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Can a strong local community improve your health? Can a strong local community improve your health?
11 October 2012

Dr Vicky Cattell examines the link between local community life and wellbeing

Better treatment for tendon injuries Better treatment for tendon injuries
3 August 2012

Using electric shockwaves for effective treatment of severe tendon injuries   

Nanotechnology opens up new ways to harvest energy Nanotechnology opens up new ways to harvest energy
27 July 2012

Developing new materials to transform waste heat into useful electrical energy

The power of sound to generate electricity  The power of sound to generate electricity
24 July 2012

Creating ‘nano-generators’ that transform sound into power

Bayesian network modelling supports surgeons working with trauma Bayesian network modelling supports surgeons working with trauma
4 July 2012

Computer scientists improve decision-making in the treatment of trauma 

Allowing databases to grow and evolve without compromising performance Allowing databases to grow and evolve without compromising performance
4 July 2012

Dr Mark Walters worked with IBM to improve the performance of large databases

Searching for cures for dementia Searching for cures for dementia
18 May 2012

Dr Bronwyn Parry is fascinated by what motivates people to donate their brains for much-needed research into dementia

Cementing the future Cementing the future
19 April 2012

Niall Kent is investigating the use of bioactive glasses in medical bone-substitute cements

A new script for prisons A new script for prisons
16 April 2012

Dr Caoimhe McAvinchey explores how theatre makers stage critical questions about the prison system

Women in power: what difference does it make? Women in power: what difference does it make?
13 March 2012

Dr Rainbow Murray looks at the rise of women in politics – from gender quotas to the differences between male and female MPs

Carrot or stick: using incentives in healthcare Carrot or stick: using incentives in healthcare
13 March 2012

Professor Richard Ashcroft explores the pros and cons of using incentives to encourage good health

What does it mean to be English? What does it mean to be English?
13 March 2012

Professor Michael Kenny is examining the political and policy implications of a resurgence of English national identity

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News

Candy cane supercapacitor could enable fast charging of mobile phones article News story: Candy cane supercapacitor could enable fast charging of mobile phones
16 August 2017

Supercapacitors promise recharging of phones and other devices in seconds and minutes as opposed to hours for batteries. But current technologies are not usually flexible, have insufficient capacities, and for many their performance quickly degrades with charging cycles.

What’s the magic word? Artificial intelligence uses internet searches to help create mind association trick article News story: What’s the magic word? Artificial intelligence uses internet searches to help create mind association trick
10 August 2017

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have created an artificial intelligence (AI) that uses internet searches to help co-design a word association magic trick.

Like father like son? How we balance work and family life may be learned from our parents article News story: Like father like son? How we balance work and family life may be learned from our parents
10 August 2017

The extent to which we prioritise work versus family life may be shaped by our childhood experiences in the family home, according to a study co-authored by Dr Ioana Lupu from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

State crime researchers uncover role of Western companies in Uzbek corruption scandal article News story: State crime researchers uncover role of Western companies in Uzbek corruption scandal
9 August 2017

Evidence in a new research report published today shows that the government of Uzbekistan acted as an organised crime network, with state agencies conducting racketeering activity that benefited political heiress Gulnara Karimova, the elder daughter of Islam Karimov, the leader of Uzbekistan from 1989 to his death in 2016.

Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control – new research blog Blog: Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control – new research
9 August 2017

Seeing an abseiling spider descend gracefully using its dragline silk instead of spinning unpredictably and uncontrollably is a magnificent sight. Professor David J Dunstan and Dr Dabiao Liu write for The Conversation, and try to understand the science behind it.

Bank of England ledgers reveal failure of World War One loan scheme article News story: Bank of England ledgers reveal failure of World War One loan scheme
8 August 2017

The British government’s initial efforts to pay for World War One through loans from the public was a spectacular failure, according to a new study using restricted Bank of England ledgers. The research reveals that the War Loan scheme failed to such an extent that the Bank of England had to secretly fund half the shortfall.

GP-based testing for HIV is cost-effective and should be rolled out in 74 local authorities article News story: GP-based testing for HIV is cost-effective and should be rolled out in 74 local authorities
31 July 2017

Offering HIV testing to people at health checks when they register at a new GP surgery in high-prevalence areas is cost-effective and will save lives, according to a study involving over 86,000 people from 40 GP surgeries, led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. 

Researchers discover how human cells maintain the correct number of chromosomes article News story: Researchers discover how human cells maintain the correct number of chromosomes
28 July 2017

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered an important part of the mechanism involved in how chromosomes are pulled apart during cell division, so that one complete set goes into each of the new cells.

From War Crime Trials to Clinical Trials – Event commemorates the Holocaust’s lasting influence on medical research article News story: From War Crime Trials to Clinical Trials – Event commemorates the Holocaust’s lasting influence on medical research
25 July 2017

On the 70th anniversary of the Nazi Doctors trial, a commemorative event in London will explore how human experimentation during the Holocaust led to the code of ethics used in clinical trials today. This will be illustrated by witnesses from both the camps and the Nuremberg Trials.

David Davis favourite to succeed Theresa May, finds survey of Conservative members article News story: David Davis favourite to succeed Theresa May, finds survey of Conservative members
24 July 2017

The Brexit Secretary David Davis is the narrow favourite among party members to succeed Theresa May, according to a major survey led by academics at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Sexual health clinics should ask about abuse article News story: Sexual health clinics should ask about abuse
21 July 2017

Training clinicians to proactively ask patients about domestic violence is feasible for sexual health clinics to implement and could increase referrals to specialist services, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the University of Bristol involving over 4,300 women.

Moderate exercise and dieting reduces risk of caesarean section and diabetes in pregnancy article News story: Moderate exercise and dieting reduces risk of caesarean section and diabetes in pregnancy
20 July 2017

Pregnant women who have a healthy diet and regular moderate exercise are less likely to have a caesarean section, gain excessive weight, or develop diabetes in pregnancy, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) using data from over 12,000 women.

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