The medicinal chemistry content will provide students with an understanding of the complex biological and chemical problems that are involved in the design and synthesis of novel therapeutic agents. They will be given an in-depth analysis of the principles of identifying new compounds with the potential to be drugs, and their development for therapeutic use. Students will also be given an understanding of preclinical testing of drugs including the use of animal models for safety testing, intra and inter-species variations, detecting carcinogenicity in experimental systems and man, strategies of new initiatives in pharmaceutical development and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals.

Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework essay
  • Item 2: 20% Oral presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Repair and Regeneration in the Nervous SystemBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD361Semester 16No

Repair and Regeneration in the Nervous System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD261 and take BMD265

Description: This module focuses on response of the nervous system to injury focusing on the peripheral nervous system and spinal cord. Detailed organisation of the peripheral nervous system, spinal cord including pathways and relevant higher brain structures will be covered. Pathological mechanisms and plasticity of the system will be examined. Topics will be covered in the context of experimental studies to develop understanding of current research strategies in the laboratory and clinic aiming to lessen effects of such injuries and facilitate neural regeneration and functional recovery.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Written Poster critique (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral poster presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Stem Cells and Regenerative MedicineBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD363Semester 16No

Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristin Braun
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD115 or take BMD116

Description: This module aims to provide a comprehensive overview and foundation in stem cell biology, including applications in regenerative medicine. The module will cover topics including: developmental origin of stem cells, comparing/contrasting different types of stem cells, biological regulation of stem cells and tissue-specific functions. The module also will cover fundamental principles of tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming. Finally, the module will explore how these concepts can be applied in academic, industrial and clinical settings, towards the development of novel regenerative technologies and treatment of disease. Essential generic skills that will be developed on this module include critical thinking, organisation and communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Exam (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Short written work
  • Item 3: 30% Poster
Level: 6
Biomarkers in NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD365Semester 26No

Biomarkers in Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Riddoch-Contreras

Description: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of biomarkers in both neurological and psychiatric disorders. The application of biomarkers for diagnosis, patient stratification, monitoring disease progression and establishing drug effects and safety will be discussed. Students will gain an appreciation of current genomic, proteomic and neuroimaging approaches to undertake biomarker discovery and validation. Neurological conditions such as Parkinson's, Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases and neurotrauma will be discussed as well as emerging biomarkers for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, and depression.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Written report (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Oral presentation
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Perspectives on Brain DisordersBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD369Semester 26No

Perspectives on Brain Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BMD261

Description: The module will focus on understanding the mechanisms underlying complex brain disorders and injury. Topic covered will include an integrated view of the major neurotransmitter systems and in-depth analysis of the mechanisms underlying the effects of drugs used in central nervous system. Neuronal pathways using excitatory and inhibitory amino acids and neuropeptides will be reviewed, with emphasis on their involvement in neuropathological processes underlying disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, schizophrenia, mood disorders, pain, head injury, stroke, epilepsy and drug abuse.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Oral presentation
  • Item 2: 25% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 6
Receptors and Mechanisms of Cell SignallingBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD373Semester 16No

Receptors and Mechanisms of Cell Signalling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray

Description: This module will consider the general properties of receptors, signal transduction pathway, and the regulation of their activity. Emphasis will be given to G-protein coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases and nuclear receptors. Introductory lectures will be followed by interactive sessions in specialised areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers and reinforce the lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay
  • Item 3: 25% In class test
Level: 6
Translational Pharmacology and Innovative TherapeuticsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD375Semester 16No

Translational Pharmacology and Innovative Therapeutics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michele Bombardieri

Description: Students will be exposed to innovative therapeutics in areas including vaccines, oncology, cardiovascular, metabolic diseases, pain and neuroscience, inflammation and immunology as well as rare disorders. Students will also gain awareness into challenges that the pharmaceutical industries face. Lectures will cover topics such as drug shortages, targeted/personalised drugs, use of biomarkers, clinical trial design, drug safety, risk/benefit assessments, collaboration between patient, academia, industry and the regulatory community, international collaborations, policy and bioethics, novel tools for scientific/clinical communication, sustainability of innovation/financial models of product development/pricing, marketing and licencing. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in both academia and industry. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Exam (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay
  • Item 3: 25% Oral presentation
Level: 6
Classic Papers and Current Topics in PharmacologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD377Semester 16No

Classic Papers and Current Topics in Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carol Shoulders

Description: In this module Students will carry out an exhaustive search of the scientific and medical literature which is relevant to their research project using the resources of the University, including appropriate databases and specialist search engines, as well as paper-based resources in the University Library. This module will provide PBL-like tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. Some students may further develop this work to include a meta analysis of multiple papers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Essay
  • Item 3: 25% Journal
Level: 6
Clinical Trials and Regulatory AffairsBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD378Semester 26No

Clinical Trials and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Pugliese

Description: This module will introduce students to the whole spectrum of the clinical trials process from first-time-in-human-beings studies through to post-marketing studies that examine whether clinical trial promises translate to 'real-life' benefits for patients, with reliable evidence that benefits are likely to exceed their harms. The stringent processes for establishing and appraising the evidence with be critically discussed, together exploring the issues of the global market-place for medicines, the roles and challenges of regulators responsible for approving new drugs for public.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% In-class test
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework
Level: 6
Cancer BiologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD381Semester 16No

Cancer Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Martin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take BIO116 or take SNU213 or take BMD116 or take BMD115 or ( take BIO111 and take BIO163 )

Description: This module is only available to students who enter under the Biomedical Sciences (B990), Medical Genetics (C431), Pharmacology & Innovative Therapeutics (B211), and with Forensic programmes. This module will define neoplasia, describe the macro and microscopic appearance of range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. Specifically, the causes of the transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The module will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Short written work
  • Item 3: 30% Essay
Level: 6
Molecular Basis of Personalised MedicineBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD383Semester 26No

Molecular Basis of Personalised Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angus Cameron

Description: This module will build on basic information on the pathological processes and cancer biology provided in other modules to provide an in-depth analysis of the tools available to analyse heterogeneity in disease (gene expression arrays, SNP analysis, next generation sequencing), and how these can be used to stratify disease and then exploited to develop individualised treatment. It will examine strategies being developed to refine treatment programmes and also investigate how such analyses can be used to predict risk and so develop preventive strategies. It will be lecture based, delivered by experts in the field, and supplemented with seminar sessions describing approaches to analysing data and interrogating the literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Coursework essay
  • Item 3: 10% Practical
Level: 6
Biomedical Sciences Research ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD600Full year6No

Biomedical Sciences Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson

Description: 30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Laboratory Work
  • Item 2: 20% Oral presentation
  • Item 3: 60% Final Project Report (10000 words)
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Project: Engaging the Public with ScienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD606Full year6No

Project: Engaging the Public with Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Durham

Description: How can we convey the importance of science and research to people who haven't studied scientific subjects? Why is it vital to do so? What is the difference between communicating science and involving the public in science?
In this module you will explore different approaches to engaging the public in science, with an emphasis on biological and medical sciences. You will look in detail at a range of examples of public engagement such as museums, broadcasts, social media and schemes that involve patient groups in medical research. You will critically assess who they are designed for and how well they work for different audiences. Examples will include some of the unique public engagement activities offered by QMUL. Based on what you have learned you will then develop and undertake a public engagement object/activity yourself. Teaching for the module will include face-to-face sessions, online resources and site visits. Assessment will be through coursework.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Lay abstract (500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation of novel engagement object (10 min)
  • Item 3: 10% In course reflection
  • Item 4: 20% Engagement activity participation
  • Item 5: 45% Public engagement placement report (5000 words)
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Research Project in NeuroscienceBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD650Full year6No

Research Project in Neuroscience

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ping Yip

Description: The aim of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to conduct an original research project in the field of neuroscience. This is a practical-based module wherein students conduct original research supervised by an academic member of staff through the academic year. Students are required to explore the background of the research and its rationale, construct hypotheses to be tested, learn necessary skills with which to conduct the work, compile results and analyse them. They will write a dissertation including critical analysis of literature, reporting of experimental design and results as well as their evaluation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Dissertation (8000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Supervisor's Mark
  • Item 3: 20% Oral Presentation (10-15 minutes)
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
Research Project in PharmacologyBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD670Full year6No

Research Project in Pharmacology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work, normally resulting in a piece of original research in the area of pharmacology and therapeutics. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field. The student also gives a short oral presentation on their work. This is a compulsory module of 30 credits and will be presented as a report not exceeding 6000 words.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Dissertation (8000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Supervisor mark
  • Item 3: 20% Research methods (10-15 minutes)
Level: 6
NetworkingBIO_PSY_6_S
MSc Biomedical Sciences Experimental ProjectBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD700PFull year7No

MSc Biomedical Sciences Experimental Project

Credits: 105.0
Contact: Dr Christoph Engl

Description: An experimental investigation involving laboratory work and/or computational work in some aspect of Biomedical Sciences. The student will be embedded within the research community of SBCS/Barts Cancer Institute and likely other institutes within SMD. The student will attend research seminars and research group meetings and typically spend a proportion of each day (from January until August) in the laboratory doing research. There will be a series or short written and spoken reports (incl Poster Presentation, Research Talk (oral presentation), Research Dissertation). The dissertation will be 10,000 words, which includes a review of relevant literature, data presentation, analysis and discussion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Poster Presentation
  • Item 2: 15% Oral presentation with questions
  • Item 3: 70% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
MSc Biomedical Sciences Literature ReviewBiological and Behavioural SciencesBMD701PSemester 17No

MSc Biomedical Sciences Literature Review

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christoph Engl

Description: In the early stages of the MSc Biomedical Sciences the student will undertake a literature review surrounding the research project they are to undertake.
The module involves the production of a report, ~5000 words.
The report will contain five elements.
i) A title of the students future dissertation in a relevant area of Biomedical Research.
ii) A description of the general background to the relevant research field.
iii) A comprehensive literature review of the specific research topic.
iv) A very brief research proposal suitable for a PhD research project will be outlined, with a focus on the first year of the research program.
v) Finally a short formal talk will be presented to a specialist audience summarizing their literature review and can include a "Research Pitch" .

This compulsory 15 credit module will involve regular one-to-one meetings with the project supervisor(s) and should be completed within the first ten weeks (in semester 1).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Literature Review & Research Proposal (2500 words)
Level: 7
Fundamentals of ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS001Semester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Lisa Morrison
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS107

Description: This module introduces students to the purpose, operations and implications of management by exploring the contexts within which management takes place. We reflect on management in relation to the social, economic, technological and legal conditions within which it operates, and analyse political and environmental consequences. We often think of management as trying to manage flows of energy, finance and labour, but it increasingly is required to confront changing social and political structures on a world scale, and challenging environmental conditions as well.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Assignment (1500 words)
Level: 4
Operations ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS002Semester 15Yes

Operations Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Roman Matousek

Description: This module has been designed to provide students with a clear understanding of the most important issues in OM (such as process design, quality planning and control, supply chain management, inventory management) through a blend of theoretical approaches and seminar-based activities. However, students are also encouraged to analyse the relationship between process design in services and manufacturing and the reproduction of technical and managerial knowledge, and the implications of such a relationship in terms of governance and strategic decisions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Report (2000 words)
Level: 5
Research MethodologyBusiness and ManagementBUS007Semester 25Yes

Research Methodology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fadi Safieddine

Description: Business and Management research methodologies with different epistemological and methodological perspectives introduce: * Academic literature review to identify interesting questions for quantitative and qualitative research * Data collection/analysis * Consideration of scientific, political and cultural underpinnings * Research topic identification for an independent study * Sensitivity to issues of outcome validity and reliability. Seminars emphasise feedback on the independent research project by using data analysis software (e.g. SPSS) to help with assessments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Project (2500 words)
Level: 5
MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS011Semester 25Closed

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis

Description: This module provides a broad overview of the key marketing concepts that underpin marketing practice. The module introduces students to buyer behaviour, marketing research, segmentation, targeting and positioning through marketing mix activities. Along the way, the social consequences of marketing practice are considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Portfolio (3000 words)
Level: 5
Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS014Semester 25Closed

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: The module introduces students to the key processes concerned with the management of people within organisations. It is pitched at non-specialist level, so it explores concepts, procedures and regulations that any manager with direct reports is likely to need to know in order to handle effectively their staff.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Case Analysis
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Economics for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS017Semester 24Closed

Economics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS137

Description: This module introduces the most relevant concepts of economics from the perspective of business decision making. The first part of the module (on microeconomics) will cover supply and demand, elasticity, firm behavior, pricing and market structures. The second part (on macroeconomics) will include aggregate demand and aggregate supply, unemployment, inflation and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Test (30 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS021Semester 14Yes

Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage

Description: The module will provide students with an understanding of the nature of accounting practices with respect to financial accounting. In this respect, the format of the module is designed to show the fundamentals and principles of financial accounting and the many uses of accounting data. The focus then moves to decision-making through examples such as the `double entry equation¿, and from an output (the primary financial statements) perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination
Level: 4
Managerial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS022Semester 25Closed

Managerial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura

Description: The module critically assesses key aspects of management accounting in the context of planning, control, decision making and governance: *Enable students to make use of management accounting tools in critical decision making process *Provide students the opportunity to appreciate the global impacts of management accounting in decision making.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Fundamentals of Management (for Science & Engineering)Business and ManagementBUS024Semester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Management (for Science & Engineering)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Lisa Morrison
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS107

Description: This module introduces students to the purpose, operations and implications of management by exploring the contexts within which management takes place. We will reflect on management in relation to the social, economic, technological and legal conditions within which it operates, as well as reflect on its political and environmental consequences. We often think of management as trying to manage flows of energy, finance and labour, but it increasingly is required to confront changing social and political structures on a world scale, and increasingly challenging environmental conditions as well.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Assignment (1500 words)
Level: 4
EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUS025Semester 25No

Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xue Zhou

Description: This module introduces the processes and management of emerging businesses concentrating upon early entrepreneurial learning activity by introducing key perspectives on the recognition and nature of entrepreneurial opportunities, resource evaluation, and creativity/legitimation processes. Objectives of the module are to develop competencies, skills and creativity to understand effectively what entrepreneur is about and critique key entrepreneurial concepts and approaches. Case studies aim to stimulate students' imagination to generate ideas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Group presentation and written report (2800 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Project ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS027Semester 25No

Project Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evangelos Markopoulos

Description: Project management (PM) techniques encouraging the use of incremental delivery for complex outcomes in the context of high uncertainty are examined. Grounding in traditional PM techniques in enterprise projects focus on projects that conclude to a clear specification within a prespecified time frame. The assessment report supports students¿ ability to evaluate complex projects and recognise how future PM efforts can be improved. The final examination applies project management techniques in different and broader situations than the examples covered in the class.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Individual report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUS029Semester 25No

Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeynep Gurguc Farooqui

Description: The focus of the module will be on business analytics methods and applications from existing businesses in which students will learn how data is collected and aggregated, how resulting data is analyzed and how the insights obtained are passed on and influence business decisions. Furthermore, the module will provide an overview of business analytics applications and the ways in which they have impacted different business areas and functions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Test (30 mins)
  • Item 2: 30% Group Report (800 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Individual Report (2000 words)
Level: 5
Introduction to Marketing and CommunicationsBusiness and ManagementBUS101Semester 14No

Introduction to Marketing and Communications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module provides an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. The course assumes no previous knowledge of marketing and will give students an overview of the basic marketing planning process, including segmentation, branding, pricing, distribution, and promotion. These concepts are brought to life through interactive lectures, and case discussions. Furthermore, students will work on a segmentation project for a real product throughout the course.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Project (3000 words)
Level: 4
Accounting for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS106Semester 14No

Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS139

Description: The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. Key concepts and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations and the use of accounting information by management for planning, decision making and control purposes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (Online) (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Business and SocietyBusiness and ManagementBUS107Semester 14No

Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gerard Hanlon
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS130
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take BUS001

Description: This module examines the relationship between business and society. It investigates how the relationship is not fixed, but rather the result of particular historical changes in which this relationship was contested. It explains how this results in particular roles for business, the state and individuals today, which in turn effects how resources, goods and services are produced and distributed within and across societies. It examines how this relationship is changing at present, and how this might reconfigure business and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 15% Group Mindmap
  • Item 3: 70% Individual Essay (1500 words)
Level: 4
Economics for Business and SocietyBusiness and ManagementBUS108Semester 24No

Economics for Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov

Description: This module introduces the most relevant concepts of micro- and macro-economics. We will consider the perspectives of consumers, individual businesses and society. Our focus is on the insights of economics for business decision making. The module will cover mostly microeconomic topics such as supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour, pricing and market structures, market failures, and consumer behaviour. The second part, devoted to macroeconomics, will study aggregate demand and aggregate supply, inequality, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Work and EmploymentBusiness and ManagementBUS124Semester 24No

Work and Employment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS132

Description: The module aims to provide an introduction to the study of the world of work and employment by giving insight into relevant conceptual and theoretical approaches. The course takes a multi-level approach to understanding work and employment. This means that work and employment relations will be explored at macro-societal, meso-organisational and micro-individual levels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words) Essay (3000 words) Essay (3000 words) Essay (3000 words) Essay (3000 words)
Level: 4
Applied EconomicsBusiness and ManagementBUS128Semester 14No

Applied Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Kavetsos

Description: This module introduces the most relevant concepts of economics from the perspective of business and management. The microeconomic part of the module covers: supply-demand, elasticities, firm behavior, pricing and market structures, and behavioural economics. The macroeconomics part includes: aggregate demand/supply, unemployment, inflation and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Business in Social and Historical ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS130Semester 14No

Business in Social and Historical Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gerard Hanlon

Description: This module examines the relationship between business and society. It investigates how the relationship is not fixed, but rather the result of particular historical changes in which this relationship was contested. It explains how this results in particular roles for business, the state and individuals today, which in turn effect how resources, goods and services are produced and distributed within and across societies. It examines how this relationship is changing at present, and how this might reconfigure business and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 15% Group Mindmap
  • Item 3: 70% Individual Essay (1500 words)
Level: 4
Work and Employment in ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS132Semester 24No

Work and Employment in Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS124

Description: The module aims to provide an introduction to the study of the world of work and employment by giving insight into relevant conceptual and theoretical approaches. The course takes a multi-level approach to understanding work and employment. This means that work and employment relations will be explored at macro-societal, meso- organisational and micro-individual levels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 4
Organisation StudiesBusiness and ManagementBUS133Semester 24No

Organisation Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mustafa Ozturk

Description: Organisation Studies explores how organisations and the work contained within them are structured, and how they variously remain stable and evolve over time. Organisational behaviour is complex, and constituted by multiple stakeholders, systems, and processes. Thus, we approach organisational behaviour by studying phenomena at the intersection of three levels of analysis: individual, group, and organisation. For example, at the individual level, we study employee personality; at the group level, we consider teamwork, and at the organisation level, we examine culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Assignment (2500 words)
Level: 4
Quantitative Analysis for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS135Semester 24No

Quantitative Analysis for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Kemeny

Description: This module aims to develop an appreciation of the role and practice of quantitative research methods, both in business and in research about business, and to prepare students for subsequent project work. It provides a first understanding of statistics and statistical inference, and develops skills in presentation of quantitative information. A subsidiary aim is to enhance student's familiarity with the use of statistical software.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Marketing PrinciplesBusiness and ManagementBUS136Semester 14No

Marketing Principles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis

Description: BUS136 is the first module in marketing and available only for students on the BSc Marketing and Management. BUS136 introduces students the areas of research and practice that need to be understood by every marketing practitioner and researcher: buyer behaviour, market segmentation, marketing strategy, marketing mix management (including pricing, distribution and communication), marketing research and ethics. The module is taught with a mix of big and small group seminars.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Portfolio (3000 words)
Level: 4
Economics for Business ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS137Semester 24No

Economics for Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Caterina Gennaioli
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS017

Description: This module introduces the fundamental concepts and principles of micro- and macro-economics. The focus is on the insights of economics for business decision-making. The first part of the module (on microeconomics) covers supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour, pricing and market structures, and market failures. The second part (on macroeconomics) includes aggregate demand and aggregate supply, unemployment, inflation, international trade and exchange rate, and economic policies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Test (30 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Introduction to Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS139Semester 14No

Introduction to Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS106

Description: This module will be offered at Level 4 as a compulsory module and will provide the necessary foundation for the level 5 modules. The module provides insights into key conventions and methods of accounting by focusing on the measuring and reporting of the financial position, the financial performance and cash flow of business organisations, and the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (Online) (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Introduction to Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS140Semester 24No

Introduction to Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura

Description: This module will be offered at Level 4 as a compulsory module and will provide the necessary foundation for the level 5 BUS239.The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. It is intended to help students to understand the essentials of management accounting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Learning Participation Diary
  • Item 2: 30% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Management Studies and SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUS141Semester 24No

Fundamentals of Management Studies and Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andromachi Athanasopoulou

Description: The module will cover a wide range of topics which will introduce students to management studies. Students will learn about key theories on the nature of managerial work and on key management skills. These skills range from working effectively in groups to developing self-awareness and from how to effectively motivate and empower others to how to manage power and conflicts. A core part of the module involves learning to recognise the responsibility implications in applying these skills in various contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% CV Writing Exercise
  • Item 2: 30% Mid-term MCQ
  • Item 3: 60% Reflective Essay (1200 words)
Level: 4
Contemporary Legal Issues in Business ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS142Semester 14No

Contemporary Legal Issues in Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fernando Barrio
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS143

Description: The module introduces the contexts in which law operates, shapes and is shaped by business. It encourages critical thinking about the intersections of law and key business themes. Topics will include law and: corporate governance (e.g. share/stakeholder theories), business strategy (e.g. outsourcing, IP), industrial organisation (e.g. global value chains), competition (e.g. mergers/acquisitions), regulation standard setting (e.g. private standards), sustainable development. The operation, structures and functions of international legal systems with differing economic levels and historical trajectories of legal development are examined via case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% News Portfolio (900 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 4
Professional and Academic Development (PAD)Business and ManagementBUS144Semester 24No

Professional and Academic Development (PAD)

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis

Description: This NCM (Non-Credit Module) aims to enhance and develop certain aspects which are essential for the academic journey. The NCM will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). It also touches another aspect of professional development which is the familiarization with computerized analytical skills in the labs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% 3 Items of Evidence of Participation in Specified Career Activities
Level: 4
Capital Markets and SecuritiesBusiness and ManagementBUS148Semester 24No

Capital Markets and Securities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tara Velez

Description: This module will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of interest rates, capital markets and securities, and will develop an understanding of how capital markets operates in the financial system. It will briefly introduce various rate of returns and their differences used in valuing cash flows. Given the importance of capital markets in the highly integrated financial markets and the global economy, it is necessary to know the functioning of various capital markets and financial instruments that are traded in the markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Mid-semester Exam (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Foundations of FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUS149Semester 14No

Foundations of Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia

Description: This module will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of finance, and will develop an understanding of why the finance function is crucial for a business organization. It will briefly introduce the currency exchange rates and explain why the value of money depends on the time when receiving or paying cash flows. Given the importance of finance in the highly integrated financial markets and in the global economy, it is necessary to understand the functioning of financial markets and financial instruments that are traded in the markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Mid-semester Exam (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Introduction to Business StudiesBusiness and ManagementBUS150Semester 14No

Introduction to Business Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu

Description: This module will introduce students to business studies and research and help them develop a set of valuable skills such as critical thinking, data interpretation and presentation, problem solving, numeracy skills, report writing, and effective written and oral communication, which will prepare them for more advanced study. The module aims to enhance students' digital literacy through completion of various tasks throughout the module. The module will cover the following topics: Business Calculations and Logical Thinking in Numeracy Skills, Research and Analytical Skills, Obtaining and Managing Data using FAME and Osiris, Quantitative Data Collection Techniques (Bloomberg), Business Communication, Presentation Techniques, Learning and Working in Groups, Handling the Assessment Process, Critical Analysis & Problem Solving, Creativity and Case Studies, Assessment Awareness and Strategy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Individual Presentation (10 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Portfolio (2500 words)
Level: 4
Accounting SkillsBusiness and ManagementBUS155Semester 14No

Accounting Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage

Description: This module aims to increase students' knowledge of the technical skills and theory of accounting and its relevance to the study of accounting practise. The module develops knowledge of year one accounting modules and complements the material covered in the second year modules in Financial Reporting. In addition, some of the theoretical material covered in Accounting Skills will provide links to modules in Management Accounting. More specifically, this module is to demonstrate fundamental technical skills that are very important for an accountant to have.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Skills Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Coursework (1500 words)
Level: 4
Current Challenges in Business and Management IBusiness and ManagementBUS156Semester 14No

Current Challenges in Business and Management I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take BUS157

Description: Current Challenges in Business and Management I is the first of a pair of modules that provide a foundation for success in the BSc Business Management programme, and in work. A problem-based approach, focused on SBM¿s core values (social justice, sustainability, corporate governance) is used. It examines a range of organisations that make up the modern economy (for-profit businesses, third sector, state and international institutions) and considers their historical, current and possible future roles.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 3: 70% Individual Essay (2000 words)
Level: 4
Current Challenges in Business and Management IIBusiness and ManagementBUS157Semester 24No

Current Challenges in Business and Management II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgy Petrov
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take BUS156

Description: BUS157 Current Challenges in Business and Management II is the second of two Year 1 modules that support incoming students in the BSc Business Management programme in achieving two aims: (1) building student understanding around current issues related to social justice, sustainability, and corporate governance, which are explicit foundational values at SBM; and (2) developing core student competencies that will enable their success throughout their degree. The module is compulsory for BSc Business and Management students. It will not be available to students on other programmes. BUS1XC builds on BUS1XB by engaging in greater depth in content in the three themes introduced in Semester A.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 3: 70% Individual Essay (2000 words)
Level: 4
Fundamentals of International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS158Full year4No

Fundamentals of International Business

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Lioliou

Description: This module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the issues pertaining international business. Students will learn about the economic, political and social forces shaping various advanced and developing economies and delve into the challenges of operating and competing internationally.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Quantitative Research Methods and Data AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUS159Semester 24No

Fundamentals of Quantitative Research Methods and Data Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michel Haddad

Description: The module will provide an overview of quantitative methods in management research and international business. Following a revision of descriptive statistics, probability and inference, the focus will be on fitting models, synthesising and communicating the results. The module will introduce students to a range of modern quantitative methods to deal with different types of data applications relevant to international business. Emphasis will be placed on the use of statistical software such as R, with practical examples and interpretation of results.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class test (30 min)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual assessment (2000 words)
Level: 4
Introduction to StatisticsBusiness and ManagementBUS160Semester 14No

Introduction to Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michel Haddad

Description: This module aims to introduce students to some of the fundamental numerical skills required to succeed in the digital age. The course provides a first understanding of probability, statistical inference and modelling, and develops skills in presentation of quantitative information. A secondary aim is to enhance student¿s familiarity with R.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class test (30 min)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual report (2000 words)
Level: 4
Managing and Leading Community ProjectsBusiness and ManagementBUS161Semester 34No

Managing and Leading Community Projects

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module enables students to understand a foundational structure for the workings of managing and leading in the community for project delivery. The module incorporates interactive workshops, group work and assignments. Theoretical and practical concepts and techniques for management and leadership studies are applied to real-time project development issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Group Presentation (30 mins)
Level: 4
Community ProjectBusiness and ManagementBUS162Semester 34No

Community Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module enables students to apply and deliver a structure for the workings of community project consulting and delivery. This module has been developed for participants who are likely to deliver a project in the community and for those with a foundational understanding of the management principles and leadership skills as understood in the Managing and Leading Community Projects module. The module incorporates interactive workshops, group activities, and assignments. The module provides an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to practice for skills required for effective project management and delivery.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Group Presentation (30 mins)
Level: 4
Financial InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUS201Semester 15Yes

Financial Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mohammed Kasbar

Description: This module will define the financial system and discuss the functioning of financial institutions. The module will also analyse why the central bank is crucial for financial system and how financial institutions operate in the financial markets. This module will be offered to Joint Programme students as a compulsory module in Year 2, Semester 1 and to Associate undergraduate students as an elective module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination
Level: 5
Business LawBusiness and ManagementBUS205Semester 15Yes

Business Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fernando Barrio

Description: This module provides an understanding of the English legal system, the principles of the law of contract and of the tort of negligence as they apply to business. It also explains the relationship between law and business, and the role that the legal system plays in enabling the conduct of business generally, its regulation, and the achievement of commercial aims.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Self-reclective Journal (1600 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2400 words)
Level: 5
Microeconomics for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUS208Semester 15Yes

Microeconomics for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov

Description: Microeconomics in problems confronting general managers is explored focusing on markets, prices and market structure in two different situations: a) generally competitive large impersonal anonymous markets, and b) markets which identities matter. Large firms in which the identities of competitors, suppliers, and sometimes customers matter, and more personal economic relations such as that between employer and customer in which identities always matter, are discussed. Analysis of markets in which identities matter involves a focus on topics such as information, reciprocity, credibility, reputation and transactions costs.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination
Level: 5
AdvertisingBusiness and ManagementBUS213Semester 25Closed

Advertising

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexis Wearmouth

Description: This module explores advertising as an evolving category of social communication within a convergent media landscape. A strategic managerial perspective is taken to generate insight into the development of advertising and the roles and processes so entailed. The consumer perspective is also considered in the light of advertising¿s role as a vehicle for cultural meaning. Media consumption issues are also important to consider given the rapid growth in expenditure on digital (especially mobile) advertising communication. The module takes a multi-disciplinary approach drawing on socio-cultural, psychological and anthropological perspectives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Applied Report (2000 words)
Level: 5
Advanced Accounting for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS216Semester 25No

Advanced Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian

Description: This module builds on the foundation provided by BUS106 Accounting for Business in Year 1. In the area of Financial Accounting, the proposed module focuses on Financial Reporting by companies and the impact of company law and accounting standards. In Management Accounting the module looks at different approaches to costing, and the concept of identifying relevant costs for management decision-making; the appraisal of investment opportunities (capital budgeting) and accounting as a control mechanism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Persuasive Strategies in MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS220Semester 15Closed

Persuasive Strategies in Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Edkins

Description: This module investigates the theory behind techniques adopted by professionals in marketing, sales, public policy as well as general business negotiation environments in order to change stakeholder behavior and attitudes, influence outcomes, and gain compliance. Students will explore, compare and integrate a variety of theories of persuasion grounded in research from the fields of psychology and marketing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination
Level: 5
Organisational Learning in the WorkplaceBusiness and ManagementBUS221Semester 25Yes

Organisational Learning in the Workplace

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Fox

Description: The module addresses the following topics: [A] Theories of organisational learning (OL) 1) Definition of workplace OL 2) OLW early practical approaches 3) OL and managerial & organisational cognition 4) Cognitive vs socially situated learning theory [B] OL studies in different areas of business and management practice. OL and: 5) innovation practices 6) strategy-as-practice 7) change management 8) knowledge management [C] Wider contexts of OL 9) Postmodernity knowledge society 10) Recent OL concepts 11) OL futures

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
International Corporate ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUS224Semester 15No

International Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu

Description: The module will commence with a consideration of financial reporting systems and environment, and the Conceptual Framework for financial reporting. Corporate governance, sustainability and ethics will follow. Preparation and interpretation of financial statements and reporting performance will be covered in subsequent weeks. Then, the module will explore the accounting treatment of revenue from contracts with customers in accordance with IFRS 15. Finally, calculation and presentation of earnings per share (EPS) concludes the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Corporate Finance and StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUS225Semester 25No

Corporate Finance and Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia

Description: This module will develop students¿ understanding of the nature of corporate finance in terms of the sources of finance and nature of internal calculations that are employed to allocate financial resources into strategic investment projects. Students will discuss how the techniques of financing and allocation of financial resources have evolved. This understanding will be blended with an analysis of the strategic management literature on how financial resources are deployed strategically to both create and capture value.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Strategic MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS226Semester 15No

Strategic Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module gives an overview over strategic marketing issues. Strategic marketing includes activities of firms that deal with the analysis of the corporate situation and the formulation and implementation of market-oriented strategies and programmes. The module provides a systematic approach that focuses on real-world applications to enable students to relate theoretical insights to marketing strategy, improve the ability to analyse business cases, and to prepare students for the possible pursuit of a career in marketing and/or a master in marketing/management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 5
International MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS227Semester 25No

International Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jieke Chen

Description: International marketing requires leaving behind the assumptions of the domestic market. Firms frequently struggle to adapt to the social and economic practices that shape markets outside their sphere of experience. Firms' internationalisation also can influence the nature of those practises (for better and for worse). This module examines the nature of the problems and theory that guides developing solutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Creative IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUS233Semester 25Closed

Creative Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani

Description: This module explores the foundational concepts and theories of the creative industries. Courses typically focus on theory mainly. Too often, little attention is paid to issues of business practice and administration. This module, seeks to address this gap and to provide the student with the relevant theories, conceptual tools and factual information necessary to gain an understanding of, and be able to engage critically with, the realities of managing, working and progressing within the cultural and creative industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Corporations and Social ResponsibilityBusiness and ManagementBUS237Semester 25No

Corporations and Social Responsibility

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar

Description: This module will provide a complete introduction to the field of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). CSR is an area of corporate self-regulation that integrates sustainability and business-ethics into the business model. 'Greening' waste management, reducing the corporation's carbon footprint and protecting the rights of workers, are all aspects of CSR management that corporations are involved in and voluntarily self-regulate. In this module you will engage with business-ethics theories and a number of real world case studies to bring the issues to life.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
International Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS238Semester 25No

International Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jan Duesing

Description: This module extends the financial accounting component of BUS139 Introduction to Financial Accounting (or BUS106 Accounting for Business) in Year 1 (Level 4) to introduce the preparation and analysis of corporate financial statements. The content includes the function and content of the main published statements under UK company law and International Financial Reporting Standards, the analysis of these statements to assess company performance, and discussion of a number of key reporting issues and the relevant Standards.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Management Accounting for Decision MakingBusiness and ManagementBUS239Semester 15No

Management Accounting for Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Homaira Semeen
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS216

Description: The module explores key aspects of Management Accounting in the context of its key pillars planning, control, internal decision making and governance. Students will be able to understand the interaction of Management Accounting with organization/business and society. Learners will appreciate the manner by which Management Accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context within an organisation. Students will critically blend professionalism with intellectualism in Management Accounting practices to ensure broad-based Management Accounting education and the enhancement of learning required in any modern organisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Learning Participation Diary
  • Item 2: 30% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Services MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS240Semester 15No

Services Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: The services sector accounts for over three-quarters of GDP and employment in many economies. In light of the growing importance of services in local and global economies, it becomes crucial to study and understand the functionality of service offerings. This module will explore the distinctive characteristics of services and explain how these characteristics affect the marketing approaches used by firms - including challenges involved in controlling service quality, managing customer experience, and synchronising demand and supply.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Project Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Corporate Financial ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUS241Semester 15No

Corporate Financial Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage

Description: Accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organisations (e.g. EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB) are explored to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income. Topics include the evolution of accounting standards, financial instruments, fair value reporting and debates on accounting conceptual frameworks. Changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements, added remuneration reports, chairman's statements and new demands for integrated corporate reporting (e.g. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting) are analysed in light of external consultants/actuaries influencing corporate reporting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Responsible LeadershipBusiness and ManagementBUS243Semester 25No

Responsible Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Szilvia Mosonyi

Description: This module covers concepts and practices of Responsible Leadership. It introduces students to elements of ethical decision-making at individual level. Core leadership theories are discussed from leader and follower perspectives linking to (ir)responsible practices. The module builds on current responsible leadership literature, while covering related theories of authentic, servant, ethical, and spiritual leadership. The module concludes by looking into how responsibilities of leaders and followers translate at a corporate level and investigating related corporate social responsibility practices.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
European Business ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS244Semester 25No

European Business Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stella Ladi

Description: This module will explore aspects of the European political, economic, social and cultural context that are relevant for managers doing business in Europe. It will begin with an introduction to Europe's structural characteristics and the history of European integration. It will then introduce students to key features of Europe's business environment such as the Single European Market and monetary union. Students will also be engaged in discussions over Europe's place in the world and future structural changes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Introduction to FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUS245Semester 15No

Introduction to Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tara Velez

Description: The function of where finance fits within a business organisation is introduced through a critical review of the time value of money in relation to the current state of the global economy where financial markets are highly integrated. The functioning of financial markets and institutions and different financial instruments being traded are examined using theoretical approaches in determining financial securities value as well as assessing risk.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Managing Under RegulationBusiness and ManagementBUS249Semester 25No

Managing Under Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6

Description: This qualitative module introduces students to the management skills of ensuring that organisations comply with regulatory rules. All industries are regulated by generic regulators for health and safety, environment, information privacy, accounting standards, patenting, equality and diversity including physical access, etc. Many have industry-specific ones too. This module compares industries to enable you to understand regulators, what inspectors do, how internal compliance units work, and how to manage across countries¿ national regulatory systems and within global business regulatory frameworks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay Outline (750 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
TaxationBusiness and ManagementBUS250Semester 25No

Taxation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Wade

Description: This module introduces to the subject of taxation and provides the core knowledge of the underlying principles and major technical areas of taxation as they affect the activities of individuals and businesses. The students are introduced to the rationale behind the functions of tax systems. The syllabus then considers the separate taxes that an accountant would need to have a detailed knowledge.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Written Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Governance and Regulatory EnvironmentBusiness and ManagementBUS252Semester 25No

Governance and Regulatory Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lilian Ngozi Schofield

Description: This module is one of three 15-credit Level 5 compulsory work-based modules in the Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship (Social Change) programme. The module will introduce management degree apprentices to the concept of governance in the voluntary and non-profit sector(s), including the history, current key themes, and key components of effective governance. Students will also develop an enhanced appreciation of the constraints and opportunities offered by the changing governance frameworks, which affect voluntary organisations. The module will enable management degree apprentices to gain a broad understanding of the legal framework within which the law and regulation of charities and charitable activity in England and Wales is set and understand regulatory requirements for charities and charitable companies, and the reporting and accountability obligations in regard to statutory accounts and reports. The module will enable management degree apprentices to explore the advantages and disadvantages of different legal forms, the nature of their constitutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation (30 mins) Presentation (30 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Work-based Report (2500 words)
Level: 5
Politics, Advocacy and Influencing ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUS253Semester 15No

Politics, Advocacy and Influencing Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module is one of three 15-credit Level 6 compulsory work-based modules in the Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship (Social Change) programme. The module introduces degree apprentices to the major forms of political lobbying that aim to influence changes in policy relevant to the voluntary and non-profit sector. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of lobbying as a phenomenon and a critical and evaluative insight into its processes, as undertaken by both commercial and non-governmental organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 65% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Politics, Advocacy and Influencing ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUS253Semester 25No

Politics, Advocacy and Influencing Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module is one of three 15-credit Level 6 compulsory work-based modules in the Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship (Social Change) programme. The module introduces degree apprentices to the major forms of political lobbying that aim to influence changes in policy relevant to the voluntary and non-profit sector. The module aims to develop a critical understanding of lobbying as a phenomenon and a critical and evaluative insight into its processes, as undertaken by both commercial and non-governmental organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 65% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Volunteering and Social Action - Theory and LearningBusiness and ManagementBUS255Semester 15No

Volunteering and Social Action - Theory and Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will enable management degree apprentices to critically appreciate the historical development and contemporary debates around societal volunteering and social/community activism. The module will make extensive use of national and international case studies to develop understanding of the range of the roles and practices of societal volunteering and activism, with application to own employer. The module will cover the historical development of key modern social and political movements, the professionalisation of social activism, contemporary grassroots activism and digitally-driven forms of activism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Work-based Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (30 mins)
Level: 5
Quantitative AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUS260Semester 25No

Quantitative Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eun-Seok Kim

Description: This module aims to improve students¿ ability to apply modern decision-making techniques and statistical methods to decision making. While this module provides an underpinning and understanding of advanced analytical and computational methodologies, it is also a practical module which uses Excel to illustrate how to apply the methodologies introduced. This module is multidisciplinary with links to accounting, economics, finance, marketing and operations management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Report (2500 words)
Level: 5
Fundamentals of Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS261Semester 15No

Fundamentals of Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu

Description: The module will provide students with an explanation of the nature of accounting practices with respect to financial accounting. In this respect, the format of the module is designed to show the fundamentals and principles of financial accounting and the many uses of accounting data. The focus then moves to decision-making through examples such as the `double entry equation¿, and from an output (the primary financial statements) perspective.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Skills Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Working with Business DataBusiness and ManagementBUS267Semester 15No

Working with Business Data

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xue Zhou

Description: The module will provide an overview of contemporary approaches to working with and interpreting data in business and management research. Students will further their competence in descriptive statistics and inference, followed by practical applications on applying data models and communicating the results. The module will then discuss different types of data before advancing on more contemporary issues of data applications and their novel sources (e.g. open datasets, application programming interfaces). Emphasis will be placed on the use of statistical software with practical examples and interpretation of results.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Individual Reflection (500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Group Presentation
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Corporate Strategy and Environmental ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUS268Semester 15No

Corporate Strategy and Environmental Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Liam Campling

Description: This module explores and debates the embeddedness of business in the Earth System. Students examine key relations between corporate strategies and the environment by introducing topical issues in climate change and biodiversity loss and examining prevailing business models and systems of provision in sectors that are foundational to societies and economies across the planet (e.g. food, energy, transport). By examining these industries students will evaluate current consumption and production patterns and their environmental effects and critically appraise a range of public and private interventions to build liveable futures based on intergenerational justice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Portfolio (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUS269Semester 25No

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mustafa Ozturk

Description: Organisational behaviour is a multi-level subject based on three levels of analysis: individual, group, and organisation. In this module, we will consider individual-level topics such as attitudes and job satisfaction, personality, and perception. As group-level phenomena, we will explore teamwork, communication, power and politics. The organisation-level analysis will review organisational structure, organisational culture, and change. Acknowledging wider social realities shaping organisational behaviour, we will also incorporate issues of social justice, sustainability and good governance into our analysis throughout the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Individual Report (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Reflective Essay (750 words)
Level: 5
Financial Institutions ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS271Semester 25No

Financial Institutions Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The Financial System offers a unique analysis of the risks faced by investors and savers, governments and companies interacting through financial markets, as well as strategies that can be adopted for controlling and managing risks. The special emphasis is put on new areas of operations in financial markets and their characteristics, and how the participants in these markets manage risks and maximize their perceived utility.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Mid-semester Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Innovation and EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUS300Semester 26Closed

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shoutong Thomas Zhang

Description: This module integrates the theory and practice of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. This module has been organised as a capstone course, to be taken in the final semester of the business and management undergraduate programme. The module will draw together learning from several functional areas that students will have already covered within the programme ¿ marketing, human resources, strategy, finance etc. ¿ and place these within the larger context of innovation and entrepreneurship in organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Organisation and IdentityBusiness and ManagementBUS302Semester 16Yes

Organisation and Identity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowland Curtis

Description: This module takes up questions regarding the significance of dimensions of identity and meaning for dynamics of managing and organizing. The module also concerns itself with associated questions regarding knowledge and learning and their role in management education and wider organizational life. In pursuing these interests we draw upon an eclectic and innovative range of theory, literature and other media, including novels and films, as means by which to open up and explore the experiential and `existential¿ dimensions that structure and deconstruct modern work organization.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS304Semester 26Closed

International Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lutao Ning

Description: This module offers a broad overview of the process of economic `globalisation¿ and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm set in the context of trends in the world economy. It provides a critical, strategic and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins, development, and theories. These issues will be illustrated through in-depth analytical case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Managing DiversityBusiness and ManagementBUS305Semester 16No

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Adamson

Description: Workforce diversity has become widely recognised in all sectors. The background and context of this debate provides an opportunity to explore contemporary contexts, concepts, policies and practices. Theories of equality, diversity and labour market occupational segregation/segmentation are analysed. Dimensions of gender, race, disability, age, religion and sexual orientation are considered in organisational processes, which produce and reinforce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups. UK/European legislative frameworks, policy approaches and implications at organisational level are reviewed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation (5 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS306Semester 16Yes

Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Thomas Mcdermott
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN226 or take MTH6156

Description: The module introduce students to the fundamental issues of financial management and to the quantitative techniques used to address them. The issues that are of importance to a financial manager operating in a global market, in particular, the application of the theories of valuation to practice, will be discussed. Some of the key financial management issues that will be discussed are: investments (whether or not a capital project adds value to business), financing (the acquisition of funding by companies and how to determine their value) and evaluating the cost of capital.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 80% Examination
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Business Management DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUS314Full year6No

Business Management Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Kavetsos
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS364
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you should gain an average mark of between 65 and 100 from BUS007

Description: The dissertation is an important part of the assessment of the BSc Management Programmes, carrying a weighting of 30 credits, the equivalent of 2 modules. The dissertation requires a demonstration of a student¿s ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, collecting and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Organisational Change and DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUS317Semester 26No

Organisational Change and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor

Description: Organisational change and development critical thinking is achieved by interrogating perspectives dealing with core problems related to business transformation. External drives of organisational change and contrasting planned/emergent approaches are explored. Focus is on micro-level topics and applied behavioural science to understand how transformation processes in organisations are shaped by individual differences, interpersonal/group dynamics and cultures. The meaning, purposes and interests underlying processes of change and development, along with theories of power-politics-resistance, are examined with the roles of different change agents and required interpersonal skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Case Study (2500 words)
Level: 6
Consumer PsychologyBusiness and ManagementBUS318Semester 16Closed

Consumer Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eric Levy

Description: A deep understanding consumers is critical for businesses that wish to meet and satisfy consumer needs. The module will help students to gain an in-depth understanding of what makes consumers buy some products and not others, how various psychological characteristics influence our consumer behaviours, how companies can best try to meet consumers' wants and needs, among other interesting topics. Building on a general understanding of marketing, this course develops a useful, conceptual understanding of psychological theories relevant to the study of consumer behaviour.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project (2000 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUS320Semester 16No

Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Williams

Description: Theoretical approaches to work and employment relations, the meaning of work, the role of power and nature of employment relationship are developed. Employment relations key actors (unions, employers, etc.) are examined. Work organisation patterns and forms of control (e.g. impact of automation, artificial intelligence, gig economy and non-standard/precarious forms of employment) affecting the quality of employment relationships are analysed. Employment relations and employer strategies in non/union firms (e.g. collective bargaining and negotiation, conflict/strikes and dispute resolution) are reviewed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Group Presentation (5 mins)
Level: 6
Business and Social Approaches to Social Media - Opportunities and IssuesBusiness and ManagementBUS321Semester 26No

Business and Social Approaches to Social Media - Opportunities and Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim

Description: This module `Business and Social Approaches to Social Media (SM) ¿Opportunities and Challenges' examines social media as a platform for social and commercial activities analysing the opportunities and challenges it presents for organisations, marketers, societies and humanity. It seeks to advance the understanding of SM as part of a wider economy where labour, markets and regulatory practises are shifting constantly with convergent technologies. In so doing, it aims to deconstruct the wider economic, social, legal and ethical implications for society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Case Study (3000 words)
Level: 6
The Management of Human ResourcesBusiness and ManagementBUS324Semester 26Closed

The Management of Human Resources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowland Curtis

Description: Organisations often claim that their most valuable resources are their employees, but one of the most difficult tasks of management is to ensure that employees feel valued. This module examines the main theories, concepts and processes that are considered central to the management of human resources. The course combines theoretical analysis with examples of practical application to encourage students to think critically about the management of people.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Global Supply ChainsBusiness and ManagementBUS326Semester 16Yes

Global Supply Chains

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni

Description: The study of global supply chains is vital to understand the global dimension of business. This module investigates firms` outsourcing strategies and their management, i.e. their growing practice to parcel out some activities from foreign suppliers. The module critically examines what value creating activities firms tend to outsource, how, why and to whom they outsource, and with what implications. Outsourcing is understood in a broad context characterised by multiple players, e.g. global institutions, states, consumers, trade unions and social movements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Project
  • Item 2: 80% Examination
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Corporate Law and GovernanceBusiness and ManagementBUS329Semester 26Closed

Corporate Law and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Min Yan

Description: This module aims to cover some of the main issues and fundamental principles which underlie corporate law and governance. The module examines the nature of the company and its legal personality; what goes on behind the corporate veil; the function of different company organs; constitutional matters; corporate management; directors¿ duties; shareholders' remedies with particular emphasis on minority shareholders¿ protection; and the main theories and principles of corporate governance. The focus is UK company law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Macroeconomics Modelling and PolicyBusiness and ManagementBUS330Semester 16No

Macroeconomics Modelling and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

Description: In this course we will focus on theories and applications of economic growth and income inequality, unemployment and inflation and tested using modern applied econometrics methods. Students will be able to address questions popular in the new empirical macroeconomic literature such as what causes a nation¿s economic activity to fluctuate, what causes unemployment, what are the new empirics of global income inequality, inflation, and unemployment, and what are the spatial distributions of economic growth and inequality across the world?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Company ValuationBusiness and ManagementBUS331Semester 26Closed

Company Valuation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu

Description: This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing global managers and corporate consultants as they operate in a global world requiring them to know what an asset is worth and what determines its value. The postulate for sound investing is that a manager does not pay more for an asset than it is worth. In a global world and under competition managers¿ assessments of value should relate to realistic estimates of cash flows and uncertainties faced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Coursework (3000 words)
Level: 6
NetworkingSBM_6_A
Corporate Governance and AccountabilityBusiness and ManagementBUS334Semester 26No

Corporate Governance and Accountability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module will commence with the evolution of corporate governance and its central focus on the risk management and agency gap, which theoretically and practically explores the differences between the demands of investors and behaviour of senior management. This narrow concept of corporate governance for 'investors' will be contrasted with a broader perspective which focuses on how to reconcile managerial interests with a wider group of stakeholders. Students will consider how corporate governance regulation and legislation has evolved and explore the differences between rules and principles-based systems of corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Business to Business and Relationship MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS335Semester 26No

Business to Business and Relationship Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: BUS335 is a compulsory module for students on the BSc Marketing and Management and is not available to students on other programmes. The module continues to develop students' knowledge and understanding of marketing theory and practice, but specifically those that relate to organisationals rather than consumers. Three themes are considered: organisational buying, industrial services and relationship marketing. By the end of the module, students will be able to work with all three themes and analyse problems using material from all three themes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Business ComputingBusiness and ManagementBUS337Semester 26No

Business Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Panagiotopoulos

Description: This module will explore the impact of computing applications on organisations and individuals. Traditional themes in information systems management will first be examined such as the role of information and how it relates to decision making, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Customer Relationship Management (CRM), e-business, e-government, IT planning, development and evaluation. The module will then cover more contemporary aspects such as business intelligence, data analytics, mobile computing and the crowd economy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Firm Governance and Strategy in the Institution ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS338Semester 16Closed

Firm Governance and Strategy in the Institution Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martha Prevezer

Description: This is an elective third year module for undergraduates enrolled in the BSc Business and Management, BSc Accounting and Management, BSc Marketing and Management. It introduces students to the concepts of governance and institutions and to the coevolution of governance, firm strategy and institutions. It explores this theme for both developed countries and emerging markets, and over the historical period of the twentieth century to the present day.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Report (10 slides, notes and individual reflection)
  • Item 2: 80% Case Study (2500 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Financial Markets and InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUS340Semester 16No

Financial Markets and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ni Peng

Description: This module will compare the forms and functions of various financial markets, and develop an understanding of how financial managers use these markets to attain corporate goals. As increasingly complex relation between financial institutions and financial markets has evolved over a period of time, this module will also analyse various sophisticated and complex financial instruments used, and establish a framework of how different forms of financial institutions operate to manage financial risks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Corporate Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS341Semester 16No

Corporate Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module will help students to develop an understanding of the nature of corporate finance in terms of the sources of finance and the internal calculations that are employed to allocate financial resources into strategic investment projects. Students will appreciate how the techniques of financing and allocation of financial resources have evolved. This understanding will be blended with an appreciation of the strategic management literature on how financial resources are deployed strategically to both create and capture value and how this impacts on risk, equity valuations and bond financing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Enterprising perspectivesMAT_SBM_6_S
Startups and IncubatorsBusiness and ManagementBUS342Semester 26No

Startups and Incubators

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang

Description: Sometime in your lives, many students will be involved in managing an entrepreneurial venture either within an existing business (intrapreneurship) or through a start-up (entrepreneurship). This module introduces concepts, theories and practices that are shaping our thinking about creating and building new ventures in a fast-moving environment. It addresses strategic (what kind of business model do we need) and practical issues (how to write a business plan designed to win funding and prepare the enterprise for launch).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Individual Coursework (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Group Presentation (20 mins)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectives,Enterprising perspectivesSBM_6_A
Mentoring and CoachingBusiness and ManagementBUS344Semester 26No

Mentoring and Coaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Mcgurk

Description: This module is a theoretical and practical introduction to coaching and mentoring. With roots in human resource management, leadership, psychology, philosophy and sports, coaching and mentoring are increasingly important interventions to develop individuals and organisations in personalised and sustainable ways through guided questioning and active listening techniques. The module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of mentoring and coaching as a contemporary management practise, and will also contribute to students¿ own development as potential coaches, mentors and leaders.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coaching or Mentoring-Related Scenario
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (1500 words)
Level: 6
NetworkingSBM_6_A
Digital MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS345Semester 26No

Digital Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitrios Dousios

Description: The module takes a (broadly) Relationship Marketing (RM) approach and focuses upon the ways in which digital, interactive media can be used to build, maintain, and evolve dialogue between stakeholders in the marketing system. Students will explore the marketing potential of email, web commerce, mobile communications, social networking sites, search engine optimisation (SEO), forums, blogs, and viral messaging through critical engagement with the marketing thinking behind them and the practical details of their implementation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Social Network AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUS346Semester 26Closed

Social Network Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa

Description: The module focuses on the structure and dynamics of a variety of networks (e.g., the World Wide Web, online social networks, collaboration networks). The aim is to uncover the network foundations of innovation, information diffusion, cultural fads, financial crises, and viral marketing. Special emphasis will be placed on the hub-dominated "scale-free"" networks and the ""small-world"" networks showing the ""six degree of separation"" phenomenon. The module will combine current research on social networks with contributions from relevant organisational and sociological literature."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-Class Test (MCQ)
  • Item 2: 75% Group Project (4 x 2000 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySBM_6_A
Creative Brand MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS348Semester 16No

Creative Brand Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitrios Dousios

Description: ¿Creating a true brand is one of the most powerful things any company can do to enhance its market power¿ (Elliott and Percy, 2007, preface). When a product-commodity becomes a brand, its use value is imbued with symbolic value that consumers deploy in constructing and maintaining their identities. The module draws on a diverse set of theories to understand current issues in brand management rather than merely relying on the cognitive, information-processing approach to branding.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Coursework (2000 words)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
Gender at WorkBusiness and ManagementBUS349Semester 26No

Gender at Work

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chidozie Umeh

Description: This module examines how gender impacts on management and work, resulting in men¿s and women¿s differential participation across occupations and in senior positions in the private and public sectors. It critically analyses modern workplaces and the assumptions we carry into work from an intersectional and feminist perspective. The module will discuss theory as well as empirical evidence, seeking to explain persistent inequalities in relation to pay and representation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_6_A
New Product DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUS350Semester 26No

New Product Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli

Description: The module analyses the relationship between product/process innovation and the emergence of technological platforms. Drawing on current theories concerning open innovation and organisational ecologies, the module will provide students with frameworks for a systematic analysis of innovation in large firms as well as tart-up organisations. Students will analyse case studies concerning traditional industries, as well high-tech organisations engaging with the development of digital ecosystems, smart devices, smart organisations and the Internet of things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Project
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
International Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS353Semester 26No

International Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take BUS306

Description: This module helps students learn how the fundamentals of corporate finance relate to multinational firms, covering a segment that is usually excluded in a basic financial management module. Managing international risks (including country risks) forms an important component. Upon completion, students will gain understanding of following topics: overview of international financial management; international monetary & financial systems including foreign exchange market; international parity relationships; opportunities in international FX investments & currency risk diversification; relevance of hedging in currency risk management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Audit and AssuranceBusiness and ManagementBUS354Semester 16No

Audit and Assurance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Andrew Wade

Description: This module introduces students to the nature, purpose and scope of audit and assurance engagements both internally and externally, including the statutory audit, its regulatory environment, governance and professional ethics. It then leads into planning the audit and performing a risk assessment. The syllabus also covers the audit of financial statements, including the scope of internal control. These include, evaluating internal controls, audit evidence, and a review of the financial statements. In addition to final review procedures, it also concentrates on the form and content of the independent auditor¿s report.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Mid-term Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Volunteering and Practical Social ActionBusiness and ManagementBUS358Semester 26No

Volunteering and Practical Social Action

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This experiential module will enable management degree apprentices to develop real experience of volunteering and practical skills of social action. Apprentices will work in teams to develop, implement and evaluate a social action project, and be facilitated to reflect critically on their experience and own development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Work-based Report (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (30 mins)
Level: 6
Contemporary Strategic AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUS359Semester 16No

Contemporary Strategic Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Lioliou

Description: BUS359 focuses on the organisation as a whole rather than the perspective of a single function taking the perspective of those people responsible for long-term organisational health, not just part of it. We explore models and frameworks used by management teams and apply them in a variety of industrial settings paying particular attention to a critical awareness of the strengths and weakness of these analytical and conceptual tools. The aim is to develop the ability to use these skills in different contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Strategic Management: Concepts and CasesBusiness and ManagementBUS361Semester 16No

Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gary Schwarz
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS204 or take BUS222

Description: This module will introduce important strategic management concepts that enable an organisation to analyse its external environment and to create the internal resources and capabilities necessary to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. Students will apply competitive, corporate, international, collaborative and digital strategy frameworks and examine them critically. Throughout the module, case studies from diverse geographical and organisational contexts that demonstrate the important role that leaders play in formulating and implementing strategy will be discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Principles of Evidence-Based ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS362Semester 26No

Principles of Evidence-Based Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Briner
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS242

Description: The ultimate goal of evidence-based practice is to help practitioners become more effective through providing a framework for making decisions and taking actions which incorporate the best available evidence from multiple sources. This module will focus on evidence-based practice in management and to provide participants with hands-on experience of how to use different types of evidence and information including organisational/company data and scientific findings both to identify real management problems and their potential solutions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Shortened Version of a Critically Appraised Topic (2500 words)
Level: 6
Social and Environmental AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS363Semester 16No

Social and Environmental Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claudine Grisard

Description: This module aims to combine both traditional accounting skills and perception of the sustainability accounting. The content of the module is drawn from the areas considered peripheral to traditional accounting but issues very relevant to day-to-day lives. The topics include external reporting; environmental accounting ¿ management systems; social accounting; theoretical frameworks in social and environmental accounting; sustainable development; social auditing; social financial reporting; non-financial reporting; ethical reporting; history of social and environmental accounting; international comparative reporting on social and environmental accounting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Portfolio
  • Item 2: 80% Individual Essay
Level: 6
Contemporary Issues in Accounting and EthicsBusiness and ManagementBUS365Semester 26No

Contemporary Issues in Accounting and Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claudine Grisard
Corequisite: In the same year as taking this module you must take BUS363

Description: This module will follow-on from some of the content taught at Social and Environment Accounting 1 module. More specifically, students will investigate the current issues in accounting including recent financial collapse in the past few decades, corporate scandals, stock market crashes, financial crises, human rights violations within corporations, incidences of bribery and corruptions, and neglect of business ethics and their implications, all resulting in losses of billions of funds for investors and society as a whole in more recent times.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Portfolio
  • Item 2: 80% Individual Essay
Level: 6
Marketing DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUS370Full year6No

Marketing Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you should gain an average mark of between 65 and 100 from BUS007

Description: The Marketing Dissertation is for BSc Marketing and Management students and enables students to develop their understanding of an area of marketing through 30 credits of supervised research. The dissertation will usually, but does not need to, include empirical research. Relevant areas of research include, but are not limited to, consumer and organisational buying behaviour, marketing strategy, product development, distribution, pricing and marketing communications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Marketing Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 6
Quantitative Research MethodsBusiness and ManagementBUSM014Semester 17No

Quantitative Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guven Demirel

Description: The module provides a relatively non-technical overview of the use of statistical methods in business research. There is an emphasis on practical work and interpretation, and there will be extensive use of Stata, a statistics/econometrics package. The course covers the basic elements of: descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, inference, and multivariate regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-Class Test 1 (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 25% In-Class Test 2 (1 hour)
  • Item 3: 50% Group Project
Level: 7
Comparative Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM016Semester 27No

Comparative Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gulce Ipek

Description: This module explores comparative employment relations and can enable an understanding of the international global context, as well as in-depth study of particular countries and key contemporary issues such as fairness, pay determination, power and regulation. The module will examine key features of employment relations, including theoretical and conceptual approaches; the role and practices of key actors in the employment relationship; including international organisations, national governments, employers and their organisations and trade unions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Managing DiversityBusiness and ManagementBUSM017Semester 17No

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nelarine Cornelius

Description: This module examines concepts of workplace equality, diversity and inclusion, and theories of occupational segregation/labour market segmentation. It explores diversity and equality across the dimensions of gender, race, disability, religion, age and sexual orientation and considers the organisational processes, which produce and reproduce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups in workplaces and careers. The module also considers equality and diversity policy and practice at labour market and organisational levels. Different national contexts are investigated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
The Global EconomyBusiness and ManagementBUSM022Semester 17No

The Global Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Roman Matousek

Description: This module is concerned with economic interactions among nations and addresses some of the major issues affecting the world economy today. The first part of the module covers such topics as: main theories of international trade, economies of scale, national competitiveness issues, and trade policy. It addresses such issues as the effects of trade on income distribution, the debate about import substitution and protectionism, and approaches to trade policy. The second part covers topics in international macroeconomics and finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% PC-based Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% PC-based Individual Assessment (2 hours)
Level: 7
Brand ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM026Semester 27No

Brand Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim

Description: This module takes a critical approach to Brand Management, reviewing key concepts through case studies. In so doing, it approaches the field of branding through global and comparative perspectives while interrograting key concepts through intercultural vantage points.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Project
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Multinationals and Global BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUSM028Semester 27No

Multinationals and Global Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Kemeny

Description: This is a core course which is compulsory for students in the MSc in International Business ; it is an optional course to other Masters programmes in SBM. It aims to introduce students to central debates about the relationship between global economic integration (globalisation) and economic development, highlighting the role played by multinational enterprises. Students are introduced to central themes and theories of international integration and its impacts, and to core ideas of why there are multinationals, and what their economic impacts are. Location and distance, and the costs therein are strong themes throughout the module, as they play central role in structuring both the actions of multinationals and larger patterns of economic activity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Group-led Seminar Activity
  • Item 2: 15% Seminar Reading Log x 6
  • Item 3: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Corporate Finance for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUSM030Semester 27No

Corporate Finance for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick

Description: By studying this module, students would be able to gain understanding of the following topics:¿ How to carry out valuation of real investment projects;¿ Calculating return and risk, cost of capital;¿ Interrelationship between real investment and financial decisions of the firm: capital structure, dividend policy, financial distress and bankruptcy;¿ International financial management: transfer pricing, international taxation, mergers and acquisitions, and optimal investment decisions

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid-Semester In-Class Test
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Corporate Finance for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUSM030Semester 17No

Corporate Finance for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick

Description: By studying this module, students would be able to gain understanding of the following topics:¿ How to carry out valuation of real investment projects;¿ Calculating return and risk, cost of capital;¿ Interrelationship between real investment and financial decisions of the firm: capital structure, dividend policy, financial distress and bankruptcy;¿ International financial management: transfer pricing, international taxation, mergers and acquisitions, and optimal investment decisions

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid-Semester In-Class Test
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
International Macroeconomics and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM041Semester 17No

International Macroeconomics and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville

Description: International macroeconomics and finance is a new area of open economy macroeconomics. This module: 1. Offers an overview of international monetary economics and finance. 2. Explain how monetary policy and fiscal policy interact to gather the dynamics of sovereign external debt and their financing. 3. Stress the importance of coordinated macroeconomic and financial policies. 4. The theory and the insights provided by this module relate to current policy issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Problem-Solving Based Coursework (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Group Essay (1500 words)
Level: 7
International Reward ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM049Semester 27No

International Reward Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Koumenta

Description: Reward management is one of the key components of human resource management. It is one of the most sensitive and problematic areas of people management that poses additional issues when cast in an international setting. The course starts by giving students a theoretical grounding before applying this knowledge to issues such as payment systems, executive compensation, equal pay, payment structures and pay negotiations. These issues are examined from an organisational and international perspective with topical case studies and practical examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Report (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Managerial EconomicsBusiness and ManagementBUSM051Semester 17No

Managerial Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Caterina Gennaioli

Description: Managerial Economics applies microeconomics to problems confronting decision-making within firms, and covers how to tie and apply economic thinking to current events and policy debates that are relevant to businesses. The topics concern key aspects of the functioning of markets, including the role of prices, interdependence and elasticities, as well as market failures, the impact of non-competitive market structures, focusing on the case of oligopoly, pricing decisions, including quantity discounts and different types of market segmentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Case Study (2000 words)
Level: 7
Financial ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUSM054Semester 17No

Financial Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Mohammed Kasbar

Description: This module examines the financial reporting of companies, and how such reporting can be analysed to evaluate performance. No prior knowledge of accounting is assumed: students learn how accounts are constructed and analysed, then examine the impact of selected issues on the reported numbers e.g. the reporting of intangible assets; and the treatment of share options used to reward management. The module takes a global perspective and refers largely to the regulatory regime of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Understanding Consumer BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM058Semester 17No

Understanding Consumer Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eric Levy

Description: All marketing action is aimed at consumers. Without an understanding of the consumer the application of marketing tools is unlikely to yield the desired outcomes. This module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of consumer and market behaviour as a main consideration in marketing. The course offers a brief introduction into consumer research and then focuses on an understanding of the consumer from a mainly psychological perspective. Overall, the course provides frameworks that enable students to address the issue of understanding consumers responsibly, systematically, and creatively.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report (2500 words)
Level: 7
Understanding Consumer BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM058Full year7No

Understanding Consumer Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eric Levy

Description: All marketing action is aimed at consumers. Without an understanding of the consumer the application of marketing tools is unlikely to yield the desired outcomes. This module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of consumer and market behaviour as a main consideration in marketing. The course offers a brief introduction into consumer research and then focuses on an understanding of the consumer from a mainly psychological perspective. Overall, the course provides frameworks that enable students to address the issue of understanding consumers responsibly, systematically, and creatively.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project Report (2500 words)
Level: 7
International AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM059Semester 27No

International Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: The module will provide students with an understanding of the nature of accounting practices in an international context. With respect to accounting it emphasises the importance of a country's culture, social and economic, legal and political environment in determining the nature of the rules and regulations, which governs its financial reporting practices. In this respect, the problems of financial reporting diversity across countries as a result of the increasing internationalisation of business are explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Integrated Group Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Corporate GovernanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM060Semester 27No

Corporate Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu

Description: This module examines the role and duties of corporate managers, goals of corporate activities, and interests in which corporations should run through debates by introducing students to key topics in corporate governance theory. Research and practice enables them to criticise relevant academic literature to develop the ability to suggest potential areas for development. Developments in early 21st century European corporate governance, corporate governance theory, regulatory frameworks, share/stakeholders, family-owned firms, institutional investors, socially responsible investments, and board of directors are explored.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Contemporary Issues in AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM061Semester 27No

Contemporary Issues in Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: The module introduces students to key theories, concepts and issues in public sector financial management and governance. It critically explores how the advanced economies central government finances have evolved over time and specifically the importance of deficit financing. We then consider the accounting practices underlying public finances and the shift to accruals accounting and adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards before turning to consider three cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Advanced Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM067Semester 27No

Advanced Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura

Description: This course examines the role played by management accounting information in organisational control and decision making to develop a critical understanding of the management accounting roles in organisations. Contemporary issues in management accounting (e.g. total quality management/accounting systems; Customer profitability analysis/customer accounting; Responsibility accounting, financial performance measures, transfer prices, Measuring non-financial performance and the balanced scorecard) are analysed. Perspectives of accounting management control are explained. Contemporary approaches of management control theories related to current global practices of management accounting are contrasted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM069Semester 17No

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrizia Kokot-Blamey

Description: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organisational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, and group dynamics which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviours both at individual, group and organisational levels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1800 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM069Full year7No

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrizia Kokot-Blamey

Description: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organisational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, and group dynamics which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviours both at individual, group and organisational levels.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1800 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Accounting for Business ModelsBusiness and ManagementBUSM070Semester 17No

Accounting for Business Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam

Description: This module conceptualises business models within an accounting framework. There are three significant parts to this module. how we can structure business models, designate business models with a sense of financial purpose (liquidity, solvency and capitalisation) and finally evaluate performance and outcomes. These financial objectives are explored and evaluated using accounting data for a range of business model types for example, banking, private equity and bio-pharma and 3rd /public sector organisations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Accounting and Value ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM071Semester 27No

Accounting and Value Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal

Description: This module is about how value is managed within different sectors: private, public and non-profits. In the private sector the focus is with value creation and capture to extract cash and a return on capital. In contrast the value management problem in the public sector is framed as one of value for money (VFM) and in not for profits 'values' management. Both public and not for profits are converging towards a private sector management approach to resource stewardship.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Financial Markets and InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUSM072Semester 17No

Financial Markets and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ni Peng

Description: This module will compare the forms and functions of various financial markets, and develop an understanding of how financial managers use these markets to attain corporate goals. This module will also analyse various sophisticated and complex financial instruments used, and establish a framework of how different forms of financial institutions operate to manage financial risks. In addition, it will discuss the framework of financial regulation and the functions of central banks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 30% Group Project (3500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Economics of DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM073Semester 27No

Economics of Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero

Description: This course introduces contemporary theories and the empirical literature of the economics of developing countries with specific reference to public policy delivery. The course will address the problems with public policy delivery in developing countries and what solutions and strategies have been identified in the literature. The course will deal with debates such as centralised and decentralised delivery methods, political economy issues of corruption and state capture, and the role of incentives among politicians and bureaucrats in service delivery.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Data Assessment (No word limit)
  • Item 2: 30% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 7
New Product Development and Business EcosystemsBusiness and ManagementBUSM084Semester 27No

New Product Development and Business Ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli

Description: Innovation is an essential drive of a firm's competitiveness. The module New Product Development and Business Ecosystems enables students to analyse innovation processes within complex ecosystems, from the definition of a new product concept to the involvement of suppliers, partners and end-users in developing new product/process architectures. Students will analyse the organisational implications and challenges deriving from the involvement of partners, supplier and end-users in new product development, through a blend of theoretical and case study based approaches.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Project
  • Item 2: 80% Individual Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Behavioural Finance and Decision MakingBusiness and ManagementBUSM085Semester 27No

Behavioural Finance and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu

Description: This module identifies and challenges modern theory of finance and covers major issues in behavioural finance. These include biases, which frequently occur in financial decision-making. Emphasis is on several theories of human behaviour that have policy implications in Finance. The module will use a number of research articles published in top academic journals, for a better understanding of theory and empirical regularities and will have guest speakers from International Financial institutions to familiarise students with real life applications.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Coursework (3000 words)
Level: 7
Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM086Semester 17No

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti

Description: BUSM086 explores theoretical approaches explaining what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. `Traditional¿ competitive positioning, resource-based views are critically evaluated for their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid environment. Contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches and time/timing are analysed. From a variety of organisational contexts, we assess the extent to which firm strategy models may be applied to public sector/voluntary/entrepreneurial types of organisations and firms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM086Full year7No

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti

Description: BUSM086 explores theoretical approaches explaining what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. `Traditional¿ competitive positioning, resource-based views are critically evaluated for their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid environment. Contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches and time/timing are analysed. From a variety of organisational contexts, we assess the extent to which firm strategy models may be applied to public sector/voluntary/entrepreneurial types of organisations and firms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
International Business StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUSM089Semester 27No

International Business Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Roman Matousek

Description: The module aims to introduce students to concepts and practices related to managing in a globally volatile, complex, dynamic environment within which organisations, national and international institutions and individuals interact. The elective is designed to be an advanced global strategic management course presenting material that is highly contemporary. This course provides balanced global strategic insights along with proven practical business frameworks and prepares you to respond quickly to today¿s challenging global environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
World Economy and DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM090Semester 17No

World Economy and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module examines processes of economic `globalisation¿ and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm in the context of trends in the world economy since the 1970s. It provides a critical and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, theories of international trade and its regulation, and conceptualisations of global supply chains. It uses sector and country case studies to encourage an applied understanding of differentiated political-economic relationships, processes and outcomes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Seminar Reading Log x 5
  • Item 2: 15% Group Presentation (5 mins)
  • Item 3: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Introduction to Marketing Theory and ConceptsBusiness and ManagementBUSM094Semester 17No

Introduction to Marketing Theory and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arash Valipour

Description: This module gives an advanced outlook on marketing as a field of inquiry. It is providing students on the MSc in Marketing with a theoretical foundation of theories and concepts of marketing, which allows them in their subsequent studies to understand and situate more specialised aspects of marketing (e.g. consumer behaviour, brand management, or business relationships and networks). Special emphasis is given to understanding current academic debates in the field. This means students are expected to read articles in leading marketing journals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Introduction to Marketing Theory and ConceptsBusiness and ManagementBUSM094Semester 27No

Introduction to Marketing Theory and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arash Valipour

Description: This module gives an advanced outlook on marketing as a field of inquiry. It is providing students on the MSc in Marketing with a theoretical foundation of theories and concepts of marketing, which allows them in their subsequent studies to understand and situate more specialised aspects of marketing (e.g. consumer behaviour, brand management, or business relationships and networks). Special emphasis is given to understanding current academic debates in the field. This means students are expected to read articles in leading marketing journals.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Individual Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Relationship and Network MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM096Semester 17No

Relationship and Network Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jie Sheng

Description: The module Relationship and Network Marketing provides students with an overview of important aspects of business-to-business marketing. For this purpose, students will explore crucial underlying concepts of relationships and networks as well as develop a sense of business marketing practices. The module fosters an understanding of how organisations are embedded in an interdependent net(work) of business exchanges. Using collaborative and cooperative relational management provides firms within such net(work)s with the possibility to mobilise important external resources via business partners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Relationship and Network MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM096Full year7No

Relationship and Network Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jie Sheng

Description: The module Relationship and Network Marketing provides students with an overview of important aspects of business-to-business marketing. For this purpose, students will explore crucial underlying concepts of relationships and networks as well as develop a sense of business marketing practices. The module fosters an understanding of how organisations are embedded in an interdependent net(work) of business exchanges. Using collaborative and cooperative relational management provides firms within such net(work)s with the possibility to mobilise important external resources via business partners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Research Methods for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM098Semester 27No

Research Methods for Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: This module will give you a basic introduction to research methods for marketing, starting with problem definition and question formulation, continuing onto selecting and designing appropriate research methodology and collecting data in various marketing circumstances, and finishing with essential data analysis with modern tools, and interpretation of that data. Finally, we will also work on essential tools for putting all of this together: how to communicate these ideas and findings to a broad audience in the form of a research report and oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Proposal (3000 words)
Level: 7
Research Methods for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM098Full year7No

Research Methods for Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: This module will give you a basic introduction to research methods for marketing, starting with problem definition and question formulation, continuing onto selecting and designing appropriate research methodology and collecting data in various marketing circumstances, and finishing with essential data analysis with modern tools, and interpretation of that data. Finally, we will also work on essential tools for putting all of this together: how to communicate these ideas and findings to a broad audience in the form of a research report and oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Proposal (3000 words)
Level: 7
Digital MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM099Semester 17No

Digital Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitrios Dousios

Description: Internet and digital technologies have transformed marketing and impacted industry from retailing to healthcare. Companies face the challenge of developing and maintaining their business operations and customer engagement in a constantly evolving digital space. The key question is how to successfully deploy digital marketing strategies. What are techniques that companies need to master to make effective use of digital marketing? This module empowers students with skills and knowledge needed to work as a digital marketing professional after graduation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Project (3000 words)
Level: 7
Digital MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM099Full year7No

Digital Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dimitrios Dousios

Description: Internet and digital technologies have transformed marketing and impacted industry from retailing to healthcare. Companies face the challenge of developing and maintaining their business operations and customer engagement in a constantly evolving digital space. The key question is how to successfully deploy digital marketing strategies. What are techniques that companies need to master to make effective use of digital marketing? This module empowers students with skills and knowledge needed to work as a digital marketing professional after graduation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Project (3000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM100Full year7No

Dissertation for Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Lilian Ngozi Schofield

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Management Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM100Full year7No

Dissertation for Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Lilian Ngozi Schofield

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Management Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for International Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM101Full year7No

Dissertation for International Financial Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia

Description: The dissertation requires a demonstration of the ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a Supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for International HRM & Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM102Full year7No

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment Relations

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Maria Adamson

Description: The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. The process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. An investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor. Students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (12000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUSM103Full year7No

Dissertation for International Business

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc International Business Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for Accounting and ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM105Full year7No

Dissertation for Accounting and Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by an Advisor. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module. Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM106Full year7No

Dissertation for Marketing

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Marketing Programme, carrying a weighting of 60 credits. The dissertation involves demonstration of ability to execute a research plan and independent investigation. The investigation can rely on primary data collected by the student, on secondary data available in the literature, or a mix of both. The dissertation will reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising information and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM106Full year7No

Dissertation for Marketing

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Marketing Programme, carrying a weighting of 60 credits. The dissertation involves demonstration of ability to execute a research plan and independent investigation. The investigation can rely on primary data collected by the student, on secondary data available in the literature, or a mix of both. The dissertation will reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising information and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM107Semester 17No

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle

Description: The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic context and how accounting is shaped by this context. Key concepts and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations and the use of accounting information by management for planning, decision making and control purposes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM107Full year7No

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle

Description: The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic context and how accounting is shaped by this context. Key concepts and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations and the use of accounting information by management for planning, decision making and control purposes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Leading Organisational ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUSM108Semester 17No

Leading Organisational Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stefan Krummaker

Description: This module will investigate and discuss leading change in organisations from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on organisational change processes through both a scientific and practical lens and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. Understanding different perspectives, practices and challenges of leading change will also contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, how they can become both an effective and a responsible future contributor to organisational change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Leading Organisational ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUSM108Full year7No

Leading Organisational Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module will investigate and discuss leading change in organisations from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on organisational change processes through both a scientific and practical lens and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. Understanding different perspectives, practices and challenges of leading change will also contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, how they can become both an effective and a responsible future contributor to organisational change.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM110Semester 17No

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module provides learners with a critical understanding of the internal and external contexts of contemporary organisations, including the managerial, business, regulatory, labour market and institutional contexts. It further examines the role of the HR function, HR strategy and the link between HR and organisational performance. The module also introduces the major functions of HRM including resourcing, performance management, learning and development and explores the applications in professional practice in different types of organisational scenarios (large, small, global, national, public, private). This is further achieved through additional skills workshops that engage learners in the analysis of case studies, role play and problem solving exercises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Project (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Applied Empirical MethodsBusiness and ManagementBUSM112Semester 27No

Applied Empirical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero

Description: The module provides a non-technical overview of quantitative methodologies frequently used in finance and international business research. The module is data driven and covers the basics of: Hypotheses testing, OLS and Logistic Regression Analysis, Instrumental Variables, Time Series Analysis, Panel Data Models and Differences-in Differences. The module also teaches how to apply these methods using STATA (a leading econometrics software).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Quiz (No word limit)
  • Item 2: 40% Group Project (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% In-class Test (1 hour)
Level: 7
Corporate ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUSM113Semester 17No

Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou

Description: In this module students will understand the evolution of corporate reporting from nationally specific practices to a more convergence towards IASB standards and why and how this has been sponsored. This module introduces the core accounting concepts and explores the financial reporting framework and guidelines currently available to international companies. Students will understand and appreciate how changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for international integrated corporate reporting.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
International Business AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM114Semester 17No

International Business Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis

Description: International Business is about business or firms engaging in intercontinental (cross-border) economic activities and trading transactions and/or the activity of doing business abroad. In this module students would be expected to understand the nature of international business and key analytical techniques for the operation of a business in a global setting. This module will involve developing a critical understanding of the key techniques that can be employed to support the allocation of corporate resources within an international sphere of operation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Digital Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
International FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM115Semester 27No

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia

Description: As the international company becomes the norm rather than the exception, the need to internationalise the tools of financial analysis is apparent. We now live in a highly integrated world economy, and it is crucial that businesses understand both the risks and opportunities that globalisation brings. This module is designed to immerse student in the international dimension of financial issues. It specifically focuses on the international aspects of financial management to appreciate the issues that international investments and money management that international operation involves.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Project
  • Item 2: 20% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 3: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Management ControlBusiness and ManagementBUSM116Semester 17No

Management Control

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis

Description: The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) ¿ the largest association of management accountants in the UK ¿ considers management control system as combining accounting, finance and management with the leading-edge techniques needed to drive successful businesses. The module focuses on the production and analysis of certain information such as job and process costing, joint costs, capital investment decisions, budgetary systems and transfer pricing. The management team in any organisation uses that information produced to shape up its strategy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-Class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Risk and Crisis ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM117Semester 27No

Risk and Crisis Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6

Description: This qualitative module introduces students to distinctive features of risk and crisis management. Concepts of probability, severity, uncertainty, anticipation, resilience, robustness and bias are explored. We examine varieties of biased risk perception among managers and regulators, assumptions underpinning assessment, mitigation and prevention of and risk. We concentrate on operational risk, external shocks, risk to customers and clients, and political risks. Regulatory requirements for corporate risk management are examined. Finally, we consider decision-making, public relations and regulatory relations during corporate crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Group Project in Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM130Full year7No

Group Project in Business Analytics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: This module is the capstone module for the MSc in Business Analytics. Students will work in groups and will be required to provide analysis of a problem or question using complex data from a business context. Each group will be assigned a Mentor who will guide the group through the process of structuring the analytical problem, obtaining and organising the data, data analysis and presentation of results. Final assessment will be based on individual essays which cover specific aspects of the case and student's reflection in the light of Business Analytics methods and theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Group Project
  • Item 2: 60% Report (4000 words)
Level: 7
Masterclass in Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM131Full year7No

Masterclass in Business Analytics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Guven Demirel

Description: The Masterclass in Business Analytics introduces students to current industrial and commercial business analytics practices. This is done through three components: 1. A hands-on experience with industry-popular Machine-Learning software packages; 2. Descriptions of recent Big-Data projects, initiatives and business models from leading corporations and organisations; and 3. Direct interaction with London-based industry experts through class presentations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Quiz
  • Item 2: 15% Presentation
  • Item 3: 70% Essay (5000 words)
Level: 7
Complex Networks and InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM132Semester 27No

Complex Networks and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zeynep Gurguc Farooqui

Description: The structure and dynamics of various complex networks (e.g. World Wide Web, online social, intra/interorganisational, im/export trade networks) are examined. A unified theoretical framework to analyse sociologically relevant phenomena exhibiting complex dynamic network structures (e.g. information diffusion, cultural fads, financial crises, and viral marketing) is the aim. Innovation, to uncover the structural foundations of knowledge creation, transfer, sharing, and diffusion in various empirical domains is emphasised from an interdisciplinary perspective by combining current research on complex networks with contributions from relevant organisational and sociological research.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-Class Test 1 (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 75% Group Project
Level: 7
EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUSM134Semester 27No

Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shoutong Thomas Zhang

Description: This module integrates the theory and practice of innovation and entrepreneurship. The module draws together the learning from several functional areas that students will have already covered in the past ¿ marketing, strategy, finance, law etc. ¿ and place these within the larger context of innovation and entrepreneurship. While we will discuss many tools, models, and frameworks that can assist innovation and entrepreneurship processes, a core focus within the course is to critically analyse and apply these ideas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Project (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Evidence-based Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM136Semester 27No

Evidence-based Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Briner

Description: This module focuses on a practical project to provide participants with a hands-on experience of using different types of evidence and information to identify real HRM problems and their potential solutions. Evidence-based practice approaches consider a broad range of sources of information and crucially develop skills around critical appraisal in order to judge the trustworthiness of information. The learner develops skills related to collecting relevant information of different types (including scientific evidence, organisational data, professional expertise and stakeholder perspectives and values).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Presentation
  • Item 2: 70% Report (2500 words)
Level: 7
Introduction to Marketing ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM137Semester 27No

Introduction to Marketing Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zahra Sharifonnasabi

Description: This module provides an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. It offers students (MSc in Management and Management and Organisational Innovation) a theoretical foundation of marketing concepts (e.g., consumer behaviour, pricing, product management, branding) and different ways that these concepts can be integrated within the broader field of management. Special emphasis is given to understanding practical implications of marketing and consumer behaviour theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Group Project (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 7
Introduction to Marketing ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM137Semester 17No

Introduction to Marketing Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Zahra Sharifonnasabi

Description: This module provides an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. It offers students (MSc in Management and Management and Organisational Innovation) a theoretical foundation of marketing concepts (e.g., consumer behaviour, pricing, product management, branding) and different ways that these concepts can be integrated within the broader field of management. Special emphasis is given to understanding practical implications of marketing and consumer behaviour theories.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Group Project (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 7
Leadership Skills for Business AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM139Semester 17No

Leadership Skills for Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evangelos Markopoulos

Description: The module will familiarise students with the fundamentals of effective leadership in analytical initiatives/project teams including the difference between leading and managing initiatives/projects, dealing with resistance, knowledge hoarding and different stakeholder interests, transactional versus transformational leadership, inspiring peers and subordinates effective communication, trust and knowledge sharing within and across teams and other stakeholders, presenting and pitching concepts and results, managing the organisational synergy of a team and dealing with acceleration and over-acceleration in analytical projects.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Project ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM141Semester 27No

Project Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management

Description: The module will focus on project management techniques, methodologies, theories appropriate to projects that deliver complex outcomes in a context of high uncertainty on the desired result. The module will also provide team and teaming management principles and practices needed to obtain the desired project management results within time, budget and quality. Students will be encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to earn an accreditation for project management and the course will prepare students for this additional examination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Research Methods for AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM143Semester 27No

Research Methods for Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou

Description: The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to prepare a research proposal, to draw out objectives of research, to undertake literature reviews and to assess suitable research methods to use. The course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students should be able to prepare a research proposal.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Proposal (3000 words)
Level: 7
Research Methods for Human Resources ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM144Semester 27No

Research Methods for Human Resources Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Adamson

Description: The nature of business and management/ human resource management research and business techniques is explored to build knowledge, skills and expertise to undertake a successful MSc dissertation. Fundamentals of business management/HR research help design relevant and rigorous dissertation projects through suitable quantitative and/or qualitative research methods techniques. The entire research process from finding a research question to the results including the write-up is developed. The dissertation will also provide the fundaments for future research projects in academia and different business contexts.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Proposal (3000 words)
Level: 7
Research Methods for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM145Semester 27No

Research Methods for Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Laffin

Description: Research Methods introduces you to the main approaches and strategies in research methods so that you develop a strong understanding of how social scientists search for and test out evidence in their disciplines. In this way it will help you to develop a critical approach to questions of evidence during your studies and specifically prepare you to work on your dissertation. The lectures will cover issues of research design, searching and reviewing the literatures on topics, and the requirements for research at this level. You will also be given guidance on how to devise research proposals and write dissertations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Proposal (3000 words)
Level: 7
Research Methods for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM145Full year7No

Research Methods for Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Laffin

Description: Research Methods introduces you to the main approaches and strategies in research methods so that you develop a strong understanding of how social scientists search for and test out evidence in their disciplines. In this way it will help you to develop a critical approach to questions of evidence during your studies and specifically prepare you to work on your dissertation. The lectures will cover issues of research design, searching and reviewing the literatures on topics, and the requirements for research at this level. You will also be given guidance on how to devise research proposals and write dissertations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Proposal (3000 words)
Level: 7
Strategic AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM147Semester 17No

Strategic Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz

Description: This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the "traditional"" competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate these analytical approaches and their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. The module will then provide an overview of the emerging literature on the application and use of big data and data analytics within organisations. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Report 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Report 2 (1500 words)
Level: 7
Leadership in the Social and Public SectorsBusiness and ManagementBUSM149Semester 27No

Leadership in the Social and Public Sectors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evangelos Markopoulos

Description: This module will investigate leadership in the social and public sectors from theoretical and practical perspectives. The module explores established and new paradigms of leadership at all levels in social and public organisations, characterised by their tendency to operate in politically- and/or resource-constrained environments. Students will reflect critically on relevant research, and apply their insights to real social and/or public organisational cases. The process of understanding and challenging leadership practises will also contribute to students' employability and personal development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Human Resource Management & EmploBusiness and ManagementBUSM156Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Human Resource Management & Emplo

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor

Description: This module consists of Professional Development workshops. These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of HR including: recruitment and selection, performance management, negotiation and bargaining, career development and talent management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Attendance
Level: 7
Experiments for Business and AnalyticsBusiness and ManagementBUSM160Semester 27No

Experiments for Business and Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz

Description: This compulsory module is taught in Semester 2 building on statistical methods in Data Analytics module in Semester 1. The module introduces students to the problem of causal inference, theories of causality and causal effects empirical methods. The focus is on randomised controlled trials in similar settings. Students learn about different econometric techniques to identify causal effects and their strengths and weaknesses. Data collection and organisation of real or natural experiments, data analysis and reporting results to non-specialists is covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% In-Class Test 1 (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 25% In-Class Test 2 (1 hour)
  • Item 3: 50% Group Project
Level: 7
Funding and Financing in the Creative and Cultural IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUSM161Semester 27No

Funding and Financing in the Creative and Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani

Description: This module focuses on the theory and practise of funding and financing in the creative and cultural sector ( including the heritage sector). The module will give students a grounding in the landscape of funding and financing streams as well as technical aspects of understanding the organisational and legal frameworks that exist in the creative and cultural sector.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% In-Class Test (1 hour)
Level: 7
Heritage: History, Theory and PracticeBusiness and ManagementBUSM162Semester 17No

Heritage: History, Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edward Legon

Description: This module will provide the theoretical basis for understanding heritage from a range of cross-disciplinary perspectives. It will address the relationships between heritage, history, and memory in theory and practice, exploring heritage on personal and collective scales, the politics of heritage, and the materiality of heritage sites and objects alongside intangible heritage in the form of testimony and stories. The module will explore the ways in which different understandings of heritage inform practice in the heritage sector, from community archives and heritage projects to museums, historic-houses, and palaces.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Research Proposal (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Case Study Analysis (3000 words)
Level: 7
Managing Heritages at Historic Royal PalacesBusiness and ManagementBUSM164Full year7No

Managing Heritages at Historic Royal Palaces

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof John Davis

Description: Academic rigour and applied professional theory introduces students to the actual practice of heritage management at historically renowned sites and coordinated by Historic Royal Palace's Programme Director with masterclass sessions by other specialists from within HRP. Possible visits to heritage organisations are planned. A combination of classroom-based discussion from readings, site visits and Masterclasses with HRP staff will take a `critical practice¿ approach connecting QMUL compulsory module themes to HRP case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Visitor Text (150 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Statement of Significance (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 65% Project Mandate (2000 words)
Level: 7
Organising in the Creative and Cultural IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUSM165Semester 17No

Organising in the Creative and Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai

Description: Explores the multiple organisational forms in the creative and cultural industries to give students critical and practical tools to organise in the creative economies. Rooted in the ethical mission of the School of Business and Management, the organising methods and organisational forms and behaviours common and emergent in the creative industries and cultural sector will be explored through an interdisciplinary understanding of creative ecologies and their political and economic networks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation (15 minutes)
Level: 7
Professional Practice in Heritage ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM166Full year7No

Professional Practice in Heritage Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Davis

Description: HRP placement students experience four key areas of heritage management practice learning professional skills, knowledge and essential experience through engagement with sector leaders. Critical skills applied to practice areas showcases their own professional capabilities by forming networks. Students have the opportunity to present lessons learnt to professionals and academics, thus promoting career planning and employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Professional Practice in Heritage ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM166Semester 27No

Professional Practice in Heritage Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Davis

Description: HRP placement students experience four key areas of heritage management practice learning professional skills, knowledge and essential experience through engagement with sector leaders. Critical skills applied to practice areas showcases their own professional capabilities by forming networks. Students have the opportunity to present lessons learnt to professionals and academics, thus promoting career planning and employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Professional Practice in Heritage ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM166Full year7No

Professional Practice in Heritage Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Davis

Description: HRP placement students experience four key areas of heritage management practice learning professional skills, knowledge and essential experience through engagement with sector leaders. Critical skills applied to practice areas showcases their own professional capabilities by forming networks. Students have the opportunity to present lessons learnt to professionals and academics, thus promoting career planning and employability.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Leadership SeminarBusiness and ManagementBUSM167Full year7No

Leadership Seminar

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Edward Legon

Description: This module consists of professional development seminars within the theme of creative industries and cultural sector leadership. The seminars, delivered by diverse professionals and practitioners from these sectors, will provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and will inspire new thinking and develop practical behaviour changes. The seminar series is also designed to bring together students on the CIAO and Heritage Management MAs, and to encourage both cohorts to cross-fertilise knowledge and understanding of sector leadership.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Attendance
Level: 7
Dissertation in Heritage ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM168Full year7No

Dissertation in Heritage Management

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Edward Legon

Description: This important module requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an issue of interest relevant to the content of the MA Heritage Management. The process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising/analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students are guided through the dissertation process by one or more supervisor/s (including HRP academics). To prepare them for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Design & Methods module (GEG7135).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Project (6000 words)
Level: 7
Applied Methods (Master Class)Business and ManagementBUSM170Semester 27No

Applied Methods (Master Class)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai

Description: This module focuses on the relevant methods of analysis and applied research into the organisation history of the creative industries. What are the interdisciplinary methods that generate innovation and leadership in the creative industries and arts and cultural sector, and which methods are more or less appropriate for engaging these different sectors of society? This module will provide students key methodological knowledge to be able to engage critically with creative industries practice and organisation, and prepares students to undertake dissertation and practice-based projects in the third semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Research Diagram Assessment 1 (2 figures, 500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Research Diagram Assessment 2 (3 figures, 750 words)
Level: 7
Introduction to Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUSM171Semester 17No

Introduction to Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani

Description: This module explores the foundational concepts and theories of the creative industries. This module provides students with the relevant theories, conceptual tools and factual information necessary to gain an understanding of, and be able to engage critically with, the realities of managing, working and progressing within the cultural and creative industries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Presentation (15 minutes)
Level: 7
Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUSM172Full year7No

Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani

Description: This module will compare the forms and functions of various financial markets, and develop an understanding of how financial managers use these markets to attain corporate goals. This module will also analyse various sophisticated and complex financial instruments used, and establish a framework of how different forms of financial institutions operate to manage financial risks. In addition, it will discuss the framework of financial regulation and the functions of central banks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Brief (3000 words)
Level: 7
Corporate Social Responsibility and Business EthicsBusiness and ManagementBUSM175Semester 27No

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar

Description: Corporate Social Responsibility will offer students an introductory and in-depth module unpacking the sensitive relationship between corporations and issues of social justice, environmental destruction (animal, climate, pollution, ecologies) and labour rights. At a time when globalisation is perceived as a threat to international business addressing inequalities across the global North and South, this module will provide postgraduate students with indispensable knowledge about key issues facing corporations today. The module will also address both philosophical issues that include ethical theories, moral debates and social scientific perspectives as well as a grounding in real life case studies and access to a local stakeholder engagement project with charities in Tower Hamlets and Poplar. Specific modules will cover a wide-range of subjects including: 'greening' management (reducing emissions, waste management, protecting biodiversity), workers rights (trade unions, ILO, outsourcing, supply-chains), sustainable consumption (ethical marketing, corporate lobbying, consumerism), and promoting democratic processes (governance, accountability, stakeholder engagement).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation of Project's Key Finding (15 mins + 5 Slides)
  • Item 2: 70% Theoretical Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Innovation and Global CompetitionBusiness and ManagementBUSM177Semester 27No

Innovation and Global Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang

Description: One of the core elements of entrepreneurship and economic leadership is competitive advantage via innovation by understanding the industry and firm dynamics of technological innovation. Issues within the context of globalisation, development and digitalisation are covered as a strategic process, beginning with assessing the context and moving on to the formulation and implementation of innovation strategies by examining strategic dilemmas within innovation (e.g. standards battles and design dominance, timing of entry, choosing innovation projects, collaborative innovation strategies and the benefits of protecting or opening up innovation for competitive strategy).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Individual Coursework (2000 words)
Level: 7
Selected Issues in Commercial and Company LawBusiness and ManagementBUSM179Semester 27No

Selected Issues in Commercial and Company Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Min Yan

Description: This module will introduce students to those aspects of law that are relevant to business operations by examining selected issues and fundamental principles that underlie the law of contract and company law. In particular, this module will deal with creating commercial contracts, contractual terms, effect of exemption and unfair clauses, remedies for breach of contract, corporate personality & limited liability of shareholders, corporate constitution and corporate management, managerial accountability & directors' duties, shareholder rights & remedies and comparative corporate governance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM180Full year7No

Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Management Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM180Full year7No

Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Management Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM180Semester 27No

Dissertation for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti

Description: The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Management Programme, carrying a weighting of four modules (60 credits), i.e., one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 7
Managing Yourself and Building Positive Relationships at WorkBusiness and ManagementBUSM182Semester 17No

Managing Yourself and Building Positive Relationships at Work

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor

Description: Organisational behaviour theories and ideas from psychology provide insight on how individuals/groups behave in organisational settings. Various organisational models are analysed for future HR practitioners to enhance self-awareness and interpersonal skills. Individual differences, managing group dynamics, communicating with impact, influencing and persuasion skills, working across differences, managing workplace politics constructively, building nurturing relationship for professional growth and career progression are examined. Self-development through practical and experiential activities are embedded in weekly sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Self-Reflective Essay (3000 words)
Level: 7
Services ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM183Semester 27No

Services Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yuansi Hou

Description: The services sector has become one of the most important sectors from both an economic and a managerial point of view. Besides pure services providers an increasing number of 'new' services providers emerge, usually offering hybrid offerings that include goods and services components. This module provides students with an overview of important aspects of services management; outlines relevant frameworks, concepts, tools, and processes to improve the understanding of service design, management and commercialisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Individual Project Essay (2000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for MSc Accounting and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM184Full year7No

Dissertation for MSc Accounting and Finance

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou

Description: BUS184 Dissertation is a significantly lengthy (7,500 words) piece of independent work on a theme chosen by the student. Each Dissertation must fulfil certain topical areas, which are supported with the guidance of a Dissertation Supervisor, and involves an extended period of research and writing (two to three months). The Dissertation supports the BUSM143 Research Methods Module. Assessment submission is at the end of the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research (7500 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation for MSc Accounting and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM184Full year7No

Dissertation for MSc Accounting and Finance

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Evisa Mitrou

Description: BUS184 Dissertation is a significantly lengthy (7,500 words) piece of independent work on a theme chosen by the student. Each Dissertation must fulfil certain topical areas, which are supported with the guidance of a Dissertation Supervisor, and involves an extended period of research and writing (two to three months). The Dissertation supports the BUSM143 Research Methods Module. Assessment submission is at the end of the semester.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research (7500 words)
Level: 7
International Investment AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM185Semester 27No

International Investment Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia

Description: The module focuses on investment analysis and aims to develop an understanding of how securities and portfolios investment fits with the international financial markets. It will introduce students the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing Theory, multi-factor model, bond valuation, equity valuation, Financial Statement analysis, option valuation and portfolio performance evaluation. This module is particularly useful for students considering a career in finance, investment management, investment banking, investment consultancy or asset management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Mid-semester Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Strategic EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUSM186Semester 17No

Strategic Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang

Description: This module introduces concepts, theories and practices that are shaping our thinking about creating and scaling new ventures in a fast-moving environment with great uncertainty. It addresses strategic (e.g. how to design a business model and entrepreneurial strategy) and practical issues (how to write a business plan and make a pitch to win funding). Students will not only be introduced to the principles of business model design, but also how to deal with uncertainty in the entrepreneurial process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Individual essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Group project (15 min)
Level: 7
Strategic EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUSM186Full year7No

Strategic Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang

Description: This module introduces concepts, theories and practices that are shaping our thinking about creating and scaling new ventures in a fast-moving environment with great uncertainty. It addresses strategic (e.g. how to design a business model and entrepreneurial strategy) and practical issues (how to write a business plan and make a pitch to win funding). Students will not only be introduced to the principles of business model design, but also how to deal with uncertainty in the entrepreneurial process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Individual essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Group project (15 min)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBusiness and ManagementBUSM187Full year7No

Dissertation in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai

Description: The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. The process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Project (10 000 words)
Level: 7
Introductory CatalanLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT4200Full year4Yes

Introductory Catalan

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Isabel Crespi Riutort
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module should be chosen by students wishing to take a full academic year of Introductory Catalan. Successful students will complete Level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Language (CEFRL). Teaching materials are selected with a view to introducing students to Catalan culture and society. Students are expected to actively participate in and contribute to the learning process in the classroom. They must attend five hours of teaching per week and expect to spend a further five hours per week on private study.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination (15 mins)
  • Item 3: 50% Online Examination (3 hours)
Level: 4
Catalan II IntensiveLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT5200Full year5Yes

Catalan II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Isabel Crespi
Overlap: CAT512
Prerequisite: CAT4200 knowledge of Catalan equivalent to CEFRL level A2?
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is aimed at students who already have a basic knowledge of Catalan. Its focus is on developing oral fluency, improving aural and reading comprehension skills, learning new structures and vocabulary, and writing skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Coursework
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination (15 minutes)
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (3 hours)
Level: 5
Networking,Multi- and inter-disciplinarity,International perspectivesSBM_DRA_ESH_GEG_HST_MAT_SPA_POL_GLH_SLF
Avant-Garde Theatre in EuropeLanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT6007Semester 26Yes

Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: "COM6007, HSP6007"
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature module; knowledge of Catalan equivalent to CEFR level C1
Corequisite: None

Description: Why should characters behave illogically on stage or not exist at all? How can image rival plot? And what is the point of shocking audiences? This module introduces some fundamental styles and plays from European avant-garde theatre and sets them within an artistic and socio-political context. Futurism, Dada, Expressionism and the Theatre of the Absurd are included. Special attention is paid to Catalan drama. We will at all times try to see texts as excuses for performance and use other aspects of culture to understand the challenges of this new drama.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Catalan IIILanguages Linguistics and FilmCAT6200Full year6Yes

Catalan III

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Isabel Crespi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CAT5200 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module is for students who have completed Catalan II Intensive. The focus will be on fluency, expansion of vocabulary, grammatical accuracy, advanced oral and reading comprehension, and development of writing skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination (15 minutes)
  • Item 3: 30% Coursework
Level: 6
Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - ArbitrationLawCCDD200Full year7No

Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - Arbitration

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - ArbitrationLawCCDD200Full year7No

Dissertation in International Dispute Resolution - Arbitration

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15,000 words)
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration Theory and ContextLawCCDD201Semester 17No

International Commercial Arbitration Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an
insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Essay 2 (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration Theory and ContextLawCCDD201Full year7No

International Commercial Arbitration Theory and Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an
insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Essay 2 (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration: Selected IssuesLawCCDD202Semester 17No

International Commercial Arbitration: Selected Issues

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The aim of this course is to establish students' knowledge and critical understanding as well as provide an
insight into the practice of international commercial arbitration as an independent comparative law subject. The subject is first examined generically, without any reference to any national laws, arbitration rules or international instruments; and then various national and institutional approaches are presented.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Essay 2 (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Investment Treaty ArbitrationLawCCDD211Semester 27No

Investment Treaty Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue a claim of, for example, alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour by a host State. Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles of state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the
commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners are aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes.

The course is divided into three main topics: International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution (2 sessions); ICSID (6 sessions); Bilateral Investment Treaties (3 sessions)

Course content: Introduction: International trade and investment disputes out of court; Regulatory and institutional framework; Basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to trade and investment; Applicable law issues; ICSID; Bilateral Investment Treaties; Enforcement of decisions and awards; Grey zone between substance - procedure / public - private international law; Case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Essay 2 (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Investment Arbitration: Substantive ProtectionLawCCDD212Full year7No

Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Remy Gerbay

Description: The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue a claim of, for example, alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour by a host State. Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles of state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the
commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners are aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes.

The course is divided into three main topics: Major Treaty Systems - Fragmentation and new Regionalisation (two sessions); Case Law of and case studies relating to Substantive Protection (six sessions); Specific Policy issues (3 sessions)

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Essay 2 (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Online Dispute Resolution in e-CommerceLawCCDM010Semester 17No

Online Dispute Resolution in e-Commerce

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle

Description: Online transactions present potential difficulties for enforcement: parties in different jurisdictions with different legal rules (and possibly languages); transactional amounts that often preclude cross-border litigation and; the use of technology to effect an offer and acceptance. This module examines the need for and use of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in the online environment in light of these challenges as well as the particular alternative dispute resolution framework, UDRP, that has evolved to address the problem of internet domain name disputes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
Information Technology OutsourcingLawCCDM011Full year7No

Information Technology Outsourcing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed

Description: Business and governments view outsourcing of information and communications technology equipment and services as a means to allow them to focus on their core functions, while maximising their effectiveness and efficiency through integration of the latest technology. This module explores the legal issues surrounding outsourcing arrangements including: the transfer of employees; legal due diligence for asset and intellectual property transfers; the ongoing management of the long-term contract; the establishment of enforceable performance criteria and mechanisms to manage change and; the termination of the contract and return of in-house function or transition to new supplier.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
Advanced Intellectual Property Issues: Protection of Computer SoftwareLawCCDM013Semester 17No

Advanced Intellectual Property Issues: Protection of Computer Software

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The first chapter provides a technical overview of software, aimed at the non-technical reader. The law of confidential information and trade secrets is then examined, and it's suitability to the software industry is assessed. The module then deals with copyright law, considering the unique characteristics of computer programs as literary works and the consequences these characteristics bring about. Patent law is examined as a vehicle for software protection, and the main difficulties that arise from the unique nature of software are highlighted. Finally, there is an examination of the main forms of software licensing, including the non-IP alternative model of open source licensing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
Privacy and Data Protection LawLawCCDM014Semester 17No

Privacy and Data Protection Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: Privacy is a growing concern in today's society, where the power of computers and the growth of the Internet have combined to make it possible to collect and disseminate more information about an individual than ever before. This module explores different aspects of privacy: privacy as a theoretical concept, a social norm or value and a legal right. The primary module focus, however, is the current legal infrastructure that governs the protection of data in various jurisdictions, (including the EU, the UK, the US, Canada and Australia) and its practical implications for global business.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (3000-4500 words)
Level: 7
Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights ManagementLawCCDM015Full year7No

Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: This module will explore the emergent legal and technological framework for the Protection of Digital Intellectual Property. This will encompass the WIPO Copyright Treaty and its implementation in key signatory states, including the EU's copyright and related rights in an information society Directive, the UK Copyright Regulations and the US' Digital Millennium Copyright Act as well as the range of digital rights management tools, their use and their interaction with laws governing other areas such as privacy and competition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Time-constrained task
  • Item 2: 35% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 3: 55% Final Assessment Exercise
Level: 7
Internet Content RegulationLawCCDM018Semester 27No

Internet Content Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: The Internet is often portrayed as unregulated and anarchic, rife with pornography and salacious lies. Laws regulating such content, typically predate the arrival of the World Wide Web. Internet technology, however, presents a number of challenges to what were previously settled legal issues such as whether an Internet service provider (ISP) should be held liable for defamatory material, as would a publisher or distributor of a newspaper. This module will consider such problems raised by the technology, and explore how different jurisdictions - particularly the UK, the EU and the US - have responded to this challenge. Policy issues surrounding legal reform will form an integral part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM023Full year7No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM023Full year7No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM023Full year7No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
20,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM024Full year7No

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
20,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM024Full year7No

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
20,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM024Full year7No

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
International Telecommunications LawLawCCDM026Full year7No

International Telecommunications Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan

Description: Telecommunications is an inherently transnational technology. As such, the development of telecommunications has always required substantial co-operation and agreement between nation states. Historically, the need for on-going co-operation between states has meant the establishment of inter-governmental organisations, of which the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is the oldest. In addition, the nature of the industry demands the construction of communications links across jurisdictions subject to both domestic and international law. As such, the telecommunications industry has been subject to treaties and conventions established under public international law for the treatment and use of common natural resources, specifically the law of the sea and outer space law. This module broadly examines four substantive aspects of international telecommunications law: (a) The construction of international telecommunications network infrastructure, both satellites and submarine cables; (b) the standards and operating rules established under the framework of the International Telecommunications Union; (c) the impact of the World Trade Organisation and associated trade agreements on national telecommunication markets and legal regimes and (d) issues for developing countries.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
e-Commerce LawLawCCDM027Full year7No

e-Commerce Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: This module examines the legal issues pertaining to e-commerce and is addressed to lawyers wishing to act for and advise e-businesses (and other information society service providers), whether in private practice or as in-house counsel. The course takes a practical, transactional and multi-jurisdictional perspective while maintaining academic rigour. The aim is to provide an in-depth analysis and examination of the ways in which the legal framework deals with the practical issues raised by e-commerce. In particular, this course will examine gaps, conflicts and compliance issues within the current and developing legal framework on e-commerce and to what extent the existing legal framework impacts on new and emerging technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Time-constrained task
  • Item 2: 35% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 3: 55% Final Assessment Exercise
Level: 7
Taxation and Electronic CommerceLawCCDM029Semester 27No

Taxation and Electronic Commerce

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: The growth of e-commerce has made it an important driver of national economies. However, it has presented such challenges for nations and states as the tax presence of virtual entities and their jurisdiction to tax online transactions, under the existing bilateral tax treaties and national laws governing taxation. This module examines these issues with a focus on both direct and indirect taxation, as well as the international legal framework that is being developed to address such issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM030Semester 27No

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Students are to prepare power point presentation on a topic with in the programme area and present this at the Residential Weekend.

In addition students will have to write a 5,000 word paper on the topic.

Students will be allocated a Supervisor to assist with the preparation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Reseach Paper (5000 words)
Level: 7
Online TrademarksLawCCDM040Semester 27No

Online Trademarks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Noam Shemtov

Description: This module focuses trademark infringement on the internet and in particular the conflict between trademarks and domain names and the use of trademarks in the metatags of websites and the use of trademarks in keyword advertising (search engines, online marketplaces). This involves an overview of trademark law from a comparative perspective (English, EU, French, German and US Federal trademark law). The module assesses the function and role of trademarks and compares this to the use on the internet. It evaluates the different types of consumer confusion on the internet and their legal assessment. It examines the role of internet service providers such as search engines, marketplaces, advertisers and how they relate to the trademark use. The module assesses primary and secondary liability in the trademark context and the various immunities granted to internet intermediaries. The module examines the relevant jurisprudence before the English, French, German, US Courts and the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
Cloud Computing LawLawCCDM043Semester 27No

Cloud Computing Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module will provide a foundation for understanding and analysing cloud computing structures and contracts for private and public sector cloud services, including standard terms and contract negotiations; the application of data protection law to the storage and other processing of information in cloud environments, including what is regulated, who is responsible, which laws apply and the circumstances in which law enforcement authorities access information; and the subsistence and ownership of proprietary rights in data stored, processed and generated in cloud environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM090Full year7No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within an appropriate subject area. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM090Full year7No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within an appropriate subject area. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
10,000 Word DissertationLawCCDM090Full year7No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within an appropriate subject area. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Research SeminarLawCCDM091Full year7No

Research Seminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Research Seminar

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Research Paper (5000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation (10,000 words)LawCCDM092Full year7No

Dissertation (10,000 words)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Dissertation (independent research), an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Computer and Communications Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation (10,000 words)LawCCDM092Full year7No

Dissertation (10,000 words)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Dissertation (independent research), an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Computer and Communications Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Dissertation (10,000 words)LawCCDM092Full year7No

Dissertation (10,000 words)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: Dissertation (independent research), an advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Computer and Communications Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation
Level: 7
Advanced IP Issues: Video GamesLawCCDM114Semester 17No

Advanced IP Issues: Video Games

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Interactive Entertainment Law analyses some of the legal and commercial issues that the Interactive Entertainment industry faces. It delineates and analyses the legal parameters within which video game developers and publishers, and Virtual Worlds platform providers operate and in which users create and consume content, providing students with an in-depth analysis of the industry from the development to the commercialisation of interactive entertainment software products and the administration of online video games and virtual worlds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Task 1 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Task 2 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Task 3 (500-1000 words)
  • Item 4: 70% Essay (2500-3000 words)
Level: 7
Law and EconomicsLawCCLF001Semester 17No

Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This module investigates the intersection of law and economics. This module discusses how economics has been used to analysis different areas of the law (e.g., contract law). This module discusses how the law impacts the economic analysis. The module looks at the neoclassical economic model, market failures, behavioural economics and their application to the law. The module looks at how laws shape economic models. The module looks at variety of laws (e.g., corporate law) and their applications to economic reasoning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Independent Research Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Advanced Law and EconomicsLawCCLF002Semester 27No

Advanced Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Garry Gabison

Description: This module further dives into the intersection of law and economics. First, this course looks at the theory of the firm: why firms are formed, financed, etc. Second, this course looks at the economics of antitrust through market definition and merger and acquisitions. Third, this course looks at how intermediaries like credit agency attempt to address information asymmetries and discusses signalling theory. Finally, this course looks at the rational agent hypothesis by looking at the empirical literature on criminal law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Independent Research Essay (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Law and EconomicsLawCCLF003Full year7No

Dissertation in Law and Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant issue within the academic fields of Law and Economics or Law and Finance. The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor. It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis. The group presentation is complementing, integrating and applying lecture material, is the small group project. The presentation is designed to develop a wide range of technical and analytical skills prior to the submission of dissertation proposal and also organizational and communication skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Law and FinanceLawCCLF004Full year7No

Dissertation in Law and Finance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: The chosen topics should relate to a relevant issue within the academic fields of Law and Finance

The particular subject area is the student's own choice, guided and agreed by their supervisor.

It is expected that students will undertake primary research and/or secondary research based in the sources where the data has not been already subjected to a relevant analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Law Internship in FranceLawCCLM600Semester 27No

Law Internship in France

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: The Internship Module consists of applying for, securing, and undertaking an internship of a minimum of three months in a law firm, company or elsewhere within the legal profession, in France (most likely Paris), between April and June. It is the student¿s responsibility to find and secure their internship. S/he will be supported by the Sorbonne and the CCLS PG Law Postgraduate Professional Development team in identifying possible internship opportunities, developing a CV and cover letter, and interview technique. As well as the day-to-day work expected within the terms of the internship, and outlined within the Convention de Stage, students will also be assessed on this module as part of the Double LLM programme. To this end, they will be expected to: i. submit a written report in French on a specific topic determined by the academic supervisor from the Sorbonne Law School by the end of June; and ii. make an oral presentation of the report in French in front of a jury including the Double LLM Programme Directors as well as an External Examiner, also in June. Note that neither QMUL nor the Sorbonne can guarantee internships for all students. Whilst they will make best endeavours to support students in securing appropriate positions, it is ultimately at the discretion of the firm/company as to who they take on and whether the student meets their expectations. In this way, we maintain perceptions and expectations of the realities of entering the legal job market. Should, for whatever reason, a student fail to secure an internship for the expected period, they would not be disadvantaged, as they would still be able to secure credit towards the programme in the form of an independent research essay in French.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Mark
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLM911Full year7No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLM911Full year7No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
French and European Law Independent ResearchLawCCLM927Semester 27No

French and European Law Independent Research

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: Independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of French & European Law. The essay should be produced in the French language.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay in French (5000-7500 words)
Level: 7
Securities and Markets RegulationLawCCLP001Semester 27No

Securities and Markets Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Katrien Morbee

Description: This module covers the most important pieces of EU legislation applicable to capital markets. These include the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive and Regulation (MiFID and MiFIR), the Transparency Directive and the UCITS and AIFM Directives, which discipline collective investment funds and alternative investment funds managers. Particular attention will be given to the study of market venues as well as the European and International institutional framework governing their supervision.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Mergers and AcquisitionsLawCCLP010Semester 27No

Mergers and Acquisitions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in corporate finance. The module will focus on issues such as: the use of debt and equity; why merge or acquire a business; due diligence, acquisition/sale agreements and contractual governance; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, US and the EU and the protection of minority shareholders through the regulation of this bid process; the role of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Ethics and Governance in Business and FinanceLawCCLP011Semester 17No

Ethics and Governance in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: This module analyses unethical practices arising in business and in the financial sector and links them with corresponding corporate governance problems. The module then provides a critical evaluation of the relevant regulatory and supervisory framework which strive to address them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Ethics and Governance in Business and FinanceLawCCLP011Semester 27No

Ethics and Governance in Business and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: This module analyses unethical practices arising in business and in the financial sector and links them with corresponding corporate governance problems. The module then provides a critical evaluation of the relevant regulatory and supervisory framework which strive to address them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Corporate Rescue and Cross-border InsolvencyLawCCLP013Semester 27No

Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Description: This course is premised upon the notion that the student of insolvency law ought to develop a sound understanding of the dynamics of insolvency and debt restructuring, including available options, methods and techniques in the light of regulatory theories, applicable legal framework, shareholders capitalism and public policy objectives. The course will provide a critical and insightful view of current international legal developments and trends with the aim of identifying the most salient legal issues involved in insolvency and debt restructuring in the context of an increasingly complex financial phenomena and global markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
International Arbitration: Regulation and InfrastructureLawCCLP043Semester 27No

International Arbitration: Regulation and Infrastructure

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Rogers

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last sixty years by the increased use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central important in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
International Arbitration: Applicable Laws and ProceduresLawCCLP044Semester 27No

International Arbitration: Applicable Laws and Procedures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Rogers

Description: The growth of international commercial transactions, including infrastructure and investment projects, financial and IP transactions, has been accompanied over the last sixty years by the increased use of arbitration to settle disputes. Arbitration is now established as the preferred method of international dispute resolution as it provides for the neutrality and flexibility commercial parties seek. This module examines the fundamental theoretical concepts and legal framework for international commercial arbitration. The teaching approach taken for this module is international and comparative, drawing on the laws of all major legal systems (including England, France, Switzerland, the USA, Model Law Countries, Singapore, China and Hong Kong) as well as the most important institutional and ad hoc arbitration rules (including the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the UNCITRAL Rules, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, the Singapore International Arbitration Centre). Particular focus is also given to the 1958 United Nations Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which has a central important in international commercial arbitration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Investment Treaty ArbitrationLawCCLP047Semester 17No

Investment Treaty Arbitration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis

Description: The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue a claim of, for example, alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour by a host State. Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles of state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners are aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes. The subject has become very topical with broader political and economic debate on ISDS. This debate has intensified in recent years and various reform projects are underway at UNCITRAL, ICSID and other international organisation. The course is divided into four main topics: Topic 1: International Investment Disputes Out-of-Court: Principles and Historical Evolution; Topic 2: ICSID; Topic 3: Bilateral Investment Treaties and Free Trade Agreements; Topic 4: Substantive Protections. Course content: Introduction: International trade and investment disputes out of court; Regulatory and institutional framework; Basic principles of dispute settlement with reference to trade and investment; Applicable law issues; ICSID Jurisdiction; ICSID Procedure; Bilateral Investment Treaties - substantive protections and state defences; Enforcement of decisions and awards; Grey zone between substance - procedure / public - private international law; Case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
European Copyright LawLawCCLP075Semester 17No

European Copyright Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jonathan Griffiths

Description: This module focuses on the copyright law of the European Union and on the relationship between that body of rules and the copyright laws of the Union's member states (including France and Germany). It aims to provide students with a broad understanding of those systems and a more detailed awareness of specific topical issues within European copyright law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
European Law of PatentsLawCCLP076Semester 17No

European Law of Patents

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents are exclusive rights granted for the protection of an invention that offers a new and inventive technical solution or way of doing something. This module deals with the process of obtaining and enforcing a patent under the provisions of the European Patent Convention (EPC) and the Unified Patent Court, including infringement, defences, recovation and remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
International Law of Patents and Related RightsLawCCLP077Semester 27No

International Law of Patents and Related Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Duncan Matthews

Description: Patents provide, for a limited time, the right to exclude others from acts of making, using, selling, keeping or importing products containing the patented invention. Under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) WTO Members, in particular developing countries, face challenges in meeting their obligations to provide patent protection and related rights. The module will assess the extent to which these obligations derived from international law impact on access to medicines, traditional knowledge, biological diversity, farmers' rights, food security and human rights.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Licensing Intellectual PropertyLawCCLP078Semester 27No

Licensing Intellectual Property

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gail Evans

Description: The module begins with an explanation of the principles of intellectual property, contract and competition law as they relate to licensing contracts. The body of the module will be concerned with the character, structure and drafting of licensing agreements for the major forms of intellectual property to include patent, trade mark and copyright licensing. The module will examine in light of statute and case law, the key terms common to such licensing agreements including: ownership; grant of intellectual property; territorial exclusivity; invention improvement; sublicensing; royalties; warranties; indemnities and dispute resolution. The module will discuss current issues in the field of licensing including trade marks and selective distribution agreements; standard essential patents and FRAND (fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory) licensing; as well as copyright licensing, news aggregation; and technological self-help measures including blockchain technologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
EU and US Design LawLawCCLP081Semester 27No

EU and US Design Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Musker

Description: Design rights are exclusive rights granted for the protection of a design that offers a new and individual appearance. This module deals with the rationales for and process of obtaining and enforcing design protection under the provisions of the European and US statutes, including infringement, defences, revocation and remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
European Law of Trade MarksLawCCLP083Semester 17No

European Law of Trade Marks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Noam Shemtov

Description: The emphasis is on European trade-mark law and, the relevant legal instruments and the extensive jurisprudence developped by the CJEU in that regard, with particular emphasis on the manner in which the latter is applied by UK courts. Trade-mark law has become an important driver of the economy, while brand loyalty, commercial reputation and goodwill are some of the most important assets a commercial entity might posses. These aspects will be covered in depth in relation to the trade-marks jurisprudence in Europe. Moreover, with the looming UK departure form the EU, the interplay between EU and UK trade-mark will be explored as it is of utmost importance to lawyers involved in pan-European transactions and litigation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Energy and Climate ChangeLawCCLP160Semester 27No

Energy and Climate Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Norah Gallagher

Description: This module will look at the international legal regime relating to climate change and consider how this will directly impact the energy sector. There is a fundamental shift in the energy industry away from fossil fuels (non renewable sources) to clean energy (renewable sources). This transition and how it will take place over the coming years will be discussed. This module will also consider emissions trading and its effectiveness, the NDC (nationally determined commitments of states to achieve climate change goals. In addition it will consider the polluter pays principle as well as the growing number of climate change disputes and consider how these might impact future energy regulation, international and national. The focus is climate change exclusively from the perspective of the energy sector.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
International Arbitration and EnergyLawCCLP163Semester 17No

International Arbitration and Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International arbitration proceedings in the energy sector have seen an important increase in recent years, both in terms of their numbers and their economic and political importance. This module provides students with the basis for understanding the particular issues of disputes in the energy sector, both in international investment and commercial arbitration. It gives students aiming to work in the arbitration area an important qualification in a very competitive market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
EU Data Protection LawLawCCLP209Semester 27No

EU Data Protection Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Ian Walden

Description: This module examines EU data protection laws and examples of the regulatory frameworks established in the Member States. It explores the key debates and commercial implications of the current regime under the Data Protection Directive and the new regime under the General Data Protection Regulation, including the challenges of particular developments, such as telecommunications, cloud computing and the Internet of Things.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (3 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Regulation on Media Reporting of the Legal System       LawCCLP218Semester 17No

Regulation on Media Reporting of the Legal System       

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Gavin Sutter

Description: One of the most fundamental concepts governing a legal system is not only that justice should be done, but that it should also be seen to be done. The modern notion of open justice sees the media encouraged to report on the court system in operation; indeed, the right to do so comes under the scope of Article 10. There are, however, situations in which limits must be put upon what may be reported, such as, for example, where the public interest lies in protecting the Article 8 privacy rights of an individual, or perhaps even where it is necessary for information identifying them to be withheld from publication lest it put their actual lives in danger, as was seen in regards to the Bulger killers, Thompson & Venables (UK). Prior to and during legal proceedings, it can be necessary to put limits on the manner in which the media report particular proceedings; in some circumstances, it may even be necessary to prevent certain key information from being able to be reported at all for the duration, as to do otherwise could pose a threat to the integrity of the proceedings, violating the Article 6 right. This module will undertake a comparative exploration of different legal approaches which seek to maintain the balance between open justice and media freedom of expression on the one hand, and the protection of vital interests in the integrity of the justice process on the other. Consideration will also be given to the challenges posed by the nature of the contemporary media: online, global, and instantaneous. Can traditional approaches in this area, designed in an era of professional journalists and defined boundaries, be adapted in order to really address the internet era of amateur commentators, online gossips, and international communication platforms with global reach?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
E-commerce TransactionsLawCCLP219Semester 17No

E-commerce Transactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar

Description: This module investigates the difficulties posed by the problem of creating legally effective e-commerce transactions in a complex cross-border legal environment and potential solutions to those difficulties. It focuses on how e-commerce businesses are constrained to undertake and structure their online activities, and on how legal creativity might be used to reduce or eliminate legal uncertainties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Final Assessment Exercise (24 hours)
Level: 7
Esports LawLawCCLP238Semester 27No

Esports Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gaetano Dimita

Description: Esports law focuses on the legal, contractual, commercial and regulatory issues that affect competitive video gaming. The module recognises the magnitude of the phenomenon and delineates the legal and commercial parameters under which esports industries operates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
English Contract LawLawCCLP601Semester 27No

English Contract Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Miriam Goldby

Description: The module will cover the English law of contract, including the rules governing the formation, construction and interpretation of contracts (including the incorporation and implication of terms), the circumstances where contracts may be deemed to be vitiated, as well as the available remedies for breach of contract. This module will also give students insight into the workings of the common law.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy)LawCCLP602Semester 27No

International Commercial Arbitration (Skills and Advocacy)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxi Charlotte Scherer

Description: International Arbitration is a more and more specialized area of law. In this module, students will learn the specific skill sets needed to become a successful arbitration lawyer. Oral and written advocacy, understanding of different cultural legal backgrounds and other skills will be taught on a 'learning by doing basis'. Students will take part in practical exercises, stepping in the shoes of arbitrator, counsel or clients. Applying the theoretical concepts of international arbitration in practice, students will lean the fundamental skills that will give students an important qualification in a competitive legal market.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Practical Exercises in Class
Level: 7
Cloud Computing LawLawCCLP604Semester 27No

Cloud Computing Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Dimitra Kamarinou

Description: This module will provide a foundation for understanding and analysing cloud computing structures and contracts for private and public sector cloud services, including standard terms and contract negotiations; the application of data protection law to the storage and other processing of information in cloud environments, including what is regulated, who is responsible, which laws apply and the circumstances in which law enforcement authorities access information; and the subsistence and ownership of proprietary rights in data stored, processed and generated in cloud environments.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Legal Aspects of International FinanceLawCCLP606Semester 17No

Legal Aspects of International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Philip Rawlings

Description: This module is concerned with the raising of large-scale finance by sovereigns, corporations and banks. it focuses on certain key financial transactions, such as syndicated loans, bonds and securitisation, but discusses them within the broader context of the legal issues that arise in the international capital and money markets. In particular, it looks at the various legal issues that shape how these cross-border transactions are structured.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 15 mins)
Level: 7
Introduction to Competition LawLawCCLP607Semester 17No

Introduction to Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ioannis Kokkoris

Description: The module will provide an introduction to competition law. The module will address the essentials of Article 101 TFEU (undertaking, agreement etc.), discuss various types of anticompetitive agreements, as well as the modern approach to the application of Article 101(3) TFEU in defending anticompetitive agreements. Then the module will look at Article 102 TFEU. The module will analyse the essential features of Article 102 TFEU i.e. the concept of dominance and the concept of abuse. Then the module will present some of the abuses (e.g. tying/bundling, exclusive dealing, price discrimination, refusal to supply). Finally, the module will analyse the assessment of mergers and acquisitions, focusing on substantive analysis. The content of the module is relevant for the competition enforcement by the European Commission, but also by National Competition Authorities of the EU Member States. The module will adopt a very practical perspective (case studies, quizzes) and will aim to equip students with the tools they need to assess/address infringements of national and EU competition law. Indicative topics include: ARTICLE 101: Agreements, concerted practices and decisions of associations of undertakings; Market Definition; Object or Effect; Article 101(3) Exemption; Sanctions, Settlements and Commitments. ARTICLE 102: Definition of Dominance; Concept of collective dominance; Concept of abuse; Abuses. MERGERS : Horizontal Mergers & Non-Horizontal Mergers; Remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent research essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Principles of International Banking RegulationLawCCLP609Semester 17No

Principles of International Banking Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo

Description: The module will provide students with in-depth knowledge and critical analysis of the legal and regulatory principles and the soft law standards applicable to international banking activities. It also investigates banking supervisory architecture in the UK, the EU, and at international level.
The regulatory framework analyzed covers the entire life cycle of a bank from its inception to failure. It also discusses banks' types and activities.
By the end of the module students will be equipped with adequate knowledge and critical understanding of both the special nature of banking activities and of the applicable regulatory and supervisory framework.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Independent Research Essay (3000-4000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Banking and Finance LawLawCCLP904Full year7No

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (12,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Banking and Finance LawLawCCLP920Full year7No

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Banking and Finance LawLawCCLP920Full year7No

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute ResolutionLawCCLP921Full year7No

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute ResolutionLawCCLP921Full year7No

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Intellectual Property LawLawCCLP922Full year7No

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Intellectual Property LawLawCCLP922Full year7No

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLP924Full year7No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in International Business LawLawCCLP924Full year7No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications LawLawCCLP925Full year7No

Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications LawLawCCLP925Full year7No

Dissertation in Technology, Media and Telecommunications Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bernard Schneider

Description: Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10,000 words)
Level: 7
Dissertation in Commercial LawLawCCLS905Full year7No

Dissertation in Commercial Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Guan Hong Tang

Description: "Dissertation - independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Commercial Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (15,000 words)
Level: 7
Essential Skills for ChemistsPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Crespo Otero

Description: This module is intended for students studying on chemistry-based degree programmes (including F100, F103, 9A32, F152, 2L22 and F154).

This module is structured around three main key areas:

(1) Acquiring mathematical skills for problem solving in chemistry.
The module will explain how mathematics underpin chemistry and will support students in acquiring a variety of key mathematical skills used to solve problem in chemistry. The material covered in this module includes: basic numeracy skills, units and order of magnitude, simple mathematical calculations, introductory calculus (differentiation/integration), complex numbers, matrices, geometry, application of probability theory in chemistry and statistical analysis of data.

(2) Considering the role of Chemistry in the "real world" and Developing graduate skills.
Through personal investigation and series of talk of professional Chemists, students will be encouraged to consider the role of chemistry in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline. Students will also develop through this module, oral and written communication skills and some basic literature search technique.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional Chemists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Homework & Tutorial 1
  • Item 2: 5% Chemdraw Workshop
  • Item 3: 5% Homework & Tutorial 2
  • Item 4: 5% Computer Exercise 1
  • Item 5: 5% Homework & Tutorial 3
  • Item 6: 25% Semester A Class Test
  • Item 7: 5% Careers Portfolio
  • Item 8: 3% Workshop/Online Quiz & Tutorial 4
  • Item 9: 3% Workshop/Online Quiz & Tutorial 5
  • Item 10: 5% Computer Exercise 2
  • Item 11: 3% Workshop/Online Quiz 1
  • Item 12: 5% Group Presentation & Tutorial 6
  • Item 13: 3% Workshop/Online Quiz 2
  • Item 14: 25% Semester B Class Test
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Foundations of Practical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE101Full year4No

Foundations of Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff

Description: This module is appropriate to first-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training in the principles and practice of key techniques of practical chemistry - including analytical methods, synthetic procedures, methods of purification, and the use of a range of instrumental techniques. Topics such as good laboratory practice, health and safety in the laboratory, the preparation of laboratory reports amd data analysis techniques are also covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Pre-lab Quizzes
  • Item 2: 10% Attendance / COSHH
  • Item 3: 10% Completion / Presentation of Results Book 1
  • Item 4: 10% Completion / Presentation of Results Book 2
  • Item 5: 30% Learning Science Exercises
  • Item 6: 30% Final Practical Examination
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE102ASemester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Assessment 1 (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 15% Assessment 2 (1 hr)
  • Item 4: 20% Final Coursework Assessment (MCQ/SAQ)
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE102BSemester 24Yes

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Assessment 1
  • Item 3: 15% Assessment 2
  • Item 4: 20% Final Coursework Assessment
Level: 4
Fundamentals of SpectroscopyPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE104Semester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen

Description: Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionised our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools in chemical research and in the development of the subject. This module aims to provide students with a coherent and rigorous introduction to the principles and applications of spectroscopic techniques, in a way that spans the traditional fields of chemistry. It covers the more common techniques, including IR, UV-VIS and NMR spectroscopy, and lays the foundations for more detailed coverage of spectroscopic techniques in subsequent years of the degree programme.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Test
  • Item 3: 10% Quiz 1
  • Item 4: 10% Quiz 2
  • Item 5: 10% Quiz 3
Level: 4
States of Matter and Analytical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE108Semester 24Yes

States of Matter and Analytical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to the properties of the different phases of matter (gases, liquids and solids), and to the theory and practise of analytical chemistry viewed from a physical and inorganic chemistry perspective. The module considers the various types of interactions that occur between atoms and molecules, and how these influence the molecular behaviour and the characteristics of the various phases of matter. The review of solid structures includes an introduction to crystallography and diffraction. The introduction to analytical chemistry will cover topics such as sample preparation, qualitative tests, gravimetric and combustion analysis, electroanalytical chemistry, an introduction to mass spectrometry and the basics of separation science, including GC and HLPC.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Homework 1
  • Item 3: 20% Homework 2
  • Item 4: 10% MCQ test
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Inorganic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE113Semester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Giordano

Description: This module is designed to introduce first year students to fundamental principles underpinning inorganic chemistry. The module will give detailed consideration to theories of atomic structure, the nature of bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the structure of inorganic complexes including consideration of their colour and magnetism as well as an introduction to symmetry operations and point groups. Emphasis is placed on developing understanding of concepts which can then be applied to more advanced topics in inorganic chemistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 15% Problem sheet 1
  • Item 3: 15% Problem sheet 2
  • Item 4: 20% Test
Level: 4
Fundamentals of Physical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE114Semester 24Yes

Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Palma

Description: An introduction to the thermodynamics of chemical systems: 1st Law; state functions and exact differentials, Internal energy, reversible and irreversible work of expansion of ideal gases; heat capacities; enthalpy, enthalpy changes of specific physical and chemical processes, and Hess's law; entropy and entropy changes accompanying specific processes, 2nd and 3rd law; spontaneous change, Helmotz energy, Gibbs free energy and equilibrium constants. An introduction to the kinetics of chemical reactions, including: differential rate equations, elementary and composite reactions, integrated rate equations,
experimental methods, effect of temperature, kinetics of multi-step reactions, catalysed processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 25% Test 1
  • Item 3: 25% Test 2
Level: 4
Professional Placement in ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE200Full year5No

Professional Placement in Chemistry

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis

Description: This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the "Year in Industry/Research" programmes in the field of chemistry offered by SBCS.
Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.
Successful applicants are supported by the School's placement coordinator and an academic tutor, who will keep in contact with students throughout the placement. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance.
It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Student Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 25% Practical Skills Assessment
  • Item 3: 25% Oral Assessment & Presentation
Level: 5
Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE202ASemester 15Yes

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE102A and take CHE102B

Description: This module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: enolate chemistry, introduction to radical chemistry, oxidation and reduction reactions. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% MCQ test 1
  • Item 3: 13% MCQ test 2
Level: 5
Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE202BSemester 25Yes

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis
Prerequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.
Corequisite: There may be additional rules for this module depending on your programme of study. Please consult your School.

Description: This course aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: reactivity of conjugated systems, pericyclic reactions and introduction to heterocyclic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% Mid-Semester Assessment
  • Item 3: 13% MCQ test
Level: 5
Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE203ASemester 15Yes

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE113 or take CHE114

Description: This module introduces key aspects of inorganic chemistry, including crystal chemistry, crystallography, electronic structure of solids and main group chemistry. Periodic trends in the p-block are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed, with emphasis on aluminosilicates and boron hydrides. In addition, characterisation techniques such as X-ray diffraction and multi-nuclear NMR are introduced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 6% Homework 1
  • Item 3: 6% Homework 2
  • Item 4: 13% MCQ test
Level: 5
Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE203BSemester 25Yes

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE113 or take CHE114

Description: This module introduces key aspects of transition metal chemistry. Periodic trends in the transition metals are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed in transition metal complexes. In addition, characterisation techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy are introduced, and d-d transitions and spectroscopic term symbols discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% Homework 1
  • Item 3: 13% Homework 2
Level: 5
Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE204ASemester 15Yes

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass

Description: This module introduces key concepts of quantum mechanics in a chemical context, explaining how the theories of quantum mechanics can be applied to atoms and molecules so as to rationalise the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of such entities.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% Mid-semester test (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 13% Final coursework assessment
Level: 5
Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE204BSemester 25Yes

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso

Description: This module considers the fundamental role of molecular symmetry in bonding and in determining molecular properties. A range of spectroscopic techniques are then considered in detail, with emphasis on developing understanding of the theoretical principles and the applications of the techniques in studying molecular structure and chemical reactivity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 13% Coursework (test) 2
Level: 5
Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE206ASemester 15Yes

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE102A and take CHE102B

Description: This module provides an introduction to the action of medicinal drugs. The topics covered include receptors, concentration-response relationships, drug disposition and pharmacokinetics and elementary structure-activity relationships.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Online quiz 1
  • Item 2: 8% Poster
  • Item 3: 2% Peer evaluation
  • Item 4: 5% PLTL
  • Item 5: 5% Online quiz 2
  • Item 6: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)Physical and Chemical SciencesCHE206BSemester 25Yes

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Fornili
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE206A

Description: Major classes of drugs, and their mechanism of actions in treating disease, are reviewed in this module. Prototypical drugs and those developed to refine the properties of earlier examples are also considered. The rationale for developing, or prescribing, a particular drug is presented. Undesireable effects of drugs and drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 18% Oral business pitches and Leaflets
  • Item 2: 2% Peer evaluation
  • Item 3: 5% Online quiz
  • Item 4: 75% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Introductory Programming for ChemistsPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE209Semester 25Yes

Introductory Programming for Chemists

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Fornili

Description: The module will provide basic programming skills as a tool for problem-solving and scientific data analysis, with emphasis on gaining hands-on programming experience. Topics to be covered will include basic concepts of algorithm design, use of an integrated development environment, data structures, control flow, functions and libraries. Applications will include visualisation, analysis and modelling of data relevant to chemistry students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% In-class test 1
  • Item 2: 13% In-class test 2
  • Item 3: 75% Programming project
Level: 5
Essential Skills for Chemists IIPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE210Full year5No

Essential Skills for Chemists II

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff

Description: Career Plans and Gathering Evidence for CV; CV and Cover Letter writing; Developing and Recognising Graduate Attributes; Scientific literacy and plagiarism.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Tutorial 1
  • Item 2: 25% Tutorial 2
  • Item 3: 25% Tutorial 3
  • Item 4: 25% Tutorial 4
Level: 5
Practical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE211Full year5No

Practical Chemistry

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE101

Description: This module is designed for second-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training at an intermediate-level in the principles and application of techniques of practical chemistry, and spans the traditional disciplines of organic, inorganic, physical and theoretical chemistry. Students will gain experience in a range of analytical methods, synthetic procedures, instrumental techniques and computational techniques. The module also includes training in the preparation of laboratory reports and data analysis techniques, as well as aspects relating to health and safety in the laboratory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Pre-lab Quizzes
  • Item 2: 10% Attendance / COSHH
  • Item 3: 10% Results Book (Semester A)
  • Item 4: 10% Results Book (Semester B)
  • Item 5: 30% Learning Science Exercises
  • Item 6: 30% Final Practical Examination
Level: 5
Applied SpectroscopyPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE215Semester 15No

Applied Spectroscopy

Credits: 10.0
Contact: Dr Christian Nielsen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE104

Description: Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionized our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools across all areas of Natural Science. This module is designed for second-year students on Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry degree programmes where its main purpose is to reinforce, integrate and extend existing knowledge of spectroscopic techniques, particularly relating to multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in relation to structure determination.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Mid-semester test (1 hr) (Assessment 1)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework (Assessment 2)
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework (Assessment 3)
  • Item 4: 20% Coursework (Assessment 4)
  • Item 5: 20% End of semester test (1 hr) (Assessment 5)
Level: 5
Organic SynthesisPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE302PSemester 17No

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray

Description: This module covers the techniques used to plan the syntheses of organic compounds, together with a selection of reaction types that may be used in organic synthesis. The aim is to provide you with sufficient knowledge and experience to analyse and evaluate the design of syntheses of molecules of pharmaceutical relevance. The second half is specifically designed to give students an understanding of advanced heterocyclic chemistry, again covering examples that are appropriate to the pharmaceutical industry. The aim here is to enable you to design syntheses of a range of types of heterocyclic compounds and to predict the reactivity of these compounds with a variety of common reagents.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Mid-semester assessment (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 13% Final coursework assessment
Level: 7
Organic SynthesisPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE302USemester 16No

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE202A and take CHE202B

Description: The module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: theory and application of retrosynthetic analysis, modern heteroatom chemistry, reactive intermediates & aromatic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will be embedded within the course. The module builds upon the knowledge of structure and reactivity of organic molecules gained in CHE202.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Poster/Blog/Video/website
  • Item 2: 13% Worksheet
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Topics in Inorganic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE303PSemester 16No

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams

Description: The module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry and is divided into two parts: modern solid-state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Homework / Workshop 1
  • Item 3: 10% Homework / Workshop 2
  • Item 4: 5% MCQ Test
Level: 6
Topics in Inorganic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE303USemester 16No

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE113 and take CHE203B

Description: The module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry and is divided into two parts: modern solid-state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Homework / Workshop 1
  • Item 3: 10% Homework / Workshop 2
  • Item 4: 5% MCQ Test
Level: 6
Topics in Physical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE304PSemester 16No

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the behaviour of molecules at interfaces and the properties of interfaces and the kinetics of adsorption of gases. Experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems will be discussed. Classical thermodynamics of open systems and interfaces will be corroborated by the statistical interpretation of thermodynamic functions. Further topics include the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, as well as experimental techniques for nanoscale investigations, e.g. atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Mid-semester assessment (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 13% Final coursework assessment
Level: 6
Topics in Physical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE304USemester 16No

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the behaviour of molecules at interfaces and the properties of interfaces and the kinetics of adsorption of gases. Experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems will be discussed. Classical thermodynamics of open systems and interfaces will be corroborated by the statistical interpretation of thermodynamic functions. Further topics include the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, as well as experimental techniques for nanoscale investigations, e.g. atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Mid-semester assessment (1 hr)
  • Item 3: 13% Final coursework assessment
Level: 6
Computational ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE305PSemester 26No

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso

Description: This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 1
  • Item 3: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 2
  • Item 4: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 3
  • Item 5: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 4
  • Item 6: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 5
Level: 6
Computational ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE305USemester 26No

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso

Description: This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 1
  • Item 3: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 2
  • Item 4: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 3
  • Item 5: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 4
  • Item 6: 10% Assessed Write-up of Practical 5
Level: 6
Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE306PSemester 26No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell

Description: This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Team-based video assignment (5 min)
  • Item 2: 2% Peer evaluation
  • Item 3: 5% Written Assignment 1
  • Item 4: 5% Written Assignment 2
  • Item 5: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE306USemester 26No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE206A and take CHE206B

Description: This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules. The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Team-based video assignment (5 min)
  • Item 2: 2% Peer evaluation
  • Item 3: 5% Written Assignment 1
  • Item 4: 5% Written Assignment 2
  • Item 5: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Bioorganic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE307Semester 26No

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE302U

Description: This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Question sheet 1
  • Item 2: 13% Question sheet 2
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Bioorganic ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE307PSemester 26No

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE302P

Description: This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Question sheet 1
  • Item 2: 13% Question sheet 2
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Topics in Biological ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE309Semester 26No

Topics in Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take CHE202B

Description: This modules focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view. Background knowledge of biochemistry is not assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Problem sheet 1
  • Item 2: 13% Problem sheet 2
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Topics in Biological ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE309PSemester 26No

Topics in Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini

Description: This modules focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view. Background knowledge of biochemistry is not assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Problem sheet 1
  • Item 2: 13% Problem sheet 2
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Topics in Biological ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE309PSemester 16No

Topics in Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini

Description: This modules focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view. Background knowledge of biochemistry is not assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 13% Problem sheet 1
  • Item 2: 13% Problem sheet 2
  • Item 3: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 6
Professional Skills in ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE310Semester 16No

Professional Skills in Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell

Description: This module aims to develop an awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as advanced experimental techniques, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present
scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Lab Assessment
  • Item 2: 25% CV and Cover letters
  • Item 3: 45% Group work - Outreach Video
  • Item 4: 5% Engagement with the module - written Exercise
Level: 6
Professional Skills in ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE310PSemester 16No

Professional Skills in Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell

Description: This module aims to develop an awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as advanced experimental techniques, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present
scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Lab Assessment
  • Item 2: 25% CV and Cover letters
  • Item 3: 45% Group work - Outreach Video
  • Item 4: 5% Engagement with the module - written Exercise
Level: 6
Professional Skills for ChemistsPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE401PFull year7No

Professional Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones

Description: This module aims at developing students' awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as green chemistry, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Cover letter
  • Item 2: 45% Outreach video
  • Item 3: 5% Engagement exercise
  • Item 4: 25% Lab assessments
Level: 7
Advanced Topics in ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE410Semester 17No

Advanced Topics in Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones

Description: This module is aimed at familiarising students with advanced areas in organic, bioorganic and/or bioinorganic chemistry, with the specific content varying periodically. The syllabus faims to equip the students with sufficient knowledge to be able to appraise and develop synthetic strategies for the synthesis of drug and other complex organic molecules using catalytic methodology. It is designed to provide an overview of the principles and applications of contemporary catalytic methodology of relevance to drug discovery and manufacture within the pharmaceutical industry. Both asymmetric and enzyme catalysis routes will be discussed. Proteins, their structure and purification will be discussed as well as the role of enzymes both in living systems and in industrial settings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 13% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Advanced Topics in ChemistryPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE410PSemester 17No

Advanced Topics in Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones

Description: This module contains advanced topics in chemistry across the disciplines of inorganic, organic, physical and materials chemistry, especially in relation to contemporary advanced topics in these areas and will touch on the research interests of staff teaching on the module. The exact content of the module may vary from year to year as different staff contribute to the module and as new topics become more relevant and/or with advances in knowledge in these areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 13% Coursework 2
Level: 7
NanomaterialsPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE411Semester 17No

Nanomaterials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module is designed to give students an understanding of nanomaterials and nanoscience from inorganic and physical chemistry perspectives. The module includes an introduction to colloidal systems and their applications, as well as insight into nanochemistry, with several examples of nanoscience applications. An overview of physical chemistry and synthesis of colloids with a clear link to practical applications such as medical diagnostics and drug delivery will be included. An introduction into interfacial phenomena, the electrical double layer and intermolecular (van der Waals) forces of significance for colloidal stability are given. Important phenomena such as colloidal stability (steric and charge stabilisation), adsorption, adhesion, self-assembly, diffusion, stability electrophoresis and aggregation will be covered. Techniques such as light scattering, small and wide angle X-ray and neutron scattering and electron transmission techniques, as well as the rheology of these systems will be covered. Methods of measuring particle/crystallite size are also discussed.
Various examples in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed. The synthesis and applications of inorganic nanomaterials including nanocomposites and colloidal dispersions will be discussed. The main properties of nanomaterials will be discussed (electronic, optical, catalytic, mechanical and magnetic properties), always including the comparison between 'nano' and 'bulk' properties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 13% Coursework 2
Level: 7
NanomaterialsPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE411PSemester 17No

Nanomaterials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh

Description: This module is designed to give students an understanding of nanomaterials and nanoscience from inorganic and physical chemistry perspectives. The module includes an introduction to colloidal systems and their applications, as well as insight into nanochemistry, with several examples of nanoscience applications. An overview of physical chemistry and synthesis of colloids with a clear link to practical applications such as medical diagnostics and drug delivery will be included. An introduction into interfacial phenomena, the electrical double layer and intermolecular (van der Waals) forces of significance for colloidal stability are given. Important phenomena such as colloidal stability (steric and charge stabilisation), adsorption, adhesion, self-assembly, diffusion, stability electrophoresis and aggregation will be covered. Techniques such as light scattering, small and wide angle X-ray and neutron scattering and electron transmission techniques, as well as the rheology of these systems will be covered. Methods of measuring particle/crystallite size are also discussed.
Various examples in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed. The synthesis and applications of inorganic nanomaterials including nanocomposites and colloidal dispersions will be discussed. The main properties of nanomaterials will be discussed (electronic, optical, catalytic, mechanical and magnetic properties), always including the comparison between 'nano' and 'bulk' properties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 13% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 13% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Chemistry Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE600Full year6No

Chemistry Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek

Description: Prerequisites: Students with an average of 60% or above (combination of first year and second year results) are eligible to register for this module. Overall the module is expected to involve students for approximately 18h/week, for 12 weeks, spent on laboratory and library work, plus additional time spent on data analysis and on writing the dissertation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #1
  • Item 2: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #2
  • Item 3: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #3
  • Item 4: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #4
  • Item 5: 10% Supervisor mark
  • Item 6: 50% Final thesis (6500 words)
  • Item 7: 20% Seminar
  • Item 8: 10% Poster
Level: 6
NetworkingCHE_6_S
Chemistry Investigative ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE601Full year6No

Chemistry Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek

Description: Students work independently on topics set by their project supervisors. The work involves extensive searching, reviewing and critical evaluation of a specific area of the scientific literature. A final dissertation is prepared, based upon the investigative work that has been undertaken. Students are also required to present their work in a variety of other forms, including a poster and seminar appropriate for a specialist audience, and in an alternative format in which the topic is made more accessible to the general public.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #1
  • Item 2: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #2
  • Item 3: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #3
  • Item 4: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #4
  • Item 5: 10% Public Dissemination Piece
  • Item 6: 50% Final thesis (6500 words)
  • Item 7: 20% Seminar
  • Item 8: 10% Poster
Level: 6
NetworkingCHE_6_S
Chemistry MSci Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE700Full year7No

Chemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt

Description: Students work independently on chemical research topics set by their project supervisors. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of this advanced project. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field. The dissertation is defended in an oral examination; students also present their work in the form of a poster and as a short
oral presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #1
  • Item 2: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #2
  • Item 3: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #3
  • Item 4: 3% Thesis (Supervisor) - checkpoint #4
  • Item 5: 20% Supervisor mark
  • Item 6: 5% Poster
  • Item 7: 5% Seminar
  • Item 8: 50% Final thesis (10,000 - 12,000 words)
  • Item 9: 10% Oral examination
Level: 7
Chemical Research ProjectPhysical and Chemical SciencesCHE700PFull year7No

Chemical Research Project

Credits: 150.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Crespo Otero

Description: This module involves students carrying-out an original piece of experimental or computational research on projects agreed with their academic supervisor. Projects are in the areas of biological, organic, inorganic, physical, materials or theoretical/computational chemistry; or a combination thereof. The work also involves an in-depth and critical evaluation and dissemination of the relevant literature associated with the topic and methodologies employed.

A dissertation is prepared and defended in an oral examination (mid-September); students also present their work in the form of a ~15-20 min research seminar (mid-September).

The diversity of expertise of the chemistry and biochemistry faculty involved with the programme affords a wide range of project choice within the chemical sciences, in addition to facilitating identification of potential project supervisors.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Research seminar
  • Item 2: 20% Practical Work and Records
  • Item 3: 40% Research Project dissertation
  • Item 4: 30% Research Oral Examination
Level: 7
The Scene of ReadingLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM200Semester 15No

The Scene of Reading

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Will Mcmorran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM4207 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores the theme of reading in literature, film, and the visual arts, and in theoretical writings past and present. Literary texts will range from the early modern to the post-modern novel, and will be taken from European and other literatures. The figure of the reader in film and the visual arts will also be examined, while recent theories of narrative, reading and reception will allow students to reflect upon their own processes as readers and spectators.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Employability Assignment (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
The Scene of WritingLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM300Semester 16No

The Scene of Writing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module aims to acquaint students with a varied corpus of fictional and theoretical writings around the theme of the author. There are two main aims: to explore the ways in which authorship is thematized and represented in literature, film and the visual arts, and to examine changes in the ways authors have been perceived in critical and theoretical writings about literature and cinema.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Job Interview Presentation
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Culture and LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4006Full year4Closed

Culture and Language

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: SML4006
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts (literary and visual), concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into four 5-week blocks, devoted to topics such as, for example, Reading Literary Texts, Visual Cultures, Culture and Society, Linguistics. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Literature Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Creative Response and Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Revised Creative Response and Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 5% Meme and Commentary (500 words)
  • Item 5: 20% Guided Film Analysis (1500 words)
  • Item 6: 5% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 7: 20% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 8: 5% Phonetic Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 9: 20% Short Answer Exercise (1500 words)
Level: 4
Culture and Language (a)Languages Linguistics and FilmCOM4006ASemester 14Closed

Culture and Language (a)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: SML4006A
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course will introduce students to a wide range of texts, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into two 5-week blocks, roughly divided between Literature Visual Cultures. Each block will be taught by a combination of lectures laying the ground work and seminars devoted to specific examples.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Literature Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 20% Creative Response and Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 20% Revised Creative Response and Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Meme and Commentary (500 words)
  • Item 5: 40% Guided Film Analysis (1500 words)
Level: 4
Culture and Language (b)Languages Linguistics and FilmCOM4006BSemester 24Closed

Culture and Language (b)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: SML4006B
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The course will introduce students to a wide range of texts, concepts, ideas, theories and practices, both historical and contemporary, and the skills they need to analyse them. It will be divided into two 5-week blocks. The precise content of these may change from year to year, but they will be broadly concerned with culture, language, and society.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Phonetic Quiz (15 mins)
  • Item 4: 40% Short Answer Exercise (1500 words)
Level: 4
Understanding Culture: An Introduction to Cultural TheoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4202Semester 24No

Understanding Culture: An Introduction to Cultural Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katarzyna Mika
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: "Building on your knowledge of literature, art, history, and science - and at the same time expanding this knowledge and challenging its certainties - this course will give you insight into all the major approaches to culture since the nineteenth century. It analyses various definitions of culture and explores the historical contexts in which they were formulated and gained currency, always with an eye on current developments and issues. The course is highly interactive, taught as one two-hour unit per week (consisting of a lecture followed immediately by discussion)."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Critical Reading Responses (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Seminar Skills
  • Item 3: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 4
Introduction to ComparisonLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4206Semester 14No

Introduction to Comparison

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: COM102
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: COM4207

Description: This module familiarises you with Comparative Literature as an academic discipline and helps you develop key comparatist skills such as comparative commentary writing and passage selection. The module aims to explore the various ways in which texts can be connected and compared, as well as the reasoning behind such endeavours, and will be divided into three distinct blocks: 'Key Skills and Debates'; 'Postcolonialism and Comparison'; and `From Comparative Literature to World Literature¿.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Comparative Commentary (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Seminar Skills
  • Item 3: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 4
The Scene of LearningLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4207Full year4No

The Scene of Learning

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Katarzyna Mika
Overlap: COM4201
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module considers a range of texts from across the globe produced in different times and places which explore the relationship between writing and learning. The module sets out to do two things. Firstly, it enables you to begin comparing and contrasting texts from across cultural contexts to develop your skills of textual analysis, including close reading, essay writing, researching and referencing. This will be central to all of the other modules you will do in the course of your degree. Secondly, it gives you the opportunity to reflect on your individual status as learners and your own personal learning experiences. You will be considering your experiences to date as well as your expectations as to what a university education can offer and provide for your future career.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% In-class Quiz 1 (15 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Close Commentary (750 words)
  • Item 3: 25% Comparative Essay 1 (2500 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Semester 1 Seminar Skills
  • Item 5: 5% In-class Quiz 2 (15 mins)
  • Item 6: 10% Analysing a Scholarly Debate (750 words)
  • Item 7: 10% Semester 2 Seminar Skills
  • Item 8: 25% Comparative Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 4
Brief Encounters: Around The World In Short StoriesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4208Semester 14Closed

Brief Encounters: Around The World In Short Stories

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kiera Vaclavik
Overlap: COM4200
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module provides an introduction to that most adaptable and global of literary forms: the short story. It explores stories from diverse cultures and traditions around the world, including Asia, Europe and the Americas. By reading short stories from across the globe, students will also be introduced to the idea of 'world literature' and some of the debates surrounding this idea.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Seminar Skills
  • Item 2: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 4
Myth, Modernity, and MetamorphosesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM4209Semester 24Closed

Myth, Modernity, and Metamorphoses

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Bryant Davis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to some of the key stories from the canon of ancient Greek myth, multiple transmission routes while also examining how these stories have been adapted, both in and since antiquity, in such a way that they have continued to pose and answer questions that are still pertinent today. Key episodes and characters from classical myth (including, for example, Prometheus and Pandora, Orpheus and Eurydice, Odysseus and the Sirens, and Oedipus and Antigone) will be explored in their ancient and modern manifestations across a wide range of cultural forms (for example, epic poetry, classical drama, philosophical texts, the short story, the novel, the visual arts, classical and popular music, film, and dance). Some theoretical perspectives on myth and modernity will also be considered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Short Writing Assignment (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Seminar Skills
Level: 4
Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and ArtLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5001Semester 15Yes

Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: "FRE5001, FRE6050"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces you to French experiences of the 'annees noires' (the 'dark years') of the German Occupation of France and more especially to the ways in which these have been remembered, represented and interpreted in the art, film and literature of post-war France. It examines the reasons for this period's uneasy status as 'unfinished history' and explores some of the creative representations and reinterpretations of events that have been produced from the aftermath of war through to the present day. The module also involves the study of contemporary theories about cultural memory, from France and elsewhere. It considers how these theories have evolved and explores productive ways of drawing upon them to interpret the primary works studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Art in France: Manet to Early PicassoLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5003Semester 15Yes

Art in France: Manet to Early Picasso

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: FRE5003
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores early modernist painting in France from Manet to the beginnings of Cubism. It focuses mainly on the works of Manet (from his Déjeuner sur l'herbe 1863), Monet, Morisot, Gauguin, Cézanne, and Picasso's early paintings (including Les Demoiselles d¿Avignon, 1906-7). Paintings will be discussed both as an aesthetic and a social practice. Topics studied include: the spectacle of the modern city, gender and representation, the dialogue between art and literature, the influence of non-European art forms, realism v modernism. No prior knowledge of art history is needed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Comparative Visual Analysis (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (Exhibition Project) (2500 words)
Level: 5
German Romanticism in its European ContextLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5004Semester 25Yes

German Romanticism in its European Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
Overlap: "GER4004, GER5004"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Romanticism was one of the defining periods in modern cultural history. Religious, philosophical and (para-)scientific phenomena were hotly debated, psychology was established and an awareness of politics became a dominant fact of life. Given wide-spread censorship the literary journal and the salon emerged as most important fora for debate. Aesthetically, a particular attraction of Romanticism was the sharing of closely related artistic experiences, such as the affirmation of sensuality and the eternal yearning for temporary fulfilment, throughout Europe for some five decades.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Oral Presentation
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 5
Literature and PhilosophyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM501Semester 25Yes

Literature and Philosophy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers an introduction to the relationship between literature and philosophy in European thought. Students will begin by exploring debates in classical thought concerning the respective functions of literature and philosophy, with a particular emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. We will then examine the renewed interactions between literature and philosophy in early twentieth-century European literature, through reading examples of philosophically-influenced short fiction by Thomas Mann, Virginia Woolf and Albert Camus. No prior knowledge of philosophy will be assumed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and FootballLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5011Semester 25Yes

Catalan Culture: Art, Literature and Football

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: CAT4011 and HSP4011
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Topics covered include: nationalism; the politics of language; the avant--garde art of Salvador Dalí and Miró; literature; football. There is no language requirement for this module; therefore it is suitable for students with no knowledge of Catalan and Spanish.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Latin America: Key ConceptsLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5012Semester 15Closed

Latin America: Key Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patricia D'Allemand
Overlap: HSP5012
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines, from a global perspective, the historical processes that gave rise to modern Latin America and shaped its diverse societies. Focusing on a range of seminal texts, the module explores the intellectual debates that have accompanied the building of the nation-states we know today, and provides an insight into the multiple political, ethnic and cultural traditions that characterise the countries of the region. The course also provides key theoretical and analytical concepts specific to the study of Latin American cultural history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Portfolio (500 words)
Level: 5
Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the MonolithLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5015Semester 25Yes

Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the Monolith

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Veselina Dzhumbeva
Overlap: "COM6015, RUS5015, RUS6015"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines developments in Russian prose fiction, especially the genre of the povest¿, in the period from 1953 to the present. Students analyse works, including those by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Valentin Rasputin, Liudmila Petrushevskaia and Viktor Pelevin in relation to the historical events and social phenomena they refract, their technique and their place in debates about Russian literature and cultural identity. You will explore the relation of cultural politics to developments in Russian society and develop an understanding of the role of literature in the political and historical process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Forum Posts/Quizzes
  • Item 3: 5% Presentation of an Essay Plan (5 mins)
  • Item 4: 55% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian Novel: Crimes and PunishmentLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5018Semester 25Yes

Russian Novel: Crimes and Punishment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: "COM6018, RUS5018, RUS6018"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1880. We will focus on Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, two novels about individuals, a man and a woman, who attempted to place themselves outside society and who are "punished" accordingly. In both cases, this emancipation from social and moral constraints becomes the occasion for a unique, profoundly influential piece of narrative art and for a sustained exploration of the spiritual, moral, and social ingredients of the modern condition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, NarrativesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5020Semester 15Yes

Why Belgium? Identities, Cultures, Narratives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Armstrong
Overlap: "FRE5020, FRE6020"
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Belgium provides an ideal setting for comparative approaches to literature. Uniquely in the UK, this module explores the work of both French- and Dutch-speaking Belgian authors. It focuses on the treatment of identity in novels, short stories, and comics written between the mid-19th and the late 20th centuries, all studied in translation. Topics covered include war and colonialism; space and place; language; Catholicism; and identity as performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Wiki Postings (800 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Russian Short Stories: The Twentieth CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5021Semester 15Yes

Russian Short Stories: The Twentieth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jeremy Hicks
Overlap: "RUS4021, RUS5021"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: While the novel has enjoyed a privileged status for much of the twentieth century, for important periods the short story dominated Russian culture. After defining and analyzing the specific features of the short story form, its theorizations, long critical neglect and the prejudice against it as a fragmentary form, this course focuses on periods where short stories came to the fore in Russia: the beginning and end of the century and the period of World War Two.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Essay/Commentary (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Forum Posts/Quizzes
  • Item 3: 5% Live or Recorded Presentation (5 mins)
  • Item 4: 55% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Colonial Power and Desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and BrazilLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5036Semester 25Yes

Colonial Power and Desire: Narratives of Dissent in Portugal and Brazil

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Frances Goodingham
Overlap: POR4036
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In this module you will study a range of texts problematising sexual, religious and racial domination within the context of the Portuguese Empire, starting with the epic The Lusiads (Camões, 1570). Desire in the epic will find a vocal expression in the report to the King of Portugal by the scribe of the first Portuguese expedition to Brazil (1500). Brazil¿s natives¿ oral narratives cast into film will later be seen to confront rape and religious imposition whilst the African slaves¿ agency against racial domination will surface in their testimonials embedded in biographies. A critique of the land concentration model, prominent in Raised from the Ground, a novel by the Portuguese Nobel Prize José Saramago, in turn, will find a vivid visual deployment in Brazilian Sebastião Salgado's photography. The agency of both slaves and the dispossessed will be seen to play out in the narratives of two major social movements in Brazil today: the quilombola¿s and the landless rural workers¿. All texts are available in English and Portuguese.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 5
Picturing a Nation: France and its Image from Marianne to #JesuisCharlieLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5042Semester 25Yes

Picturing a Nation: France and its Image from Marianne to #JesuisCharlie

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: FRE4042
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines how images form the foundation of our understanding of French culture, and of how France understands itself. Students will be introduced to the methodology of visual studies and will be applying it to images of historical and cultural relevance to the French-speaking world, ranging from Marianne as the personification of `national¿ values, through the representation of the colonies in advertising, to the tradition of satire embodied in the magazine 'Charlie Hebdo'. Through these visual analyses, students will consider concepts such as cliché, symbol, and allegory, and reflect on questions of nationhood and cultural identity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Visual Analysis (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 5
Literature, Dictatorship and Cultural Memory in the Hispanic WorldLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5043Semester 25Yes

Literature, Dictatorship and Cultural Memory in the Hispanic World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Dorado-Otero
Overlap: "HSP5043, HSP5200"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: In the twentieth century, Spain and many Latin American countries shared the common experience of dictatorship. By focusing on a representative sample of texts from the twentieth and early twenty-first century (mostly narratives and a play) from Spain, Chile, Uruguay, Argentina, El Salvador and Guatemala, this module aims to study Hispanic writers within their historical and political contexts, paying particular attention to the so-called dictator novels. We will explore how specific authors write and represent military dictatorship and how they reexamine the role of literature as a productive social text in the light of repression and censorship. In this context, this module will examine critically issues of 'official history', cultural memory, oral history, gender, national identity and exile in Spain and Latin America, relevant to this day.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Essay 1 (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 1 (2000 words)
Level: 5
Race and Racism in European CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5045Semester 25Closed

Race and Racism in European Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval
Overlap: SML5045
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module encourages students to analyse representations of race and racism within European culture from the Middle Ages to the present. It engages with a variety of sources (literary, historical, material, and visual) and draws on evidence from a range of European traditions (such as French, German or Spanish) to explore these representations. It mobilises key critical theories that relate to these issues

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
FaustLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5052Semester 15Yes

Faust

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
Overlap: "COM6022, GER5052, GER6022 "
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature module
Corequisite: None

Description: The life and legend of Johann Faust, the necromancer who sold his soul to the devil in return for power and knowledge, have cast a spell on writers since the late 16th century. We will study this fascination and receptivity through the centuries and across European literatures, from Marlowe to Valéry via Goethe.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Portfolio (500 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 5
Catalan Literature: An IntroductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5055Semester 15Yes

Catalan Literature: An Introduction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: "CAT5055, HSP5055"
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: How did a language with so few speakers give rise to texts of world importance? Covering examples by well-known writers from the medieval period to the present, this module provides an overview of Catalan literature. Theatre, mystical prose, modern novels and postmodern short stories are analyzed and discussed on their own stylistic terms and in relation to historical and aesthetic developments. Love and war, as well as national and personal identity make for a potent literary mixture.
All texts are available in English and/or Spanish translation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 5
German Thought I: Hegel, Marx, NietzscheLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5058Semester 15Yes

German Thought I: Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ruediger Goerner
Overlap: "COM5008, COM5038, GER5008, GER5038, GER5058"
Prerequisite: Any level 4 literature module
Corequisite: None

Description: This module introduces students to three major thinkers in 19th century German thought all of whom have exerted a global impact, Georg W.F. Hegel, Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzsche. Topics explored will Hegel's conception of phenomenology and aesthetics; Marx's early criticism of Hegel, his 'social intellectualism' and conception of history; and Nietzsche's philosophy of culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Short Answer Exercise 1 (500 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Short Answer Exercise 2 (500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
European TragedyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM507Semester 25Yes

European Tragedy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: Tragedy is one of the most vital and enduring European literary genres. Tragic dramas are often perceived as among the most significant achievements of different national literatures. Not only are there outstanding examples of the genre in the national literatures drawn on in this programme, tragedy has from antiquity been the object of intense theoretical reflection. It has been discussed by such major philosophers as Aristotle and Nietzsche; it has been treated by literary theorists of all schools. What do we gain from and why can we take a kind of pleasure in the spectacle of human misfortune? Are the benefits psychological, spiritual, intellectual? What kind of pleasure is produced? What kinds of misfortune produces the effect proper to tragedy? What can tragedy tell us about the cultures in which it flourishes? What kind of theoretical approaches (social, psychoanalytical, historical) are most fruitfully applied to it?

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Colonial Literatures, Post Colonial PerspectivesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5200Semester 15Yes

Colonial Literatures, Post Colonial Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will introduce students to a selection of novels and short fiction written within the context of the European colonisation of South Asia, South East Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas (within any given year a maximum of three of these regions will be studied). The focus of the module will be upon non-European authors, and by extension upon the experience of colonialism from a non-European perspective. Texts will be contextualised in relation to the history of European colonisation within the relevant regions, and will also involve some consideration of post-colonial theory and its broader relevance to the discipline of Comparative Literature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% 4 Reading Responses (4 x 250 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Reflection Exercise (500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Comparative Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Madness, Past and PresentLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM5207Semester 25Closed

Madness, Past and Present

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Annabel Cox
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines how madness has been constructed and represented in western culture from the late Middle Ages to the twenty-first century. It looks at the medical and popular notions of madness prevailing at crucial historical moments, and analyses the ways in which the main themes related to madness (fragmentation, folly, lovesickness, alienation, melancholy, delusion, derangement) have been explored and exploited in a wide selection of genres, such as autobiography, diary writing, the novel, the short story, epic poetry, theatre and film.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Shorter Essay (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Longer Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Test (50 mins)
Level: 5
Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the AgesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6006Semester 16Yes

Narrative in Theory and Practice: Analysing and Creatively Responding to French Literature Through the Ages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Mason
Overlap: FRE6006
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module centres on narratology, the structural study of fictional narrative. Narratological analysis addresses questions such as: How can we talk about the selection of detail in fiction? What are the implications of having characters narrate their own stories? You will study a major work of narratology, and apply its principles to some classic French literary texts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century, studied in translation. Creative writing work, based on the set texts - rewriting passages, composing additional episodes, etc. - plays an important part in the module, developing your understanding of texts and techniques as well as your skills in written expression.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Narratological Analysis (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Creative Exercise and Reflective Commentary (2500 words)
Level: 6
Avant-Garde Theatre in EuropeLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6007Semester 26Yes

Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John London
Overlap: "CAT6007, HSP6007"
Prerequisite: Any level 5 literature module
Corequisite: None

Description: Why should characters behave illogically on stage or not exist at all? How can image rival plot? And what is the point of shocking audiences?
This module introduces some fundamental styles and plays from European avant-garde theatre and sets them within an artistic and socio-political context. Futurism, Dada, Expressionism and the Theatre of the Absurd are included. We will at all times try to see texts as excuses for performance and use other aspects of culture to understand the challenges of this new drama.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
The Mexican Revolution and its AftermathLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6009Semester 16Yes

The Mexican Revolution and its Aftermath

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patricia D'Allemand
Overlap: HSP6009
Prerequisite: COM101 or equivalent
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines the historical background to the Revolution and the profound impact that this first major revolution of the twentieth century (1910-1917) had on the society and culture of modern Mexico. It focuses on the ways in which Mexican artists, writers and intellectuals responded to and engaged with the processes the revolution unchained. The course will look at Mexican Muralism and the writings of authors such as José Vasconcelos, Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Elena Poniatowska and Carlos Fuentes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay 2 (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Portfolio (500 words)
Level: 6
Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the MonolithLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6015Semester 26Yes

Modern Russian Literature II - Beyond the Monolith

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Veselina Dzhumbeva
Overlap: "COM5015, RUS5015, RUS6015"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines developments in Russian prose fiction, especially the genre of the povest¿, in the period from 1953 to the present. Students analyse works including those by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Valentin Rasputin, Liudmila Petrushevskaia and Viktor Pelevin in relation to the historical events and social phenomena they refract, their technique and their place in debates about Russian literature and cultural identity. You will explore the relation of cultural politics to developments in Russian society and develop an understanding of the role of literature in the political and historical process.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 5% Forum Posts/Quizzes
  • Item 3: 5% Presentation of an Essay Plan (5 mins)
  • Item 4: 55% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 6
Russian Novel: Crimes and PunishmentLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6018Semester 26Yes

Russian Novel: Crimes and Punishment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: "COM5018, RUS5018, RUS6018"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course examines the development of the Russian novel between 1860 and 1880. We will focus on Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, two novels about individuals, a man and a woman, who attempted to place themselves outside society and who are "punished" accordingly. In both cases, this emancipation from social and moral constraints becomes the occasion for a unique, profoundly influential piece of narrative art and for a sustained exploration of the spiritual, moral, and social ingredients of the modern condition.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
Afropean IdentitiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6052Semester 26Closed

Afropean Identities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rebekah Vince
Overlap: SML6052
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: 'Afropean' is a term coined by Belgian music artist Zap Mama to encompass being both African and European, not as a contradiction but as an expression of plurality and site for creativity. Beyond identity politics, though acutely aware of racism as manifested across European contexts, Afropean writers acknowledge the dark histories of slavery and colonialism while uniting around cultural memories and contemporary activist movements. Students will analyse literary texts including essays, poems, novels, and short stories. They will engage with race critical theory and Afropea as a utopian concept, as well as positioning themselves in relation to local Afropean history and culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
From Louvre to Louvre: Memory, History and 'Patrimoine' in the French MuseumLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6053Semester 26Yes

From Louvre to Louvre: Memory, History and 'Patrimoine' in the French Museum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emilie Oleron Evans
Overlap: FRE6053
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines the cultural history of France through its museums, from the opening of the Musée central des arts in the Louvre Palace (1793), to the inauguration of the Louvre Abu Dhabi in 2017. It explores the idea of the museum as a space where symbolic value and cultural discourse are built. Students will be introduced to the concept of 'patrimoine' (heritage) through the study of a range of artworks and artifacts in (and outside of) major French collections.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Exhibition Concept: Portfolio (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Postmigrant Literature and Film after German UnificationLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6054Semester 16Yes

Postmigrant Literature and Film after German Unification

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maha El Hissy
Overlap: GER6054
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall, a rich literary and film scene has emerged that wrestled with Germany¿s past, with questions of remembering and forgetting, and the challenge of a multi-layered and hybrid German identity. As the German body politic has been reshaped, questions of otherness, exclusion and belonging, national identity and heritage have become more pressing topics in German society, and are often negotiated through immigrants. Taking this as a point of departure, the course investigates post-Unification literature and film by postmigrants in Germany. The module will focus particularly on literary and filmic devices and the modes of narrating otherness, refuge, travel, and border crossing. How are borders being marked, crossed and shifted? How is Europe being represented? Where does it end? How are Otherness and national 'purity' being performed? What marks religious belonging? Are there postmigration figures, such as the pensioner, the fanatic, the academic, the preacher? These are some of the many questions the course aims to tackle. This module will require some independent screening of films.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Podcast (20 minutes)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
Spanish Graphic Novels in the 21st CenturyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6056Semester 16Yes

Spanish Graphic Novels in the 21st Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Dorado-Otero
Overlap: HSP6056
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Through a selection of twenty-first century Spanish graphic novels, this module will introduce students to the boom in new, hybrid textual and visual narratives, operating within a wider cultural environment. Students will learn how medium-specific features can influence how these narratives unfold through fictional and graphic texts developed from non-fictional contexts to express in new ways current social, historical, and political concerns in Spain. Paying attention to literary and aesthetic responses in relation to historical memory, trauma, national identity, economic, and ecological issues affecting Spain, this module will enable students to think critically in light of relevant theories that have been developed based on the growing production of graphic novels in a global context. The module will be approached from an interdisciplinary perspective, relying on studies of memory, trauma, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality, cultural studies, and political history focusing on contemporary Spain.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 6
Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central AsiaLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6057Semester 16Yes

Stories from the Silk Road: Post-Soviet Women¿s Literature and Film from the Caucasus and Central Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamar Koplatadze
Overlap: "RUS5057, RUS6057"
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Once part of the ancient Silk Road, the countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia have a roller-coaster history which includes subjection to Russian imperial and Soviet rule. Through the prism of award-winning literature and film by a new post-Soviet generation of women (e.g. Mariam Petrosyan¿s The Gray House, 2009; Nana Ekvtimishvili¿s In Bloom, 2013), this module explores the cultural and socio-political developments in the now independent Georgia, Armenia, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Themes to discuss will include childhood, youth, migration, post-Soviet identity, the effects of colonialism, and more.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
Schools for Scandal: Sexual Fictions from Venus in the Cloister to Venus in FursLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM606Semester 26Yes

Schools for Scandal: Sexual Fictions from Venus in the Cloister to Venus in Furs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Will Mcmorran
Overlap: FRE304
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module explores a range of erotic, libertine and pornographic texts from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. It includes so-called 'whore dialogues' (Venus in the Cloister), best-selling novels (Fanny Hill, and Thérèse philosophe), and some well-known works by the Marquis de Sade, and Sacher-Masoch. It will examine the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality are represented within these and other texts from the period, and explore past and present constructions of pornography and literature. Warning: this module contains sexually explicit material.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Commentary Exercise (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
The East in the WestLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM608Semester 26Yes

The East in the West

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This course module will survey and analyse key aspects of the interaction between Russian and East European émigré and exilic cultures and Western culture and thought in the 20th century (French, German, American). Particular fields to be considered include the fine arts, literature, cultural history, and social and political thought. Drawing on works by a range of Russian and East European artists and thinkers, we will explore the legacy of these key figures in their fruitful dialogue with Western culture and thought, and how Western culture responded to the challenges and opportunities of this encounter.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework (4000 words)
Level: 6
Comparative Literature Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6201Full year6No

Comparative Literature Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Hannah Scott Deuchar
Overlap: Students are not permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: At least 2:1 average attainment up to final year
Corequisite: None

Description: Entry to this module will not be automatic. All students wishing to take this module must meet the entry requirements, present an approved topic and have an agreed supervisor. It is designed to enable suitably qualified final-year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual or group research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. Introductory group sessions on research methods will be followed by individual supervision. You should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Project Progress Exercise (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 90% Research Project (8000 words)
Level: 6
The European City in Contemporary Literature and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6209Semester 16Yes

The European City in Contemporary Literature and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Anderson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module examines trends in the depiction of European cities in literature and film from the 1980s to the present. It will explore the relationship between aesthetic representations and social-cultural contexts, paying attention to traditions of literary and cinematic urbanism while also engaging with contemporary questions concerning urban identity and culture. The module will provide students with the opportunity to pursue a substantial research project of their choosing, focusing either on one author¿s representation of more than one city, or on one city¿s representation by more than one author (/film-maker etc).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 85% Long Essay (3500 words)
Level: 6
Epic Remakes: Ancient Hero(in)es and Modern SocietyLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6212Semester 16Yes

Epic Remakes: Ancient Hero(in)es and Modern Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Bryant Davis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module will investigate how some key Greek and Roman mythical figures have been adapted, from antiquity to today, to suit new contexts. How have these ancient Western characters been re-purposed to contemporary social debates? Drawing on artistic media, films, operas, children¿s magazines and even computer games, in addition to literary translations and adaptations, we will focus on characters, mortal and divine, from the Trojan War myths. These may include: Cassandra, Circe, Dido, Penelope, Helen, Briseis; Achilles, Ulysses, Patroclus, Aeneas, Thersites. Analysis will focus on issues of identity and representation, including from intersectional and postcolonial perspectives, and with the intention of raising awareness of how divergences between source and adaptation can perpetuate, or challenge, implicit bias and ideological assumptions.
All texts will be studied in English. However, there will be some linguistic support (no prior knowledge assumed) to enable students to engage with some of the choices regarding vocabulary, syntax, and poetic metre, so that translators' choices can be assessed with an eye to the original Latin and ancient Greek.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Public Engagement (Magazine) Portfolio (800 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Learning Journal (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
European Philosophy and the Representation of Consciousness in Modern LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6213Semester 26Closed

European Philosophy and the Representation of Consciousness in Modern Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The module initially focuses on the concept of consciousness in the philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche and its significance for the writing of authors such as Fyodor Dostoevsky, Knut Hamsun and Hjalmar Söderberg. It then examines the legacy of this early modernist thematic concern with interiority and subjectivity, considering the influence of Henri Bergson's philosophy on British literature by Samuel Beckett, who in turn influenced the work included in the course by B.S. Johnson and James Kelman. The final part of the module contrasts these writers' focus on memory and consciousness, with the postmodernist preoccupation with solipsism, apparent in novels such as Joseph Heller's 'Something Happened' (1974), and stories such as Lydia Davis's 'Break It Down' (1986) and David Foster Wallace's 'Good Old Neon' (2004), and considers the influence of Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialist philosophy on this fiction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Essay Plan (500 words)
  • Item 2: 90% Essay (3500 words)
Level: 6
Intersectional Feminist WritingLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM6214Semester 26Closed

Intersectional Feminist Writing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maha El Hissy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: The first wave of feminism that occurred throughout the Western world in the 19th and 20th century has been widely criticised for focusing only on white, middle-class women, thus overlooking discrimination against Black and women of colour, migrant women or women from the working class. Taking this as a point of departure, the module aims to highlight questions of intersectionality in women¿s writing on race, gender, class, and religion. We will discuss novels, essays, and other hybrid genres by Black women and other women of colour as well as the work of Jewish writers, feminist Muslim writers, and writing by queer writers of colour. How does literature reflect or shape questions of intersectionality? Does intersectionality lead to the creation of new aesthetics, genres, or stylistic devices? What affects are evoked in intersectional feminist writing? How does intersectional feminist writing re-read and respond to Eurocentrism and patriarchy? How can feminist writing sometimes become complicit in adapting and reproducing the same discrimination mechanisms that it criticises and writes against? These are some of the questions the course aims to tackle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Podcast (20 minutes)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 6
On the Subject of Sex II: Queen to QueerLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM626Semester 26Closed

On the Subject of Sex II: Queen to Queer

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Wilks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: Queer offers exciting, challenging and virulently contested new ways of understanding sex, gender and sexuality. In this module we shall examine the phenomenon in its historical context, exploring in particular its relationship with gay and lesbian studies, feminism, and postmodernism, and tracing its influence in and through various cultural artefacts. We shall also be engaging with core texts of queer theory and seeking to apply its tenets to contemporary culture.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 6
Studio Practice Year 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN126Full year4No

Studio Practice Year 1

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani

Description: This module seeks to investigate themes within design and engineering that relate to sociocultural and engineering analysis of 'Purpose and Performance'. It is intended to introduce students to important aspects of design and engineering as a starting point for the synthesis of ideas and innovations in design and engineering. The briefs set out a framework within which the students generate ideas, rather than being directed toward a conventional design outcome or specialist area. This module will run in parallel with the Context module, and encourage students to engage with and understand the value of discourse within design practice which is an interdisciplinary activity of technical and sociocultural creative thinking.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% End of Year Portfolio
  • Item 2: 20% Project 1 presentation
  • Item 3: 20% Project 2 presentation
  • Item 4: 20% Project 4 presentation
Level: 4
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Studio Practice Module Year 2 Human and MachineEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN212Full year5No

Studio Practice Module Year 2 Human and Machine

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN126

Description: The second year studio practice 'Human and Machine' explores how the contemporary designer and engineer can negotiate a changing social, cultural, technological, environmental and political terrain to contextually locate their design activity. It encourages students to adopt a personal, ethical and ideological stance in tackling projects that place their concern within a design and an engineering territory. The module encourages the student to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules on the programme including; Studio practice, History and theories, Design and meaning, Aspect of engineering and analysis, Methods and processes and Technical studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% End of Year Portfolio
  • Item 2: 30% Group Project presentation
  • Item 3: 30% Individual Project presentation
Level: 5
Low Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN233Semester 25Yes

Low Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: The module builds on the concepts introduced in Mechanics of Fluids I to study inviscid, incompressible flow over aircraft wings. The concepts of stream function, velocity potential, vorticity and circulation are developed and exact solutions of flow over some simple two-dimensional bodies are discussed. From this basis, methods are developed for calculating forces and moments on thin wing sections and finite-span wings in low-speed flow.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 10% Online timed assessment
  • Item 4: 10% Laboratory report 2
Level: 5
Stability and Control of AircraftEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN303Semester 16Yes

Stability and Control of Aircraft

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4108 and take DEN4005

Description: The module introduces the classical theory for the stability and control of a conventional fixed-wing aircraft including both the static trim conditions and the dynamic response to symmetrical and asymmetrical control inputs and other disturbances. It provides the student with some of the analytic tools needed to contribute to the design of a safe aircraft.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Flight dynamics project
Level: 6
Aircraft PropulsionEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN306Semester 26Yes

Aircraft Propulsion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN427
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN107

Description: The aims of this module are to introduce the basic concepts of propulsion and to show how thrust and fuel consumption can be calculated for a variety of engines under design conditions. It will provide an understanding of the way in which materials constraints and aerodynamics limit gas-turbine and aero-engine performance, particularly of turbines and compressors and will introduce the basic principles of turbine, compressor and nozzle design

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 15% Online assessment
Level: 6
Aerospace StructuresEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN307Semester 26Yes

Aerospace Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen

Description: This module will provide the student with the basic tools of structural analysis including the structure idealization, analysis of the thin-walled cellular type of structure peculiar to the aircraft, stress calculations of composite structures, fundamentals of elasticity and buckling analysis of plate.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Online test 1
  • Item 2: 30% Online test 2
  • Item 3: 40% Courswork (1000 words)
Level: 6
Third Year Project (BEng/MEng)Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN318Full year6No

Third Year Project (BEng/MEng)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital

Description: The purpose of the project is to provide an in depth knowledge of a particular area of Engineering. The project may typically involve experimentation or computational modelling which will be carried out in an subject area developed together with an academic member of staff (the supervisor). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis, interpretation and discussion of the results or data obtained.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final Report
  • Item 2: 15% Rationale, Aims and Objectives
  • Item 3: 10% Progress Report
  • Item 4: 10% Poster
  • Item 5: 15% Viva
Level: 6
Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN319Semester 16No

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nuria Gavara

Description: A 15 credit project specific to BSc(Eng) programmes. The purpose of the project will be to provide knowledge of a particular research area. There will be no set rules concerning format, which will depend on the nature of the subject and personal choice. The project will typically involve experimentation which will be carried out in an associated subject area chosen by a member of academic staff (supervisor).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation and Oral Presentation
Level: 6
Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN320Semester 26No

Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN420
Prerequisite: Must have a-level maths or equivalent

Description: The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the impacts of engineering activity on the environment. It provides them with the basic professional skills to recognise, analyse and minimise adverse impacts. The students will be made aware of the variety of impacts that pollution and engineering works can have upon the environment, e.g. air quality, water quality, waste disposal, noise and vibration, transportation. They will be able to analyse and construct predictive models of the processes which control the level and extent of these impacts. They will apply these, working either individually or in multi-disciplinary groups, to realistic case studies involving engineering problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Coursework
Level: 6
Combustion in Automotive EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN326Semester 26Yes

Combustion in Automotive Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Xi Jiang
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN426

Description: This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Online test
  • Item 3: 20% Coursework
Level: 6
Studio Practice Year 3 GDP Industry Related Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN327Full year6No

Studio Practice Year 3 GDP Industry Related Design Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN212

Description: This module offers a live industrial project in industrial design. This design project is a crucial component of the programme which emulates the industrial context of design and engineering whilst exposing the student to the realities of the multidisciplinary group design project. This will provide the opportunity for the student to work alongside practising designers and engineers. The design project brief is generated in collaboration with industry and academic staff to deliver a realistic experience of the live project. The intention is to provide knowledge and understanding of the expectations of professional designers and the engineers, while simultaneously supporting the student in an academic context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Group Project Presentation and Report
  • Item 2: 30% Interim Group Presentation
Level: 6
Studio Practice Year 3 Individual Design Project Joie de VivreEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN329Full year6No

Studio Practice Year 3 Individual Design Project Joie de Vivre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN212

Description: This module offers students the opportunity to work on a complex design project from the initiation of the project to completion of design proposal. The student will experience the critical decision making stages in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also learn project management and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Project Presentation and Report
  • Item 2: 30% Interim Presentation
Level: 6
Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and FluidsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN331Semester 16No

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: This is an introductory module in computational modelling. It covers both computational solids and computational fluids. The most widely used methods such the finite element method are covered. The emphasis is on engineering applications with students being exposed to hands on experience of both solids and fluids commercial packages.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Solids Coursework
  • Item 2: 25% Fluids Coursework
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Computational EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN401Semester 17Yes

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN331

Description: This is an advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aeronautical and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Report 1
  • Item 2: 25% Report 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Computational Fluid DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN403Semester 27Yes

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ahmed Ismail
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take DEN331 or take DEN6407

Description: This module introduces students to numerical analysis and computational methods for solving engineering fluid dynamic problems. It enables students to develop skills in programming and using CFD codes using modern computational techniques, including the properties of discretisations and their application to simple model equations. Aspects of modelling turbulence and microscale capillary flow are considered. The students will generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems and perform the analysis of the quality of the simulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Computational mathematics quiz
  • Item 2: 10% Microcapillary MCQ
  • Item 3: 30% Report
  • Item 4: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN408Semester 17No

Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5109 and take DEN5200

Description: The module introduces robotics as an integral part of modern automation, provides an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems. It also provides an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, actuators and sensors, principles and roles in robotics. It introduces various aspects of robot modelling and control and problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
AeroelasticityEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN410Semester 27Yes

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN419Full year7No

Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN327 and take DEN329

Description: Students will be engaged in a self-initiated project of some weight; evolving their own practice and producing new and meaningful design work. Students will be expected to produce design work, which is appropriately contextualised and also produced to high professional standard. The student will experience the critical decision making in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also demonstrate project management skills and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project
Level: 7
Advanced Gas TurbinesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN427Semester 27No

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN306

Description: Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306 for the first six weeks. In the last 5 weeks (weeks8-12) the lectures will cover the Land-Based Power-Generation Systems (gas turbine based, steam turbine based and combined cycle based), the use of steam tables for steam engine performance calculation. Power Plant Performance Analysis and Optimisation and mechanical aspects of turbomachinery design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 15% Online assessment
Level: 7
Biomedical Engineering in UrologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN430Semester 17No

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight

Description: The course explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, catheters, pads and implantable devices and materials. Initially the course covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including NHS clinical engineerings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% MCQ Test 2
  • Item 2: 25% Data processing and analysis
  • Item 3: 25% MCQ Test 1
  • Item 4: 25% Engagement in asynchronous and synchronous activities
Level: 7
Economics and Management of Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN433Semester 27No

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module will equip you with the fundamental tools of economics and management principles. You will learn about their application to conventional and sustainable energy conversion powerplants; systems and their components; and life cycle analyses of energy systems. In addition to understanding the key aspects of international energy supply and demand economics, (and their effect on fuel prices and energy sources), you will also consider the effects of national and international energy policy and emissions regulations on the overall energy scene, analyse developments in the energy markets, and assess the overall impact on environmental issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 25% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Renewable Energy SourcesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN438Semester 17Yes

Renewable Energy Sources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Huasheng Wang

Description: The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the global energy scene and the impacts of energy production and consumption on the environment. The module provide the students with an understanding of the origin and nature of various renewable/sustainable energy resources, the assessment of their ability to meet our future energy demands, and the design of renewable energy systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Design and analysis of a sustainable energy application
Level: 7
Engineering Materials for DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5002Semester 25No

Engineering Materials for Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT4002 or take ECS426U

Description: This module provides an introduction to engineering materials, providing the student with an understanding of how the structure of materials (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites) influences their properties and performance when used in products and how these properties can be improved. It will cover how to structure business and financial plans and how to produce them, as well as providing an understanding of project management methodologies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Activity portfolio
  • Item 2: 80% Design portfolio
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Design For ManufactureEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5101Semester 15No

Design For Manufacture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah

Description: This module will develop strategies to identify product requirements, identify design constraints, think creatively, solve problems and identify solutions. It will examine how 3D CAE can be used to create detailed design drawings, create simple assemblies, manufacture prototypes, real parts and also how analytical models such as finite element analysis can be used to evaluate designs. A wide range of different processing techniques will be examined. Various strategies such as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) that can be used to evaluate the design risk, will be described to determine 'safe' design. The role of inspection and statistical process control techniques in ensuring a robust design and manufacturing process will be examined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 13% Initial Requirements Specification
  • Item 3: 30% DfM report
  • Item 4: 8% Self and peer assessment
Level: 5
Solid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5102Semester 25Yes

Solid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vassili Toropov
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4102 or take MAT102

Description: This module further develops material taught in the first year with respect to stresses and strains in components and how they may be designed to prevent failure. It considers plane stress and strain conditions, using matrix notation to describe these conditions and the failure criteria that may be applied to these systems. It also considers complex bending conditions in asymmetric and composite beams and the stability of struts. Examples will be drawn from applications in aerospace, mechanical and medical engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Laboratory Report
  • Item 3: 25% Test
Level: 5
Energy Conversion AnalysisEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5107Semester 15Yes

Energy Conversion Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take DEN4006 or take DEN4404 ) and take DEN107

Description: This module will develop the ideas introduced in DEN4006 Energy Conversion Systems and study how energy conversion systems can be analysed quantitatively. To do this it will use many of the concepts and fundamental laws introduced in DEN107. It will also analyse reacting flows with particular reference to combustion and their application to the analysis of internal combustion engines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Online Test 1
  • Item 3: 25% Online Test 2
Level: 5
Engineering InstrumentationEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5109Semester 15No

Engineering Instrumentation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hasan Shaheed

Description: This module is focused on transducers and their uses in engineering control systems. It studies methods of taking measurements, and motor and actuator theory, reviewing important transducer characteristics and the methodology for selecting an appropriate transducer. In relation to this, the module also covers methods of acquiring data from transducers, and effectively processing electronic signals. All aspects of the module content are brought together in a problem based learning exercise, involving the control of a robotic arm.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Lab report on PBL
  • Item 2: 25% Online Test 1
  • Item 3: 25% Online Test 2
  • Item 4: 25% Coursework
Level: 5
Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5122Semester 15No

Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4122 and take DEN4123

Description: This module builds on DEN4122/4123 Mathematics and Computing 1/2 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basics of vector calculus, vector and scalar fields, gradient of scalar fields, optimisation, div and curl of vector fields, vector integration, integral theorems, curvilinear coordinates, application to derivation of the Navier-Stokes Equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Engagement with asynchronous content
  • Item 3: 30% Online timed assessment 1
  • Item 4: 30% Online timed assessment 2
Level: 5
Control Systems Analysis and DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5200Semester 25Yes

Control Systems Analysis and Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guang Li

Description: This module is focused on the basic principles of control systems analysis and design and its application to engineering systems in relation to mechanical, medical, electro-mechanical and aerospace systems. The students will acquire the skill of designing a control system for a particular application. They will also gain practical experience in analysis and design of a typical control system with MATLAB using the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures and problem solving sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Online quiz 1
  • Item 2: 30% Lab report
  • Item 3: 35% Online quiz 2
Level: 5
Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics IEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5208Semester 25Yes

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4101

Description: The role of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics in materials science. The module will begin wilth derivation and description of some fundamental kinematics and thermodynamic phenomena such as Gibbs free energy, rate equations, equilibria etc. The effect of variables such as temperature and pressure will be examined. The module will go and to demonstrate with examples how these can be applied to solve problems for gas, solution, and solid phase scenarios with a particular emphasis on polymer synthesis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Online test
  • Item 2: 25% Lab report
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Aerothermodynamics of Fluid FlowsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5242Semester 15No

Aerothermodynamics of Fluid Flows

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4101

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows, formation of waves, Mach number and Mach Wave, Shock-Waves, effect of area change and back pressure on the flow of gases and its application to jet engines and wind tunnels, flow measurement and flow visualization in compressible flows. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of compressible aerodynamics and its implication in aerospace engineering. The second part of the module provides students with a basic knowledge of viscous flows and boundary layers and drag.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 10% Online timed assessment
  • Item 4: 10% Laboratory report 2
Level: 5
Fluid Mechanics of the Cardiovascular SystemEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5300Semester 25Yes

Fluid Mechanics of the Cardiovascular System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rob Krams
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4101

Description: This module further develops material taught in the first year about fluid mechanics. It introduces more complex concepts including the role of the boundary layer and the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. It will describe the non-Newtonian nature of blood, haemodynamics and pulsatile flows. It will consider flow in the context of the human cardiovascular system, including the structure of the vascular network and blood vessels, the heart anatomy and cardiac cycle, flow through bifurcations and bypass grafts. It will consider the clinical relevance of the endothelial cell and their function.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 85% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Mid term test
Level: 5
Neuromuscular Bioelectricity and BiomechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5302Semester 15No

Neuromuscular Bioelectricity and Biomechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su

Description: The module proposal results from a review of the Undergraduate Engineering programmes in Aerospace / Mechanical / Medical Engineering and is a compulsory module for the Medical Engineering programme. It broadens the programme with topics not previously disucssed at level 5, with the capacity available as a result of delivering more materials content in year 1 of the programme

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Individual Report
  • Item 3: 20% QMplus MCQ Test
Level: 5
Chemical Reaction Engineering 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5401Semester 15No

Chemical Reaction Engineering 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stoyan Smoukov

Description: This module introduces and develops an understanding of reaction rate kinetics of chemical systems and applies this understanding to design of a typical chemical reactor. The module discusses example application areas and basic definitions of Chemical Reaction Engineering, general mole balance for ideal reactors, rate laws and stoichiometry, theories of reaction rates, collection and analysis of batch reactor data, complex reactions, reactor design and sizing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Report on reaction kinetics
  • Item 3: 40% Report on reactor design
Level: 5
Student Centred Learning for Chemical Engineers 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5402Full year5No

Student Centred Learning for Chemical Engineers 2

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: This module provides the essential scientific, practical and design skills for Chemical Engineers. The module material is delivered by means of a combination of brief lectures, hands-on lab sessions, design exercises and group-based problem based learning tasks.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Lab Reports
  • Item 2: 30% Lab Presentations
Level: 5
Multi- and inter-disciplinarity
Industrial ChemistryEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5405Semester 15No

Industrial Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: The module will cover aspects of Chemical Process Technology, Surfaces, Adsorption and Heterogeneous Catalysis, Polymeric Materials, Colloids and Surfactants.
An introduction to the History of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry will be given and a broad discussion of existing Hydrocarbon Recovery Methods, Refinery and Petroleum Products Technology, Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis and Kinetics, Gas Adsorption at Solid Surfaces and Advanced Reaction Kinetics.
Existing and emerging technology in Polymer Engineering will be covered, as well as Surface/Interface Science, Colloidal Science and Surfactants.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Technical Reports
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Mass Transfer and Separation Processes 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5406Semester 15No

Mass Transfer and Separation Processes 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Petra Szilagyi

Description: The module will cover the fundamental concepts in mass transfer and separation processes.
Introduction to mass transfer: characteristics, the fundamental laws of transport phenomena. Comparison of mass transfer with heat transfer. Motion of molecules and diffusion. Mass transfer in the gas, vapour and liquid phases. Mass transfer in a boundary layer.
Liquid-liquid extraction: equilibrium data for immiscible and partially miscible systems. Stage calculations for single-stage, cross-flow and countercurrent systems. Binary distillation: continuous distillation (column configuration, condensers, reboilers).
McCabe-Thiele approach for binary systems. Total, minimum, and optimum reflux. Effect of feed thermal condition, product specifications and relative volatility. Sidestreams and multiple feeds. Binary batch distillation (single stage, multi-stage).
Evaporation: types of evaporators. Multi-effect evaporators and their arrangement. Evaporator sizing calculations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Technical report
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Integrated Chemical Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5410Semester 15No

Integrated Chemical Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roberto Volpe

Description: The learning within this module has been structured around two sections, a first half of the module will be dedicated to general aspects of chemical engineering design and project management such as Health and safety, environmental and economical sustainability. The second half will consist of a 5 week design exercise that is related to the current energy technology challenges and in particular to the renewable energy field. The design exercise will provide students with direct opportunities to apply the concepts learnt during the first half of the module. Working in small groups, students will learn how to to integrate the experimental methods and simulations while training their critical thinking/problem solving, effective team-working, self-directed learning and communication skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Final design portfolio
  • Item 2: 15% Individual Presentation
  • Item 3: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 4: 25% Quizzes
Level: 5
Chemical Reaction Engineering 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN5411Semester 25No

Chemical Reaction Engineering 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radomir Slavchov
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4404

Description: This module builds on knowledge acquired in previous module 'Chemical Reaction Engineering 1' to deepen the theoretical knowledge into more complex real cases and add practical aspects of reaction design. The design of process reactors for homogeneous systems will be covered. Students will study reactions conducted in non-ideal set-ups. Elements of computational reaction control methods will also be taught.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Problem solving and design coursework
Level: 5
Mass Transfer and Separation ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5412Semester 15No

Mass Transfer and Separation Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Folashade Akinmolayan

Description: The module will cover the fundamental concepts in mass transfer and separation processes.
Fundamentals of phase changes, phase equilibria, and fluid mixtures (including real systems of gases and liquids) will be discussed and related to separation processes. Correlations and similarities between heat, momentum, and mass transfer will be discussed. The module will give a detailed discussion on mass flux and its role in diffusion and convection. A quantitative analysis of diffusion and convection in fluids will also be given.
Liquid-liquid extraction: equilibrium data for immiscible and partially miscible systems.
Binary distillation: continuous distillation (column configuration, condensers, reboilers).
McCabe-Thiele approach for binary systems. Total, minimum, and optimum reflux. Optimal feed placement, product specifications and relative volatility. Binary batch distillation (single stage, multi-stage).
Solid-liquid separation by filtration or drying.
Osmosis, pressure-retarded osmosis, reverse osmosis from theory to applications.
Analysis of psychrometric charts, including wet bulb temperature, and absolute and relative humidity.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Problem solving coursework
  • Item 3: 20% Quizzes
Level: 5
Engineering Industrial ExperienceEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN616Full year6No

Engineering Industrial Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof James Busfield

Description: Students will be helped to secure a work placement through a range of new initiatives in a company appropriate to the programme. The work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful students with a placement will each be allocated a tutor, a SEMS academic in a relevant field, who will wherever practical visit the student twice in the year. Where a visit is not possible the tutor will ensure that there is email and telephone contact with the student. SEMS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer. This person is likely to be their line manager and will be expected to support as well as line-manage the student. Students completing the module will be required to work on a project that will allow them to follow a pathway toward CEng registration approximately three years after graduation; maintain a training diary to be reviewed by their tutor during and after the placement is completed; attend at least one Industrial Liaison Forum to share their experience with other SEMS students; deliver one seminar at QMUL to promote future opportunities at their sponsor; complete a final report on the placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Project Review
  • Item 2: 20% Training diary
  • Item 3: 20% Industrial liaison attendance
  • Item 4: 20% Seminar
  • Item 5: 20% Final Report
Level: 6
Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN6208Semester 16No

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7208
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5208

Description: This module covers more advanced topics in heat transfer, developing the ideas introduced in DEN5208 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 1. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; fins; heat exchangers; phase change; turbulent flows; compressible flow.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework 1 report
  • Item 3: 30% Coursework 2 report
Level: 6
Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6305Semester 16No

Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7305
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take DEN233 and take DEN303

Description: This module is concerned the design and performance of a broad range of aerospace vehicles including fixed-wing aeroplanes (subsonic and supersonic), helicopters, hovercraft, airships, and launch vehicles.
Coursework and tutorial materials involve use of spreadsheets, but the module is primarily assessed by a written exam.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% nline timed assessment 1
  • Item 3: 20% nline timed assessment 2
Level: 6
Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6311Semester 26No

Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take MAT4003 or take DEN6407

Description: This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature. The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage. It brings this together considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Group Lab Report
  • Item 3: 13% Group presentation
  • Item 4: 13% Online Test
Level: 6
Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6335Semester 26Yes

Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7335
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN4108

Description: The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 6
Modelling and Control of Robotic SystemsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6336Semester 16No

Modelling and Control of Robotic Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ketao Zhang
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7336

Description: This module builds upon the control and dynamics modules of earlier years to prepare the students for more advanced methods. Modelling of mechanical systems using the Euler-Lagrange and Hamiltonian methods is introduced. Holonomic and nonholonomic constraints are introduced and used in the modelling of mobile robots. Modern nonlinear control methods for mechanical systems are introduced.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Project report
  • Item 2: 30% Project report
  • Item 3: 40% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6405Semester 26Yes

High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN7405

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics , design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Laboratory Experiment 1
  • Item 2: 10% Laboratory Experiment 2
  • Item 3: 10% In-class test (50 min)
  • Item 4: 70% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Intercalated Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6407Full year6No

Intercalated Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury

Description: The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Final Report
  • Item 2: 20% Review Article
  • Item 3: 30% Viva
  • Item 4: 10% Symposium
Level: 6
Integrated Chemical Engineering Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6410Full year6No

Integrated Chemical Engineering Design Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Balcombe

Description: Students will work in teams of approx. 5. Each team will be responsible for the detailed design of a specific unit of larger plant, so that the class as a whole will ultimately be designing a chemical plant. Each team will interact with other teams, just as different units of a chemical plant interact with one another. This will make the exercise realistic and train students to work in an environment as close as possible to reality. Process Synthesis, Design of key elements of the unit, Unit control, Unit safety and Layout, Environmental impact and Economic evaluation will be the core elements of group work.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Individual Presentation
  • Item 2: 15% Feasibility Study
  • Item 3: 15% Basic Design
  • Item 4: 30% Advanced Design
  • Item 5: 10% HAZOP and Plant Design
Level: 6
Particle Technology and Advanced Separation ProcessesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6413Semester 26No

Particle Technology and Advanced Separation Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Folashade Akinmolayan
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5412 or take DEN5406

Description: Fundamentals of particle technology including charaterisation of particle size, shape and size distribution, flow through packed beds and porous media; fundamentals of humidification, dehumidification, cooling and drying, particle formation processes, solid-liquid separation processes, membrane separations and chromatography, and Quantitative analysis of mass transfer problems in separation methodologies discussed in the 2nd year module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Online quiz
  • Item 3: 20% Group based design project
Level: 6
Implant DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6437Semester 26No

Implant Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathleen Tanner
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5101 and take DEN4101 and take DEN4102 and take DEN5102 and take DEN331 and take MAT4002

Description: The module includes a review of the design process concept and its application to implantable medical devices, as well as reviewing materials for use in the body. Issues related to biomaterial evaluation will be covered including biocompatibility, material response to the physiological environment, matching the mechanical environment and preparation of devices for clinical use. It will consider the relevant stakeholders in the design of medical devices. It will use the design methods and evaluation tools appropriately in a hands-on approach for each of the key steps to support the overall design process of medical implants.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Individual Report
  • Item 3: 15% Group Presentation
  • Item 4: 20% Group Report
Level: 6
Advanced Safety EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6440Semester 26No

Advanced Safety Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Balcombe

Description: This module introduces hazards encountered in industrial process plants. It offers students an opportunity to acquire basic skills in the main areas of Safety and Loss Prevention. The core lecture programme covers elementary stress analysis ('mechanics'), process safety and plant reliability; a parallel stream introduces fundamental concepts of corrosion, a particularly important hazard. Environmental impact is considered in DEN320 Environmental Engineering.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Final Report
  • Item 2: 5% Bid Presentation
  • Item 3: 25% Group final presentation
  • Item 4: 30% Group final report
Level: 6
Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace VehiclesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7001Semester 17No

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Medical Ethics and Regulatory AffairsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7020Semester 27No

Medical Ethics and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Lee

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied medical ethics and law related to the development of new products in the field of bioengineering. It provides knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of approval of products for clinical use in the UK, the EU and the US, risk management and design processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Report on consent and patient info sheet
  • Item 3: 10% Report on innovation vs regulation
Level: 7
Numerical Optimisation in Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7026Semester 17No

Numerical Optimisation in Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: 1. Introduction.
Motivating examples. Sizing, shape and topology opt, Local vs Global opt. Deterministic vs. stochastic opt, linear vs. non-linear, unconstrained vs constrained opt.

2. Deterministic Optimisation
* Unconstrained Optimisation.
Line search vs Trust region methods. Line search methods: Armijo and Strong Wolfe Conditions. Steepest descent algorithm. Search directions: nonlinear conjugate gradient method, Newton's method; Quasi-Newton methods.
* Constrained Optimisation
Penalty methods, interior point methods
* Computation of derivatives Finite-Differences, tangent linear models, adjoints, automatic differentiation

3. Stochastic Optimisation
* Population-based methods
Genetic algorithms, Evolutionary algorithms, Simulated annealing, Particle swarm methods, Multi-criteria evolutionary strategies
* Surrogate modelling
Design of Experiments, Response surface methods, Kriging, Regression models

4. Applications
* Parametrisation
Shape optimisation methods (CAD-based methods, surface and volume morphing, re-meshing techniques), Topology optimisation methods (negative / positive voxel methods)
* Industrial applications
FEM applications in structural opt of shape and topology, CFD applications in shape optimisation
* Overview of commercial software

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class test
  • Item 2: 30% Project
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7208Semester 17No

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6208
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5208

Description: This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework 1 report
  • Item 3: 30% Coursework 2 report
Level: 7
Advanced Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7311Semester 27No

Advanced Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take MAT4003

Description: This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature.
The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage.
It brings this together, considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Group Lab Report
  • Item 3: 13% Group presentation
  • Item 4: 13% Online Test
Level: 7
Chemical Engineering Individual Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7318Full year7No

Chemical Engineering Individual Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edo Boek

Description: Syllabus:
The fourth year project consists of an individual piece of work, carried out under the supervision of a member of academic staff. It will take one of the following forms or a combination thereof:
¿ Research linked to SEMS PGR programmes
¿ Research in an industrial research lab
¿ Analysis of an industrial process
¿ A theoretical project including a literature review with subsequent data analysis/computer modelling
¿ Analysis of a previous experimental investigation
¿ The development (modelling) of a piece of apparatus
¿ A design study
¿ A review of a topic of current interest.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Final report (5000 words)
  • Item 2: 15% Rationale, Aims and Objectives (1000 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Progress Report (2000 words)
  • Item 4: 10% Poster
  • Item 5: 15% Viva
Level: 7
Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7335Semester 27No

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6335

Description: The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7405Semester 27No

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take DEN6405
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take DEN5242

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 10% Online timed assessment
  • Item 4: 10% Laboratory report 2
Level: 7
Whole System Design in Sustainable EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7433Semester 27No

Whole System Design in Sustainable Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module examines the nature of sustainability and various sustainability models before examining the role of national and international government agencies on environmental management. The role of technology is examined, primarily through life cycle analysis, and includes design of products, energy supply, and personal consumption. A particular emphasis will be placed on life cycle analysis of wind, solar and nuclear.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Energy Storage EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7600Semester 27No

Energy Storage Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Jorge Sobrido

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Video/poster
  • Item 2: 30% Lab report
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Introduction to Solar EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7601Semester 27No

Introduction to Solar Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Poster
  • Item 2: 30% Lab report
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace VehiclesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM001Semester 17No

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Computational EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM004Semester 17No

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen

Description: This is advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aero and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Report 1
  • Item 2: 25% Report 2
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Biomedical Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM006Full year7No

Biomedical Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Project
Level: 7
Computational Fluid DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM010Semester 27No

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ahmed Ismail

Description: This module introduces students to numerical analysis and computational methods for solving engineering fluid dynamic problems. It enables students to develop skills in programming and using CFD codes using modern computational techniques, including the properties of discretisations and their application to simple model equations. Aspects of modelling turbulence and microscale capillary flow are considered. The students will generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems and perform the analysis of the quality of the simulations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Computational mathematics quiz
  • Item 2: 10% Microcapillary MCQ
  • Item 3: 30% Report
  • Item 4: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM011Semester 17No

Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module introduces robotics as an integral part of modern automation, provides an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems. It also provides an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, actuators and sensors, principles and roles in robotics. It introduces various aspects of robot modelling and control and problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM012Semester 27No

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton

Description: This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Coursework
Level: 7
Biomedical Engineering in UrologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM016Semester 17No

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight

Description: The course explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, catheters, pads and implantable devices and materials. Initially the course covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including NHS clinical engineerings..

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% MCQ Test 2
  • Item 2: 25% Data processing and analysis
  • Item 3: 25% MCQ Test 1
  • Item 4: 25% Engagement in asynchronous and synchronous activities
Level: 7
Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM021Semester 27No

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali

Description: This module covers fundamentals and applications of combustions in automotive engine. Topics covered in the module include the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations, as well as additional directed advanced reading material in energy use in power plants, combustion modelling and life cycle analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 28% Project report
  • Item 3: 12% Online test
Level: 7
Advanced Gas TurbinesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM022Semester 27No

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306, but there will be additional directed reading on this module, to enable students to tackle a substantial piece of coursework. This will concern the energy use in power and propulsion systems and the optimisation of land-based power-generating gas turbines in combined cycles with steam plant or similar project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 15% Online assessment
Level: 7
Economics and Management of Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM023Semester 27No

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module describes the global energy scene including a historical review of energy supply and demand trends, fossil fuels and climate change, what is renewable energy and a review of sustainable energy sources. It describes Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, accounting and management principles, the free market structure, cartels, barriers to entry, and example applications in the energy field. Applications related to energy vectors and technologies for power plants are included. Policy and climate change issues are discussed, including the emissions regulations. A thermo-economic analysis of various conventional and renewable power plants and their components is included.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 2
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework 3
  • Item 4: 25% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Numerical Optimisation in Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM026Semester 17No

Numerical Optimisation in Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: 1. Introduction.
Motivating examples. Sizing, shape and topology opt, Local vs Global opt. Deterministic vs. stochastic opt, linear vs. non-linear, unconstrained vs constrained opt.

2. Deterministic Optimisation
* Unconstrained Optimisation.
Line search vs Trust region methods. Line search methods: Armijo and Strong Wolfe Conditions. Steepest descent algorithm. Search directions: nonlinear conjugate gradient method, Newton's method; Quasi-Newton methods.
* Constrained Optimisation
Penalty methods, interior point methods
* Computation of derivatives Finite-Differences, tangent linear models, adjoints, automatic differentiation

3. Stochastic Optimisation
* Population-based methods
Genetic algorithms, Evolutionary algorithms, Simulated annealing, Particle swarm methods, Multi-criteria evolutionary strategies
* Surrogate modelling
Design of Experiments, Response surface methods, Kriging, Regression models

4. Applications
* Parametrisation
Shape optimisation methods (CAD-based methods, surface and volume morphing, re-meshing techniques), Topology optimisation methods (negative / positive voxel methods)
* Industrial applications
FEM applications in structural opt of shape and topology, CFD applications in shape optimisation
* Overview of commercial software

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class test
  • Item 2: 30% Project
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
AeroelasticityEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM032Semester 27No

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Renewable Energy SourcesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM035Semester 17No

Renewable Energy Sources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Huasheng Wang

Description: The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the global energy scene and the impacts of energy production and consumption on the environment. The module provide the students with an understanding of the origin and nature of various renewable/sustainable energy resources, the assessment of their ability to meet our future energy demands, and the design of renewable energy systems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Design and analysis of a sustainable energy application
Level: 7
Extended Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM100Full year7No

Extended Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: The module is an intensive research module that spans all three MSc semesters. It draws together the knowledge and skills from the taught component to address a research challenge of significant scope to be undertaken independently, under supervision. It focuses on the technical, project management and communication skills needed to successfully execute academic- and/or industry-oriented research. The project entails to apply research methods to solve original problems of fundamental or applied nature.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Final Report
  • Item 2: 10% Directed Learning Assessment 1
  • Item 3: 10% Directed Learning Assessment 2
  • Item 4: 10% Project Rationale, Aims and Objectives
  • Item 5: 15% Project SOTA
  • Item 6: 15% Viva
Level: 7
Essential Mathematics Skills for EngineersEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM122Semester 14No

Essential Mathematics Skills for Engineers

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts

Description: This module provides students with knowledge of basic mathematical skills that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basic logic, sequences and series, limits, differentiation and integration, partial derivatives, complex numbers, basic vector calculus, matrix algebra and an introduction to ordinary differential equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% 5 online Exercises
Level: 4
Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM208Semester 17No

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework 1 report
  • Item 3: 30% Coursework 2 report
Level: 7
Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDENM209Semester 16No

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs

Description: This module covers more advanced topics in heat transfer, developing the ideas introduced in DEN5208 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 1. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; fins; heat exchangers; phase change; turbulent flows; compressible flow.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework 1 report
  • Item 3: 30% Coursework 2 report
Level: 6
Advanced Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM305Semester 17No

Advanced Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: This module is concerned with the design and performance of a typical aircraft. It covers mission based subsonic aircraft design methodology, areodynamic design, engine design, and noise in propeller and jet driven aircraft, structural design and materials selection.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% nline timed assessment 1
  • Item 3: 20% nline timed assessment 2
Level: 7
Advanced Aerospace StructuresEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM307Semester 27No

Advanced Aerospace Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen

Description: This module provides students with the basic tools of structural analysis including the structure idealisation, analysis of the thin-walled cellular type of structure peculiar to the aircraft, stress calculations of composite structures, fundamentals of elasticity and buckling analysis of plate. This specialisation covers theory, computations, experiments and implementation issues, as well as the study of specific cutting edge aerospace vehicles. In this module, four case-studies in aerospace manufacturing will be designed/
delivered during the tutorial sessions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Online test 1
  • Item 2: 35% Online test 2
  • Item 3: 30% Coursework of ABAQUS
Level: 7
Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM311Semester 26No

Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta

Description: This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature.
The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage.
It brings this together considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Group Lab Report
  • Item 3: 13% Group presentation
  • Item 4: 13% Online Test
Level: 6
Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and FluidsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM331Semester 16No

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller

Description: This is an introductory module in computational modelling. It covers both computational solids and computational fluids. The most widely used methods such the finite element method are covered. The emphasis is on engineering applications with students being exposed to hands on experience of both solids and fluids commercial packages.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Solids Coursework
  • Item 2: 25% Fluids Coursework
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM335Semester 27No

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa

Description: The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 7
Advanced High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM405Semester 27No

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi

Description: This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Laboratory report 1
  • Item 3: 10% Online timed assessment
  • Item 4: 10% Laboratory report 2
Level: 7
Whole System Design in Sustainable EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM433Semester 27No

Whole System Design in Sustainable Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters

Description: This module examines the nature of sustainability and various sustainability models before examining the role of national and international government agencies on environmental management. The role of technology is examined, primarily through life cycle analysis, and includes design of products, energy supply, and personal consumption. A particular emphasis will be placed on life cycle analysis of wind, solar and nuclear.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework 1
  • Item 3: 25% Coursework 2
Level: 7
Energy Conversion AnalysisEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM510Semester 15No

Energy Conversion Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali

Description: This module will develop the ideas introduced in DEN4006 Energy Conversion Systems and study how energy conversion systems can be analysed quantitatively. To do this it will use many of the concepts and fundamental laws introduced in DEN107. It will also analyse reacting flows with particular reference to combustion and their application to the analysis of internal combustion engines.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 25% Online Test 1
  • Item 3: 25% Online Test 2
Level: 5
Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM512Semester 15No

Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Henri Huijberts

Description: This module builds on DEN4122/4123 Mathematics and Computing 1/2 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basics of vector calculus, vector and scalar fields, gradient of scalar fields, optimisation, div and curl of vector fields, vector integration, integral theorems, curvilinear coordinates, application to derivation of the Navier-Stokes Equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Engagement with asynchronous content
  • Item 3: 30% Online timed assessment 1
  • Item 4: 30% Online timed assessment 2
Level: 5
Energy Storage EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM600Semester 27No

Energy Storage Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Jorge Sobrido

Description: This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Video/poster
  • Item 2: 30% Lab report
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Introduction to Solar EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM601Semester 27No

Introduction to Solar Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joseph Briscoe

Description: Solar Energy is an important aspect of Sustainable Energy Engineering. The understanding of key processes within solar energy will provide students with the knowledge needed to progress further within the relevant industry. The module will focus on the following aspects of solar energy: solar insolation, physical background for semi-conductor materials, photovoltaic devices and applications , photocatalysis, learning from nature and photosynthesis, future solutions. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lectures from industrial practitioners.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Poster
  • Item 2: 30% Lab report
  • Item 3: 50% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 7
Medical Ethics and Regulatory AffairsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM702Semester 27No

Medical Ethics and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Lee

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied medical ethics and law related to the development of new products in the field of bioengineering. It provides knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of approval of products for clinical use in the UK, the EU and the US, risk management and design processes.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Report on consent and patient info sheet
  • Item 3: 10% Report on innovation vs regulation
Level: 7
Basic Clinical SciencesDentistryDIN4101Full year4No

Basic Clinical Sciences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This 30-credit module is designed to provide an in-depth, scientific understanding of the structure and function of the human body systems in health and disease (e.g. musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory), including Oral Biology (consisting, Head & Neck, Oral Cavity, Immunology & Pathology) and Dental Materials, in order to provide appropriate health promotion advice and clinical intervention in the promotion of optimal oral health.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Oral Biology Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% In-course Assessment
Level: 4
Clinical Practice 1DentistryDIN4102Full year4No

Clinical Practice 1

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This 60-credit module has been designed to encompass total patient care, and through this, a philosophy of continual learning & layering of information gained from engagement and delivery of dental care for patients. Clinical Practice will be delivered as a continuum in stages commencing with the acquisition of skills during Year 2 in the clinical skills laboratory and transition from the laboratory to the clinic prior to treating patients.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Written Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% In-course Assessment
Level: 4
Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 1DentistryDIN4103Full year4No

Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Murray

Description: This 15-credit module will develop the themes of professionalism, team working & social responsibility through enhancing your values, attitudes and behaviours, which will underpin the science and practice of dentistry with professional ethics, healthcare law, sociology and psychology, team working and social responsibility to produce dental professionals for the future.These will link to the provision of patient care management. It will additionally encourage commitment to continuous life long learning.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% PTSR Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
Level: 4
Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 1DentistryDIN4104Full year4No

Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dominic Hurst

Description: Develop the themes of Global Health & Evidence Based Dentistry and introduce the principles of clinical and population epidemiology.
Develop critical appraisal skills and integrate evidence into the wider social context.
Engage critically with and commit to continuous learning (life-long learning).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Coursework 1: DPH report
  • Item 2: 50% Coursework 2: EBD assessment
Level: 4
Clinical SciencesDentistryDIN5101Full year5No

Clinical Sciences

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This module will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding of how systemic health or disease affects oral health, and how this may impact on the provision of dental care. This student will utilise this knowledge in order to provide safe dental care to a range of patients with complex medical histories. An understanding of pharmacology will be further developed and consolidated in relation to a patient¿s medical history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Case report / Course work (3500 words)
Level: 5
Clinical Practice 2DentistryDIN5102Full year5No

Clinical Practice 2

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This module will provide the student with the knowledge and understanding of how systemic health or disease affects oral health, and how this may impact on the provision of dental care. This student will utilise this knowledge in order to provide safe dental care to a range of patients with complex medical histories. An understanding of pharmacology will be further developed and consolidated in relation to a patient¿s medical history.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Exam
  • Item 2: 20% Structured clinical reasoning and communication - child
  • Item 3: 20% Structured clinical reasoning and communication - adult
  • Item 4: 10% In-course Assessment
  • Item 5: 20% OSCE
Level: 5
Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 2DentistryDIN5103Full year5No

Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Baldeesh Chana

Description: This 15-credit module builds upon knowledge and skills acquisition gained in Year 1 and continues to develop professionalism, teamworking, and social responsibility, with further development of the theme of complaints handling which will be integrated into Clinical Practice. Much of this module will be embedded into patient care, with some specific academic teaching in key
areas. Special Care Dentistry will become a key feature throughout this year and will continue through the year.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 5
Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 2DentistryDIN5104Full year5No

Public Health and Evidence Based Dentistry 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Huda Yusuf

Description: The course combines structured Evidenced Based Dentistry and Dental Public Health teaching; and will build on concepts introduced in Year 1. You will be encouraged to use your EBD skills (including asking structured questions, searching for research and critically-appraising the research) and apply it to your clinical practice.

You will focus on exploring national oral health trends and social inequalities in oral health in the UK. You will also be introduced to new concepts such as patient-reported oral health measures, the link between general health and oral health and oral health promotion.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Coursework
Level: 5
Clinical Practice - Child Oral HealthDentistryDIN6101Full year6No

Clinical Practice - Child Oral Health

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Mr Leon Bassi

Description: This 45-credit module has been designed to bring together all the knowledge and skills taught previously to enable students to assess, diagnose, treatment plan and treat children within their scope of practice. This will ensure that they will be undertaking a holistic approach to patient care, considering aspects such as law and ethics, professionalism and teamwork and how this affects the management and treatment of patients.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Practical Exam (Seen paediatric case)
  • Item 3: 30% Practical Exam (structured clinical reasoning)
Level: 6
Clinical Practice - RestorativeDentistryDIN6102Full year6No

Clinical Practice - Restorative

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Mr Leon Bassi

Description: This 45-credit module has been designed to bring together all the knowledge and skills taught previously to enable students to assess, diagnose, treatment plan and treat adults within their scope of practice. This will ensure that they will be undertaking a holistic approach to patient care, considering aspects such as law and ethics, professionalism and teamwork and how this affects the management and treatment of patients.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Practical Exam (Structured Clinical Reasoning)
  • Item 3: 30% Practical Exam (Seen adult case)
Level: 6
Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 3DentistryDIN6103Full year6No

Professionalism, Teamwork and Social Responsibility 3

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Leon Bassi

Description: This 30-credit module builds upon knowledge and skills acquisition gained in Year 2 and continues to develop professionalism, teamworking, and social responsibility, and continues to expand students communication and teamworking skills as they work with different patients in varied dental environments. Management and leadership skills will become a feature throughout this year to enable novice clinicians to understand the leadership and management skills required to nurture a constructive working environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Year Project (8000 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Report
Level: 6
Level 7 ProjectDentistryDIN7000Full year7No

Level 7 Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Paul Anderson

Description: The module will initially provide students with a introduction to research, including qualitative and quantitative paradigms, methodology, validity and reliability and support them to choose their research projects which are in the areas of their discipline.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Thesis (20000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 20% Powerpoint Presentation
Level: 7
OcclusionDentistryDIN7004Full year7No

Occlusion

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Chad Cluff

Description: This module introduces students to the occlusal concepts for Prosthodontics. Subjects covered in seminars are anterior/posterior occlusion, group function, balanced occlusions and conformative and re-organised occlusions. TMJ and managing occlusal changes and articulation. This module is based on the theory of occlusion, which will be applied to the technical practice cases carried out in the laboratory including: Setting up dentures; Occlusal splints; Diagnostic/occlusal waxing; Impressions, casts, facebows and mounting for analysis of cases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Practical
  • Item 3: 20% Essay
Level: 7
Introduction to ImplantologyDentistryDIN7005Full year7No

Introduction to Implantology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Science (MSc) in Dental Technology which is designed to ensure students are taught about the use of osseointegrated implants to stabilise or support fixed or removable prostheses.
Subjects covered are: History & Development of Implantology, Osseointegration Surface Topography; Patient Assessment and Restorative Driven Planning for Implant Restorations; Imaging & Implantology; Diagnostic Wax ups, Radiographic stent, surgical stents; Implants in Anterior Maxilla, Guided Bone Regeneration, Socket Preservation; Soft Tissue Augmentation; Surgical and restorative Procedures; Maintenance of Implants and Implant Restorations; Fixed/removeable implant construction.

Practicals:
Radiographic Tracing
Pouring working casts.
Making Provisional Restorations.
Customising Impression copings.
Implants restorations may be constructed as part of the technical practice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Essay
Level: 7
AestheticsDentistryDIN7006Full year7No

Aesthetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Science (MSc) in Dental Technology which is designed to ensure students are taught the basic principles of the factors that affect aesthetics in Restorative Dentistry including;

Light, colour and shade selection, Basic restoration aesthetics (understanding and designing tooth shape and form and use of colour effects), Ethical aesthetics, Denture aesthetics, Maxillo facial aesthetics, Implant aesthetics.

Practicals;
Shade selection and designing a colour map.
Diagnostic waxing, Denture gingival staining, contouring/stippling techniques. Porcelain building techniques to achieve aesthetics.

Techniques may be taught one to one during the technical practice sessions to enable the student to complete their advanced case presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (1 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 2: 10% Essay
Level: 7
Advanced Technical PracticeDentistryDIN7007Full year7No

Advanced Technical Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Cattell

Description: This module involves advanced laboratory Technical practice in order to produce a complex dental prosthesis for case submission. Students will tackle a multitude of Technical exercises in order to achieve this and will receive one to one teaching where necessary.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Case submission
  • Item 2: 10% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 10% Case Presentation
Level: 7
Properties of Dental Materials IDentistryDIN7008Semester 17No

Properties of Dental Materials I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mangala Patel

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Sciences (MSc) in Dental Technology, Oral Biology and Dental Materials (the latter jointly accommodated by the Institute of Dentistry, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and The School of Engineering and Materials Science). It is designed to enable students to gain a greater and more in depth understanding of the basic sciences knowledge that underpins the clinical uses of dental materials. Topics covered include chemical, mechanical, surface properties and other physical property tests used for dental biomaterials, as well as basic ceramic science, basic polymer science and basic metallurgy. Water absorption and the biocompatibility of dental materials are also covered in detail.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Essay
Level: 7
Properties of Dental Materials/Processing Methods IIDentistryDIN7009Semester 27No

Properties of Dental Materials/Processing Methods II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mangala Patel

Description: This is a core module delivered in the Master of Sciences (MSc) in Dental Technology and Dental Materials (the latter jointly accommodated by the Institute of Dentistry, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the School of Engineering and Materials Science). This module is designed to ensure students gain in depth knowledge of the composition and essential properties (eg physical, chemical and biological) of clinical dental materials based on metals, ceramics/glasses, and polymers. Application of clinical dental materials and appropriate processing techniques are also thoroughly examined.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Essay
Level: 7
Fundamentals of Research MethodsDentistryDIN7011Full year7No

Fundamentals of Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Anderson

Description: This module is divided into two components: research process (including methods and ethics) and basic statistics. Students will learn about the research stages including conducting literature searches, setting research questions, selecting study designs and research methods, drafting research protocols and seeking ethical approval delivered in the form of lectures and practical seminars. The basic statistics component will introduce students to medical statistics and common statistical tests delivered in lectures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Research/Audit Project Protocol
  • Item 2: 25% Statistical Practical Test
Level: 7
Molecular Organisation of the Eukaryotic CellDentistryDIN7021Semester 17No

Molecular Organisation of the Eukaryotic Cell

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Muy-Teck Teh

Description: Eukaryotic cell structure. Cytoskeleton. Extracellular Matrix. DNA, RNA to Protein. Transcription & Translation. Cell Receptors and Cell Signalling. Cell cycle.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Techniques in Cell and Molecular BiologyDentistryDIN7022Full year7No

Techniques in Cell and Molecular Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Angray Kang

Description: Antibody Discovery and Applications. Bioinformatics. Cell Culture. Fixation and Processing. Immunocytochemistry. Immunofluorescence. Staining. Molecular Biology. Proteomics. Stereology

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Biology of Oral TissuesDentistryDIN7023Full year7No

Biology of Oral Tissues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saroash Shahid

Description: Anti-microbial peptides. Structure and function of oral mucosa. Bone pathologies. Cell biology of bone. Cytoskeleton. Desmosomes and cell attachment. Introduction to stem cells. Oral defence mechanisms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Coursework attendance
  • Item 2: 40% Report (3000 words)
  • Item 3: 40% Presentation (Poster)
Level: 7
Cellular PathologyDentistryDIN7024Full year7No

Cellular Pathology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ines Sequeira

Description: Introduction to pathology. Cell adhesion and migration. Genetics of oral cancer. Mechanisms of cell death. Mendelian inheritance. Hallmarks of cancer. Salivary gland structure, normal and inflamed mucosa.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Inflammation and Immunology (General and Oral)DentistryDIN7025Semester 27No

Inflammation and Immunology (General and Oral)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fabian Flores-Borja

Description: Introduction to immunology. Immune functions. Cells of the immune system. Mucosal immunology

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Laboratory TechniquesDentistryDIN7027Semester 27No

Laboratory Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hong Wan

Description: ELISA. mRNA extraction reverse transcription.PCR. Immunofluorescence staining. SDS PAGE. Western blot.
Cell culture. Introduction to microscopy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Assessed Coursework
  • Item 2: 80% Assessed Coursework (Portfolio)
  • Item 3: 10% Examination (H&S MCQ) (1 hours)
Level: 7
Oral Pathology and the Oral MicrobiomeDentistryDIN7028Full year7No

Oral Pathology and the Oral Microbiome

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Abish Stephen

Description: Carcinogenesis. Acquisition and metabolism of oral flora. Oral commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Dental plaque. Disease of the salivary gland. Microbiology and periodontal disease. The mouth as a microbial habitat. Oral defence mechanisms. Oral infections. Overview of infectious agents. Pathology of pre cancer. Overview of virulence.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Courseork (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Applied Principles of Clinical DentistryDentistryDIN7090Full year7No

Applied Principles of Clinical Dentistry

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This is an academic and practical module which introduces clinical concepts and approaches.

Teaching will be delivered in the form of lectures/seminars, journal clubs and problem-based and critical reasoning sessions. Students will also be expected to engage in independent study and reflection.

Topics covered will include: Patient examination and diagnosis; Treatment planning and patient management; Health promotion and disease prevention; Medical and dental emergencies; Anesthesia, sedation, pain & anxiety control; Periodontal therapy and management of soft tissues; Hard and soft tissue surgery; Non-surgical management of the hard and soft tissues of the head and neck; Management of the developing dentition; and Restoration and replacement of teeth.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Written Paper (EMQ) (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 50% Written Paper (SBA) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Clinical Dental SkillsDentistryDIN7091Full year7No

Clinical Dental Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Cecilia Gonzales-Marin

Description: This is an academic and practical module which provides students with hands-on experience which will include practice in taking radiographs using phantom heads. Teaching will be delivered in the clinical skills laboratory but there will also be seminars and small group discussions and problem based critical reasoning sessions. Students will have the opportunity to observe current UK dental practice via clinics in Oral Medicine, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontology, Paediatrics, Orthodontics, Sedation and General Anaesthesia.

Topics covered will include: Infection control; Patient examination; Diagnostic tools and techniques and their interpretation; anesthesiology and sedation techniques, basic life support (BLS); Accurate measurement of periodontal indices according to current deadlines

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% OSCE (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Clinical Case Report
  • Item 3: 20% Structured Critical Reasoning (1 hours)
Level: 7
Professionalism Management and LeadershipDentistryDIN7092Semester 37No

Professionalism Management and Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eleni Hagi-Pavli

Description: This module is designed to ensure that students develop their management and leadership skills in the context of the ethical and legal framework within which a UK dental professional should practice. It will be conducted in the form of lectures and interactive sessions. Topics covered will include: Ethics, Law, Communication Skills and UK regulatory requirements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Professional Portfolio & Reflective Essay
Level: 7
Dental Manikin Practical SkillsDentistryDIN7093Full year7No

Dental Manikin Practical Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ali Nankali

Description: This is an academic and core module which will provide students with hands on experience of undertaking dental procedures using typodont teeth set in a manikin head. This is a practically biased module that will cover intracoronal direct filling plastic restorations, extracoronal restorations, endodontics and removable prostheses. Teaching will be delivered using the dental phantom head facilities but there will also be seminars and small group discussions. Students will be expected to engage in independent study and reflection.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Clinical Skills using Dental Manikin (Typodont) (Intracoronal)
  • Item 2: 30% Clinical Skills using Dental Manikin (Typodont) (Extracoronal)
  • Item 3: 10% Clinical Skills using Dental Manikin (Typodont) (Endodontics)
  • Item 4: 40% Written Paper (Extended Matching Questions (EMQ) & Single Best Answer (SBA) (2 hours)
Level: 7
Dental Science Clinical Audit ProjectDentistryDIN7094Full year7No

Dental Science Clinical Audit Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Judith Rogers

Description: This is an academic module which will involve researching and analysing the literature pertinent and relevant to dental clinical sciences. Students will be expected to use library and on-line sources and will be supported and supervised by a dedicated teacher.
Students will undertake and complete a clinical audit and present their findings and conclusions. Students will be familiarized with the principles of clinical governance and training will be provided in designing and implementing an audit project. Students will have dedicated support and supervision and access to clinical resources.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Dissertation (15000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Oral Presentation
Level: 7
Dental Hard Tissues and their MicroenvironmentDentistryDIN7151Semester 27No

Dental Hard Tissues and their Microenvironment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Anderson

Description: Mechanisms and underlying principles and of the diseases of dental hard tissue loss, including calcium phosphate chemistry, chemical interaction with acids, and protective role of salivary proteins

How an understanding of these processes can contribute to the treatment, restoration, and ultimately prevention of these diseases.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Laboratory Work
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Minimally Invasive DentistryDentistryDIN7152Semester 17No

Minimally Invasive Dentistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The underlying biochemical and physicochemical mechanisms of clinical dental prevention methods

How protective mechanisms against hard dental tissues diseases exist in the oral environment and how these can be used to prevent the disease.

The progress of hard dental tissue diseases and learn about existing and novel detection methods.

How novel biomaterials are developed mimicking oral environment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Extended Essay
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Biomineralisation and BiomimeticsDentistryDIN7154Semester 27No

Biomineralisation and Biomimetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Anderson

Description: Mechanisms and underlying principles of biomineralisation with particular emphasis on hard tissues relevant to the oral environment such as enamel, dentine and bone formation.

Also, how an understanding of these processes can lead to the development of synthetic biomaterials and biomimetic products with applications in Oral Biology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Extended Essay
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Introduction to Oral BiologyDentistryDIN7156Semester 17No

Introduction to Oral Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alan Boyde

Description: This module is an academic module focussing primarily on the introduction to the basic and clinical sciences of the dental hard and soft tissues and the biochemical processes processes relevant of Oral Biology. It will be conducted in the form of 12 seminars of 3 hour duration, and 6 research seminars. The major topics include:
Tooth development and mechanisms driving formation
Structure of enamel
Structure of dentine
Structure of bone
Structure of the periodontal ligament
Dental anomalies

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Minimally Invasive Approaches in Clinical Dentistry Part 2DentistryDIN7158Full year7No

Minimally Invasive Approaches in Clinical Dentistry Part 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The field of minimally invasive dentistry is wide, including the detection of diseases as early as possible, the identification of risk factors (risk assessment) and the implementation of preventive strategies and health education for the patient.

This module will provide practical points for the Clinical Dentistry in relation to Minimally Invasive approaches.

3 hour clinical and Clinical Skills laboratory exposure for 12 weeks = 36 hours
2 hour lecture/seminar every week over 11 weeks = 22 hours
2 hour revision seminar during the last week = 2 hours

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Case work (20 min)
Level: 7
OIder Population and Oral Health with Minimally Invasive StrategiesDentistryDIN7159Full year7No

OIder Population and Oral Health with Minimally Invasive Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The population of older people in the developed world is increasing significantly and nowadays older population retain more of their teeth. This module will deal with the special knowledge, attitudes and clinical with technical skills in the provision of oral health care for older people.

The module is 15 credits. There will be closely supervised clinical sessions throughout the programme in parallel to the seminars.
3 hour clinical exposure for 9 weeks = 27 hours
2 hour lecture/seminar every week over 9 weeks = 18 hours
1 hour revision seminar during the last week = 1 hour

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Case work (15 min)
Level: 7
Oral Health Management for Children by Implementing MI TechniquesDentistryDIN7161Full year7No

Oral Health Management for Children by Implementing MI Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aylin Baysan

Description: The population of younger people in the developed world is increasing significantly. Paediatric Dentistry with MI approach is therefore becoming an essential part of the clinical dentistry which deals with the special knowledge, attitudes and clinical with technical skills in the provision of oral health care for children.

The module is designed to develop understanding and knowledge through a structured and developmental series of topics in Paediatric Dentistry in relation to Minimally Invasive approaches.

3 hour clinical and Clinical Skills laboratory exposure for 9 weeks = 27 hours
2 hour lecture/seminar every week over 9 weeks = 18 hours
1 hour revision seminar during the last week = 1 hour

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay (3000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Examination (2 hours 30 mins)
  • Item 3: 30% Case work (15 min)
Level: 7
Applied Science of EndodontologyDentistryDIN7170Full year7No

Applied Science of Endodontology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This module is an academic module focussing primarily on the basic science of endodontology.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (Three out of four questions) (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Advanced Applied Science of EndodontologyDentistryDIN7171Full year7No

Advanced Applied Science of Endodontology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This module is an academic module focussing primarily on the clinical basis of endodontics and its interface with other aspects of dentistry.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Examination (Three out of four questions) (2 hours 30 mins)
Level: 7
Laboratory Endodontic SkillsDentistryDIN7172Full year7No

Laboratory Endodontic Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This module is a practical module essential for the development of the skills required for competency in endodontic techniques. Students will need to demonstrate satisfactory completion of this module as a pre-requisite for the clinical module which follows this module.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Practical Test (de novo)
  • Item 2: 50% Practical Test (retreatment)
Level: 7
Clinical Skills in EndodonticsDentistryDIN7173Full year7No

Clinical Skills in Endodontics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: This core module comprises supervised clinical patient treatment sessions. At the end of this module, students are required to submit two clinical case reports of patients they have treated.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Patient Case Report (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 20% Logbook of all patient Cases
  • Item 3: 20% Patient Case Report viva
  • Item 4: 30% Unseen Case (simulated)
Level: 7
Literature Review in Relation to Endodontic PracticeDentistryDIN7174Full year7No

Literature Review in Relation to Endodontic Practice

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: In this module, the students will build on skills in conducting a search and appraisal of the literature on an agreed endodontic topic. At the end of this module, students will be required to produce a literature review report.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Assessment of Presentations of two Papers at Journal Club Meetings
  • Item 2: 10% Project Presentation and content summary - an interim Assessment
  • Item 3: 60% Written Report
  • Item 4: 10% Viva
Level: 7
Audit Project in Endodontic PracticeDentistryDIN7175Full year7No

Audit Project in Endodontic Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bun Chong

Description: In this module, students will build on the principles and protocols for audit and/or research. The students will select an agreed endodontic topic, design a strategy, collect relevant data and analyse the findings. At the end of this module, students will be required to produce a report of their project.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation of the Project and summary of the project as an interim Assessment
  • Item 2: 60% Written Report
  • Item 3: 20% Viva on audit Project
Level: 7
Initial Presentation and AssessmentDentistryDIN7250Semester 17No

Initial Presentation and Assessment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: This module provides the basic understanding behind the whole course in terms of the types of injury caused by the various mechanisms of trauma commonly seen in clinical practice. Background pathophysiology required to understand healing processes and surgical manipulation with respect to both bone and soft tissue elements underpin all of the following modules. Emergency assessment relevant to both the primary and secondary trauma survey are discussed together with treatment delivered in this phase of treatment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Management of the Fractured MandibleDentistryDIN7251Semester 17No

Management of the Fractured Mandible

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "The module discusses fractures of the mandible and condyle using a variety of techniques which underpin the totality of facial trauma management. Building on presented anatomical principles, the module will build a strategy which will enable the student to diagnose and treatment plan a wide variety of simple and complex injury patterns. Different types of bone fixation are discussed together with principles of intermaxillary fixation. Fractures of the mandibular condyle and their management are discussed with an evidence based rationale for decision making. Edentulous (fragility) mandibular fractures are discussed in terms of management options and prognostic indicators."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Management of Fractures of the Lateral MidfaceDentistryDIN7252Semester 27No

Management of Fractures of the Lateral Midface

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module will focus on injuries of the lateral face to include the orbit, zygomatic bone, and soft tissues of the region. A summary of the relevant anatomy and physiology of the region will build to diagnostic principles, urgent management, treatment planning followed by surgical management. Principles of surgical access, methods of production and fixation, and both autogenous and alloplastic reconstruction of this anatomical area. More advanced techniques including surgical navigation are discussed, together with the use of CAD CAM imaging and prosthesis fabrication."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Management of Fractures of the Central Middle ThirdDentistryDIN7253Semester 27No

Management of Fractures of the Central Middle Third

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: The module discusses the management of complex middle third of the face injuries with special reference to the naso orbital region. Surgical management of fractures of the midface is discussed both in terms of anatomical reconstruction and sequencing of repair of the region and adjacent anatomical subunits within the middle third - upper and lower thirds of the craniofacial skeleton. The importance of the integrity of the medial canthal region is discussed and management of ligament reconstruction is discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Management of Craniofacial FracturesDentistryDIN7254Semester 17No

Management of Craniofacial Fractures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module discusses the interface between the neurosurgical and craniofacial management of upper third facial injuries. The management of the frontal sinus and frontal bone fractures with particular emphasis on timing of surgical intervention and anterior skull base reconstruction. Diagnostic principles are discussed with reference to both hard and soft tissue treatment planning. The anatomy of the upper third of the facial skeleton and skull base are discussed, as well as neurosurgical implications of these injuries. Surgical approaches to the region are classified and discussed and surgeon choice based on a risk benefit analysis. Choice of plating strategies are discussed and an evidence based algorithm based on complexity is presented."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Management of Acute Facial Soft Tissue InjuriesDentistryDIN7255Semester 17No

Management of Acute Facial Soft Tissue Injuries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module deals with all aspects of acute facial soft tissue management from intial wound care and correct surgical technique for primary wound closure through to complex soft injuries involving tissue loss and motor nerve loss. The module will also discuss the soft tissue management of major tissue loss and gross contamination in acute gunshot and major avulsive injury. Applied neck anatomy is discussed with reference to penetrating neck trauma, and the management of major neck neurovascular injuries is discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Hard Tissue)DentistryDIN7256Semester 27No

Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Hard Tissue)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module will address the differences between the management of acute hard tissue injuries and those presenting late - either after no treatment or failed management. This is an extremely challenging area and requires a methodical and systematic approach to diagnose and treatment plan. Three dimensional diagnosis of secondary defects uses the latest digital technology and this is discussed with reference to malunions of the orbit, zygoma, maxilla and mandible."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Soft Tissue)DentistryDIN7257Semester 27No

Principles of Secondary Reconstruction (Soft Tissue)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "This module will address the differences between the management of acute hard tissue injuries and those presenting late - either after no treatment or failed management. This is an extremely challenging area and requires a methodical and systematic approach to diagnose and treatment plan. Soft tissue scar management together with manipulation of the superfical musculoaponeurotic system, deep and superficial tissue suspension is discussed. The role fat grafting techiques together with rhinoplasty is discussed."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Written Report
  • Item 2: 30% Oral Examination
Level: 7
DissertationDentistryDIN7258Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Simon Holmes

Description: "The students are required to build upon the knowledge acquired in the masters program to produce a dissertation. The coursework is presented in anatomical blocks which then build to an interrelated understanding which will be augmented by an independent project. The project will link clinical practice within the student's practice and the coursework. The project will take the form of a clinical audit of outcome or process which will include case selection , database design, data collection, analysis and publication of results. The student will then be mentored to develop the work both for publication in the literature and presentation to a scientific meeting. The dissertation will enable the student to reflect on their own clinical practice, and signpost further opportunities for further independent research."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Dissertation
  • Item 2: 15% Oral Examination
  • Item 3: 10% Project Planning
Level: 7
Dental Public Health and PolicyDentistryDIN7701Semester 17No

Dental Public Health and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: The Dental Public Health and Policy module is the first module in the distance-learning (online) Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and MSc course. This module covers the fundamental principles of Public Health, Dental Public Health and policy making. Teaching is delivered online over nine weeks using a range of interactive e-learning tools, videos, key readings and tasks for students to complete on a weekly basis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Policy analysis structured report
  • Item 2: 25% PowerPoint Presentation
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Assessing Oral Health and Diseases in PopulationsDentistryDIN7702Semester 27No

Assessing Oral Health and Diseases in Populations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristina Wanyonyi

Description: The Assessing Oral Health and Diseases in Populations module covers oral epidemiology, measures of oral diseases and the study designs used to assess the prevalence and causes of oral diseases in populations. It will introduce students to the epidemiology of common oral diseases. Students will also learn how to interpret data from epidemiological studies. The teaching delivered online over nine weeks will use a range of interactive e-learning tools, videos, key readings and weekly tasks for students to complete.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% MCQ Examination
  • Item 2: 70% Survey protocol (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Evidence Based DentistryDentistryDIN7703Semester 27No

Evidence Based Dentistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Easter Joury

Description: This module will equip students with (i) applied knowledge of evidence-based dentistry; (ii) the skills to enable them to critically appraise research and; (iii) strategies that allow them to apply and implement evidence in practice. The nine-week online teaching will use videos, existing publicly available resources, key readings and interactive task to build critical appraisal skills. Library skills teaching developed in collaboration with the School of Medicine and Dentistry librarian will equip students will database searching skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Search strategy (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 45% Oral presentation (30 min)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Prevention and Oral Health PromotionDentistryDIN7704Semester 37No

Prevention and Oral Health Promotion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Donatella D'Antoni

Description: The Prevention and Oral Health Promotion module is the fourth module in the distance-learning (online) Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and MSc course. This applied and consolidated module covers oral health promotion, oral health promotion strategies, how to use behaviour change theories and models in oral health promotion, and how to use planning models to design, implement and evaluate oral health promotion activities. The module will enable students to design oral health promotion activities, and learn how to evaluate them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Oral Health Promotion Video (20 min)
  • Item 2: 45% Oral health promotion planning report (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Research MethodsDentistryDIN7705Semester 17No

Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: This compulsory module will be delivered in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning postgraduate Diploma and MSc courses. It will start by giving students the theoretical basis for research. They will then journey through the stages of planning a research project including setting research questions, designing a study and acquiring ethical approval. The nine weeks of teaching will culminate in students submitting a research protocol and defending this in an oral presentation as a summative assessment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Research Protocol (2500 words)
  • Item 2: 35% Oral presentation (15 min)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Primary Dental CareDentistryDIN7706Semester 27No

Primary Dental Care

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Huda Yusuf

Description: This module will be delivered in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning postgraduate Diploma and MSc courses. Students will explore working relationships, skill-mix and practice management approaches in primary dental care. They will learn how to identify and design a quality improvement project that they can use in their own practice environment. Students will reflect on their role as professionals in the wider healthcare workforce and create a oral presentation aimed at other health professional audience.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Protocol for a Quality Improvement project
  • Item 2: 25% Oral presentation (15 min)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Leadership and Planning in Health and Public ServicesDentistryDIN7707Semester 37No

Leadership and Planning in Health and Public Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vanessa Muirhead

Description: This module will be delivered in Year 2 of the Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership distance-learning postgraduate Diploma and MSc courses. The Institute of Dentistry and the School of Business and Management will deliver this collaborative module. It will cover dental service planning including planning models, needs assessments, priority setting and action planning. Students will explore leadership theories and critically reflect on leadership challenges in case studies. They will evaluate their own leadership styles and skills by completing a summative personal leadership e-Portfolio.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Planning report (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 55% Leadership E-Portfolio (2000 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Oral Health in the Global ContextDentistryDIN7710Semester 37No

Oral Health in the Global Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kristina Wanyonyi

Description: The Oral Health in the Global Context is a Year 2 elective module available to MSc students taking the distance learning Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership course. It will cover global oral health surveillance systems, development theories and the concept of universal health coverage. Students will also explore the role of advocacy, networking and communication. Students will then demonstrate their applied knowledge by preparing a position statement and giving an online 30 minute conference-style oral presentation as a summative assessment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% Online oral presentation (30 min)
  • Item 2: 60% Position statement (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 5% Student interaction and online engagement
Level: 7
Research Project for Dental Public Health, Policy and LeadershipDentistryDIN7711Full year7No

Research Project for Dental Public Health, Policy and Leadership

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Kristina Wanyonyi

Description: The research project module will allow students to develop both an understanding of the research processes and the skills required to undertake a supervised project. It has two components worth 60 credits. The written report is a synopsis of a research project worth 90% of the module assessment (maximum 20,000 words). Students will have the option of carrying out a systematic or scoping review, a primary research study with fieldwork carried out in their home country or submit a full research grant proposal or a publishable academic public health report. Students will answer questions about their research project in a 20-minute oral presentation (viva) via Skype worth 10% of the module mark.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 90% Dissertation (20,000 words)
  • Item 2: 10% Oral Examination (viva)
Level: 7
London/Culture/PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA114Semester 14Closed

London/Culture/Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Mckinnie

Description: London/Culture/Performance has four key aims: 1. To equip you with skills for analysing performance (as distinct from written text) (keyword: performance); 2. To facilitate your critical and productive engagement with London and the vast cultural resources, history and global connections it has to offer (keyword: London); 3. To introduce you to some current issues in cultural politics and critical ways of approaching them (keyword: culture); 4. To develop your critical skills in reading, research, writing, referencing, fieldwork and presentations. This module provides opportunities for you to explore the performance resources available in London and to develop your skills in using, understanding and responding critically to them.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1400 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 4
InterventionsEnglish and DramaDRA120Semester 24Yes

Interventions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: Interventions examines the intersections between performance and activism. You will be introduced to work by a range of performance practitioners and theorists across live art, applied theatre and site-specific performance. Throughout the module, you will explore how performance practices can provoke, argue, and advocate for social change. The module draws on international case studies, and you will undertake fieldwork rooted in the economic, historical and political contexts around our campus. Emphasis is also placed on developing your skills in communicating to audiences in, and beyond, the university.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Group Presentation (12-15 min)
  • Item 2: 60% Written Exercise (1800 words)
Level: 4
Beyond ActingEnglish and DramaDRA121Semester 24No

Beyond Acting

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin O'Brien

Description: Acting is perhaps the dominant mode of performance that many audiences routinely expect in the theatre, particularly in an Anglo-American context. However, acting is only one among various ways of performing. Beyond Acting explores what you can carry out on stage by thinking critically about what acting involves, or how it might be questioned, refused, or exceeded. You will study how performance makers since the 1960s have performed onstage (and elsewhere) without the conventions of pretence, impersonation, or character. You will explore new ways of performing plays, scores and other texts, including through physical theatre, live art, experimental theatre, and other forms.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Group Performance Project (10-12 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Essay 2 (1000 words)
Level: 4
Spectatorship: Time, Place, PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA122Semester 24Yes

Spectatorship: Time, Place, Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Margaret Inchley

Description: This module investigates histories of spectatorship across a range of cultural and historical contexts. We¿ll consider how we can analyse theatre going, audiences and spectatorship in other times and places, and use this historical investigation to reflect on the various forms that spectatorship has taken over time. We¿ll explore these issues through field trips, examination of archival and other primary sources, and by engaging with critical debates.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Participation
  • Item 2: 40% Written exercise (1400 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 4
Power PlaysEnglish and DramaDRA123Semester 14No

Power Plays

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Swati Arora

Description: Power Plays explores how power dynamics, especially in relation to race, gender, disability and cultural identity, have been examined through play texts, performance and critical debates. We will explore these issues through practical workshops, developing your skills in play text analysis, performance and technical theatre skills. The module also aims to develop your critical vocabulary for analysing power and aspects of identity, and skills in reading, research and writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay (1400 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Group Performance Project (8-10 mins)
Level: 4
Making Theatre and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA124Semester 14No

Making Theatre and Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Ansuman Biswas

Description: In Making Theatre and Performance you¿ll work in a company, led by a tutor, to explore the performance-making strategies of a select practitioner, company and/or practice. We will investigate these strategies through research that is both text-based (reading, viewing, etc.) and practice based. You will develop select key practical skills to work in the mode of the practitioner, company and/or practice studied, adopting and critically adapting the theatre and performance-making strategies studied.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 60% Group Performance Project
  • Item 3: 20% Essay
Level: 4
Performing ShakespeareEnglish and DramaDRA205Semester 25Closed

Performing Shakespeare

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Julia Bardsley

Description: How to perform Shakespeare has been one of the most enduring and ideologically fraught struggles in modern British theatre production. This module builds on the historiographical and cultural studies work of year one, providing a practical laboratory in which you will learn and explore modes of performance that will illuminate the theatrical work in performance while preserving its historical strangeness. Drawing variously on our contemporary understanding of the conditions of English Renaissance production and on performance techniques associated with experimental theatre artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, you will work on text from Shakespeare plays, making use of, for example, rhetorical gesture, improvisation, flirting and showing off, talking to the audience, audio feeds, part-scripts, textual muddles, obscenity and cross-dressing. The emphasis will be on finding viable and intellectually rigorous modes of performance that challenge the dominant 'naturalistic' modes that operate in most British theatre production.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Portfolio (2400 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Performance Project (15-20 mins)
Level: 5
Making Contemporary TheatreEnglish and DramaDRA220Semester 15Yes

Making Contemporary Theatre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alistair Campbell

Description: This module examines processes, techniques and modes of expression used by contemporary theatre-makers to create a variety of forms. We examine how the performance-making processes of significant practitioners function analytically, creatively, and practically. We consider how practitioners strategically deploy methodologies, conventions and techniques to produce particular outcomes. We consider how process is informed by content, genre, mode of representation, theatrical convention, and ideological and cultural context. We learn methods of workshopping and performing that can create stimulating and engaging theatre. Theatre makers examined change from year to year; please contact the convenor for further details.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Group Performance Project (15-20 min)
  • Item 2: 40% Essay (2400 words)
Level: 5
NaturalismEnglish and DramaDRA223Semester 15Yes

Naturalism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aoife Monks

Description: Naturalism seems to be the theatre that all fashionable modern theatre people love to hate. This module aims to reconnect with the original dynamic energy of naturalist theatre, and to trace a century-long fascination with the art of making it look and feel real. We will look at new discoveries and explorations of nineteenth century science, and at radical moves in painting and literature, as a way of framing our exploration of naturalist drama itself. We will find out why it was so offensive to see a version of your own living room on stage and how theatre started to bring all the sordid realities of everyday life on stage. Seminars will involve extensive study of naturalist plays, from Ibsen and Strindberg, via Franz Xavier Kroetz to Richard Maxwell, film screenings and critical and historical texts that place the phenomenon of naturalism in historical and aesthetic context.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Presentation (5-7 min)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Group Practical ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA242Semester 25No

Group Practical Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Lois Weaver

Description: Group Practical Project exposes you to key academic and practical skills relevant to the study and making of theatre and performance. The module asks you to reflect and act critically and creatively on the kinds of performance outcomes you want to work on. It also asks you, through group practice, to work collaboratively towards developing your specialist expertise. Through practical workshops, writing, documentation and a process of research, group rehearsal and performance, you will consider what theatre and performance studies mean to you as individuals and as a group, and the kinds of creative, critical and practical work that your degree might lead to.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 35% e-Portfolio (2100 words equivalent)
  • Item 2: 65% Group Performance Project (15-20 min)
Level: 5
Action DesignEnglish and DramaDRA245Semester 15Yes

Action Design

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Julian Deering

Description: This module provides a practical and theoretical introduction to technical production for performance. Looking closely at specific examples though the 20th century to the present day, you will develop a theoretical understanding of the design systems of (among others) Edward Gordon Craig, Josef Svoboda, Jaroslav Malina, Robert Lepage, Robert Wilson, Maria Franková and Es Devlin, for example, and develop an appreciation and active practical response to the term¿ scenography¿ and various design movements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Exercise [Design Analysis] (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Group Presentation (25-35 min)
  • Item 3: 30% Essay (1800 words)
Level: 5
London Performance NowEnglish and DramaDRA261Semester 15Yes

London Performance Now

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: London is one of Europe's most exciting theatrical cities with a range of productions on offer at any given time. This module will examine a range of live productions to explore strategies for reading live performance that recognize the importance of where performances take place. As a group we will visit the National Theatre, the Barbican, and the Royal Court as well as 'fringe' or alternative venues in examining how we read the performance event. You will be expected to engage with critical reviews of performances, examine the role of press and marketing and explore the targeting of specific productions to particular audience groups

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Exercise (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
London Performance NowEnglish and DramaDRA261Semester 25Closed

London Performance Now

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: London is one of Europe's most exciting theatrical cities with a range of productions on offer at any given time. This module will examine a range of live productions to explore strategies for reading live performance that recognize the importance of where performances take place. As a group we will visit the National Theatre, the Barbican, and the Royal Court as well as 'fringe' or alternative venues in examining how we read the performance event. You will be expected to engage with critical reviews of performances, examine the role of press and marketing and explore the targeting of specific productions to particular audience groups

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Exercise (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Race and Racism in PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA263Semester 25Yes

Race and Racism in Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: This module explores how race is performed in theatre, art, and popular culture. Of particular interest are performances that trouble how we think or talk about race, especially as it intersects with other identity categories like gender, class, sexuality and disability. Why are race and structural racism such difficult topics to discuss, especially in the context of performance? What does it mean to label a performance racist, and how can we as artists develop anti-racist performance practices? The topics this seminar covers could include histories of blackface minstrelsy, debates over "colour-blind" casting, the politics of cultural appropriation in pop culture for example.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay 2 (2500 words)
Level: 5
Performance Art in the 1970sEnglish and DramaDRA266Semester 25Yes

Performance Art in the 1970s

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dominic Johnson

Description: This module introduces the study of performance art in the 1970s -- arguably the first decade of its emergence as a major cultural phenomenon. You will learn about a range of internationally significant artists and groups active in the US, Europe, and elsewhere. You will explore key themes including presence, representation, disappearance, documentation and archives, as well as emotion, difficulty, and risk, towards a fuller understanding of the politics and aesthetics of performance art.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Written Exercise (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Voice, Gender, PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA268Semester 15Closed

Voice, Gender, Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Molly Mcphee

Description: How do people use their voices, and what does this reveal or conceal about their gendered identities? How do gendered voices intersect with other aspects of identity, such as region, class, nation and race? Drawing on theoretical material from a range of disciplinary fields, including cultural philosophy, sociolinguistics, film studies, and psychology, this module will consider the voicing of gender in a variety of different physical spaces and discursive spheres - from the playground to Parliament - and through a range of media, including theatre, internet, TV, film and music.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Group Podcast (14-16 min)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (1750 words)
Level: 5
Culture, Power and PerformanceEnglish and DramaDRA273Semester 15No

Culture, Power and Performance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: This module examines the power relations of theatre and performance, focusing on how artists engage with the politics of representation and identity formation. The module builds on the introduction to the semiotics and histories of theatre from your first year, while developing your skills in performance analysis and research. Discussions and readings will draw from key academic and political debates, which could include queer theory, post-colonial studies, critical race theory, feminism, disability studies, Marxism, etc. Through study of a wide range of play texts and performance traditions, you will examine how formal and aesthetic innovations in theatre relate to the social and economic conditions from which they emerge.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Essay 1 (1500 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Essay 2 (2000 words)
Level: 5
Theatre, Experiment and RevolutionEnglish and DramaDRA274Semester 15Yes

Theatre, Experiment and Revolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

Description: This module introduces students to a range of theatre and performance practices that offer radical challenges to the established theatre of European bourgeois modernity.
These theatre practices involve experiments with theatre as an art form, as well as attempts to involve theatre in revolutionary political projects.
This historical survey of experimental and revolutionary theatre-making might, in any given year, range from Brecht¿s communist education, to avant-garde experimentation in twentieth-century Mexico; from socialist theatre in 1980s Scotland to voguing in New York, via butoh in post-war Japan and minimalist dance; from the formation of a national theatre in twentieth-century Dakar, to the post-migrant theatre of early twenty-first century Turkish Berlin.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Group Presentation (12-15 mins)
  • Item 2: 70% Essay (2500 words)
Level: 5
Feeling It: Emotion and Sensation in the TheatreEnglish and DramaDRA307Semester 16Closed

Feeling It: Emotion and Sensation in the Theatre

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Penelope Woods

Description: Who feels what in which theatre? From theories of catharsis in tragic theatre to the predicament of the spectator in postmodern performance, this module takes a critical, historical and theoretical look at how emotion and sensation have been experienced in the theatre and relate practices, which could include live art, video and film. We will work with records, documents and memories of performance, to consider what it might mean to feel real feelings and sense real sensations in relation to events and experiences that we may not think of as being real. Theoretical texts about performance and emotion will be examined in relation to historical accounts and contemporary experiences of performances. We will investigate what different cultures and traditions understand by emotion, and what different kinds of theatre and performance imagine they are doing with people's feelings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Participation
  • Item 2: 20% Presentation (5-7 mins)
  • Item 3: 70% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Shakespeare After ShakespeareEnglish and DramaDRA316Semester 26Closed

Shakespeare After Shakespeare

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

Description: This module examines how Shakespeare has been adapted and appropriated in a variety of performance contexts. We will address and debate issues such as cultural and textual authority, authorship, gender, sexuality, national identity, ethnicity, adaptation and appropriation. Possible topics, contexts and texts through which these issues will be addressed may include, but are not limited to: authorship; decolonisation, postcolonial and settler cultures; queering Shakespeare; feminist performance; heritage and tourism; festivals; translation; popular culture; education. We will engage critically with Shakespeare's play texts, performances 'after Shakespeare' and critical writing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% e-Portfolio (1000 words equivalent)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Madness and TheatricalityEnglish and DramaDRA323Semester 26No

Madness and Theatricality

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

Description: This module explores madness and mental illness in recent and historical performance. It asks questions about how a society's constructions of madness are reflected in and produced by performance, and about the versions of subjectivity or selfhood that emerge when we play mad. The module is taught through practice-based case studies of ancient Greek, English Renaissance and twentieth/twenty-first century European texts and performances. It examines the versions of madness and mental illness produced in historical performance, and the ways in which these have been reinterpreted and rewritten to reflect current constructions and concerns of and about madness. It explores recent constructions of madness and its 'treatment' on stage.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Group Performance Project (15-20 min)
  • Item 2: 40% Essay (2800 words)
Level: 6
Written Research ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA329Semester 26No

Written Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Catherine Silverstone

Description: This module guides you through the process of choosing a research topic, researching that topic, framing appropriate research questions, structuring an argument and writing a dissertation in the expanded field of Drama, Theatre and/or Performance Studies. You will develop your project through independent research supported by a programme of seminars/workshops and supervision with your supervisor and seminar leader, addressing areas of research methodology and presentation such as: research ethics; planning and executing research, including book/journal-based, electronic, archival and interview-based research; selecting research methodologies; approaches to critical writing; and giving a research presentation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Presentation (10-12 min)
  • Item 2: 90% Dissertation (8000 words)
Level: 6
Offstage LondonEnglish and DramaDRA333Semester 16Closed

Offstage London

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie

Description: This module explores the political and artistic aims and effects of non-theatrical performance in the twentieth century and contemporary urban environment. It explores how the city is sometimes conceived as a dystopian site of potentially enormous social oppression. And it examines everyday, artistic and activist performative responses to this potential subjection, responses which imagine the city as, instead, a utopian site of personal and social liberation. We contextualise and historicise our analysis through studying various theoretical analyses of urban experience (e.g. Baudelaire, Benjamin, Debord, Lefebvre) as well as a variety of artistic practices (e.g. everyday interventions, activism, public art). Throughout the module, we work to map the ideas and practices we encounter, many originally grounded in Paris, in our own experiences of London. The module concludes by imagining what performance might do next to contest the particular challenges of living in the city now and to explore and exploit its opportunities. Please note that in addition to the weekly 2-hour seminar there will be regular 3-hour field-trips and/or screenings.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Atlas (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 6
Performance and CelebrityEnglish and DramaDRA341Semester 26Yes

Performance and Celebrity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aoife Monks

Description: This module examines 'celebrity' and the 'performance of celebrity'. It positions an array of celebrities (actors, politicians, musicians, sports-people, for example) within their individual political, social, historical and cultural contexts allowing them to be read as texts through which to think through and around issues of commodification, globalisation, virtuosity, stardom, identity and consumerism, for example. The module refracts these issues through a variety of theoretical and ideological lenses, encouraging an analysis of how celebrity constructions of race, gender, nation, sexuality and power, for example, function in the public imagination. The module considers both historical and contemporary case studies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Presentation (5-7 min)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay (3000 words)
Level: 6
Cultures of SleepEnglish and DramaDRA342Semester 16Closed

Cultures of Sleep

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tiffany Watt-Smith

Description: This module takes as its starting point the idea sleep isn¿t a `dead time¿ or an obvious biological fact, but is rich with meanings that change from culture to culture. The module takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding these historical and contemporary cultures of sleeping. In particular it focuses on the intersection between medicine and performance in constructing our ideas about how and why we sleep. We will trace the history of slumber by focusing on the intimate and sometimes unexpected relationships between sleep medicine, literature and theatre. Alongside exploring primary and archival materials from sleeping¿s past, we will investigate themes and issues arising from the interdisciplinary study of the history of medicine (an approach sometimes referred to as `the medical humanities¿).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 25% Essay 1 (1000 words)
  • Item 2: 75% Essay 2 (3000 words)
Level: 6
Practice-based Research ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA344Semester 26No

Practice-based Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Julia Bardsley

Description: This module facilitates the development and production of a practice-based research project that is proposed individually, in pairs or a small group . You will formulate a project proposal outlining research questions, thematics, aesthetics, contexts, touchstones and methodologies that will be developed through independent research, peer support mechanisms and tutor mentoring. Through weekly workshops and student-led practice sessions you will be introduced to a range of performance-making approaches, research strategies, tools and techniques, and will be encouraged to devise your own research methodologies for generating performance materials and processes. Through the module you will explore, interrogate, test, develop and focus your research project, conducting on-going documentation of your research, working towards mid-module work-in-progress showings and culminating in a Festival of Performance in May.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Portfolio (2800 words equivalent)
  • Item 2: 60% Performance Project (15-25 minutes)
Level: 6
Theatre and the SupernaturalEnglish and DramaDRA349Semester 16Yes

Theatre and the Supernatural

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

Description: The dead live. In a range of different theatre and performance cultures, performers and spectators either embody or come face to face with the dead. In this module we will explore how this happens in different historical moments and in different cultures, including, for example, the ghosts, witches and magicians of early modern European drama, spirit possession in Haitian Vodou, spiritualist séances in Victorian England. Through the comparative study of these cultural forms we will consider how different conceptions of the natural and the supernatural have been shaped by theatre and performance practices.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Project Proposal (1000 words or equivalent)
  • Item 2: 70% Project (3000 words or equivalent)
Level: 6
Verbatim, Testimonial and TribunalEnglish and DramaDRA350Semester 16Yes

Verbatim, Testimonial and Tribunal

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Catriona Fallow

Description: This module explores the traditions and practices of verbatim, testimonial, documentary and tribunal forms of theatre. Raising complex issues such as what it means to 'have a voice' in theatre, notions of authenticity and realness, and of representation and rights, it explores the shaping and framing of material from various sources, including interviews, media, archives and documents.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Group Presentation (12-15 min)
  • Item 2: 60% Group Performance Project (15-20 min)
  • Item 3: 20% Written Exercise (1500 words)
Level: 6
Writing about the ArtsEnglish and DramaDRA351Semester 26Closed

Writing about the Arts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module is designed to familiarise students with a range of writing practices in the Arts. The focus will be on specific writing tasks that will serve to introduce students to different types of writing in the Arts. This will likely include, for example, theatre and film reviews, features, and coverage of an exhibition. It will cover key issues in Arts journalism that will heighten your awareness of who you are writing for and how to shape your writing to 'fit' the designated readership of a particular broadsheet/media outlet. Encounters with different writing practices will be accompanied by readings of relevant critical texts and manuals which will enable you to write creatively and productively about a range different artistic practices.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Written Exercise 1 (800 words)
  • Item 2: 30% Written Exercise 2 (1200 words)
  • Item 3: 50% Written Exercise 3 (2000 words)
Level: 6
Performance in the GalleryEnglish and DramaDRA355Semester 16Closed

Performance in the Gallery

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin O'Brien

Description: This module looks at performance in relation to visual art. It examines what it means to develop performance work within a gallery context and how the 'white cube' functions as different from but related to the 'black box' of the theatre. We will work practically to explore the possibilities of performance art as a form emerging from the histories of the visual arts, and to experiment with form and the potentials of the gallery as a place of performance. The module will address practices such as durational performance and endurance art, action art, performance photography, performance to camera, installation-performance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 30% Performance Project Proposal (2000 words)
  • Item 2: 70% Performance Project
Level: 6
DissertationEnglish and DramaDRA7000Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton

Description: "This independent research project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words. Working with the support of a supervisor, students pursue their own independent investigation of the theory and practice of performance. Research development is also encouraged by a dissertation colloquium in late May/early June, in which students present their research in progress and receive feedback from academic staff and other graduate students. Recent dissertation topics have included studies of illness and performance, performance and second language acquisition, the performance of rural spaces and identities, contemporary performance and relational aesthetics, circus performance in Victorian Britain, cultural value and performance and performance and social conflict."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (12000 - 15000 words)
Level: 7
Independent Practical ProjectEnglish and DramaDRA7002Semester 27No

Independent Practical Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Lois Weaver

Description: "This module requires students to devise an individual project that focuses on a chosen area of performance practice. The aim of the module is for each student to raise a series of research questions that are addressed as a result of and through their practical work. This could encompass playwriting, applied drama, directing, dramaturgy, acting, new technologies, site-specific performance and live art. Working under the supervision of the module convenor and a mentor, each student will craft a professional project that also provides an opportunity for critical reflection on the processes of performance practice. Whilst the work developed on the module will be undertaken within the confines of academia, and subsequently critically rigorous, the importance of the public economy in which performance takes place will not be overlooked. In order to give focus to both creative and theoretical investigation, the module will produce a series of in-progress presentations that will be open to the public, who will be invited to follow the development of the work as it progresses. This is intended not only to invite critical commentary from the public as well as the module tutors, but also to anchor the importance of public presentation as part of artistic creation. The final assessed presentation will be produced in the context of a public festival of new work during the exam term and each student will design and create a portfolio of documentation to accompany the presentation. Both assessments (presentation and portfolio) are designed to provide public platforms for the dissemination of rigorous practice-based research while maintaining an emphasis on high standards of professional performance making."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Continuous Assessment
  • Item 2: 50% Performance or Presentation
  • Item 3: 40% Portfolio of documentation
Level: 7
Performance LabEnglish and DramaDRA7004Semester 17No

Performance Lab

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin O'Brien

Description: This module is a studio-based research laboratory that focuses on and experiments with performance process. In tandem with these practical activities students formulate creative strategies for documenting and disseminating process. Through weekly workshops the group will be introduced to a range of performance-making approaches, tools and techniques, and will be encouraged to devise their own methodologies for creating performance languages. Each student raises a series of research thematics that are explored through practical group experiments, individual development of performative prototypes, critical analysis, evaluative writing and collaborative dialogue and feedback sessions. The module leads towards a Performance Lab Research Event where students present the practical and process-based outcomes of their research investigations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Practical Process Project
  • Item 2: 40% Artist Website (2000 words equivalent)
Level: 7
Theatre and Performance TheoryEnglish and DramaDRA7006Semester 27No

Theatre and Performance Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas Ridout

Description: "This module examines theoretical texts and ideas that have shaped our contemporary understanding of performance, theatre and culture. It offers a distinctive, performance-oriented route into looking at some work of wider theoretical, philosophical, and political importance. It aims to provide students with a diverse range of theoretical and historical starting points from which to consider the study of theatre and performance. It also offers students an historical frame of reference through which to situate the practice and study of theatre and performance in relation to other disciplines and social practices, and to submit the concept of performance and performance studies to critical and historical scrutiny."

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Essay (4000 words)
Level: 7
Performing Mental HealthEnglish and DramaDRA7010Semester 17No

Performing Mental Health

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

Description: "This module explores the performance of mental health and mental illness as they have been defined across history, and in the contemporary moment. In particular the module asks how the social construction of mental health is reflected in and produced by performance. While the module focuses on the types of subjectivity and selfhood that have emerged in the history of theatre and performance, students are also encouraged to explore ways other creative practices engage these topics. Special attention is given to representations of 'madness' and `mental illness' produced in historical performance, as well as to how these representations have since been reinterpreted and adapted to reflect current constructions and concerns. In addition we will consider a variety of contemporary and collaborative performance practices that interrogate attitudes relating to normative concepts of mental health, and even try to intervene into policy and care. Students will be introduced to broad debates on mental health from within the Humanities and informed by the approaches of disability studies. "

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation (8-10 minutes)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3500 words)
Level: 7
Research DesignEnglish and DramaDRA7103Semester 27No

Research Design

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: This module aims to help you build skills and methods in research design. Moreover, it helps to prepare you for your MA dissertation by providing guidance and skills in designing and completing research projects. Seminars will include discussions of assigned readings and research workshops. By the end of the semester, you will have prepared and submitted a final draft of your dissertation proposal if you're studying full time; if you're studying part time, you will have the option of submitting a final draft of your dissertation proposal or preparing a field statement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Proposal/Field Statement (750 words)
Level: 7
Theatre for Young People: Pedagogy in PracticeEnglish and DramaDRA7204Semester 27No

Theatre for Young People: Pedagogy in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Bridget Escolme

Description: This module offers a group placement within a young people's theatre company or other relevant arts organisation working with young people. The organisations offering the group placement will normally be working with young people in mental health contexts, or with young people who have experiences of social and mental health issues. It offers the opportunity to observe, learn and develop arts-based teaching methodologies with and for young people and to explore the social, mental and creative benefits of the arts for young people.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Workshop (60 mins)
  • Item 2: 50% Essay (2000 words)
Level: 7
Practice-Based DissertationEnglish and DramaDRA7711Full year7No

Practice-Based Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Julia Bardsley

Description: This independent research project offers the opportunity of a practice-based dissertation consisting of a sustained piece of practice-based research that is documented in a submittable format, and a critical analysis (or written reflection) of 4,000-6,000 words. The form and scope of the practice is to be agreed between you and the supervisor and the MA Live Art convener. The documentation may accompany a live performance; or may document or otherwise consist of practice taking another form, including but not limited to performances with incidental audiences, one-to-one performances, performance for video or camera, online interventions, organising, or curating. Research development is enabled and supported by participation in a Dissertation Colloquium and Festival in May/June, in which you will present your research in progress and receive feedback from academic staff and other postgraduate students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 40% Critical Analysis (4000-6000 words)
  • Item 2: 60% Documentation of Practice-Based Research
Level: 7
Live Art HistoriesEnglish and DramaDRA7712Semester 17No

Live Art Histories

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Dominic Johnson

Description: 'Live Art Histories' explores histories, social contexts, and genealogies of live art in the UK and internationally after 1960, in its emergence from visual art, as well as from intersections with other histories including those of theatre, dance, video, installation and activism. Key histories and case studies may include solo and autobiographical, endurance and durational, intimate and one-to-one, interventionist and collaborative performances, among other forms of live art practice. The module reflects upon the aesthetic, methodological, historiographical and other implications of encountering live art in its live manifestations and through documentation (such as scores, photographs, videos or oral accounts). In addition, the module will introduce you to key research methods and provide essential research training you will need on the rest of the programme. Teaching will include archival research at a venue such as the Live Art Development Agency, Tate Archives or Whitechapel Gallery Archive.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation (6-10 minutes)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3500 words)
Level: 7
Disciplines of Live ArtEnglish and DramaDRA7713Semester 27No

Disciplines of Live Art

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Michael Shane Boyle

Description: 'Disciplines of Live Art' explores the material conditions and social infrastructures for live art as a practice and an object of study. You will consider the institutional pressures and considerations that shape performance, while giving special attention to the cultural politics of live art specifically. In addition, you will study how the practice of live art relates to other disciplines of art making- such as visual art, theatre, music, and more - and how research into live art requires engagement with multiple academic disciplines ¿ such as Art History, Performance Studies, Musicology and more. The module examines how artists, curators and researchers negotiate funding structures, engage with cultural policy, and seek to intervene into a range of political and cultural issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Presentation (8-10 minutes)
  • Item 2: 80% Essay (3500 words)
Level: 7
Personal and Career Development Plan 1Economics and FinanceECN004Full year4No

Personal and Career Development Plan 1

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Serena Spoendlin

Description: The module aims to get students started on their career journey by highlighting the importance of gaining work experience during university, as well as the various opportunities available. All students will meet one-on-one with the careers team to create a competitive CV, as well as applying to at least two first year opportunities and taking a psychometric test. The overall theme of this module is discovery and getting ready.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Personal Development Portfolio (2000 words)
Level: 4
Personal and Career Development Plan 2Economics and FinanceECN005Full year5No

Personal and Career Development Plan 2

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Miss Serena Spoendlin

Description: The module builds on the Personal and Career Development Plan from year one, focussing on internships, job hunting strategies, extra-curricular activities, and commercial awareness. Students are required to engage with a wide-ranging set of compulsory and optional activities designed to actively engage students in the development of desirable transferable skills.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Personal Development Portfolio (2000 words)
Level: 5
World EconomyEconomics and FinanceECN102Semester 14Yes

World Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: The aim of this module is to introduce the basic concepts and methods that economists employ to analyse economic growth and international trade. It will review and analyse the current macroeconomic issues and events from the perspective of the business community and policymakers, including: strategies for growth; causes of trade deficits; consequences of government deficits; short- and long-term effects of monetary policy; and the globalisation of financial markets. The module will feature examples from both developed and developing countries to enhance knowledge of the world economy and skills in solving practical problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination
  • Item 2: 10% Quizzes
  • Item 3: 10% Report
  • Item 4: 10% Poster Presentation
Level: 4
Principles of FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN103Semester 14Closed

Principles of Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radoslawa Nikolowa
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS201 or take BUS245 or take BUS340
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN115

Description: The module is an introduction to the core concepts in finance and covers the economic principles underlying the working of national and international financial institutions. It introduces the theory and operation of financial systems from an economist¿s viewpoint. The stress is on financial instruments and markets in which they are traded. Students are expected to gather a good understanding of the functioning of the financial system. They are expected to learn applying an economics perspective to the study of financial assets and institutions, and to form a coherent view of the disparate variables in financial activity, markets, and their governance as well as to understand these in the context of financial crises.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination
  • Item 2: 15% In-class Test (45 mins)
  • Item 3: 15% Written Assignment (750 words)
Level: 4
Contemporary Economic IssuesEconomics and FinanceECN105Semester 24Yes

Contemporary Economic Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guglielmo Volpe
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN102 and take ECN113

Description: This module will provide students with an opportunity to explore contemporary economic issues, debates and policy. The module builds on the insights provided by the first semester Principles of Economics, World Economy and Economics (and Finance) in Action modules to develop in students an ability to: identify and apply the appropriate economic approaches to explain real world economic issues; to be able to engage in both written and oral form with the critical analysis of current economic issues; to be able to understand, interpret and write journalistic discussions of economic issues and to be able to contribute to the policy debate concerning the contemporary issues under investigation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Short News Clip Video (3 mins)
  • Item 3: 10% In-class Group Presentation/Debate
  • Item 4: 15% Technical/Non-technical Brief on a Topic (1000 words)
Level: 4
Macroeconomics IEconomics and FinanceECN106Semester 24Yes

Macroeconomics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Lee
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS108 or take BUS128 or take BUS137
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN113
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN111

Description: The module is an introduction to macroeconomics. It addresses how goods, labour and financial markets interact to determine aggregate output, employment, interest rates and the price level. The topics covered include: definitions and measurement of aggregate variables, equilibrium on each market in isolation (partial equilibrium) and on all markets (general equilibrium) both in the short and in the medium run, the impact of fiscal and monetary policy on aggregate variables.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Midterm Test 1
  • Item 3: 20% Midterm Test 2
Level: 4
Microeconomics IEconomics and FinanceECN111Semester 24Yes

Microeconomics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN113
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN106

Description: This module is the first in a sequence of three modules intended to provide students with a thorough introduction to microeconomic theory. This module will cover: introduction to microeconomic modelling; producer theory: technology and costs, competitive supply, monopoly supply; consumer theory: the budget set, preferences and utility, competitive demand, price and income effects, and intertemporal choice.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Midterm Test
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Principles of EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN113Semester 14Closed

Principles of Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eileen Tipoe
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS017 or take BUS018 or take BUS128 or take BUS137

Description: This module will be an introduction to economic reasoning and analysis. No prior knowledge of economics is necessary. The module will cover standard topics such as: demand, supply and price in consumer markets; demand, supply and price in labour markets: returns to education, the New Deal; competitive equilibrium: optimality; trade; market power; price discrimination, oligopoly, government policy; externalities and the environment; public goods, taxes and free-riding; globalisation; growth.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination
  • Item 2: 15% Quizzes
  • Item 3: 15% Group Presentation
Level: 4
Mathematical Methods in Economics and FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN115Semester 14Closed

Mathematical Methods in Economics and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis

Description: This module provides a detailed introduction to the core mathematical techniques and concepts that are necessary for the study of economics and finance. Topics covered include: linear and non-linear functions; differentiation; integration; constrained and unconstrained optimisation; vectors and matrices; difference and differential equations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Midterm Test (60 mins)
  • Item 3: 20% Group Project
Level: 4
Elements of AccountingEconomics and FinanceECN120Semester 24Yes

Elements of Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS021
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: This module will offer you a grounding in financial accounting from basic book keeping to the preparation of financial statements for sole traders and limited companies and an understanding of the way in which accounts are analysed using accounting ratios. You will also learn the basic concepts of accounting and international accounting standards.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 4
Statistical Methods in EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN121Semester 24Yes

Statistical Methods in Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Guglielmo Volpe
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH4100 or take MTH4107 or take MTH4216 or take MTH5129 or take BUS135 or take BUS229
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: The module is an introduction to Probability and Statistics. Topics include: Descriptive statistics and linear regression; Probability theory; Random variables and probability distributions; Sampling distributions; Estimation; Confidence intervals; Hypothesis testing. The objective of this module is to give students a grounding in the use of data for description and inference. Topics include descriptive statistics; probability theory; random variables and probability distributions; sampling distributions; properties of estimators; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Quizzes
  • Item 2: 20% Project
  • Item 3: 60% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Economics and Finance in ActionEconomics and FinanceECN126Semester 14No

Economics and Finance in Action

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eileen Tipoe
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS005
Corequisite: While taking this module you must take ECN113 and take ECN115

Description: This module develops practical skills that are essential for success both during your undergraduate studies and in your future career. You will learn how to obtain, analyse, and represent economic and financial data using standard databases and spreadsheet software. You will also learn the principles of effective writing in a professional context, enabling you to use language effectively to communicate your arguments and conclusions. Connections between these two categories of skills will be noted.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Homework Exercises
  • Item 2: 20% Short Essays
  • Item 3: 30% Written Assignment (1500 words)
  • Item 4: 30% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 4
Money and BankingEconomics and FinanceECN205Semester 15Closed

Money and Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomai Filippeli
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN106 and take ECN111 ) or take BUS128

Description: The aim of this module is to study the role of money in the macroeconomy, the behaviour of interest rates, banks and other intermediaries, and the regulation of both money markets and the banking system.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Quizzes
  • Item 2: 25% Group Presentation and Report
  • Item 3: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Macroeconomics IIEconomics and FinanceECN206Semester 15Yes

Macroeconomics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karlygash Kuralbayeva
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS330
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN106 and take ECN111

Description: This module looks at three main topics. The first one is open economy and exchange rates, in particular uncovered and covered interest parity, real and nominal exchange rates determination under both flexible and fixed exchange rates with and without nominal rigidities. The second one is growth theory, in particular both exogenous (Solow) and endogenous growth models and their implications. The third topic is the determinants of saving, in particular the consumption/saving choice and the overlapping generation model (without production).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Problem Set 1
  • Item 3: 15% Problem Set 2
Level: 5
International FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN209Semester 25Yes

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Kokonas
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must ( take ECN111 and take ECN206 ) or take BUS128

Description: Topics include balance of payments; definitions; international consumption smoothing; nominal and real exchange rates; interest rate parity; elasticity approach to the trade balance; macroeconomic policy in an open economy; Exchange rate determination under flexible and sticky price and exogenous and endogenous expectations; Exchange rate regimes and speculative attacks; optimal currency areas.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Microeconomics IIEconomics and FinanceECN211Semester 15Yes

Microeconomics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pawel Dziewulski
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 or take MTH4101 ) and take ECN111

Description: This is the second in a sequence of three modules intended to provide students with a thorough introduction to microeconomics. The course focuses on general equilibrium including exchange economies, the fundamental welfare theorems, externalities and public goods. Additionally, it provides an introduction to information economics with the expected utility model, choice under risk, adverse selection, moral hazard and market signalling.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework
Level: 5
Games and StrategiesEconomics and FinanceECN214Semester 25Yes

Games and Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Tyson
Prerequisite: Before or while taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 or take MTH4101 ) and take ECN211

Description: This module provides an introduction to game theory, a framework for studying situations of strategic interdependence. You will be shown how to describe such situations formally, how to analyse them using concepts of dominance and equilibrium, and how the theory can be applied to questions arising in various social sciences.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 5
Selected Topics in MacroeconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN223Semester 25Yes

Selected Topics in Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francesc Xavier Mateos-Planas
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN211

Description: Topics include: Consumption: life-cycle and permanent-income hypothesis; Inflation: causes and effects of inflation, disinflation, seignorage, dynamic inconsistency, hyperinflation; Debts and deficits: the government budget constraint, Ricardian equivalence, fiscal policy and output stabilisation. In addition to these three topics, the module may cover additional topics such as basics of monetary policy (eg money targets versus interest targets); Rational expectations (eg policy ineffectiveness, Lucas critique); Investment; The Euro; Globalisation.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Econometrics 1Economics and FinanceECN224Semester 15Yes

Econometrics 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Cristina Gualdani
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take MTH5120
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 ) and take ECN121

Description: This module builds on students' basic understanding of statistics acquired in their first year to introduce them to the basic theoretical and practical principles of econometrics analysis. There are two main goals: to strengthen and widen students' knowledge and understanding of statistical analysis, and to provide a solid grounding of the theory and practice of simple and multiple regression analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-Class Test (1 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Group Presentation (30 minutes)
  • Item 3: 10% Homework (5 pages)
  • Item 4: 60% Written Examination
Level: 5
Econometrics 2Economics and FinanceECN225Semester 25Yes

Econometrics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stepana Lazarova
Corequisite: Before or while taking this module you must take ECN224 or take MTH5120

Description: Econometrics 2 builds on Econometrics 1 module, providing students with the knowledge of further econometrics methods in standard use in current applied econometrics. Topics covered include: nonlinear regression functions, instrumental variables regression, stationary and nonstationary time series, panel data and regression with binary dependent variable.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Mid-Term Test
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Capital Markets 1Economics and FinanceECN226Semester 25Yes

Capital Markets 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS306
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 or take MTH4101 ) and take ECN111

Description: The aim of this module is to provide a rigorous training in the theory of investment and capital markets and a good understanding of its central concepts. More specifically, its purpose is to show how firms, individuals and institutions take decisions about optimal investment, and to examine the behaviour of the capital markets in which these decisions are taken.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Group Assignment (1500 words)
Level: 5
Experience in Economics and FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN227Full year5No

Experience in Economics and Finance

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte

Description: It is anticipated that during the work placement the students will undertake a wide range of activities to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students will be expected to write a reflective report during the placement and they must present this report at the end of the placement.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 50% Report
  • Item 2: 50% Presentation
Level: 5
International TradeEconomics and FinanceECN228Semester 25Yes

International Trade

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alessandra Bonfiglioli
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 ) and take ECN111

Description: This course covers the basic theoretical tools to understand what determines international trade (the flow of goods across countries) and international economic relations more generally. Some of the topics covered by the module are: Labor productivity and comparative advantage: the Ricardian model; Resources and Trade: the Heckscher-Ohlin model; External economies of scale and the international location of production; Firms in the global economy: export decisions, outsourcing, and multinational enterprises; The instruments of trade policy; The political economy of trade policy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Group Presentation
  • Item 2: 10% In-class Test
  • Item 3: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 5
Economics of Social IssuesEconomics and FinanceECN231Semester 15Closed

Economics of Social Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elisabetta Pasini
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN111 and take ECN113

Description: This is a module in the applied microeconomic analysis of social issues of topical importance in and outside the UK. Issues such as crime, addiction and wellbeing would seem to be the main research domain of social sciences such as psychology, health, sociology and politics. However, in recent years economics has provided valuable theoretical and empirical insights that have contributed to add the current debates on these issues. Students will have the opportunity to look at these various social issues not only from the point of view of various social sciences but, in particular, from through the lenses of the economics approach.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination
  • Item 2: 20% Essay (500 words)
  • Item 3: 10% Individual Presentation (10 minutes)
Level: 5
Principles of TradingEconomics and FinanceECN274Semester 15No

Principles of Trading

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN115 and take ECN103

Description: The objective of the this module is to provide theoretical knowledge and practical understanding of financial markets, trading strategies, risk & money management and trader analytics. This is where the student¿s theoretical knowledge meets the real world. The module offers a mix of classroom based instruction, case study and practical trading exercises where students will trade on real-time simulated global markets through the use of industry strength proprietary trading software in the trading lab.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 40% Portfolio
Level: 5
Corporate StrategyEconomics and FinanceECN302Semester 16Yes

Corporate Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This module provides an overview of corporate strategy in a global context and will enable you to become familiar with the core concepts of: External environmental analysis; models of internal and external analysis, analysis and management of resources; analysis of corporate strengths and weaknesses; knowledge management; development of strategic choice; elements influencing implementation of strategy.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Quizzes
  • Item 3: 30% Business Report (2500 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Topics in EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECN322Semester 16Yes

Topics in Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stepana Lazarova
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN225

Description: This module develops the knowledge of econometric methods that are useful in the analysis of economic phenomena and financial markets. The module is suitable for students with interest in theory and empirical applications of econometrics and for students considering master studies. The topics considered may differ over years. Candidate topics are maximum likelihood estimation, GMM estimators, panel data, limited dependent variable models, ARCH and GARCH models, structural change and time series.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Homework
  • Item 3: 20% Midterm Test (60 mins)
Level: 6
Economics Project IIEconomics and FinanceECN325Full year6No

Economics Project II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Simon Franklin
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN326
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 or take ECN211

Description: An expansion of Economics Project I ECN326. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not available to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (10000 words)
Level: 6
Economics Project IEconomics and FinanceECN326Semester 16No

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Franklin
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN325
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 or take ECN211

Description: Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (7500 words)
Level: 6
Economics Project IEconomics and FinanceECN326Semester 26No

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Franklin
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take ECN325
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 or take ECN211

Description: Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Dissertation (7500 words)
Level: 6
Applied EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECN336Semester 26Yes

Applied Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrea Tesei
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN225

Description: This module provides you with hands-on environment in which you will learn how to analyse real economic data by applying economic theories and econometric methods in combination. The module also aims to develop your abilities in data collection, information gathering from a wide range of reading and critical evaluation of what is taught in textbooks. The module is assessed by coursework only.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Exercise 1
  • Item 2: 20% In-class Exercise 2
  • Item 3: 40% Group Project (5000 words)
  • Item 4: 20% Viva (20-30 minutes)
Level: 6
Economics of Technology and InnovationEconomics and FinanceECN344Semester 26Yes

Economics of Technology and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Aniol Llorente-Saguer
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This course studies the interrelation between, market structure, firm behaviour, innovation and technology. Topics covered will include competitive markets, monopolies, pricing and marketing tactics, networks and technological standards, cartel formation, implicit collusion, antitrust enforcement, differentiated products, advertising, patents and intellectual property rights, among others.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 10% Mid-term Test 1
  • Item 2: 10% Mid-term Test 2
  • Item 3: 80% Written Examination
Level: 6
Business CyclesEconomics and FinanceECN346Semester 26Closed

Business Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roman Sustek
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 ) and take ECN206

Description: The module aims to evaluate how business cycle theories perform when confronted with business cycles stylised facts. The theories are presented based on a micro-founded intertemporal model of the economy that provides understanding on how different types of shocks cause macroeconomic fluctuations.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Test (50 mins)
  • Item 2: 80% Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
Environmental EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN351Semester 16Closed

Environmental Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: Sustainable and unsustainable development; the economic determinants of population growth; strategies of population control; intertemporal resource management; renewable and exhaustible resources; global warming, ozone depletion and acid rain externalities and the control of pollution; economic management of forest resources; the exploitation of the sea.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Written Examination
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework (750 words)
Level: 6
Public EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN352Semester 26Yes

Public Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and ( take ECN115 or take ECN114 )

Description: This module focuses on the role of the government in the economy. The aim is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, analysing the benefits of possible government policies, and the response of economic agents to the government¿s actions. The module covers (i) social insurance and (ii) tax policy and related issues, such as inequality and budget deficits.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 15% Group Project
  • Item 3: 10% Group Presentation
Level: 6
Macroeconomic PolicyEconomics and FinanceECN355Semester 26Yes

Macroeconomic Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francesc Xavier Mateos-Planas
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206

Description: This module presents the theoretical underpinnings of modern macroeconomic policy, providing a critical understanding of the policy debate and knowledge of the tools of the trade. Topics covered include: fiscal policy, temporary vs. permanent tax changes, policy sustainability, money creation, seignorage, inflation, monetary policy rules, UK monetary arrangements, and liquidity traps.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 30% Coursework
Level: 6
Labour EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN356Semester 26Yes

Labour Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Raute
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This module introduces the economic analysis of the labour market. It presents both traditional topics in the labour economics literature (e.g. demand, supply, human capital, discrimination and compensating wage differentials) as well as recent developments (e.g. early childhood education, migration, non-competitive labour markets and alternative work arrangements). The focus on the module are the fundamental models of labour economics, while basic empirical methods and empirical applications in contemporary labour economics will also be discussed. Students will apply the economic concepts to real world empirical problems.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Briefing Paper and Group Presentation
Level: 6
Futures and OptionsEconomics and FinanceECN358Semester 26Yes

Futures and Options

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Mouabbi
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN226

Description: Topics include operation of forward and futures markets; arbitrage and its application to forward and futures prices; hedging. Options - use of options in hedging and speculation; price bounds and putcall parity; elements of stochastic calculus and its application to the Black-Scholes model; delta hedging; binomial pricing models, early exercise and exotic options. Regulatory issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Group Presentation
Level: 6
Advanced MicroeconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN361Semester 16Yes

Advanced Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arup Daripa
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: This module aims to help you to bridge the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate economics. It is strongly recommended for all students who are considering continuing to a taught Master's degree in Economics. The module will attempt to develop your capacity for strategic reasoning via the translation of economic stories into simple models, spelling out every step of each argument in detail. Topics covered include individual decision making, efficiency of competitive market economy and causes of market failure, social choice and welfare, and information economics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% In-class Test (1 hour)
  • Item 2: 80% Written Examination
Level: 6
Health EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN369Semester 16Closed

Health Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211

Description: This module covers the application of economic principles to the study of health. Topics will include the demand for health care and its supply; issues in health care finance, including uncertainty, insurance, and the rationale for public and private provision; the extent to which welfare economics can be applied to health, including definitions of inequality and the links between inequalities in income and health; overview of reforms of the health care sector; and evaluation of health care treatments (cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis).

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Examination
  • Item 2: 25% Coursework
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Development EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN370Semester 16Closed

Development Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Hampus Sebastian Gunnar Axbard
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN211

Description: This module is concerned with the analysis of economic problems faced by developing countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It focuses, on the one hand, on the meaning, measurements and comparability of growth and development across countries (ie income per capita, income distribution and poverty) and, on the other, on the availability and characteristics of resources (ie labour, land, capital, savings), and the problems with their use in the context of developing countries vis-a-vis OECD countries. The above is presented in the analytic context of (historical) alternative development models and globalisation issues. Although the module does not demand advanced mathematics it does require the use of some mathematics and a fair amount of reading.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 75% Final Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Quizzes
  • Item 3: 15% Midterm Test (60 mins)
Level: 6
International perspectivesSEF_6_A
Behavioural EconomicsEconomics and FinanceECN374Semester 26Yes

Behavioural Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Simon Franklin
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN211 and take ECN214

Description: Behavioural economics seeks to improve our understanding of economics by providing empirical evidence on how human behaviour differs from the predictions of standard models of `perfect rationality¿. The module will provide an understanding of how controlled experiments can be used to study how humans make economic decisions. Students should be able to interpret and design both lab and field experiments to test economic ideas. The module will be applied and `hands-on¿; we will examine real-world examples and studies from business, policy-making, personal-wellbeing, and economic development. In doing so, the module aims to enrich students¿ understanding of core economic concepts, and the relationship between economic theory, empirical evidence and prediction.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 70% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Project
  • Item 3: 10% Presentation
Level: 6
Political EconomyEconomics and FinanceECN375Semester 26Yes

Political Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrea Tesei
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN214

Description: This module introduces students to the study of political institutions through formal models. It covers some of the major topics studied in Political Economy and Formal Political Theory: The aggregation of preferences from individual preferences to social preferences, voting, electoral competition and electoral systems, collective action, public goods, legislature voting and separation of powers.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 6
Finance of Emerging MarketsEconomics and FinanceECN376Semester 26Yes

Finance of Emerging Markets

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniela Tavasci
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN226 and take ECN206

Description: The module is addressed from the perspective of an investment manager (responsible for investment portfolios of institutional investors including banks, pension funds, insurance companies, mutual funds, endowment funds, and personal trusts) who invests in various securities in emerging markets. Certain policy issues concerning emerging markets are discussed, including investment, market institutional development, political risk, corporate governance, and project finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 20% Groupwork
  • Item 2: 80% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
International Financial StrategyEconomics and FinanceECN377Semester 26Yes

International Financial Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergio Vicente
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS353
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN206 and take ECN378

Description: The focus of the course is on understanding how the global environment affects the decision making of managers in corporations. Students will develop a strategic understanding of key financial decisions faced by organizations by putting them into an international context. While the module discusses the theoretical basis on the various issues and topics, it also mixes in empirical evidence and discussion of firms' actual behaviors and for that reason lectures will be also based on case studies of multinational corporations.

Students will use prior knowledge of International Finance and valuation methods to build upon ideas in global financial markets and foreign investment decisions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 15% Midterm Test
  • Item 2: 25% Group Assignment (1500 words)
  • Item 3: 60% Final Examination (2 hours)
Level: 6
International perspectivesSEF_6_A
Corporate FinanceEconomics and FinanceECN378Semester 16Yes

Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Moqi Groen-Xu
Overlap: In taking this module you cannot take BUS225 or take BUS341
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN226

Description: The module is organized around two key questions in corporate finance. In a first part dedicated to the investment choices made by firms: the students will understand how investments affect the value of the firm and will be exposed to the analytical tools necessary for evaluating real and financial assets. In a second part of the course we will study how firms design their capital structure, as well as the corporate governance mechanisms they put in place in order to ease their access to external financing.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination
  • Item 2: 20% Group Report (3000-4000 words)
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
History of Economic ThoughtEconomics and FinanceECN379Semester 16Closed

History of Economic Thought

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Luca Larcher
Prerequisite: Before taking this module you must take ECN106 and take ECN211

Description: This module aims to provide a critical overview of the evolution of economic theory since Adam Smith. The module focuses on how different schools of thought/economists have addressed a number of themes including where value comes from, pricing and distribution theories, the relation between finance and the real economy, the role of the government. Each school of thought/economist is critically analysed by focusing on assumptions, methods and techniques, economic problems and policy prescriptions.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 5% Quizzes
  • Item 2: 15% Group Project
  • Item 3: 80% Written Examination
Level: 6
Multi- and inter-disciplinaritySEF_6_A
Study Abroad YearEconomics and FinanceECN400Full year5No

Study Abroad Year

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed

Description: This module is specifically for students undertaking the four year Economics and Finance programmes with a year abroad. These students are the only students eligible for this module. Students must pass this module in order to progress to year 4 of the programme. The requirement to pass a year abroad module of this type shall be to take 120 and pass minimum of 105 QMUL academic credits in the assessments set by the partner institution, and to achieve a minimum year average mark of 40.0. If a student fails the module they will be transferred to the equivalent three year programme. This module wii be zero-weighted. Students can take modules both in and outside their subject-area, expanding their horizons and providing for future development.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 100% Pass/Fail
Level: 5
Macroeconomics AEconomics and FinanceECOM001Semester 17No

Macroeconomics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gino Gancia

Description: This module deals with the long-run growth of GDP and its short-run fluctuations. You will start by analysing the traditional models of economic growth theory, ie the Solow-Swan model and the Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans model. Within the framework of these models you will study the central questions of growth theory as well as the effects of government expenditure on macroeconomic variables. You will then discuss the most important ideas of endogenous growth theory, including research and development, human capital formation, and knowledge creation. The second part of the module deals with two classes of theories of aggregate fluctuations, ie, real-business-cycle theories and Keynesian theories. Whereas real-business-cycle theories assume flexible prices and market clearing, Keynesian theories proceed from the assumption of nominal stickiness and market failure. We discuss possible reasons why prices and wages are sticky and analyse the implications of this fact.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 10% Mid-term Test (1 hour)
  • Item 3: 10% Problem Sets
Level: 7
Microeconomics AEconomics and FinanceECOM002Semester 17No

Microeconomics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alp Atakan

Description: Microeconomic Theory provides the basic conceptual tools of economic analysis. In Microeconomics A, we will cover the standard economic models of individual decision making, models of consumer behaviour and producer behaviour under perfect competition, the Arrow­Debreu general equilibrium model and the two fundamental welfare theorems. At the end of the course students should be able: to analyse decision making with and without uncertainty, derive individual and market demand curves and explain the concept of market equilibrium and its welfare properties.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Econometrics AEconomics and FinanceECOM003Semester 17No

Econometrics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Emmanuel Guerre

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with the necessary tools for formalising a hypothesis of interest and testing it, writing a simple econometric model, estimating it and conducting inference. The module starts with a review of the classical linear model. We then analyse finite sample and asymptotic properties of ordinary least squares, instrumental variables and feasible generalised least squares, under general conditions. Classical tests, as well as general Hausman tests, and moment's tests are covered. The case of dependent stationary observations is also covered. Finally nonlinear estimation methods, and in particular the generalised method of moments, are covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Macroeconomics BEconomics and FinanceECOM009Semester 27No

Macroeconomics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Giulio Fella

Description: Together with Macroeconomics A, this module will give you a firm grounding in modern macroeconomics. Topics to be covered include: the determinants of individual consumption and saving and their aggregation, macroeconomic theories of asset pricing, the determinants of firm investment and the implications for aggregate investment.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Microeconomics BEconomics and FinanceECOM010Semester 27No

Microeconomics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Aniol Llorente-Saguer

Description: This course aims to help students to develop advanced analytical and theoretical skills. The course will attempt to develop students' capacity for strategic reasoning via the analysis of game theoretic tools and mechanism design. Topics to be covered in the second term include: games in strategic and extensive form; Nash equilibrium and its refinements; games with incomplete information; repeated games; adverse selection, signalling, and screening; the principal­agent problem; incentive theory and mechanism design.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Time Series AnalysisEconomics and FinanceECOM014Semester 17No

Time Series Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fabio Calonaci

Description: The module aims to provide a foundation in time series analysis in general and in the econometric analysis of economic time series in particular, offering theory and methods at a level consonant with an advanced training for a career economist. Topics include: An Introduction to Time Series Analysis for Econometrics and Finance; Linear Time Series Models; Seasonal Time Models; Estimation and Forecasting; Unit Roots and Co­integration; and ARCH and GARCH Time Series models.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 7
Corporate FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM015Semester 17No

Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radoslawa Nikolowa

Description: This course provides a broad introduction to the key issues in understanding corporate financial policy. In particular, we will investigate how companies should finance their activities by issuing securities (debt, equity and convertible claims) and the interaction of business policy with corporate financial policy. Special consideration is given to tax issues, the possible costs of financial distress, the incentives behind financial decisions and the signalling impact of those for financial market participants. The final part of the course covers some specific topics in corporate finance: dividend policy, the decision to go public, mergers and acquisitions and possibly corporate governance issues.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 7
Financial EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECOM025Semester 27No

Financial Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniele Bianchi

Description: This module discusses econometric methodology for dealing with problems in the area of financial economics and provides students with the econometric tools applied in the area. Applications are considered in the stock, bond and exchange rate markets. Students will cover the following issues: asset returns distributions; predictability of asset returns; econometric tests of capital markets efficiency and asset pricing models; inter-temporal models of time-varying risk premium; nonlinearities in financial data; value at risk; pricing derivatives 6 MSc Finance and Economics, MSc Finance and Econometrics with stochastic volatility (or GARCH) models; modelling non-synchronous trading; and numerical methods in finance.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Financial DerivativesEconomics and FinanceECOM026Semester 27No

Financial Derivatives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Patrick Boyle

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with an overview of the theory and practice of pricing and hedging derivative securities. These include forward and futures contracts, swaps, and many different types of options. This module covers diverse areas of derivatives, such as equity and index derivatives, foreign currency derivatives and commodity derivatives, as well as interest rate derivatives. This module also addresses the issue of how to incorporate credit risk into the pricing and risk management of derivatives. All the relevant concepts are discussed based on the discrete time binomial model and the continuous time Black­Scholes model. The extensions of the Black­Scholes model are also discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Financial DerivativesEconomics and FinanceECOM026Full year7No

Financial Derivatives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Patrick Boyle

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with an overview of the theory and practice of pricing and hedging derivative securities. These include forward and futures contracts, swaps, and many different types of options. This module covers diverse areas of derivatives, such as equity and index derivatives, foreign currency derivatives and commodity derivatives, as well as interest rate derivatives. This module also addresses the issue of how to incorporate credit risk into the pricing and risk management of derivatives. All the relevant concepts are discussed based on the discrete time binomial model and the continuous time Black­Scholes model. The extensions of the Black­Scholes model are also discussed.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Econometrics BEconomics and FinanceECOM032Semester 27No

Econometrics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Emmanuel Guerre

Description: This module is designed to provide you with a general knowledge and the basic methods used in the current practice of macroeconometrics. The module covers the following lecture topics: a brief history of macroeconometrics and current methodological issues in macroeconometrics; the main characteristics of macroeconometrics and fundamental tools. It examines two important aspects: dynamics and interdependence; and interpretation of econometric results: expectation and exogeneity. It then goes through basic models with co­integrated time series and discusses how to link macroeconometric models to macroeconomic theory.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
Level: 7
International FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM035Semester 27No

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Francis Breedon

Description: Foreign exchange is not only the most heavily traded of all financial assets, it has the clearest interface between macroeconomics and finance. In this module you'll get an introduction to the main theoretical models used to understand FX markets as well as in­depth analysis of how they work in practice. Topics include: understanding global imbalances, models of exchange rate determination, the structure of the FX market and how trades are priced, FX derivatives markets, foreign exchange intervention and reserves, and currency regimes and crises. Each week the key lessons of the lecture are illustrated through an analysis of current economic events such as the problems in the Euro­area, China's foreign exchange rate policy and the role of the dollar as a global reserve currency. We also price and monitor foreign exchange trades suggested by course participants to see how good you are at FX trading!

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Quantitative TechniquesEconomics and FinanceECOM037Semester 17No

Quantitative Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof George Skiadopoulos

Description: The course offers an introduction to Econometrics in the context of quantitative financial analysis. Basic econometric tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained. These will be accompanied by a number of applications in the fields of asset management and risk management. The two variables regression model will first be used to present the topics of estimation and hypothesis testing. Then, the standard regression model will be generalized to the multiple variables regression model. Next, an introduction to time series analysis and forecasting will be undertaken. Depending on time constraints, topics such as volatility forecasting and principal components analysis will be explained. We will assume that you have knowledge of basic statistics and mathematics.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Behavioural FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM038Semester 27No

Behavioural Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asen Ivanov

Description: Behavioural finance studies irrationalities in savings and investment decisions as well as puzzles on financial markets. Some key topics are saving for retirement, insurance, predictability of returns, and bubbles. Knowledge of behavioural finance provides students with a deeper and more realistic understanding of finance than is offered by the mainstream approach alone. Such knowledge will hopefully make students less susceptible to common mistakes when they make financial decisions in their personal or professional lives.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Test(s) and Homework Test(s) and Homework
Level: 7
Advanced Asset Pricing and ModellingEconomics and FinanceECOM044Semester 27No

Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarolta Laczo

Description: The aim of this module is to provide students with the analytical tools of advanced finance theory. The module will give an introduction to stochastic calculus, optimal control and martingale methods, and will cover dynamic asset pricing models, optimal consumption and portfolio theory, equilibrium models of the term structure of interest rates, option pricing of interest rates and stocks based on arbitrage and general equilibrium models, incomplete markets and portfolio optimisation in incomplete markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Commercial and Investment BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM049Semester 27No

Commercial and Investment Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis

Description: The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of the international financial system and its associated risks given the ever evolving regulatory regime.On successful completion, students should be able to critically understand, evaluate and question the operations of banks and of non­bank financial institutions, the process of deposit creation, the term structure of interest rates, the supply and demand of loanable funds, and the role of Central Banks. More importantly students should be competent in the analysis, interpretation and assessment of all facets and aspects of financial risk and its management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
  • Item 3: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 7
Commercial and Investment BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM049Full year7No

Commercial and Investment Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis

Description: The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of the international financial system and its associated risks given the ever evolving regulatory regime.On successful completion, students should be able to critically understand, evaluate and question the operations of banks and of non­bank financial institutions, the process of deposit creation, the term structure of interest rates, the supply and demand of loanable funds, and the role of Central Banks. More importantly students should be competent in the analysis, interpretation and assessment of all facets and aspects of financial risk and its management.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 60% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Coursework
  • Item 3: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 7
Investment ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM050Semester 17No

Investment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alfonsina Iona

Description: This offers a high level introduction to concepts related to investment analysis. Topics covered include valuation of financial securities; the principles of investment; portfolio analysis and management; financial market equilibrium; the CAPM and APT models; capital budgeting and risk; and market efficiency.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 7
Investment ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM050Semester 27No

Investment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alfonsina Iona

Description: This offers a high level introduction to concepts related to investment analysis. Topics covered include valuation of financial securities; the principles of investment; portfolio analysis and management; financial market equilibrium; the CAPM and APT models; capital budgeting and risk; and market efficiency.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 7
Quantitative Methods in FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM053Semester 27No

Quantitative Methods in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Koutrompis

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied econometrics used to analyse financial problems. The material is presented through detailed examples with associated data and software, and hence should prove useful and interesting to students whether or not they have some prior exposure to econometrics. Basic statistical tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 7
Quantitative Methods in FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM053Semester 17No

Quantitative Methods in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Koutrompis

Description: This module provides an introduction to applied econometrics used to analyse financial problems. The material is presented through detailed examples with associated data and software, and hence should prove useful and interesting to students whether or not they have some prior exposure to econometrics. Basic statistical tools needed for understanding and using financial models are introduced and explained.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Mid-term Test
Level: 7
Risk Management for BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM055Semester 27No

Risk Management for Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelson Camanho Da Costa Neto

Description: The module is designed to give an insight into the risk management process and how capital is allocated. We identify the main sources of risk experienced by financial institutions such as credit, market, liquidity, and operational risks. Methods for quantifying and managing risk are explored in detail with an emphasis on understanding factors affecting Value at Risk (VAR) calculations. Finally, we see how reporting standards, regulation and innovation have transformed the way financial institutions operate and what can we learn from recent risk management failures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Risk Management for BankingEconomics and FinanceECOM055Full year7No

Risk Management for Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelson Camanho Da Costa Neto

Description: The module is designed to give an insight into the risk management process and how capital is allocated. We identify the main sources of risk experienced by financial institutions such as credit, market, liquidity, and operational risks. Methods for quantifying and managing risk are explored in detail with an emphasis on understanding factors affecting Value at Risk (VAR) calculations. Finally, we see how reporting standards, regulation and innovation have transformed the way financial institutions operate and what can we learn from recent risk management failures.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Asset ManagementEconomics and FinanceECOM057Semester 27No

Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Goncalo Faria

Description: The purpose of this module is to provide students with a practical introduction to modern portfolio theory and asset pricing, including active portfolio management, portfolio performance evaluation, portfolio insurance, and international portfolio diversification. On the successful completion of the module students will know how to implement modern portfolio management strategies and will be familiar with the practical aspects of asset valuation. The course emphasises real world cases and real world investment and hedging strategies.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Principles of AccountingEconomics and FinanceECOM058Semester 27No

Principles of Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Luca Larcher

Description: This module aims to introduce students to the fundamentals of accounting and financial reporting: the conceptual and regulatory framework of accounting; and the interpretation of financial statements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Principles of AccountingEconomics and FinanceECOM058Full year7No

Principles of Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Luca Larcher

Description: This module aims to introduce students to the fundamentals of accounting and financial reporting: the conceptual and regulatory framework of accounting; and the interpretation of financial statements.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
InvestmentsEconomics and FinanceECOM065Semester 17No

Investments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Zachariadis

Description: This course introduces students to the key principles in asset pricing and investment management. It covers risk, return and portfolio construction, focussing on equity, bond and derivatives markets.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Econometrics for FinanceEconomics and FinanceECOM072Semester 17No

Econometrics for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Haroon Mumtaz

Description: The module will cover fundamental methods for the empirical analysis of financial data. Some prior knowledge of general econometrics will be assumed, and the focus will be on building an understanding of the ideas behind, and the application of, those methods that are most heavily relied upon in the empirical analysis of financial data. A majority of the topics treated will be related to empirical asset pricing and portfolio choice, although other areas of finance will also be covered.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Topics in Financial EconometricsEconomics and FinanceECOM073Semester 27No

Topics in Financial Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Liudas Giraitis

Description: The module will reaffirm the student's understanding of the classical techniques of regression analysis, which will be extended to encompass financial data modelling. The module will also cover the techniques of time series modelling. It will begin by analysing classical linear stochastic models that are formulated in discrete time. It will proceed to analyse models in continuous time that are a feature of modern financial analysis.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Bond Market StrategiesEconomics and FinanceECOM074Semester 27No

Bond Market Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Darren Cullen

Description: Bond markets are a critical part of the global financial system. This module explores global bond markets from a practitioner perspective. The module is designed to help students learn key bond market mathematics, identify value and understand the key risks. The module will explore how bond market strategies can be employed to capture value, create portfolios and meet specific investment objectives. The course also links core material with topical issues in global bond markets, showing students the critical importance of bond markets for the banking system, the wider financial system, the economy and government policymaking.

Assessment:

  • Item 1: 80% Examination (2 hours)
  • Item 2: 20% Written coursework
Level: 7
Bond Market StrategiesEconomics and FinanceECOM074Full year7No

Bond Market Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Darren Cullen

Description: Bond markets and the term structure of interest rates have always been two cornerstones of financial theory. Moreover, in the last decades, bond markets have become highly sophisticated in their offering of a wide range of instruments, from bonds with embedded options to asset-backed securities or structured notes. Because of the great importance of these markets and instruments, participants must become well-informed of the structure and uses of these securities and also of the increasingly complex techniques for valuing them. This module is designed to develop the MSc students understanding of bond markets and securities theory and practice. It is an advanced course that covers the different types and features of these bond instruments and the fundamental analytical tools to price them. The principle objective is