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Directory of Modules 2014-15

Modules below are listed alphabetically. You can search and sort by title, key words, academic school, module code or semester. Details about the module, including timetabling information, can be found by clicking on the green plus icon: plus icon

For a full explanation of the module information, please refer to our guidance notes.

If timetable information is not listed for modules running in Semester 1 or Semester 2 (A or B versions of Full Year courses), look for the 'Full Year' version of the module in the timetable, which does not have the trailing 'A' or 'B' in the module code e.g. for HST5324A look at HST5324 for timetable information.

Note: while every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change, and timetable information in particular is provisional.

QMUL Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM090 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM090 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM023 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM023 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM023 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 10,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme. A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic. Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM090 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM090 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

10,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM090 Full year 7 No

10,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

20,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM024 Full year 7 No

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

20,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM024 Full year 7 No

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

20,000 Word Dissertation Law CCDM024 Full year 7 No

20,000 Word Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 20,000 word dissertation on a particular topic within a subject area of the computer and communications programme.

A Supervisor will be allocated according to topic.

Students will have two terms to write up and submit the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

21st Century Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS703P Semester 1 7 No

21st Century Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Uhlig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an in-depth understanding of the key issues in next generation, all-IP networks. As the module provides timely material, it will be subject to constant but minor evolution. The topics covered include: converged network infrastructures including wired and wireless access networks, IPv6, network virtualization, network design and engineering, Internet traffic and applications, cloud and content delivery, economics and privacy.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm

21st Century Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS703U Semester 1 7 No

21st Century Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Uhlig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an in-depth understanding of the key issues in next generation, all-IP networks. As the module provides timely material, it will be subject to constant but minor evolution. The topics covered include: converged network infrastructures including wired and wireless access networks, IPv6, network virtualization, network design and engineering, Internet traffic and applications, cloud and content delivery, economics and privacy.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm

21st Century Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS703D Semester 1 7 No

21st Century Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Uhlig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an in-depth understanding of the key issues in next generation, all-IP networks. As the module provides timely material, it will be subject to constant but minor evolution. The topics covered include: converged network infrastructures including wired and wireless access networks, IPv6, network virtualization, network design and engineering, Internet traffic and applications, cloud and content delivery, economics and privacy.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Abnormal and Clinical Psychology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC501 Semester 2 5 Yes

Abnormal and Clinical Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to give students a scientific overview of psychopathology based on empirical findings and to critically evaluate the range of approaches in this field. Topics covered include the history, classification and diagnosis of abnormal behaviour; aetiology and treatment protocols; current developments and advances in biological psychiatry (e.g., cognitive and affective neurosciences); cognitive and behavioural consequences of neurological disorders; anxiety disorders; mood disorders; personality disorders; schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders; somatoform and dissociative disorders; sexual and "gender identity" disorders; developmental psychopathology; practical and ethical concerns in mental health care; the role of mental health professionals particularly psychologists.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 16: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Academic Listening Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4640 Semester 1 4 Yes

Academic Listening

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to build confidence in your ability to listen to lectures and take notes by helping you develop effective listening and note-taking strategies. You will learn ways of identifying key points by understanding the role of introductions and repetition in lectures. The module will develop an understanding of different styles of lecturing and the role of lectures and seminars at university.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Academic Listening Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4640 Semester 2 4 Yes

Academic Listening

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to build confidence in your ability to listen to lectures and take notes by helping you develop effective listening and note-taking strategies. You will learn ways of identifying key points by understanding the role of introductions and repetition in lectures. The module will develop an understanding of different styles of lecturing and the role of lectures and seminars at university.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Academic Practice (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7009 Full year 7 No

Academic Practice (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Andrew
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The role of the academic and the university has evolved with time and will continue to change in the future. Such changes are having profound implications on both academic and public understanding of the central role and responsibilities of academics and universities within society. Academics need to reflect upon the drivers for these changes and the implications for their own personal and professional development. This module encourages participants to examine their own view of the role of an academic in contemporary higher education by exploring themes of scholarship, academic freedom and professionalism.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Academic Practice (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7009 Full year 7 No

Academic Practice (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Andrew
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The role of the academic and the university has evolved with time and will continue to change in the future. Such changes are having profound implications on both academic and public understanding of the central role and responsibilities of academics and universities within society. Academics need to reflect upon the drivers for these changes and the implications for their own personal and professional development. This module encourages participants to examine their own view of the role of an academic in contemporary higher education by exploring themes of scholarship, academic freedom and professionalism.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Academic Study Skills Languages Linguistics and Film IFP3812 Full year 3 No

Academic Study Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Peter Latham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide students with an understanding of UK academic culture, and help them develop the linguistic, analytic and argumentative skills, in both written and spoken work, necessary to succeed on an undergraduate degree programme. It will help them produce linguistically sophisticated work, including under exam conditions, which demonstrates a clear line of argumentation. The students will be exposed to different styles of planning, organising and writing essays (both shorter timed exam essays of 500-600 words and more extended essays of 2000 and 5000 words ) within a standard Humanities and Social Sciences framework. The students will be encouraged to employ strategies to reflect on their writing styles. Regular formative feedback on writing produced on the module will be imperative in ensuring learning outcomes.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 3

Accounting and Value Management Business and Management BUSM071 Semester 2 7 No

Accounting and Value Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is framed with the context of managing for value and how managerial and investor interests are aligned and reflected in accounting information for value creation and market value added and value for money. This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are employed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control and drive value creation for market value added or value for money. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and direct corporate and non-corporate organizations towards generating value on invested funds whether these are public, private or state sponsored agencies.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Accounting for Business Business and Management BUS106 Semester 2 4 Yes

Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. Key concepts and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and the financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations and the use of accounting information by management for planning, decision making and control purposes.

Assessment: 40.0% Practical, 60.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Accounting for Business Models Business and Management BUSM070 Semester 1 7 No

Accounting for Business Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module conceptualizes business models within an accounting framework. There are three significant parts to this module. how we can structure business models, designate business models with a sense of financial purpose (liquidity, solvency and capitalization) and finally evaluate performance and outcomes. These financial objectives are explored and evaluated using accounting data for a range of business model types for example, banking, private equity and bio-pharma and 3rd /public sector organizations.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Accounting for Lawyers Law CCLE019 Semester 1 7 No

Accounting for Lawyers

Credits: 22.5
Contact: Mr Leon Vinokur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce fundamental management accounting concepts to non-accountants. This will include applying various techniques to evaluate business decisions in both the long and short term. Students will be able to employ a range of control methods within a business and analyse its performance. The module is designed for students to gain an appreciation of the concepts while having an insight into their practical application.

Students on this module will be introduced to a wide range of accounting techniques. The emphasis during lectures will be on building confidence in the use of financial techniques associated with planning, control and decision-making.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990 History HST5324 Full year 5 Yes

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Dina Gusejnova
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a systematic account of German history in the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country up to today.

In the beginning, special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. The module then turns to the Allied occupation, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification.

Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Suggested reading:
M. Fulbrook, The Divided Nation: A History of Germany 1918-1990 (1991)

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990 History HST5324A Semester 1 5 Yes

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dina Gusejnova
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a systematic account of German history in the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country up to today.

In the beginning, special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. The module then turns to the Allied occupation, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification. Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990 History HST5324B Semester 2 5 Yes

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dina Gusejnova
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a systematic account of German history in the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country up to today.

In the beginning, special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. The module then turns to the Allied occupation, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification. Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

A Closer Look at Chemistry Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF004 Semester 2 3 No

A Closer Look at Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module expands upon topics covered in SEF003 and provides a further introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry; including topics such as thermochemistry, reaction kinetics and equilibria, molecular structure, aspects of organic chemistry, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: SEF003 Introductory Chemistry

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Acoustic Analysis of Speech Languages Linguistics and Film LIN5200 Semester 2 5 Yes

Acoustic Analysis of Speech

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module, students will be introduced to some of the key acoustic techniques used to examine segmental elements of speech. As such, this module focuses on the smallest physical properties of speech which ultimately give rise to meaning. Much of the module will involve lab work and students will be given the opportunity to work both with guidance and independently on assignments. For example, students will undertake a durational analysis of voice onset time in the waveform and a frequency analysis of formants in the spectrogram. Such analyses will build on knowledge of the Source-Filter Theory and on articulatory correlates of the acoustic signal. Students will become confident in identifying how biological, linguistic, social, and psychological factors underlie variation in the acoustic signal. By the end of the module students will be equipped to perform independent acoustic analyses into segmental elements of speech. This module is a prerequisite for Describing and Measuring Prosody.

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Acting Theory English and Drama DRA252 Semester 2 5 Yes

Acting Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to the theories - critical, scientific, folk and common-sense - which have informed contemporary and historical approaches to actor training. In the last century in particular, the 'guide' or 'manual' became an increasingly popular means of disseminating ideas and examples of acting technique and training. The course invites students to undertake critical readings of such works by examining their use of language and their historical and cultural contexts, as well as the work of their exponents.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Action Design English and Drama DRA245 Semester 1 5 Yes

Action Design

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Julian Deering
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a practical and theoretical introduction to the seven areas of technical production for the theatre: Lighting, Sound, Design, Workshop, Costume, Technical Drawing and Stage Management. Through this practical introduction you will develop a theoretical understanding of the Design systems of Josef Svoboda, Jaroslav Malina and Jan Dusek and develop an appreciation and active practical response to the term 'scenografie' and the Action Design Movement. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Actuarial Mathematics Mathematical Sciences MTH6100 Semester 2 6 Yes

Actuarial Mathematics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "MTH4101 MTH4107"

This module gives an introduction to the mathematics of life assurance. You will learn to value cash flows and use life tables for making predictions and analysing mortality patterns. This leads on to the valuation of life annuities and of the benefits paid in life assurance policies. Various life assurance products will be explained and then used for illustration of the basic principles of life assurance.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Actuarial Mathematics Mathematical Sciences MTH6100P Semester 2 6 No

Actuarial Mathematics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Dudley Stark
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module gives an introduction to the mathematics of life assurance. You will learn to value cash flows and use life tables for making predictions and analysing mortality patterns. This leads on to the valuation of life annuities and of the benefits paid in life assurance policies. Various life assurance products will be explained and then used for illustration of the basic principles of life assurance.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Adaptations English and Drama DRA248 Semester 1 5 Yes

Adaptations

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Drama
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Performances as diverse as Hollywood cinema, West End theatre, Restoration drama, costume dramas, verbatim theatre and experimental theatre and performance practices exhibit a fascination with adapting the work of other artists and media. This module explores issuees at stake in practices of adaptation and provides students with opportunities to experiment with creating adaptations. In particular, Adaptations investigates the ways in which a variety of media might be adapted for performance and the aesthetic, cultural and ethical considerations that arise from this work. Students will engage with these issues and practices through a critical engagement with case studies, criticism and practical tasks. In the module of these investigations, students will experiment with a range of performance-making strategies and test ideas and concepts such as simulation, mimesis, genre, originality and authenticity. Students will work with a range of materials for adaptation which might include, but is not limited to: film, fiction, painting, sculpture, interviews, news media, plays, (auto)biography and photographs.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Student-led teaching
  • Semester 1: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Administrative Law Law LAW5106 Semester 2 5 Yes

Administrative Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Daniela Nadj
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Law Background

The module in Administrative Law focuses on the principles of judicial review, the process by which the courts are asked to determine the validity or invalidity of the decisions, actions and inaction of government departments, local councils and other public bodies.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Accounting for Business Business and Management BUS216 Semester 2 5 Yes

Advanced Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module builds on the foundation provided by BUS106 Accounting for Business in Year 1. In the area of Financial Accounting, the proposed module focuses on Financial Reporting by companies, and impact of company law and accounting standards. In Management Accounting the module looks at different approaches to costing, and the concept of identifying relevant costs for management decision-making; the appraisal of investment opportunities (capital budgeting) and accounting as a control mechanism.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Advanced Aircraft Design Engineering and Materials Science DEN7305 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: "DEN6305,DENM30
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the design and performance of a typical aircraft. It covers mission based subsonic aircraft design methodology, areodynamic design, engine design, and noise in propeller and jet driven aircraft, structural design and materials selection.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Aircraft Design Engineering and Materials Science DENM305 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the design and performance of a typical aircraft. It covers mission based subsonic aircraft design methodology, areodynamic design, engine design, and noise in propeller and jet driven aircraft, structural design and materials selection.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7

Advanced Analytical Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences SBCM603 Semester 2 6 No

Advanced Analytical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module builds on the 1st year analytical course (SBC107), with an emphasis on advanced instrumental methods. The course will cover advanced separation and spectroscopic methods of analysis, with a special emphasis on hyphenated techniques such as GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS etc as well as advanced techniques in capillary electrophoresis and molecular spectroscopy such as ATR and Raman spectroscopy. Various applications of these methods will be discussed with a view to their application in a modern analytical laboratory.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 6

Advanced Analytical Chemistry & Spectroscopy Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE308 Semester 2 6 No

Advanced Analytical Chemistry & Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE104

This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and "hyphenated" techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Biological and Chemical Sciences MCHE308 Semester 2 6 No

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and "hyphenated" techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6

Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling Economics and Finance ECOM044 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Akindynos Baltas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aim of this module is to provide students with the analytical tools of advanced finance theory. The module will give an introduction to stochastic calculus, optimal control and martingale methods, and will cover dynamic asset pricing models, optimal consumption and portfolio theory, equilibrium models of the term structure of interest rates, option pricing of interest rates and stocks based on arbitrage and general equilibrium models, incomplete markets and portfolio optimisation in incomplete markets. Prerequisites: ECOM043 Quantitative Asset Pricing

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 6 pm - 9 pm

Advanced Biocompatibility Science Engineering and Materials Science MAT7312 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Biocompatibility Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karin Hing
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts related to and underpinning biocompatibility. It will cover topics including proteins and protein adsorption, biomaterial- cell, blood and tissue interactions, Inflammation, wound healing, foreign body response, Toxicity, hypersensitivity and infection.
The pre-clinical testing of biomaterials will be considered with respect to chemical exchange and degradation, cell response (proliferation vs differentiation), evaluation of material compatibility, evaluation of device functionality (biomechanics, remodelling/adaptation). Clinical trials and regulatory approval will also be discussed.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Combinatorics Mathematical Sciences MTH742P Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Combinatorics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Ellis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module builds on the combinatorial ideas of the modules Combinatorics and Extremal Combinatorics and introduces some of the more advanced tools for solving combinatorial and graph theoretic problems. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise but significant emphasis will be on the techniques used as well as the results proved.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Combinatorics Mathematical Sciences MTH742U Semester 1 7 Yes

Advanced Combinatorics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Ellis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6109

This module builds on the combinatorial ideas of the modules Combinatorics and Extremal Combinatorics and introduces some of the more advanced tools for solving combinatorial and graph theoretic problems. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise but significant emphasis will be on the techniques used as well as the results proved.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines Engineering and Materials Science DEN426 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: "DEN326,DENM021
Prerequisite: DEN208 and DEN101 DEN313

This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines Engineering and Materials Science DENM021 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: "DEN326,DEN426"
Prerequisite: None

This module covers fundamentals and applications of combustions in automotive engine. Topics covered in the module include the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations, as well as additional directed advanced reading material in energy use in power plants, combustion modelling and life cycle analysis.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Computing in Finance Mathematical Sciences MTH773P Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Corporate Finance Economics and Finance ECOM088 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an advanced treatment of four of the main topics in corporate finance: capital structure, dividend policy, initial public offerings, and mergers and takeovers. Emphasis is placed both on the understanding of theoretical models (e.g., moral hazard and agency problems, adverse selection, signaling, symmetric and asymmetric information) and on the formation and testing of empirical hypotheses.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Database Systems and Technology Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS613U Semester 1 6 Yes

Advanced Database Systems and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Topics covered include: Database performance tuning: denormalisation, over normalisation, indexing and clustering. Active databases: the event, condition action model, different types of triggers and their applications. Databases for XML and XML query languages: DTD, storage, model, native database, XPath, XQuery, mapping to relational and OO DBMS; Data mining: the exploration of large quantities of data for the discovery of meaningful rules and knowledge; Information extraction: the analysis of unrestricted text to extract information about pre-specified types of events, entities or relationships; Mobile databases: design and performance; Moving objects databases: language extensions to support spatial-temporal data.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Database Systems and Technology Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS716P Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Database Systems and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Database performance tuning: denormalisation, over normalisation use of indexes, clustering. Active database systems: the event condition action model, types and applications of triggers. Databases for XML and XML query languages: DTD, storage, model, native database, XPath, XQuery Data mining: the exploration of large quantities of data for the discovery of meaningful rules and knowledge; Moving object databases: approaches to the modelling and querying of temporal, spatial and spatial-temporal data

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Environmental Engineering Engineering and Materials Science DEN420 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: "DENM012,DEN320
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Environmental Engineering Engineering and Materials Science DENM012 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: DEN420
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles Engineering and Materials Science DEN7001 Semester 1 7 Yes

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles Engineering and Materials Science DENM001 Semester 1 7 Yes

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN303

This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Gas Turbines Engineering and Materials Science DEN427 Semester 2 7 Yes

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital
Overlap: DENM022
Prerequisite: "DEN107 DEN240 DEN241 DEN242 DEN313"

Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306, but there will be additional directed reading on this module, to enable students to tackle a substantial piece of coursework. This will concern the energy use in power and propulsion systems and the optimisation of land-based power-generating gas turbines in combined cycles with steam plant or similar project.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 8 am - 8 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Gas Turbines Engineering and Materials Science DENM022 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital
Overlap: DEN427
Prerequisite: "DEN107 DEN313"

Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306, but there will be additional directed reading on this module, to enable students to tackle a substantial piece of coursework. This will concern the energy use in power and propulsion systems and the optimisation of land-based power-generating gas turbines in combined cycles with steam plant or similar project.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Engineering and Materials Science DENM208 Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Engineering and Materials Science DEN7208 Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics Engineering and Materials Science DEN7405 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: "DEN6405,DENM40
Prerequisite: DEN5242

This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics Engineering and Materials Science DENM405 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: "DEN6405,DEN740
Prerequisite: None

This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Advanced Management Accounting Business and Management BUSM067 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing organisations as they operate in a world of increasing competitiveness and change, requiring managers to combine management accounting ideas with those from other areas such as marketing, technology and HR. Accordingly it is interdisciplinary.
The module is arranged around:
1 Accounting for strategic management: introduction: methodological issues in management accounting
2 The essence of management control in private, voluntary and public sectors
3 Strategic Issues in cost allocation and activity-based costing and activity-based management
4 Advanced manufacturing technology, JIT, target costing and product life-cycle costing
5 Quality costing, total quality management and management accounting systems
6 Value-chain analysis and accounting
7 Customer profitability analysis/customer accounting
8 Competitor analysis/competitor accounting
9 Responsibility accounting, financial performance measures, and transfer prices
10 Measuring non-financial performance: the balanced scorecard
11 Benchmarking analysis
The module will draw upon a range of case studies drawn from the `real world¿.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Materials Characterization Techniques Engineering and Materials Science MAT804 Semester 2 7 Yes

Advanced Materials Characterization Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asa Barber
Overlap: MTRM066
Prerequisite: None

The module details the latest developments and breakthroughs in characterization techniques used to examine common types of materials. These techniques are varied but focus on high resolution imaging and structural information as well as methods to measure the physical properties of materials. Core topics investigate advanced scanning probe microscopy to image surfaces and provide a wealth of physical information, mechanical testing small volumes using nanoindentation, electron imaging and sample preparation using focussed ion beam methods and X-ray scattering used in biological tissue. Topics are delivered by experts in the field.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Materials Characterization Techniques Engineering and Materials Science MTRM066 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Materials Characterization Techniques

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asa Barber
Overlap: MAT804
Prerequisite: None

The module details the latest developments and breakthroughs in characterization techniques used to examine common types of materials. These techniques are varied but focus on high resolution imaging and structural information as well as methods to measure the physical properties of materials. Core topics investigate advanced scanning probe microscopy to image surfaces and provide a wealth of physical information, mechanical testing small volumes using nanoindentation, electron imaging and sample preparation using focussed ion beam methods and X-ray scattering used in biological tissue. Topics are delivered by experts in the field.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Medical Negligence Law QLLM005 Full year 7 No

Advanced Medical Negligence

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will closely delve into medical negligence by examining the principal difficulties associated with the common law cause of action, and the various (often controversial) ways in which statute has encroached in recent years to adjust patient-medical practitioner patterns of legal liability.

Following a brief revision of the general cause of action, the module will analyse and critique a number of its manifestations, including: wrongful conception, wrongful birth, wrongful life, secondary victim psychiatric illness, treatment of the legal good Samaritan, failure to warn actions, therapeutic privilege, obligations to fund or to provide health treatment, faulty screening services, and compensatory ceilings.

Prerequisites: none
Applicable Groupings: M

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Microeconomics Economics and Finance ECN361 Semester 1 6 Yes

Advanced Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roberto Veneziani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN211 ECN214

This module aims to help you to bridge the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate economics. It is strongly recommended for all students who are considering continuing to a taught Master's degree in Economics. The module will attempt to develop your capacity for strategic reasoning via the translation of economic stories into simple models, spelling out every step of each argument in detail. Topics covered include individual decision making, efficiency of competitive market economy and causes of market failure, social choice and welfare, and information economics.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Oral Competence in French Languages Linguistics and Film FRE407 Full year 6 Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in French

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Laetitia Calabrese
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: There will be a qualifying entry test in Welcome Week; priority will be given to non-francophone stu

This module aims to develop oral comprehension and language production skills to a very high level. You will study authentic extracts from a wide variety of French and Francophone sources (radio, tv and the internet) and will be trained in language competence in both formal and informal situations ranging from debates to recorded formal oral communication.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Advanced Oral Competence in Spanish Languages Linguistics and Film HSP611 Full year 6 Yes

Advanced Oral Competence in Spanish

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Consuelo Sanmateu-Martinez
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: HSP233 or HSP271

Students in their final year will practice their aural and oral skills. A range of tests will be used, such as aural comprehension of either video or audio material, summary of a lecture, ability to recognise and switch between linguistic registers (standard, colloquial, etc) and liaison interpreting.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE306 Semester 2 6 No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE206

This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 7, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences MCHE306 Semester 2 6 No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry by Distance Learning Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE306X Full year 6 No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry by Distance Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6

Advanced Polymer Synthesis Engineering and Materials Science MAT7797 Semester 2 7 Yes

Advanced Polymer Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Julien Gautrot
Overlap: MTRM797
Prerequisite: None

This module will give students a thorough understanding and knowledge of polymer synthesis techniques and their main applications. It will focus on key areas for industrial applications: synthesis of high performance polymers, polymeric biomaterials, polymers used for energy production and in the micro-electronics area. At the beginning of the module, basic polymerisation methods and concepts will be reviewed, to enable students with different backgrounds to come to the same level in the field of polymer chemistry. Following lectures will focus on more advanced polymerisation methods and their use to synthesis functional materials with industrial applications.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Polymer Synthesis Engineering and Materials Science MTRM797 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Polymer Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Julien Gautrot
Overlap: MAT7797
Prerequisite: None

This module will give students a thorough understanding and knowledge of polymer synthesis techniques and their main applications. It will focus on key areas for industrial applications: synthesis of high performance polymers, polymeric biomaterials, polymers used for energy production and in the micro-electronics area. At the beginning of the module, basic polymerisation methods and concepts will be reviewed, to enable students with different backgrounds to come to the same level in the field of polymer chemistry. Following lectures will focus on more advanced polymerisation methods and their use to synthesis functional materials with industrial applications.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Practical Chemistry 1 Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE301 Semester 1 6 No

Advanced Practical Chemistry 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A module of practical work designed to familiarise chemistry students with modern experimental methods and techniques in inorganic and organic chemistry. This module will build upon the practical skills acquired during the first two years. A report based on a literature search will also form part of the module, and instruction in the technique of searching the literature will be provided.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6

Advanced Practical Chemistry 2 Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE311 Semester 2 6 No

Advanced Practical Chemistry 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE301

This is a level 6 module, but is only available to third year students registered on a four year chemistry-based MSci programme. The module provides experience of advanced methodology in practical chemistry, including experience of using more advanced (research-level) analytical and preparative instrumentation. Students undertake a series of extended experimental procedures and investigations, and are required to produce a detailed report for each.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6

Advanced Principles of Spacecraft Design Engineering and Materials Science DENM028 Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Principles of Spacecraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Stark
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will familiarise the students with the technologies underpinning spacecraft engineering. Including thermal control, orbit dynamics, propulsion and phase systems.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7

Advanced Program Design Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS711P Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Program Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Huntbach
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Basic concepts and techniques of object-oriented programming in general and the use of Java in particular. Issues in class and interface design (minimising class and member accessibility, immutability, composition versus inheritance, interfaces versus abstract classes, preventing subclassing, static versus nonstatic classes). The module will also examine a number of Design Patterns. Requirements for creating understandable, maintainable, and robust classes that can be easily reused by others in a team. Exceptions, type variables, iterators and other advanced aspects of the core Java language will be covered. Java's Collections Framework will be considered in detail as an example of a coherent set of Java classes designed to work together, and for its use of generic typing. There will also be some coverage of software engineering principles: analysis and specification of user requirements, object-oriented design, testing and debugging, refactoring.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Program Design Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS711U Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Program Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Huntbach
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Basic concepts and techniques of object-oriented programming in general and the use of Java in particular. Issues in class and interface design (minimising class and member accessibility, immutability, composition versus inheritance, interfaces versus abstract classes, preventing subclassing, static versus nonstatic classes). The module will also examine a number of Design Patterns. Requirements for creating understandable, maintainable, and robust classes that can be easily reused by others in a team. Exceptions, type variables, iterators and other advanced aspects of the core Java language will be covered. Java's Collections Framework will be considered in detail as an example of a coherent set of Java classes designed to work together, and for its use of generic typing. There will also be some coverage of software engineering principles: analysis and specification of user requirements, object-oriented design, testing and debugging, refactoring.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Quantum Field Theory Physics and Astronomy SPA7001P Semester 2 7 Yes

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Advanced Quantum Field Theory Physics and Astronomy SPA7001U Semester 2 7 Yes

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Advanced Readings in Geography Geography GEG7101 Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Readings in Geography

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Unlike other option modules, Advanced Readings in Geography will be taught on an individual basis and only in exceptional circumstances. The student would be required to complete a proposal explaining why s/he would like to conduct advanced level readings on a clearly defined area of research that is not covered in detail on other MA/MSc courses. If an appropriate colleague agrees to supervise the Readings module, fortnightly meetings will be held to discuss the readings and to develop the 5000 word paper. The course is essentially self-directed, like equivalent courses taught elsewhere at Masters level.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Advanced Research and Practice in Environmental Science Geography GEG6216 Full year 6 No

Advanced Research and Practice in Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to develop advanced skills in Environmental Science Research and Practice, in order to prepare students for the Independent Research Project at Level 7 and employment beyond Queen Mary. The module enables students to:
(i) develop project ideas for their Level 7 Independent Research Project.
(ii) develop the research design for the Independent Research Project.
(iii) undertake a critical review of methodological approaches within a relevant scientific field, contributing to the development of the research design for the Independent Research Project and developing writing skills in relation to the synthesis and effective communication of advanced scientific and/or technical information.
(iv) produce a detailed project plan and timetable, together with full risk assessment covering any field and laboratory work to be undertaken as part of the Independent Research Project.
(v) explore potential future career paths.
(vi) develop their ability to effectively communicate their skills and experience in relation to employment criteria.

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Coursework
Level: 6

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics Engineering and Materials Science DEN7335 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Stark
Overlap: "DEN6335,DENM33
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics Engineering and Materials Science DENM335 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Stark
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Advanced Statistics Project Mathematical Sciences MTH6103 Full year 6 No

Advanced Statistics Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5120

The major part of this module is an individual project on some aspect of probability, statistical theory or applied statistics. There will also be classes, which will cover an introduction to project work, statistical study skills and report writing.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in Materials Engineering and Materials Science MAT706 Semester 1 7 Yes

Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asa Barber
Overlap: MTRM065
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces the advantages of producing complex materials consisting of constituents of relatively small size (nanomaterials). The physical properties of nanomaterials are considered and justification on using nanomaterials within composite design made. Complex materials produced synthetically and those found in nature (such as bone, teeth and shell) are examined. The production of complex materials using biomineralization in nature and synthetic routes are defined. In addition, developing an understanding of the relationship between structure and function is enhanced using practical work.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in Materials Engineering and Materials Science MTRM065 Semester 1 7 Yes

Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asa Barber
Overlap: MAT706
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces the advantages of producing complex materials consisting of constituents of relatively small size (nanomaterials). The physical properties of nanomaterials are considered and justification on using nanomaterials within composite design made. Complex materials produced synthetically and those found in nature (such as bone, teeth and shell) are examined. The production of complex materials using biomineralization in nature and synthetic routes are defined. In addition, developing an understanding of the relationship between structure and function is enhanced using practical work.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Engineering and Materials Science MTRM064 Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Lee
Overlap: MAT311
Prerequisite: None

This specialised module covers a range of topics in Tissue Engineering. It will develop the knowledge base of the student with emphasis on the current research directions of this rapidly emerging topic supported by skills developed in the laboratory. The students will understand the multidisciplinary principles underpinning tissue engineering, They will appreciate principles that underlie behind a series of strategies to repair both tissues and organs. They will be able to apply their engineering background to biological systems. They will develop skills to enable them to be fully conversant with current research.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Tissue Mechanics Engineering and Materials Science DEN7311 Semester 2 7 No

Advanced Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature.
The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage.
It brings this together, considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 7

Advanced Transform Methods Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS706P Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Transform Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ioannis Patras
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces transform and sub-band techniques as a pre-cursor to compression and other applications. It is the first step beyond the fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing. The module highlights the time-frequency trade-off and students will learn to understand the relative merits of different time to frequency mappings. Students will also be a exposed to joint time-frequency transforms and will learn to utilize and develop skills in high performance mathematical visualization software.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Transform Methods Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS706U Semester 1 7 Yes

Advanced Transform Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ioannis Patras
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces transform and sub-band techniques as a pre-cursor to compression and other applications. It is the first step beyond the fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing. The module highlights the time-frequency trade-off and students will learn to understand the relative merits of different time to frequency mappings. Students will also be a exposed to joint time-frequency transforms and will learn to utilize and develop skills in high performance mathematical visualization software.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Transform Methods Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS706D Semester 1 7 No

Advanced Transform Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ioannis Patras
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces transform and sub-band techniques as a pre-cursor to compression and other applications. It is the first step beyond the fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing. The module highlights the time-frequency trade-off and students will learn to understand the relative merits of different time to frequency mappings. Students will also be a exposed to joint time-frequency transforms and will learn to utilize and develop skills in high performance mathematical visualization software.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Translation for French Erasmus and Associate Students Languages Linguistics and Film FRE602 Full year 6 Yes

Advanced Translation for French Erasmus and Associate Students

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE452
Prerequisite: Native competence in French

This module is intended for full-year Erasmus or Associate students from French-speaking countries. It offers advanced training in translation skills both from French into English (semester 1) and English into French (semester 2). A variety of challenging literary and journalistic texts will be used.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6

Advanced Translation Into German, and Precis Languages Linguistics and Film GER619 Full year 6 Yes

Advanced Translation Into German, and Precis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Astrid Kohler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Near Native Competence in German

This module is intended for Erasmus or Associate Students from German-speaking countries. It offers practice and translation of linguistically and intellectually challenging literary texts and précis in English of substantial German texts.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Advertising Business and Management BUS213 Semester 2 5 Yes

Advertising

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores advertising as an evolving category of social communication within a convergent media landscape. A strategic managerial perspective is taken to generate insight into the development of advertising and the roles and processes so entailed. The consumer perspective is also considered in the light of advertising¿s role as a vehicle for cultural meaning. Media consumption issues are also important to consider given the rapid growth in expenditure on digital (especially mobile) advertising communication. The module takes a multi-disciplinary approach drawing on socio-cultural, psychological and anthropological perspectives.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Aeroelasticity Engineering and Materials Science DEN410 Semester 2 7 Yes

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DENM032
Prerequisite: DEN211

The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Aeroelasticity Engineering and Materials Science DENM032 Semester 2 7 No

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DEN410
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Aerospace Research Project Engineering and Materials Science DENM003 Full year 7 No

Aerospace Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Steven Dunn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Aerospace Structures Engineering and Materials Science DEN307 Semester 2 6 Yes

Aerospace Structures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide the student with the basic tools of structural analysis including the structure idealization, analysis of the thin-walled cellular type of structure peculiar to the aircraft, stress calculations of composite structures, fundamentals of elasticity and buckling analysis of plate.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Aerothermodynamics of Fluid Flows Engineering and Materials Science DEN5242 Semester 1 5 Yes

Aerothermodynamics of Fluid Flows

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "DEN4101 DEN107"

This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows, formation of waves, Mach number and Mach Wave, Shock-Waves, effect of area change and back pressure on the flow of gases and its application to jet engines and wind tunnels, flow measurement and flow visualization in compressible flows. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of compressible aerodynamics and its implication in aerospace engineering. The second part of the module provides students with a basic knowledge of viscous flows and boundary layers and drag.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Aestheticism and Fin de Siecle Literature English and Drama LCMM015 Semester 1 7 No

Aestheticism and Fin de Siecle Literature

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Maxwell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to developments in the literature of the late Victorian period with an eye to its possible influences on modernist writing. Students are encouraged to explore such issues as the construction of the self and personality, representation of the body, the role of the artist with reference to gender and sexuality, Decadence, and the 'New Woman', as well as making a more general survey of aesthetics, style, and the visual and literary imagination in the writings of the period. Students study a variety of different kinds of writing including poetry, drama, art and literary criticism, and the novel. Writers included are Swinburne, Pater, Wilde, and Hardy, and lesser known figures such as Vernon Lee and Charlotte Mew.

Assessment: .0% Practical, 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Africa and International Politics Politics and International Relations POL372 Semester 1 6 Yes

Africa and International Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sophie Harman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Africa has consistently been ignored by many of the major social science disciplines. Many of the major theoretical traditions treat Africa as either irrelevant to great power politics, or as simply an effect of great power or class domination. This module aims to introduce students to Africa's international relations, African-centric perspectives which challenge traditional academic approaches and seeks to locate Africa's fate not merely in processes of imperial domination but also in African social and class configurations themselves. This is a distinct approach which centres the teaching of Africa on the continent itself, rather than exclusively on what external actors are doing to it. This is not to dismiss the influence of external actors and processes, but to reveal the many cases of where this distinction between the external and internal in Africa has limited utility in explaining events and processes on the continent.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

A History of Terror in the Modern Age 1858-2008 History HST6319 Semester 2 6 Yes

A History of Terror in the Modern Age 1858-2008

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martyn Frampton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Terrorism" has become a defining phenomenon of the modern era. In the "war on terror" politicians and commentators alike have argued that we face a "new kind" of threat and that the "rules of the game" have changed. This module will consider the truth of such assertions by examining the history of terrorism in the modern age. The process of modern state formation since the middle of the nineteenth century has been accompanied by violent challenges to the status quo from non-state actors who have deployed terrorist methods in pursuit of their goals. From international anarchists to Irish "rebels", from anti-imperialist "revolutionaries" to the Islamist-inspired millenarians of today, this module will examine the methods and ideologies of "terrorism", exploring the milieu and mindset of some of its most prominent perpetrators.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Aircraft Design Engineering and Materials Science DEN6305 Semester 2 6 Yes

Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEN7305
Prerequisite: DEN233

This module is concerned the design and performance of a broad range of aerospace vehicles including fixed-wing aeroplanes (subsonic and supersonic), helicopters, hovercraft, airships, and launch vehicles.
Coursework and tutorial materials involve use of spreadsheets, but the module is primarily assessed by a written exam.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Aircraft Propulsion Engineering and Materials Science DEN306 Semester 2 6 Yes

Aircraft Propulsion

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital
Overlap: "DEN427,DENM022
Prerequisite: "DEN107 DEN205"

The aims of this module are to introduce the basic concepts of propulsion and to show how thrust and fuel consumption can be calculated for a variety of engines under design conditions. It will provide an understanding of the way in which materials constraints and aerodynamics limit gas-turbine and aero-engine performance, particularly of turbines and compressors and will introduce the basic principles of turbine, compressor and nozzle design

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Algebraic Structures I Mathematical Sciences MTH5100 Semester 2 5 Yes

Algebraic Structures I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Leonard Soicher
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH4104

The modern axiomatic approach to mathematics is demonstrated in the study of the fundamental theory of abstract algebraic structures. Group theory, subgroups, generators, Lagrange's theorem. Normal subgroups, homomorphisms, isomorphism theorems. Ring theory, integral domains. Ideals, homomorphisms and isomorphism theorems. Polynomial rings, Euclidean algorithm, fields of fractions.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Algebraic Structures II Mathematical Sciences MTH6104 Semester 1 6 Yes

Algebraic Structures II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH4104

This is a second module in algebraic structures, covering more advanced aspects of group theory and ring theory as well as introducing the theory of modules. There is a strong emphasis on abstract thinking and proof. The group theory portion includes the basics of group actions, finite p-groups, Sylow theorems and applications, and the Jordan-Holder theorem. In ring theory, matrix rings and Noetherian rings are studied. After studying the basic theory of modules, the structure of finitely generated modules over Euclidean domains is determined.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Algebraic Structures II Mathematical Sciences MTH6104P Semester 1 6 No

Algebraic Structures II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Algorithms and Complexity Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS634U Semester 1 6 Yes

Algorithms and Complexity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Soren Riis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is a theoretical module, which is concerned with reasoning about algorithms. Using sorting algorithms and graph algorithms as examples, the module introduces methods for proving the correctness of algorithms and for analysing their complexity. The module then introduces the theory of NP-completeness, and attempts to solve NP-complete problems in practice, including approximate and heuristic algorithms.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Algorithms and Data Structures in an Object-Oriented Framework Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS510U Semester 1 5 Yes

Algorithms and Data Structures in an Object-Oriented Framework

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Huntbach
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Algorithms are "ways of doing something", data structures are ways of combining collections of data to form a coherent whole. Many algorithms are about processing collections of data; an obvious example being to re-arrange a collection to put it in some sorted order. This module will introduce the basic concepts of algorithms and data structures expressed using the Java programming language.Java is an object-oriented language, and the object-oriented style is recognised as a good way of both breaking down a program into coherent parts, and generalising these parts so they may be re-used in a variety of contexts. This module introduces algorithms and data structures in an object-oriented framework. A key theme is the idea of "abstraction": being able to separate out the way a program component works in interaction with other components from what goes on underneath to make it work.The module is intended for those who have already covered the basics of programming, and wish to move on to use and develop their programming skills for designing and constructing components of programs of a larger scale.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern Alps Geography GEG5220 Semester 2 5 No

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern Alps

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the most rapidly uplifting orogens on Earth, driven by an interplay between active tectonics, climate and erosion. This collision of forces, creates a remarkably diverse environment, characterized by an 800 km long, 3000 m high mountain belt, a strong west-east climatic divide, active glacierized headwaters and labile piedmont braided rivers and alluvial fans. This spectacular, and geologically young environment provides a rich natural laboratory for the study of the physical environment, in which the landforms and pattern of landscape evolution are tangibly connected to the physical processes driving sediment transfers from source to sink. This module will offer students an insight into the dynamic landscapes of Alpine environments and the research methods used to study them. Particular emphasis will be placed on investigating the processes and products of glacial and fluvial systems in order to understand how they might respond to tectonic and climate drivers.

Teaching and learning will begin in the classroom, through a series of lectures and workshops examining the environments and processes of the Southern Alps. This will involve some group-based preparatory research design, and culminates in a 10-day trip to NZ, based on three-centres offering contrasting landscapes and suites of processes: a) Franz Josef and the west-coast glaciers; b) the Queenstown lake district; and c) Mount Cook Village. These venues will provide opportunities for investigative research on active glaciers, tectonic geomorphology, and a chance to study dynamic glacio-fluvial braided rivers and their associated hazards. Field teaching will involve a mix of staff-led and group-based project work, with a particular focus on research design and data interpretation. Please note that students will be required to fund their own airfares to NZ (from £800, which offers the flexibility to extend their stay through the Easter Vacation) and contribute a fee to cover the costs of travel and subsistence in NZ (c. £650-750).

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern Alps Geography GEG6220 Semester 2 6 No

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern Alps

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the most rapidly uplifting orogens on Earth, driven by an interplay between active tectonics, climate and erosion. This collision of forces, creates a remarkably diverse environment, characterized by an 800 km long, 3000 m high mountain belt, a strong west-east climatic divide, active glacierized headwaters and labile piedmont braided rivers and alluvial fans. This spectacular, and geologically young environment provides a rich natural laboratory for the study of the physical environment, in which the landforms and pattern of landscape evolution are tangibly connected to the physical processes driving sediment transfers from source to sink. This module will offer students an insight into the dynamic landscapes of Alpine environments and the research methods used to study them. Particular emphasis will be placed on investigating the processes and products of glacial and fluvial systems in order to understand how they might respond to tectonic and climate drivers.

Teaching and learning will begin in the classroom, through a series of lectures and workshops examining the environments and processes of the Southern Alps. This will involve some group-based preparatory research design, and culminates in a 10-day trip to NZ, based on three-centres offering contrasting landscapes and suites of processes: a) Franz Josef and the west-coast glaciers; b) the Queenstown lake district; and c) Mount Cook Village. These venues will provide opportunities for investigative research on active glaciers, tectonic geomorphology, and a chance to study dynamic glacio-fluvial braided rivers and their associated hazards. Field teaching will involve a mix of staff-led and group-based project work, with a particular focus on research design and data interpretation. Please note that students will be required to fund their own airfares to NZ (from £800, which offers the flexibility to extend their stay through the Easter Vacation) and contribute a fee to cover the costs of travel and subsistence in NZ (c. £650-750).

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Alternative Dispute Resolution Law QLLM006 Full year 7 No

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to familiarise you with a wide range of dispute resolution processes alternative to conventional forms of adjudication and their impact on legal system. The module is not designed to train you as a mediator or negotiator. If you are interested in mastering these skills you should take specially designed skills based training modules. Instead the module will equip you with basic tools, which can help you in representing your client in ADR process, primarily in mediation. The module in particular aims to form your own attitude so that you can help your clients and society select and employ the most effective, just, and humane methods of dispute resolution.

The classes are designed to cover a wide range of jurisdictions where it is possible, and they take a comparative standpoint. Although the module will give an overview of existing institutional and legal framework in all major areas where ADR is currently used, it will focus more on the broad area of commercial disputes.

ADR is truly interdisciplinary field comprising law, social science, economics, psychology and others. However, the module is primarily designed for lawyers and experts directly involved into resolution of legal disputes.

ADR is also a newly emerged and vibrant area of scholarship, it is impossible to give "yes" or "no" answers to most of the questions. Therefore the module will employ critical thinking and open discussion approach. It is expected that students are willing to share results of their research and are involved in active discussion of all issues.


Prerequisites: none
Applicable Groupings: B, C, J

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 40.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Alternative Dispute Resolution Law CCDD002 Full year 7 No

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms T Kyselova
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Knowledge: The purpose of this module is to familiarise you with a wide range of dispute resolution processes alternative to conventional forms of adjudication and their impact on legal system. Skills: The module is NOT designed to train you as a mediator or negotiator. If you are interested in mastering these skills you should take specially designed skills based training modules. Instead the module will equip you with basic tools which can help you in representing your client in ADR process, primarily in mediation. Attitudes: It is not the goal of this module to persuade you in inherited superiority of ADR over traditional court system or settlement, but rather to form your own attitude so that you can help your clients and society select and employ the most effective, just, and humane methods of dispute resolution.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Alternative Investments Economics and Finance ECOM076 Semester 2 7 No

Alternative Investments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This thirty-hour optional module provides a thorough overview of recent developments in investment strategies including a description of the peculiarities of alternative asset classes. The main emphasis will be on the various complementary investment vehicles, methods and industries, namely commodities, real estate and hedge funds. The first part of the course concentrates on commodities, metals, energy and agriculture. The second part of the course focuses on alternative real estate financing and investment vehicles. The third part of the course offers an analysis of hedge fund strategies. The final part of the course provides an overview of additional alternative investments such as socially responsible funds, microfinance funds and other alternative investments.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

American Money Novels 1793-1930. English and Drama ESH6018 Semester 1 6 Yes

American Money Novels 1793-1930.

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Claire Preston
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

We will explore the great American subject of money from the foundations of the Republic to the Jazz Age in the fictions of capital, thrift, production, high finance, self-sufficiency, and fraud. The semester will be roughly divided into four sections (Making It, Robber-Barons, Girl-Power, and Voices Like Money, each section of three or four weeks) that allow a big range of reading, thematically organised. The module will also be roughly, but not rigidly, chronological, in order to give students without a lot of experience of American literature a sense of what¿s there to be investigated. There will be a lecture each week, which will introduce the themes and work under scrutiny, followed by a seminar.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Analogue Electronics Engineering and Materials Science MELM008 Semester 1 7 No

Analogue Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hasan Shaheed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide a rapid introduction to analogue electronics, to bring students from different backgrounds to an equivalent level, followed by a more detailed look at specific aspects of electronics of importance to medical applications

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7

Analogue Electronic Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS409U Semester 2 4 Yes

Analogue Electronic Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria De Los Angeles Mondragon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is a Level 4 module introducing you to electronic devices, components, circuits and simple systems. There is particular emphasis on the basic theorems and techniques of electric circuit theory in relation to simple a.c. and d.c. circuits in order to provide a sound theoretical background to both analogue and digital modules in subsequent semesters.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Analysing Public Policy Politics and International Relations POL350 Semester 2 6 Yes

Analysing Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Diamond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

The aim of this module is to examine the theory and practice of policy-making in modern liberal democratic political systems. The module explores the way in which public issues and problems are triggered, defined and constructed, how policy agendas are set, how decision making takes place, and how policies are implemented. The module is comparative in scope and focuses primarily on case studies from the UK and USA.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Ancient Myth - Modern Theory English and Drama ESH348 Semester 2 6 Yes

Ancient Myth - Modern Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katie Fleming
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"We are all Greeks." (Shelley, Hellas) The myths of ancient Greece have long fascinated and perplexed scholars and intellectuals. In this module we shall examine some of those myths, and their influence on the Western intellectual tradition. The module aims to familiarise students with a number of theories to which they have given rise. Students will be encouraged to examine and critique these interpretations. "We are much less Greek than we believe." (Foucault, Discipline and Punish).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Anglo-American Relations 1945-70 History HST5301 Semester 2 5 Yes

Anglo-American Relations 1945-70

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Ellison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines Anglo-American relations from 1945 to 1970 and analyses the nature of the special relationship. Set within the rich historiography of this subject, the module considers how US and UK governments responded to major events in world history from 1945 to 1970. Throughout, particular reference will be made to Anglo-American relations in the political, diplomatic, economic, defence and intelligence arenas and to the importance of personalities in strengthening and weakening the alliance.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Anglo-German Travel Writing Languages Linguistics and Film SMLM034 Semester 1 7 No

Anglo-German Travel Writing

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Astrid Kohler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is to explore the mutual perception of identity and culture of Germany and Britain as reflected by the various modes of travel writing (essay, letter, diary, literary journal etc.) since the Enlightenment. It offers a close study of this important means of literary communication and exploration of `otherness¿. It also addresses the aesthetic and socio-cultural function of Anglo-German travel writing and examines its historical development.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Animal and Plant Diversity Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC221 Semester 1 5 No

Animal and Plant Diversity

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will consist of lectures, workshops and a fieldcourse. Collectively these will cover the diversity of organisms on Earth (with a primary emphasis on animals) including previous diversity (the fossil record) their relationships and key characteristics. The field work will concentrate on invertebrates but opportunity will be taken to study some vertebrates: reptiles, birds, seals, and small mammals. During the semester there will be workshops consisting of trips to the Natural History Museum and Grant Museum to allow further study of extant and fossil animals.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

An Independent Geographical Study Geography GEG6000 Full year 6 No

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5103 GEG5211

As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment: .0% Coursework, 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Antennas for Mobile Applications Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS723P Semester 2 7 No

Antennas for Mobile Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Akram Alomainy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce the antennas and antenna requirements applicable to mobile applications. The module covers all aspects of antennas for mobile from the background theory through their design and testing to their application in real world systems.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Antennas for Mobile Applications Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS723U Semester 2 7 Yes

Antennas for Mobile Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Akram Alomainy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce the antennas and antenna requirements applicable to mobile applications. The module covers all aspects of antennas for mobile from the background theory through their design and testing to their application in real world systems.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Antennas for Mobile Applications Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS723D Semester 2 7 No

Antennas for Mobile Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Akram Alomainy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce the antennas and antenna requirements applicable to mobile applications. The module covers all aspects of antennas for mobile from the background theory through their design and testing to their application in real world systems.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Antisemitism and the Holocaust History HST7405 Semester 2 7 Yes

Antisemitism and the Holocaust

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wildmann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Modern European Jewish history has for centuries been profoundly affected by anti-Judaism and antisemitism, influencing Jewish life in legal, social, economic, cultural and intellectual spheres from the middle ages until today. The study of antisemitism is crucial for our understanding of the wider social and cultural context of Jewish history in Modern Europe. The programme will trace the development of antisemitism in Modern Europe, through its historical transformation under the impact of secularisation, the rise of nationalism and racial theories. The module will try to compare the history of antisemitism in different European countries, but the emphasis will be on the role of antisemitism in the Third Reich. It will survey the development of historical writing and the interpretation of antisemitism and the Holocaust, and will address forms of secular and religious antisemitism since the Holocaust.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Applied Dental Materials Engineering and Materials Science MAT220 Semester 1 6 Yes

Applied Dental Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karin Hing
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an understanding of the interrelationships that exist between different dental materials and that dictate their usage in clinical practice in order to develop depth and applied knowledge of the key specialist dental materials including the science that underpins their technical usage.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Applied Econometrics Economics and Finance ECN336 Semester 1 6 Yes

Applied Econometrics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Andrea Tesei
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN224

This module provides you with hands-on environment in which you will learn how to analyse real economic data by applying economic theories and econometric methods in combination. The module also aims to develop your abilities in data collection, information gathering from a wide range of reading and critical evaluation of what is taught in textbooks. The module is assessed by coursework only.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Applied Future and Options Economics and Finance ECOM064 Semester 2 7 No

Applied Future and Options

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Gerry Perez
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course will provide students a general overview of exchange-traded futures and options (derivatives), from the perspective of a market participant ie, where are they traded? Who trades derivatives? The composition of a trade? Order types available? What happens after the trade? What is the impact of Information Technology on trading? Further, the course will clarify definitions relating to trading derivatives, evaluating option pricing using synthetics, assessing risk, the impact of margin and various equity option strategies will be simulated.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 6 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 7 pm - 8 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 7 pm - 9 pm

Applied Linguistics: Critical Reflection Languages Linguistics and Film EAL7842 Semester 2 7 No

Applied Linguistics: Critical Reflection

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is offered to Applied Linguistics (Dissertation Pathway 2) students at level 7 and responds to their linguistic and discipline specific needs in terms of reflective thinking and writing, as well as planning, reading, analysis and synthesis, argument structure and dissertation writing skills. Students joining this module are already at IELTS level 7 (minimum 7 in writing), which equates to C1 on the CEFR framework. Queen Mary currently benchmarks this to level 6 on the NQF framework.

This module will help students to deliver what is expected from them in their Applied Linguistics PGT programmes (dissertation Pathway 2) in terms of reflective thinking and writing. The academic skills needed to succeed in the Applied Linguistics Dissertation Pathway 2 have been itemised and will be presented in terms of the reflective thinking and writing, planning, the structure of a such a dissertation, and the accuracy of grammar, syntax and vocabulary. Students will be given the tools to manage their research and writing time efficiently and plan their work accordingly. They will be guided through the process of researching and writing their dissertations, will be expected to reflect upon their own practice and integrate this with theory, and will be provided with formative feedback to ensure the learning outcomes are achieved.

The module is needs driven and therefore the syllabus is necessarily flexible and the content delivered in workshop format. However, the basic syllabus is likely to include:
¿ The critical reflection and writing process
¿ The dissertation planning and scoping process
¿ The integration of theory and own practice
¿ Revision, proof reading and editing skills
¿ Development of the argument, including synthesis of sources, argument validity, and development of conclusions
¿ Macro structure of the dissertation, planning and development of theoretical / conceptual frameworks; micro structure of chapters, sections and paragraphs
¿ Coherence and cohesion at macro and micro levels
¿ Readability and recognition of the audience and development of the writer's voice
¿ Referencing
¿ Accuracy (grammar, vocabulary and punctuation)

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Applied Performance English and Drama DRA339 Semester 1 6 Yes

Applied Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Alistair Campbell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course will investigate critical issues in the field of Applied Performance whilst developing practical professional skills required for working in socially engaged contexts. In collaboration with various partners - for example artists, arts organisations, local schools or services - we will examine the possibilities and challenges of applied performance practice including project planning and development, performance methodologies, ethics, documentation and evaluation. Some of this work will take place in designated class time, either at QM or in local venues. Other opportunities will be time-tabled and negotiated with the group as they arise.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Student-led teaching
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm

Applied Research Methods Economics and Finance ECOM080 Semester 1 7 No

Applied Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course is about research design for causal inference. Students will learn econometric methods used to test economic hypotheses with real-world data. In the course of doing so, we will survey many of the issues currently studied by economists working in the areas of labor, education, health, immigration, crime, urban, political economy and development. Methodological topics will include selection bias, omitted variables bias, simultaneity, fixed effects, differences in differences, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, propensity score matching, lab and field experiments, and peer effects.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7

Applied Risk Management Economics and Finance ECOM059 Semester 2 7 No

Applied Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giles Spungin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is aimed at MSc Banking and Finance and MSc Investment and Finance programmes as an optional module, and fills the gap in the school's current MSc curriculum by addressing one of the most important "hot topics" in the post-financial crisis financial industry - identification, measurement and management if risks faced by financial institutions.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 7 pm - 9 pm

Applied Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTH705U Semester 1 7 Yes

Applied Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5120

The semester will be divided into three four-week periods. In each a genuine application of statistics will be studied, led by a different lecturer with at most two lectures per period. The list of topics will vary from year to year and you should obtain the current list from the module organiser. You can find out more about this module on the Maths website

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Applied Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTHM002 Semester 1 7 Yes

Applied Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Coad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The semester will be divided into three four-week periods. In each a genuine application of statistics will be studied, led by a different lecturer with at most two lectures per period. The list of topics will vary from year to year and you should obtain the current list from the module organiser. You can find out more about this module on the Maths website

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Applied Statistics Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS764P Semester 1 7 No

Applied Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Steve Uhlig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Applied Wealth Management Economics and Finance ECOM079 Semester 2 7 No

Applied Wealth Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Konstantinos Maratos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces concepts in wealth management to be able to comprehend recent developments in the regulatory economics framework behind wealth management. The course will start at a level that is appropriate for students with an economics background enabling them to master the understanding of relevant regulatory framework,. It will start with the basic building blocks, i.e. regulatory environment, conduct of busines rules, cash management, financial products etc., and move on to more applied topics, i.e. retirement planning, financial assets and markets etc.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 6 pm - 7 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 8 pm

Approaches and Analysis Languages Linguistics and Film FLM401 Full year 4 Yes

Approaches and Analysis

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Lucy Bolton
Overlap: "FLM004,FLM105,
Prerequisite: None

Approaches and Analysis will examine film from the perspectives of genre, stardom and auteurism. The module begins with a study of historical and contemporary genre filmmaking, then considers stardom from theoretical, industrial and cultural perspectives. We then look at the origins of auteur theory and its operation in the European context. The final quarter of the module draws on all these approaches in close analysis of filmic texts, thereby consolidating the perspectives and contexts examined across the whole course.

Assessment: 25.0% Examination, 75.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching Languages Linguistics and Film LLU7010 Semester 2 7 No

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching is a compulsory module on the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students are presented with a comprehensive overview of the main approaches and methods in language teaching, and have the opportunity to put these into practice: each week there is a lecture/interactive seminar to discuss the theoretical underpinnings of language teaching, followed by a practical session in which students will try out the different approaches in a peer/micro-teaching learning environment. Students will receive practical and formative feedback on their teaching sessions from both teachers and peers. The areas to be covered include: common assumptions of language teaching; the natural, oral and audio-lingual approaches; situational language teaching; social and cognitive construction; communicative language teaching; content-based Instruction; and task-based teaching.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Approaches to Applied Performance English and Drama DRA250 Semester 2 5 Yes

Approaches to Applied Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Alistair Campbell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will introduce students to skills and approaches used by theatre artists working in educational, community and socially engaged contexts. Students will gain a unique working knowledge of the project cycle with equal emphasis on theatre practice, project management, documentation and evaluation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Student-led teaching
  • Semester 2: Monday 6 pm - 8 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Approaches to Political Economy Politics and International Relations POLM059 Semester 1 7 No

Approaches to Political Economy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the theoretical foundations of the contemporary analyses of advanced capitalism. How have thinkers within politics and economics theorised and analysed the relationship between the two disciplines? Is it even possible to analytically distinguish between the two? The aim of this module is to answer these two questions by reference to the major theories within the field of political economy. The module analyses both classical and contemporary theories of political economy, and explores their continued relevance to understanding the development of advanced capitalism. Towards the end of the module we will consider some heterodox approaches brought to the fore by the onset of the ongoing financial and economic crisis and consider their relevance.

Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Aquatic Biology Investigative Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC613 Full year 6 No

Aquatic Biology Investigative Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Pickersgill
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Aquatic Biology Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC612 Full year 6 No

Aquatic Biology Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical, 60.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Aquatic Ecoystems: Structure and Function Biological and Chemical Sciences SBCM002 Semester 1 7 No

Aquatic Ecoystems: Structure and Function

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) has called for an integrative understanding of aquatic systems, including river basins, lakes, estuaries and coastal ecosystems. This new module will introduce ecological concepts from an aquatic perspective, developing ideas introduced in the more general ecology modules you will have taken previously. This module will introduce the student to the dynamic biological, physical and chemical attributes of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., both marine and freshwater) and thus unite these often separately taught disciplines to produce a more holistic insight into the structure and functioning of such systems. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the linkages and subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial systems, particularly in response to the EU WFD.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Aquatic Systems: Field Course Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM025 Semester 1 7 No

Aquatic Systems: Field Course

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The field module provides students with the opportunity to put theory into practice. Students are introduced to a variety of freshwater and coastal habitats (including rivers, shallow lakes, ponds, estuaries, rocky shores and nearshore marine environments) and a range of aquatic organisms (including protests, macrophytes, macroinvertebrates, fishes, wading birds and waterfowl). 'Hands-on' experience and training is given in field survey and monitoring techniques and in basic taxonomy.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 7

Aquatic Systems: Science, Policy and Management Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM026 Semester 2 7 No

Aquatic Systems: Science, Policy and Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module concerns applications in marine and freshwater biology, combined with hands-on experience and direct contact with employers in the aquatic sciences. It introduces a broad spectrum of human impacts on aquatic systems, including pollution (e.g. organics, inorganics, acidification, nitrogen deposition and the concept of critical loads) and habitat alteration, and how these can be mitigated (river restoration, coastal management). National and international legislation and directives are considered (e.g. EU Water Framework Directive; Habitats Directive; Urban Waste Water Treatment; Marine Protected Areas; Nitrate Vulnerable Zones). 'Case Studies' will be used to look at the link between successful science and policy: for example, the recovery of freshwaters from acidification, restoration of coastal salt marshes and the development of marine and freshwater nature reserves. Contemporary aspects of the EU Water Framework Directive will be considered, including underlying methodology behind bioassessment and biomonitoring (e.g. RIVPACS). This module is designed to bring the student 'face to face' with the regulators, policies and their science base, as these potential employers (e.g. CEFAS, Defra, EA, Natural England) will give lectures on these issues and also provide information on possible career paths.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Architecture in London I 1600 - 1837 History HST5200 Semester 1 5 Yes

Architecture in London I 1600 - 1837

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Annekatrin Hultzsch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Taught by lectures and building visits, this course is intended to introduce the study of architecture in both its historical context and its stylistic development. The course will cover buildings in the London area chronologically, from the beginnings of the Stuart dynasty to the accession of Queen Victoria, dealing mainly with the rise and development of the classical style in both domestic and public architecture. The classical style will be studied in greater depth than certain others, partly because of the lavish availability of monuments, but also so that students may better develop their knowledge of the variety of forms in which that particular style can appear, and be able to assess the significance of such varieties within that style.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Architecture in London II 1837 - to the Present History HST5302 Semester 2 5 Yes

Architecture in London II 1837 - to the Present

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Annekatrin Hultzsch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Taught by lectures and building visits, this course is intended to introduce the study of architecture in both its historical context and its stylistic development. The course will cover buildings in the London area roughly chronologically along thematic lines. Taking the ascension of Queen Victoria to the throne as a starting point, it will explore the effects of Imperialism, the Industrial Revolution, the Second World War, the Welfare State and the more recent rise of the financial elite on the built fabric of London. It is intended that students should gain a good understanding of English architecture in the period considered.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Architexts English and Drama ESH243 Full year 5 Yes

Architexts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Katie Fleming
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module allows students to explore systematically both the work of three influential thinkers - Marx, Nietzsche and Freud - and also the responses to and effects of their work in the thought of twentieth century intellectuals and theorists. Students will read a number of seminal theoretical texts, tracing critical genealogies of modern thought.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Architexts English and Drama ESH243B Semester 2 5 Yes

Architexts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Molly Macdonald
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce Associate students to the intellectual and political legacies of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by way of critical post-Marxist, Niezschean, and Freudian thnkers. Student will read from a viariety of seminal theoretical texts, which trace a number of genealogies in modern thought.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Architexts I English and Drama ESH243A Semester 1 5 Yes

Architexts I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katie Fleming
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module allows students to explore systematically both the work of three influential thinkers - Marx, Nietzsche and Freud - and also the responses to and effects of their work in the thought of twentieth century intellectuals and theorists. Students will read a number of seminal theoretical texts, tracing critical genealogies of modern thought.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Argument and Address English and Drama ESH204 Semester 2 5 Yes

Argument and Address

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Chris Reid
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is intended as an introduction to rhetorical theory and practice. The module will provide a foundation in the principles of argument, with particular reference to classical treatises on rhetoric, but the main emphasis will be on the practical analysis of argument as a key element in a variety of texts and forms of utterance, including letters (both public and familiar), essays, sermons, pamphlets, and speeches, as well as some more obviously literary examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 13: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Art, Performance and the City Geography GEG7102 Semester 2 7 Yes

Art, Performance and the City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Pinder
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module centres on projects by artists and cultural practitioners in London and particularly its East End. It involves critical reading, background research, and engaging with practices and sites through documentation, excursions and discussions with artists. The module begins with sessions on cultural practices of urban exploring and walking. Sessions then introduce and discuss particular cases that form the basis for research and seminar discussion. These may include historical walking tours in East London; artistic walking projects by Francis Alys, Tim Brennan, Janet Cardiff and Iain Sinclair; cinematic representations by Patrick Keiller; controversies about place and politics involved in Rachel Whiteread's House, completed in 1993 at a site on Grove Road next to Queen Mary; and contemporary artistic engagements with the Olympics site. Through these materials, the module explores geographical and political issues concerned the art and the city, and aspects of the changing nature and practice of urban cultures in London and its East End.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Artificial Intelligence Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS629U Semester 2 6 Yes

Artificial Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Dixon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS407

The module introduces the student to techniques used in Artificial Intelligence including problem formulation, search, logic, probability and decision theory. The module aims to provide the participants with a basic knowledge of artificial intelligence; an understanding of how to design an intelligent agent; and knowledge of basic AI tools.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Artificial Intelligence Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS759P Semester 2 7 No

Artificial Intelligence

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Dixon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Arts Application Programming Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS405U Semester 1 4 Yes

Arts Application Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcus Pearce
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce programming to students through designing and building arts applications. Students will learn to build graphics-based applications using Processing and audio applications using Java. By focussing on the range of applications that can be built, students will learn programming skills. The focus on this module is as much on the creativity of ideas as on how to write code to realise these ideas.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Asian and African Legal Systems Law QLLM171 Semester 1 7 No

Asian and African Legal Systems

Credits: 22.5
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a comparative framework to analyse non-Western legal orders. It examines the conceptual underpinnings of four main families of law, namely Hindu, Islamic, African and Chinese - all in relation to each other and to Western law. It examines their development, from within a legal pluralist framework, through pre-modern, modern and post-modern phases. Students will analyse how the different building blocks of state, society, and religion and other value systems have their roles to play in the overall structures of these families of law and how the balance among them changes through different historical periods. Within this larger context there will also be a focus on particular states¿ legal systems in the non-Western world as case studies. These may vary from year to year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Aspects of Meaning Languages Linguistics and Film LIN503 Semester 1 5 Yes

Aspects of Meaning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Elbourne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN400

When you say a sentence, that sentence somehow evokes a new thought in the mind of the person you are talking to. This is because words of human languages have meanings, and the ways that those words combine also has an effect on meaning. This module looks at all the different aspects of meaning that contribute to the process of understanding, and explores a number of different ways that linguists have tried to theorize about meaning. This module is a pre-requisite for LIN301 Formal Semantics and for LIN601 Philosophy of Language.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Assessing Students The Learning Institute ESDM015 Full year 7 No

Assessing Students

Credits:
Contact: Dr Matthew Williamson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment and feedback to students are two of the most important mechanisms for supporting student learning, as well as being the lowest scoring areas nationally in the National Student Survey. This module will consider how assessment can be used to drive learning, and how feedback to students can enable both staff and students to monitor and plan progress.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 13: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Assessing Students The Learning Institute ESDM015 Full year 7 No

Assessing Students

Credits:
Contact: Dr Matthew Williamson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment and feedback to students are two of the most important mechanisms for supporting student learning, as well as being the lowest scoring areas nationally in the National Student Survey. This module will consider how assessment can be used to drive learning, and how feedback to students can enable both staff and students to monitor and plan progress.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 13: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Assessing Students (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7015 Full year 7 No

Assessing Students (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Williamson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment and feedback to students are two of the most important mechanisms for supporting student learning, as well as being the lowest scoring areas nationally in the National Student Survey. This module will consider how assessment can be used to drive learning, and how feedback to students can enable both staff and students to monitor and plan progress.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Assessing Students (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7015 Full year 7 No

Assessing Students (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Williamson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment and feedback to students are two of the most important mechanisms for supporting student learning, as well as being the lowest scoring areas nationally in the National Student Survey. This module will consider how assessment can be used to drive learning, and how feedback to students can enable both staff and students to monitor and plan progress.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Asset Management Economics and Finance ECOM057 Semester 2 7 No

Asset Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Goncalo Faria
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to provide students with practical application of modern portfolio theory and asset pricing, including active portfolio management, portfolio performance evaluation, portfolio insurance, and international portfolio diversification. On the successful completion of the module students will know how to practically implement modern portfolio management strategies and will be familiar with the practical aspects of asset valuation. Prerequisites: ECOM050 or ECOM043

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Astrophysical Plasmas Physics and Astronomy SPA7004U Semester 2 7 Yes

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Astrophysical Plasmas Physics and Astronomy SPA7004P Semester 2 7 Yes

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Autobiographical Literature and Religious Dissent English and Drama ESH7102 Semester 2 7 No

Autobiographical Literature and Religious Dissent

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

We will first investigate the Dissenting origins of autobiography prior to the coinage of that term in the 1790s, then discuss the relation - whether of continuity or subversion - that Romantic-period life narratives bear to the tradition of puritan religious confession. In examining the impact of theological ideas on narrative self-fashioning, gender-issues, and the controversy regarding 'enthusiasm' in the long eighteenth century, the module will also introduce the reesearch of the Dr Williams's Centre for Dissenting Studies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 7 pm

Automata and Formal Languages Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS421U Semester 2 4 Yes

Automata and Formal Languages

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Tautschnig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is centred on grammar and language. Grammar is crucial in computing, and in life. You will gain fluency in building new grammars, and analysing/understanding existing ones. Handson experience will be given using XML.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Background to British Politics Politics and International Relations POL107 Full year 4 Yes

Background to British Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tim Bale
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

British Politics is not just about the institutions like cabinet, parliament, parties and pressure groups. Nor is it simply about voting and elections. It's also an ongoing attempt by more or less self-interested actors to cope with the issues, conflicts, opportunities and threats thrown up by time and chance, as well as by underlying economic and social developments. Using a thematic rather than a chronological approach, this module delves back decades and brings things bang-up-to-date in order to provide you with an academic understanding of why, politically, we are as we are today.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 13: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Background to British Politics Politics and International Relations POL107A Semester 1 4 Yes

Background to British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Bale
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

British Politics is not just about the institutions like cabinet, parliament, parties and pressure groups. Nor is it simply about voting and elections. It's also an ongoing attempt by more or less self-interested actors to cope with the issues, conflicts, opportunities and threats thrown up by time and chance, as well as by underlying economic and social developments. Using a thematic rather than a chronological approach, this module delves back decades and brings things bang-up-to-date in order to provide you with an academic understanding of why, politically, we are as we are today.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Background to British Politics Politics and International Relations POL107B Semester 2 4 Yes

Background to British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tim Bale
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

British Politics is not just about the institutions like cabinet, parliament, parties and pressure groups. Nor is it simply about voting and elections. It's also an ongoing attempt by more or less self-interested actors to cope with the issues, conflicts, opportunities and threats thrown up by time and chance, as well as by underlying economic and social developments. Using a thematic rather than a chronological approach, this module delves back decades and brings things bang-up-to-date in order to provide you with an academic understanding of why, politically, we are as we are today.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am -10 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am -11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am -12 pm

Banking Law Law QLLM007 Full year 7 No

Banking Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Banking Law is concerned with the regulatory and private law aspects of banks and banking including both Commercial Banks and Investment Banks as well as Financial Conglomerates (or complex groups) made up of banking, securities and insurance firms. Banks are among the most important financial institutions within any economy, nationally and internationally, and the City of London is one of the foremost financial centres of the world.

This module examines all relevant aspects of law concerning the structure, operation and function of banks and banking markets. The module is also taught on a comparative basis with reference to significant international standards as well as European and other national country models including the United States. This is not an exclusively UK module.

No previous knowledge of banking or financial markets or finance theory is required although this is of value. It is assumed that students have no prior background expertise. All relevant materials are provided on the module webct which includes links to all relevant websites including electronic Financial Dictionaries, Glossaries and Summaries. Comprehensive Book Lists are also provided although no book purchases are required to take this module.

The module is essentially in five parts and covers Bank Regulation (International, European and UK), Private Law, Financial Crime and Money Laundering, Bank Remedies and Civil Procedure (including ADR) and International Financial Crisis and Global Financial Stability (including Financial Conglomerates and Complex Groups).

Prerequisites: None
Applicable Groupings A, B, P

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Banking Law Law CCLD001 Full year 7 No

Banking Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof George Walker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Banking Law is concerned with the regulatory and private law aspects of banks and banking including both Commercial Banks and Investment Banks as well as Financial Conglomerates (or complex groups) made up of banking, securities and insurance firms. Banks are among the most important financial institutions within any economy, nationally and internationally, and the City of London is one of the foremost financial centres of the world. The course examines all relevant aspects of law concerning the structure, operation and function of banks and banking markets. The course is also taught on a comparative basis with reference to significant international standards as well as European and other national country models including the United States. This is not an exclusively UK course. The course is essentially in five parts and covers Bank Regulation (International, European and UK), Private Law, Financial Crime and Money Laundering, Bank Remedies and Civil Procedure (including ADR) and International Financial Crisis and Global Financial Stability (including Financial Conglomerates and Complex Groups).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Banking Regulation Economics and Finance ECOM069 Semester 2 7 No

Banking Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will address the legal, theoretical and practical aspects of bank regulation and supervision, with a particular focus on current events. The student will be introduced to the rationale of why regulation and supervision are necessary and the analysis of the domestic and international directives that govern banking institutions in the UK and abroad.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, 16: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7, 9, 11: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 7 pm

Basic Biochemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS017 Semester 2 4 No

Basic Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Overlap: "SBC175,SBC175B
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover amino acids, the fundamentals of protein structure, isolation and purification of proteins, modification of proteins, and methods of determining protein conformation. You will also cover the basics of enzyme catalysis and kinetics with specific case studies. Other topics include ion transport, and other transport proteins, and the utilisation of proteins and soluble cofactors to generate and store metabolic energy. You will cover the basics of metabolism in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, as well as ATP synthesis and membrane bound electron transfer in mitochondria. Chloroplasts in plants and algae, and molecular motors, such as muscles, that consume metabolic energy are also covered. A detailed module synopsis will be handed out in the first lecture, and summary outlines of subsequent lectures will be available on the school teaching website for guidance.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Basic Immunology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS803 Semester 2 5 No

Basic Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Macdonald
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017), Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008), The Diversity of Life (SBS005). This module will cover the principles of innate and acquired immunity, as well as the structure and function of cells and organs of the immune system. Antigens, immunoglobins, complement, and immunoassays and the molecular basis of Bcell and Tcell responses are also covered. Other topics include major histocompatibility complex, antigen presentation, cellcell interactions and cytokines. Transplantation, tolerance, autoimmunity, infectious diseases, inflammation and hypersensitivity reactions are also considered.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 7, 9, 11: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 7, 9, 11: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 7, 9, 11: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Basic Principles of English Law, Evidence and Practice Law IPLM028 Full year 7 No

Basic Principles of English Law, Evidence and Practice

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mrs Christina Perry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is for MSc students in IP following either professional or business stream.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 7
Timetable: Lectures:

  • Monday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Wednesday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Friday 9 am - 1 pm

Basic Principles of English Law, Practice and Evidence Law IPLC024 Semester 1 7 Yes

Basic Principles of English Law, Practice and Evidence

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mrs Christina Perry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 7
Timetable: Lectures:

  • Monday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Tuesday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Wednesday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Friday 9 am - 1 pm

Bayesian Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTH709U Semester 2 7 Yes

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6136

The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Bayesian Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTH776P Semester 2 7 No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6136

The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Bayesian Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTHM042 Semester 2 7 No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Behavioural Ecology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS216 Semester 1 6 Yes

Behavioural Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alan Mcelligott
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SBC174 & some sort of statistics module

Prerequisites: The Diversity of Life (SBS005), Evolution (SBS110), Statistical Methods in Biology (SBS020) This module will cover concepts in animal behaviour which underpin ideas about more complex behaviours, including communication, ritualisation, homeostasis, instinct and learning. Decision-making and the evolution of adaptive strategies of individuals, optimal strategy sets and habitat selection are also included. Comparative socio-ecology including sexual and kin selection, reproductive strategies and social structure is considered. You will also look at resource patchiness, predictability and productivity as determinants of individual and social behaviour.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Behavioural Economics Economics and Finance ECN374 Semester 2 6 No

Behavioural Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ghazala Azmat
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explains how the study of economic behaviour in the controlled environment provided by laboratory experiments allows us to examine and to deepen our understanding of economic theory (both microeconomic and game theory). As an integral part of the module, a number of experiments will be conducted and evaluated.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Behavioural Finance Economics and Finance ECOM038 Semester 2 7 No

Behavioural Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asen Ivanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to develop students understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of behavioural finance, the empirical research surveyed in this area and the implementation of investment strategies based on the behavioural finance approach. To compare and contrast the assumptions behind modern financial economics with behavioural finance. Prerequisites: ECOM 050 Investment Management

Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Behavioural Finance Economics and Finance ECCL010 Semester 2 7 No

Behavioural Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Asen Ivanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to develop students understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of behavioural finance, the empirical research surveyed in this area and the implementation of investment strategies based on the behavioural finance approach. To compare and contrast the assumptions behind modern financial economics with behavioural finance. Prerequisites: ECOM 050 Investment Management

Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Behavioural Finance and Decision Making Business and Management BUSM085 Semester 2 7 No

Behavioural Finance and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and challenges modern theory of finance and covers the major issues in behavioural finance and decision making. These include biases, which frequently occur in financial decision-making such as optimism, mental framing, over-reaction, trend-chasing, conservatism and anchoring of expectations. Emphasis is on related work in psychology in terms of several theories of human behaviour that have policy implications in Finance. Accordingly the module is arranged around:Traditional Finance and Historical development of behavioural finance, Biases in Financial decision making, their manifestation and reduction, Prospect theory and loss aversion, Use of mental frames in financial decision making, Heuristics and biases in financial forecasting, Group decision making processes, Financial Crisis and human behaviour, Empirical regularities such as overreaction and momentum, Introduction to experimental and empirical methodologies in measuring biases in fiancial domains.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Behind Closed Doors: Houses, Interiors and Domestic Life, c. 1660-c1830 History HST6209 Full year 6 No

Behind Closed Doors: Houses, Interiors and Domestic Life, c. 1660-c1830

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Amanda Vickery
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module unlocks the front door of the Englishman's castle, to peer into the privacies of life at home from c. 1660-1830. It will vividly recreate the texture of life at home, from bed bugs and insects breeding behind the wallpapers, to new goods, fashions and rituals, from the performances of the drawing room to the secrets of the dressing room. The course sits on the research frontier, and crosses disciplinary boundaries, drawing on anthropology, historical geography, the history of architecture and decorative arts, material culture and museum studies. Domestic life will come out of the closet.

Assessment: 5.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination, 50.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Benjamin and Adorno English and Drama ESH7100 Semester 2 7 No

Benjamin and Adorno

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Paul Hamilton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is intended to address core issues in interpreting what might constitute the modern age and a writing appropriate to it. Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno are two of the most important cultural theorists of the 20th century. They explain their ideas in the process of defining the modernism in writing and thinking of which they approve, in contrast to modern trends they condemn. In understanding these two thinkers, students are introduced to the ways in which a heritage of philosophical and political theory is transmitted to the 20th century and applied to that era's sense of its own period. Their opposition is also central to the methodological justifications by literary and cultural studies right now of what they think they can achieve.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Beyond Acting English and Drama DRA302 Semester 1 6 Yes

Beyond Acting

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is about things you can do on stage without acting. Since the 1960s, among many serious attempts to reinvigorate the work of the performer, some artists have tried to avoid acting altogether. This module will explore how we might make theatre out of such behaviour: task-based activities, durational work, working from audio and video feeds, building systems and making mistakes, using transcripts, following stage directions to the letter, doing nothing, flirting and listening to music.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Student-led teaching
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 1 pm

Big Data Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS640U Semester 1 6 Yes

Big Data Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Cuadrado
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming. The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures. Queen Mary has been actively involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, you will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain first hand experience in relevant techniques. Laboratory work will be based on the MPI (Message Passing Interfaces) standard, running on a network of PCs in the teaching laboratory. The module should be of interest to Computer Scientists and those following joint programmes (eg CS/Maths, CS/Stats). It is also suitable for Chemistry and Engineering students and all those who are concerned with the application of high performance parallel computing for their particular field of study (eg Simulation of chemical Behaviour). The 12-week module involves two hours of timetabled lectures per week. Laboratory sessions are timetabled at two hours per week, normally spanning half the semester only. The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance. In addition, it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise you with messagepassing systems (MPI) as adopted by the industry.

Assessment: 15.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Big Data Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS765D Semester 1 7 No

Big Data Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Cuadrado
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The 12 week module involves 2 hours of timetabled lectures per week.

Laboratory sessions are timetabled at 2 hours per week for 6 to 7 weeks only.

The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance.

In addition it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise students with message-passing systems ((MPI) as adopted by industry.

Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming.

The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures.

Queen Mary has been involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, students will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain firsthand experience in relevant techniques.

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Big Data Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS765P Semester 1 7 No

Big Data Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Cuadrado
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The 12 week module involves 2 hours of timetabled lectures per week.

Laboratory sessions are timetabled at 2 hours per week for 6 to 7 weeks only.

The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance.

In addition it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise students with message-passing systems ((MPI) as adopted by industry.

Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming.

The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures.

Queen Mary has been involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, students will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain firsthand experience in relevant techniques.

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Big Data Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS765U Semester 1 7 No

Big Data Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Felix Cuadrado
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The 12 week module involves 2 hours of timetabled lectures per week.

Laboratory sessions are timetabled at 2 hours per week for 6 to 7 weeks only.

The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance.

In addition it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise students with message-passing systems ((MPI) as adopted by industry.

Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming.

The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures.

Queen Mary has been involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, students will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain firsthand experience in relevant techniques.

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Bilingualism Languages Linguistics and Film LIN304 Semester 1 6 Yes

Bilingualism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN400

This module will provide an introduction to the field of bilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspective. Topics to be covered include the definition of bilingualism and types of language contact, bilingual interaction and code-switching, bilingual education and policy, cognitive aspects of bilingual ability, and bilingual language development.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Bilingualism Languages Linguistics and Film LIN7018 Semester 1 7 No

Bilingualism

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the consequences of simultaneous use of two (or more) languages in an individual or a community. The module covers aspects of societal bilingualism, including language planning, attitudes, language change through contact, codeswitching, and bilingual identity. It also covers individual bilinguality, including experimental research in neurocognition, cognitive advantages or disadvantages of bilingualism, formal models of bilingual mental representations, debates over a critical age for language learning, effects of early and late bilingualism, and language attrition. Throughout the course, the interaction of cognitive and social forces will be emphasised, as will links to linguistic and sociolinguistic theory.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Biochemistry Communication Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC301 Full year 6 No

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. The module will focus on types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review. Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Attendance at research seminars is required and a library workshop to developing literature search skills. Tutorials will require a high level of student participation. A number of essays and other course will set and assessment for the module will be Coursework (60%) Final Exam (40%).

Assessment: 40.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 7: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Biochemistry Communication Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC301X Semester 2 5 No

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 5
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11, 13: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Biofluids and Solute Transport Engineering and Materials Science DEN7322 Semester 2 7 No

Biofluids and Solute Transport

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Wen Wang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module addresses the important transport mechanisms in biological and physiological systems, with particular focus on diffusive transport of solutes and bio- molecules at cellular, tissue and organ levels. The physiological functions and pathological consequences in health and disease are highlighted during formal lectures, discussion sessions and group presentations.

Assessment: 15.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Biofluids and Solute Transport Engineering and Materials Science DENM322 Semester 2 7 No

Biofluids and Solute Transport

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Wen Wang
Overlap: DEN7322
Prerequisite: None

This module addresses the important transport mechanisms in biological and physiological systems, with particular focus on diffusive transport of solutes and bio- molecules at cellular, tissue and organ levels. The physiological functions and pathological consequences in health and disease are highlighted during formal lectures, discussion sessions and group presentations.

Assessment: 15.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Biogeosciences and ecosystem services Geography GEG713U Semester 2 7 Yes

Biogeosciences and ecosystem services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Biogeosciences and ecosystem services Geography GEG7313 Semester 2 7 Yes

Biogeosciences and ecosystem services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Bioinformatics Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM038 Full year 7 No

Bioinformatics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc Bioinformatics modules, by conducting a novel piece of bioinformatics work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at a partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Bioinformatics Software Development Group Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM037 Semester 2 7 No

Bioinformatics Software Development Group Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same written specification for a piece of software that must be delivered by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate software architecture and development plan, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real software development environment, providing
invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Biological and Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE464 Semester 2 7 No

Biological and Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE512

Prerequisites: Contemporary Inorganic Chemistry (CHE512). This module seeks to provide a coherent introduction into the roles that metals play in biological and medicinal systems. The first six lectures of the module focus on electron transfer and will include an introduction to basic terms (redox potential and its tuning in biological systems, excited-state electron transfer) and elements of the Marcus theory, followed by a discussion of electron transfer processes in biology, including light-energy harvesting and conversion in photosynthetic reaction centre, long-range electron transfer in metalloproteins, DNA and molecular wires. Application in molecular devices will be discussed as well. Molecular redox chemistry and electrochemistry including redox catalysis is surveyed.The next set of lectures detail the role that metal plays in a range of biological systems and in medical applications. Initially the focus will be on electron transport in naturally occurring systems such as in the oxygen evolving centre within PS2 of the photosynthetic apparatus, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer. There will then follow a discussion of the roles metals play as Lewis acids in a range of biological systems covering metalloenzymes such as carbonic anhydrase, liver alcohol dehrdrogenase and nickel urease. The final lectures in this part of the module will focus on the roles metal play in medicine eg anti-ageing drugs, anti-cancer drugs and in imaging agents.The final four lectures of the module will begin with an introduction to the important area of biomaterials, which will then be followed by an overview of selected topics from the areas of metallic biomaterials, ceramic biomaterials and bioglasses. The final lecture will consider implant/host interactions and the factors affecting long-term performance of a biomaterial.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7, 9, 11, 13: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Biological and Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHEM464 Semester 2 7 No

Biological and Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Watkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module seeks to provide a coherent introduction into the roles that metals play in biological and medicinal systems. The first six lectures of the module focus on electron transfer and will include an introduction to basic terms (redox potential and its tuning in biological systems, excited-state electron transfer) and elements of the Marcus theory, followed by a discussion of electron transfer processes in biology, including light-energy harvesting and conversion in photosynthetic reaction centre, long-range electron transfer in metalloproteins, DNA and molecular wires. Application in molecular devices will be discussed as well. Molecular redox chemistry and electrochemistry including redox catalysis is surveyed.The next set of lectures detail the role that metal plays in a range of biological systems and in medical applications. Initially the focus will be on electron transport in naturally occurring systems such as in the oxygen evolving centre within PS2 of the photosynthetic apparatus, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer. There will then follow a discussion of the roles metals play as Lewis acids in a range of biological systems covering metalloenzymes such as carbonic anhydrase, liver alcohol dehrdrogenase and nickel urease. The final lectures in this part of the module will focus on the roles metal play in medicine eg anti-ageing drugs, anti-cancer drugs and in imaging agents.The final four lectures of the module will begin with an introduction to the important area of biomaterials, which will then be followed by an overview of selected topics from the areas of metallic biomaterials, ceramic biomaterials and bioglasses. The final lecture will consider implant/host interactions and the factors affecting long-term performance of a biomaterial.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Biological Sciences Psychology Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC608 Full year 6 No

Biological Sciences Psychology Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Magda Osman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Biological Sciences Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC360 Full year 6 No

Biological Sciences Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Richard Pickersgill
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

An experimental investigation involving laboratory work and/or computational work in some aspect of Biological Sciences. The background, results and conclusions of the study to be reported in the form of an oral presentation (part-way through Sem B) and a dissertation (submitted toward the end of Sem B). The dissertation will not normally exceed 10,000 words, which includes a review of relevant literature, data presentation, analysis and discussion.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Biology for Psychologists Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC401 Semester 1 4 No

Biology for Psychologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Brennan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

To provide psychology students with a scientific overview of biology, especially the central notions of variation in whole organism biology, as relevant to behaviour. This supports the distinctiveness of QMUL psychology as a natural and experimental science and introduces students to the growing notion of psychology as a branch of the biological sciences (e.g., that "behaviour" is the end product of whole organism biology). It will also introduce students to the integrative scientific thinking skills required to study subsequent psychological topics (e.g., how the study of micro-organisms and plants has contributed to our understanding of gene-environment interactions which are now routinely studied in behaviour genetics). Students will be introduced to empirical findings and will critically evaluate the range of methods in the field. Topics covered include basic genetics, origins and diversity of life, phylogeny, development, eukaryotes, prokaryotes and plants, microbiology, invertebrates and vertebrates, biodiversity, body size and life history strategies.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Biomedical Engineering in Urology Engineering and Materials Science DEN430 Semester 1 7 No

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight
Overlap: DENM016
Prerequisite: None

The module explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology and nephrology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, implantable devices, functional electrical stimulators, dialysis and lithotripsy. Initially the module covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including clinicians and NHS clinical engineerings.

Assessment: 45.0% Coursework, 55.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Biomedical Engineering in Urology Engineering and Materials Science DENM016 Semester 1 7 No

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight
Overlap: DEN430
Prerequisite: None

The module explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology and nephrology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, implantable devices, functional electrical stimulators, dialysis and lithotripsy. Initially the module covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including clinicians and NHS clinical engineerings.

Assessment: 45.0% Coursework, 55.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 45.0% Coursework, 55.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Biomedical Pharmacology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC402 Semester 2 5 No

Biomedical Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Diana Velluto
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: Biomedical Physiology I (SBS022). This module is only open to students on the Biomedical Sciences degree programme and to suitably qualified associate students. The module aims to show how, from an understanding of biochemical and physiological processes, putative drug targets can be identified and therapeutic agents developed. You will also cover the reasons for prototypical drugs being refined to provide more suitable drugs with regard to route of administration; bioavailability; duration of action; selectivity; and reduction of adverse effects. All the above will be exemplified by consideration of the pharmacological properties of drugs used for the treatment of well known medical diseases/conditions.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and Integration Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS022 Semester 2 4 No

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and Integration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel O'Callaghan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to major non-cardiovascular/respiratory physiological systems involved in human homeostasis for students reading for the degree in Biomedical Science. Topics covered will include: microanatomy and histology of the major human tissues; feedback control, temperature regulation, cell exchange processes; function and integration of nervous, muscle, gastrointestinal, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. The module will describe some of the major human physiological diseases, disorders and dysfunctions of these systems, and some parasitic diseases.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 11, 13: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 11, 13: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 11, 13: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and Respiratory Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS202 Semester 1 5 No

Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and Respiratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Puddefoot
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is for students who enter under the B990 programme only. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy (SBC102), The Human Cell (SBC100). This module provides an introduction to the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Topics covered will include: structure, function and regulation of cardiovascular activity and respiration. It will include descriptions of some of the major diseases, conditions, abnormalities anddysfunctions of the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems and problems associated with aerospace travel and diving.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical Research Project Engineering and Materials Science DENM006 Full year 7 No

Biomedical Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Steven Dunn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS320 Full year 6 No

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Sullivan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

B990 students only.
The SBS320(X) modules comprise 6 Biomedical Science clinical case histories at both levels 5 and 6. The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour
assessment sessions. The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS320(X) modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology,
anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials. The module is examined in SBS320 year 3 and the 2nd year coursework marks will comprise 10% of the coursework marks for SBS320 3rd year.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 7, 10: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS320X Full year 5 No

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

B990 students only.
This module is a pre-requisite for the 3rd year SBS320.
The SBS320(X) modules comprise 6 Biomedical Science clinical case histories at both levels 5 and 6. The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour
assessment sessions. The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS320(X) modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology,
anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials. The module is examined in SBS320 year 3 and the 2nd year coursework marks will comprise 10% of the coursework marks for SBS320 3rd year.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Biomedical Sciences Investigative Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS044 Semester 1 6 No

Biomedical Sciences Investigative Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Biomedical Sciences Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS084 Full year 6 No

Biomedical Sciences Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Richard Pickersgill
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

30-unit research projects require prior SBCS approval. All students wishing to graduate with a degree from the School of Biological and Chemical sciences must undertake a project in their final year of study. In the case of biology related projects, students have three choices: a research project (worth 30 credits), which can encompass laboratory based experimental investigations, field studies, field experiments and so on; an investigative project (worth 15 credits), which can include analysis of previously acquired epidemiological data, nutritional surveys and analysis, mathematical modelling of biological processes and so on; as an alternative, students can take the Project skills in the life sciences module (worth 30 credits).

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical, 60.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Biomolecules of Life Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC323 Semester 2 4 No

Biomolecules of Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Sullivan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module offers a grounding in a good range of biochemical topics including the structure function relationship of protein, carbohydrates and lipids; fundamentals of enzyme catalysis and kinetics; transport of molecules across biomembranes; biochemical reactions involved in the generation and storage of metabolic energy; in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle; mitochondrial electron transfer and ATP synthesis; and molecular motors.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 7, 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 7, 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Bioorganic Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE307 Semester 2 6 No

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE302

This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5, 10, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Bioorganic Chemistry by Distance Learning Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE307X Full year 6 No

Bioorganic Chemistry by Distance Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6

Biopolitics in Modern Britain History HST7336 Semester 1 7 Yes

Biopolitics in Modern Britain

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rhodri Hayward
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course explores the relationship between biology and government in modern Britain. Providing a broad introduction to the ideas of Michel Foucault, Ian Hacking, Bruno Latour, Nikolas Rose and Giorgo Agamben, the course is designed to provide students with a new set of theoretical tools with which to interrogate modern British history. It focusses on the emergence of 'biopolitics' -which may be broadly defined as those strategies which are used by states and sovereigns to maximise the power and productivity of the population. It tracks the shift from old forms of power which were based upon repression to new forms which seek to realise the imagined potential of the people. These tools are introduced through case studies of eugenics, sexuality, the family and pharmacology. These case studies will be used to question to question the assumptions implicit in contemporary historical writing and to explore the complex and contested relationship between biology and history.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Black Writing in Britain English and Drama ESH205 Semester 2 5 Yes

Black Writing in Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachael Gilmour
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine a selection of works (from slave narratives to dub/rap/performance poetry) by black (African, Caribbean and Asian) poets and novelists published in Britain from the 1780s to the present day. Drawing on contemporary cultural, post-colonial and feminist theories, this module focuses on the ways in which authors such as Olaudah Equiano, Edward Brathwaite, Hanif Kureishi, Jackie Kay and Patience Agbabi present their views on British society in the context of immigration, assimilation and cultural difference.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Bond Market Strategies Economics and Finance ECOM074 Semester 2 7 No

Bond Market Strategies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Darren Cullen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Bond markets and the term structure of interest rates have always been two cornerstones of financial theory. Moreover, in the last decades, bond markets have become highly sophisticated in their offering of a wide range of instruments, from bonds with embedded options to asset-backed securities or structured notes. Because of the great importance of these markets and instruments, participants must become well-informed of the structure and uses of these securities and also of the increasingly complex techniques for valuing them. This module is designed to develop the MSc students understanding of bond markets and securities theory and practice. It is an advanced course that covers the different types and features of these bond instruments and the fundamental analytical tools to price them. The principle objective is to forge a solid understanding of structuring techniques, portfolio strategies and products within the bond markets.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 7 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Book History from Gutenberg to Google History HST5609 Semester 1 5 Yes

Book History from Gutenberg to Google

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores whether books, and print culture, have been a dynamic and revolutionary force of change since the mid-fifteenth century. It examines the reading and communications commonly associated with the invention of printing, and will ask if the spread of the printed word had wide-ranging social and political consequences. It introduces students to historical bibliography and bibliometrics; the concept of the early modern public sphere; books as propaganda in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the current debates over `born digital' resources and e-publishing.

Assessment: 15.0% Practical, 85.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Brain and Behaviour Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC141 Semester 2 4 Yes

Brain and Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isabelle Mareschal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module builds on the theme of psychology as a biological science in parallel with the 'Exploring Psychology' module by specifying the proximate biological mechanisms involved in psychological phenomena. The module will focus on basic principles of biological psychology predominantly, and then introduce psychological processes to illustrate these.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Brand Management Business and Management BUSM026 Semester 2 7 No

Brand Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will focus on the strategic role that brands play in the successful marketing of products and services. It aims to introduce current academic thinking and business practice of contemporary branding to students introducing key concepts such as brand equity, brand identity and corporate branding. In addition the course aims to introduce and show the actual process of brand management and the issues and dilemmas that contemporary brand managers and stewards have to face. It aims to comprehensively cover these areas and will deal with topics such as brand identity, brand development, brand strategy, organisational support for branding, brand features and personality, brand portfolios and the internet and branding. The focus of the course will be a final presentation and report that students both in groups and as individuals will have to prepare on analysing a failing brand and proposing ideas to reposition and revitalise it. The brand itself will be taken from the contemporary business world and so will provide the students with opportunities to carry out challenging and relevant research.

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition Languages Linguistics and Film FLM5034 Semester 1 5 Yes

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: POR5034
Prerequisite: None

Why would a Brazilian director depict not the guerrilla Che Guevara but the young doctor developing his social awareness? Walter Salles¿s Motorcycle Diaries will set the tone for the discussion of Brazil¿s emphasis on the social agenda as its major contribution to world cinema. This course will approach the evolution of this genre, beginning with Cinema Novo, the shift towards the commercial film (Pixote, Central Station), the development of a new aesthetics (City of God) and of recent radical experimentations such as prisoners and favela (shantytown) inhabitants making their own film. Discussions will include the tensions between aesthetics and ethics, the achievement of the commercial film and of the documentary as social action, and film as a tool for the empowerment of the marginalized.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition Languages Linguistics and Film POR5034 Semester 1 5 Yes

Brazilian Cinema: The Social Tradition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: FLM5034
Prerequisite: None

Why would a Brazilian director depict not the guerrilla Che Guevara but the young doctor developing his social awareness? Walter Salles¿s Motorcycle Diaries will set the tone for the discussion of Brazil¿s emphasis on the social agenda as its major contribution to world cinema. This course will approach the evolution of this genre, beginning with Cinema Novo, the shift towards the commercial film (Pixote, Central Station), the development of a new aesthetics (City of God) and of recent radical experimentations such as prisoners and favela (shantytown) inhabitants making their own film. Discussions will include the tensions between aesthetics and ethics, the achievement of the commercial film and of the documentary as social action, and film as a tool for the empowerment of the marginalized.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Brazilian Cinematic Cities: Regional and Historical Diversity Languages Linguistics and Film FLM4032 Semester 1 4 Yes

Brazilian Cinematic Cities: Regional and Historical Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: POR4032
Prerequisite: None

This module explores four Brazilian cinematic cities, namely those which have a significant film industry and whose identities have been particularly projected by film (Mark Shiel and Tony Fitzmaurice): (a) Rio de Janeiro, the wonders of its topography; its choreography; the eroticization and exoticization of its beach culture; the spectacle of its Carnival contrasting with the over-sensationalized violence on the screen; (b) São Paulo: images of physical and social mobility in the complexity of a city the size of Lebanon; the impact of technology and traffic of this hub of the car industry on its social networks; the financial high-rises of the epicentre of this emerging global power contrasting with underclass pockets; its industrialization and the rise of the Labour Unions¿ political power; (c) Salvador: its vibrant Afro-Brazilian culture contrasting with Cinema Novo¿s depiction of power hierarchies and social conflicts; the carnivalesque return of the defunto in the streets of Bohemian Salvador; (d) Brasília: projections of the utopian modernist capital of Brazil and the aftermath of this project 50 years later.

No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required, as all films are available in English or with English subtitles.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Brazilian Cinematic Cities: Regional and Historical Diversity Languages Linguistics and Film POR4032 Semester 1 4 Yes

Brazilian Cinematic Cities: Regional and Historical Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: FLM4032
Prerequisite: None

This module explores four Brazilian cinematic cities, namely those which have a significant film industry and whose identities have been particularly projected by film (Mark Shiel and Tony Fitzmaurice): (a) Rio de Janeiro, the wonders of its topography; its choreography; the eroticization and exoticization of its beach culture; the spectacle of its Carnival contrasting with the over-sensationalized violence on the screen; (b) São Paulo: images of physical and social mobility in the complexity of a city the size of Lebanon; the impact of technology and traffic of this hub of the car industry on its social networks; the financial high-rises of the epicentre of this emerging global power contrasting with underclass pockets; its industrialization and the rise of the Labour Unions¿ political power; (c) Salvador: its vibrant Afro-Brazilian culture contrasting with Cinema Novo¿s depiction of power hierarchies and social conflicts; the carnivalesque return of the defunto in the streets of Bohemian Salvador; (d) Brasília: projections of the utopian modernist capital of Brazil and the aftermath of this project 50 years later.

No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required, as all films are available in English or with English subtitles.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Brecht and the Drama Languages Linguistics and Film COM5040 Semester 2 5 Yes

Brecht and the Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: GER5040,COM/GER
Prerequisite: None

It is generally acknowledged that Bertolt Brecht is one of the most important playwrights of the 20th century. However, his plays, his theatre work and his theories of the theatre are often misunderstood. The purpose of this module, which is also available to students who know no German, is to take some representative plays, put them into their historical and dramatic context, and examine how they work. We will also examine Brecht's pronouncements on the theatre and on individual plays.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 40.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am -12 pm

Brecht and the Drama Languages Linguistics and Film COM6040 Semester 2 6 Yes

Brecht and the Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: "COM5040,GER504
Prerequisite: None

It is generally acknowledged that Bertolt Brecht is one of the most important playwrights of the 20th century. However, his plays, his theatre work and his theories of the theatre are often misunderstood. The purpose of this module, which is also available to students who know no German, is to take some representative plays, put them into their historical and dramatic context, and examine how they work. We will also examine Brecht's pronouncements on the theatre and on individual plays.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am -12 pm

Brecht and the Drama Languages Linguistics and Film GER5040 Semester 2 5 Yes

Brecht and the Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: "COM5040,GER604
Prerequisite: None

It is generally acknowledged that Bertolt Brecht is one of the most important playwrights of the 20th century. However, his plays, his theatre work and his theories of the theatre are often misunderstood. The purpose of this module, which is also available to students who know no German, is to take some representative plays, put them into their historical and dramatic context, and examine how they work. We will also examine Brecht's pronouncements on the theatre and on individual plays.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 40.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am -12 pm

Brecht and the Drama Languages Linguistics and Film GER6040 Semester 2 6 Yes

Brecht and the Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Gillett
Overlap: "GER5040,COM504
Prerequisite: None

It is generally acknowledged that Bertolt Brecht is one of the most important playwrights of the 20th century. However, his plays, his theatre work and his theories of the theatre are often misunderstood. The purpose of this module, which is also available to students who know no German, is to take some representative plays, put them into their historical and dramatic context, and examine how they work. We will also examine Brecht's pronouncements on the theatre and on individual plays.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am -12 pm

Bridging Arts and Technology Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS406U Semester 1 4 No

Bridging Arts and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Karen Shoop
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module investigates the relevance of creativity to computers and their applications. Students will develop ideas through a range of artistic practices to see how creativity informs technological development. Student writing will be developed through exploring narratives of technology, such as science fiction, using this as a springboard to understand the protocols and algorithms that underpin the technologies used in the digital world.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Britain and the Middle East, 1900-1960 History HST7300 Semester 2 7 Yes

Britain and the Middle East, 1900-1960

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Brooks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an essential grounding in modern intellectual history and political thought. It introduces students to the most important kinds of methodology practised in the field of intellectual history since the nineteenth century, and some of the most influential thinkers and themes in the history of political thought since antiquity.

It is divided into two parts, corresponding to semesters one and two respectively. The first part covers a variety of key philosophical, historical, political and sociological theorists whose work has inspired a range of approaches in the history of ideas in Anglo-American and European scholarship. The second part involves in-depth exploration of the thought of a selection of major authors and thematic concerns in the history of European political thought, considering them in the light of the different methodologies surveyed in the first part.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

British Cinema and the Second World War: Propaganda, Myth and Memory History HST6342 Full year 6 No

British Cinema and the Second World War: Propaganda, Myth and Memory

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Mark Glancy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

During the Second World War, cinema-going in Britain was at an all-time high, and films offered a key means of informing and entertaining the public. This module investigates the use of film as a medium of propaganda during the war, as well as the pleasures that cinema-going offered wartime audiences, and the role that film has subsequently played in shaping the cultural memory of the war. The module will consider a wide array of different historical sources. In addition to the substantial body of scholarly literature on this topic, these will include primary sources such as Mass Observation reports, Ministry of Information files, the memoirs of filmmakers, audience surveys, film criticism, and a range of wartime and postwar films.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination, 50.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

British Cinema from the 1960's New Wave to the Arrival of Channel 4 Languages Linguistics and Film FLM307 Semester 2 6 Yes

British Cinema from the 1960's New Wave to the Arrival of Channel 4

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charles Drazin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the hybrid and diverse nature of the British cinema from the New Wave of the early 1960s to the collapse of Goldcrest in 1987.The module will explore two key themes in the British cinema's long quest for a sustainable model of film-making: the tensions between the indigenous and the international; and the recurring pattern of boom and bust in British production. Topics covered include: the emergence of the New Wave and the Swinging London films of the 1960s; the relationship between British cinema and Hollywood; the British film renaissance of the early 1980s; state of the nation cinema in the Thatcher era; the advent of Channel 4; British auteur film-makers (Peter Greenaway, Derek Jarman, Terence Davies, Bill Douglas); and British genre from horror to heritage.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

British Culture in the 1950's English and Drama ESH344 Semester 2 6 Yes

British Culture in the 1950's

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Clair Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to introduce you to the variety of British cultural expression in the 1950s, including novels, poetry, drama, and television and film adaptations. The literature will be analysed in the context of a number of historical and social contexts: post-war austerity, the Festival of Britain, the development of post-imperial Britain, the Suez Crisis, Americanisation and the Cold War, the development of the Welfare State, the role of radio (the Third Programme) and television, the formation of the Arts Council. We will interrogate the critical assumption that the 1950s constituted a period of loss of confidence and ambition among British writers, and examine the range, styles and crucial reception of the literature of the decade. Writers studied will include George Orwell, Kingsley Amis, John Osborne, Doris Lessing, Iris Murdoch, Philip Larkin and Harold Pinter.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

British Horror: Film, Television and Literature History HST5305 Semester 1 5 Yes

British Horror: Film, Television and Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Matthew Jacobsen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

British cinema is often celebrated for its social realism, yet it has made significant and influential though often overlooked contributions to the horror, fantasy and sci-fi film genres. This module will investigate this alternative history or `repressed underside¿ of British cinema. While horror is often side-lined as having little artistic worth, this module aims to reassess the genre's aesthetic, philosophical and intellectual value. It will examine British horror films from key periods in cinema history within their cultural production context and alongside developments in cinema worldwide, from Hammer Studios in the 1960s to the reinvigorated British interest in horror and fantasy film and TV in the 2000s. Students will engage with debates on the cultural appeal and social significance of the genre, and the nature of horror film audiences and spectatorship. With an emphasis on cinema, students will also compare the writing of several authors with film adaptations of their work.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

British Politics Politics and International Relations POL243 Full year 5 Yes

British Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Peter Allen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This module will provide students with an advanced knowledge of the British Political system. It is divided into two principal parts: the study of the institutions of British politics, and the study of political culture, behaviour and participation within those institutions. Topics covered include: constitutional reform, Parliament, Prime Minister and the Cabinet system, civil service devolution, role of the judiciary, representation, political engagement, electoral and party systems, political parties, electoral behaviour and pressure groups. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/243A; Spring Semester POL/243B.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am

British Politics Politics and International Relations POL243A Semester 1 5 Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Allen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This module will provide students with an advanced knowledge of the British Political system. It is divided into two principal parts: the study of the institutions of British politics, and the study of political culture, behaviour and participation within those institutions. Topics covered include: constitutional reform, Parliament, Prime Minister and the Cabinet system, civil service devolution, role of the judiciary, representation, political engagement, electoral and party systems, political parties, electoral behaviour and pressure groups. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/243A; Spring Semester POL/243B.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am

British Politics Politics and International Relations POL243B Semester 2 5 Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Allen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This module will provide students with an advanced knowledge of the British Political system. It is divided into two principal parts: the study of the institutions of British politics, and the study of political culture, behaviour and participation within those institutions. Topics covered include: constitutional reform, Parliament, Prime Minister and the Cabinet system, civil service devolution, role of the judiciary, representation, political engagement, electoral and party systems, political parties, electoral behaviour and pressure groups. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/243A; Spring Semester POL/243B.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am

British Politics - Theory and Practice Politics and International Relations POLM065 Full year 7 No

British Politics - Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Michael Kenny
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an in-depth introduction to some of the leading theories and approaches that have been employed in the study of politics, including rational choice, institutionalism, discourse theory and biography. It also sets the context for the more practically oriented optional modules. More generally, it introduces students to the different arguments that have been advanced in favour of building on the insights of other disciplinary fields -- notably History, Sociology and Economics -- in relation to British political developments and issues, and explore arguments for more comparative and international approaches to the study of British politics. It also invites students to explore in depth some of the main interpretive controversies in recent political life, and to understand the different kinds of data and research that can be employed to shed light upon them. These include such issues as:

-- Why are political parties becoming so much weaker in British politics?

-- What factors will determine the future of the UK?

-- Do ideas and ideologies still matter in British politics?

-- Are citizens indifferent or hostile to politics?

-- Is business now the predominant social influence on politics?

-- Is the problem with the UK state that it is too weak or too strong?

--How effectively is Britain governed?

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Building a Research Profile (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7017 Full year 7 No

Building a Research Profile (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janet De Wilde
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to aid new academic staff in developing a sustainable research portfolio of external research funding and publications of the highest quality. The module provides a basis for staff to establish their research careers and enhance their research profile. This module will support the College¿s commitment to provide mentorship and other forms of support systems for the development of future research leaders of international standing.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Building the American Nation: 1756-1900 History HST4310 Semester 2 4 Yes

Building the American Nation: 1756-1900

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Cohen
Overlap: HST4303
Prerequisite: None

This course examines the turbulent development of the United States from the mid-eighteenth century through to 1900. We begin with the country¿s origins as a band of disparate colonies and go on to chart the establishment of the United States and its expansion into the West. We then explore the nation¿s disastrous descent into Civil War and finally examine the postwar ascendancy of a newly powerful capitalist nation at the end of the century. Focusing particularly on America¿s diverse and often diverging culture and society, the course explores the limits and fragility of American democracy, both as a way of politically empowering citizens and as a political system that held the nation together.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Business and Social Approaches to Social Media - Opportunities and Issues Business and Management BUS321 Semester 2 6 Yes

Business and Social Approaches to Social Media - Opportunities and Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This optional module seeks to familiarise students with social media as a business and social platform. It locates social media through the changes in the communication frameworks and explores the different and diverse opportunities, challenges and issues created by social media in an inter-connected world. The lectures will apply theoretical and conceptual issues to real life contexts and phenomena in different cultural contexts.

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Business and Society Business and Management BUS107 Semester 1 4 Yes

Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Liam Campling
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS001

The module covers the main aspects of the business environment. It covers: nature and types of business and other organisations; business and society: relationship between work organisations and society; business and governments: government as control, consumer, supplier; business and politics: managing influence; business and people: consumers, clients, employees, the public perceptions; business and the physical environment - sustainability in the business context; business and the technological environment; the social and ethical responsibilities of business; business in emerging economies; the and the international context ( regional economic blocs, World Trade Organization).

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Business Cycles Economics and Finance ECN346 Semester 2 6 Yes

Business Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roman Sustek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN206

The module aims to evaluate how business cycle theories perform when confronted with business cycles stylised facts. The theories are presented based on a micro-founded intertemporal model of the economy that provides understanding on how different types of shocks cause macroeconomic fluctuations.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Business Finance Economics and Finance ECOM051 Semester 1 7 No

Business Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giles Spungin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop an understanding of how firms raise external finance and design their capital structure. We will examine the assumption that a firm's cash flows are exogenous with respect to financial decisions. Also studied are the Modigliani-Miller theorems stating which conditions make capital structure irrelevant, and derive the optimal debt/equity mix in the presence of taxes and costly bankruptcy. The rest of the module addresses the issue of how a firm's financial and governance structure affects its value once information problems between firms' insiders and investors are taken into account.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 7 pm - 9 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 9: Wednesday 7 pm - 9 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Business Finance Economics and Finance ECCL017 Semester 1 7 No

Business Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giles Spungin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop an understanding of how firms raise external finance and design their capital structure. We will examine the assumption that a firm's cash flows are exogenous with respect to financial decisions. Also studied are the Modigliani-Miller theorems stating which conditions make capital structure irrelevant, and derive the optimal debt/equity mix in the presence of taxes and costly bankruptcy. The rest of the module addresses the issue of how a firm's financial and governance structure affects its value once information problems between firms' insiders and investors are taken into account.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 7 pm - 9 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 9: Wednesday 7 pm - 9 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Business Information Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS508U Semester 2 5 Yes

Business Information Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the basics of business information systems, with emphasis on the technical, ethical and human factors in successful information system deployment. You will study how organisations use information systems as well as the basic concepts, methods and terminology used during the design and development stages of business information systems. The module reviews the typical hardware, software, data and telecommunications used in business systems and their strategic importance.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Business Information Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS745P Semester 2 7 No

Business Information Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The role of software is increasingly critical in our everyday lives and the accompanying risks of business or safety critical systems failure can be profound. This module will provide students with a framework for articulating and managing the risks inherent in the systems they will develop as practitioners. Likewise, students will learn how to build decision support tools for uncertain problems in a variety of contexts (legal, medical, safety), but with a special emphasis on software development. This course will make a distinctive offering that will enable our students to bring a principled approach to bear to analyse and solve uncertain and risky problems. Course contents: Quantification of risk and assessment: Bayesian Probability & Utility Theory, Bayes Theorem & Bayesian updating; Causal modelling using Bayesian networks with examples; Measurement for risk: Principles of measurement, Software metrics, Introduction to multi-criteria decision aids; Principles of risk management: The risk life-cycle, Fault trees, Hazard analysis; Building causal models in practice: Patterns, identification, model reuse and composition, Eliciting and building probability tables; Real world examples; Decision support environments.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Business Information Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS745D Semester 2 7 No

Business Information Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tony Stockman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The role of software is increasingly critical in our everyday lives and the accompanying risks of business or safety critical systems failure can be profound. This module will provide students with a framework for articulating and managing the risks inherent in the systems they will develop as practitioners. Likewise, students will learn how to build decision support tools for uncertain problems in a variety of contexts (legal, medical, safety), but with a special emphasis on software development. This course will make a distinctive offering that will enable our students to bring a principled approach to bear to analyse and solve uncertain and risky problems. Course contents: Quantification of risk and assessment: Bayesian Probability & Utility Theory, Bayes Theorem & Bayesian updating; Causal modelling using Bayesian networks with examples; Measurement for risk: Principles of measurement, Software metrics, Introduction to multi-criteria decision aids; Principles of risk management: The risk life-cycle, Fault trees, Hazard analysis; Building causal models in practice: Patterns, identification, model reuse and composition, Eliciting and building probability tables; Real world examples; Decision support environments.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Business Law Business and Management BUS205 Semester 1 5 Yes

Business Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This unit provides an understanding of: the English legal system, the principles of the law of contract and of the tort of negligence as they apply to business. The unit also provides an understanding of the part law plays in enabling the conduct of business generally; its regulation, and the achievement of commercial aims.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Business Management Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF028 Semester 2 3 No

Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ron Holland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide an introduction to business management and administration. It develops understanding of the external and internal business environment, the different contexts of business, an analysis of markets and issues within business management.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Business Management Languages Linguistics and Film SEF028 Semester 2 3 No

Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ron Holland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide an introduction to business management and administration. It develops understanding of the external and internal business environment, the different contexts of business, an analysis of markets and issues within business management.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Business Management Dissertation Business and Management BUS314 Full year 6 No

Business Management Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In order to take this module students must have attained 65% or over in module BUS007. A dissertation is a piece of independent research carried out by the student under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Research can be carried out in any area of business and management, broadly defined, as long as there is sufficient expertise in the School of Business and Management to supervise the research. The student is expected to identify and review the relevant literature, identify a research problem and conduct original empirical research on primary data, or conduct original analysis of secondary data.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Business Modelling Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS418U Semester 2 4 Yes

Business Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tassos Tombros
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduces students to the development of quantitative models and associated processes for problem solving and decision making in IT management. The module introduces basic statistical concepts and provides practical experience in developing spreadsheet implementations of quantitative methods. A case study approach is taken to the application of statistical analysis and modelling of a range of engineering activities including concept selection, design optimisation, robust design, manufacturing process improvement, and problem-solving. Examples of modelling approaches may include the use of Microsoft Excel Solver, Scenario Analysis, Data Mining and Discrete Event Simulation.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Business Studies Languages Linguistics and Film IFP3808 Full year 3 No

Business Studies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Dorota Bourne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines the political, economic and legal context in which business operates, people and resources, the structure of firms and organizations, management and leadership, marketing, strategic management and development, organisation management and control, organisational communication, Human Resource Management, motivation, business ethics, and globalization. Students will analyse and comment on management in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on Year 1 of a BA Business Management, or similar programme.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Business Studies Languages Linguistics and Film IFP6805 Full year 6 No

Business Studies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Dorota Bourne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines the political, economic and legal context in which business operates, people and resources, the structure of firms and organizations, management and leadership, marketing, strategic management and development, organisation management and control, organisational communication, Human Resource Management, motivation, business ethics, and globalization. Students will analyse and comment on management in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on taught masters degrees with the School of Business and Management.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Business Studies Languages Linguistics and Film IFP3908 Full year 3 No

Business Studies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Dorota Bourne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines the political, economic and legal context in which business operates, people and resources, the structure of firms and organizations, management and leadership, marketing, strategic management and development, organisation management and control, organisational communication, Human Resource Management, motivation, business ethics, and globalization. Students will analyse and comment on management in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on Year 1 of a BA Business Management, or similar programme.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semesters 2 and 3: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 16; Semester 3: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 3: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 2 and 3: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Business Studies (Graduate Diploma) Languages Linguistics and Film IFP6905 Full year 6 No

Business Studies (Graduate Diploma)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Dorota Bourne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines the political, economic and legal context in which business operates, people and resources, the structure of firms and organizations, management and leadership, marketing, strategic management and development, organisation management and control, organisational communication, Human Resource Management, motivation, business ethics, and globalization. Students will analyse and comment on management in both written work and seminar discussions to the level that will lead to potential success on taught masters degrees with the School of Business and Management.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 2 and 3: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semesters 2 and 3: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Business Taxation Law QLLM120 Full year 7 No

Business Taxation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr David Southern
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aim of the module is to analyse the basis on which businesses are taxed, in both incorporated and unincorporated forms. The module is addressed to lawyers, accountants, tax advisers, tax officials and tax policy-makers. The module takes a practical transactional perspective, and examines the system of business taxation in the UK and in an international perspective. The module provides a comprehensive understanding of the issues and methods relating to business taxation in the UK, while also taking the situation of international businesses into account. The module also prepares students for the professional examinations of the Chartered Institute of Taxation, and gives lawyers an insight into taxation which would not be derived from their purely legal studies.

Prerequisites: None
Applicable Groupings: B, P

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 6 pm - 8 pm

Business Technology Strategy Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS728P Semester 2 7 No

Business Technology Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Rachel Appleton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on strategic management within the technology industries, specifically in the Electronic Engineering sectors, which includes telecommunications. The module aims to apply the theoretical knowledge to real-world examples, using case studies from the international business environment.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Business Technology Strategy Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS728U Semester 2 7 Yes

Business Technology Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Rachel Appleton
Overlap: ECS622U
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on strategic management within the technology industries, specifically in the Electronic Engineering sectors, which includes telecommunications. The module aims to apply the theoretical knowledge to real-world examples, using case studies from the international business environment.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Business Technology Strategy Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS728D Semester 2 7 No

Business Technology Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Rachel Appleton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on strategic management within the technology industries, specifically in the Electronic Engineering sectors, which includes telecommunications. The module aims to apply the theoretical knowledge to real-world examples, using case studies from the international business environment.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

C++ for Image Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS624U Semester 2 6 Yes

C++ for Image Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pengwei Hao
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "ECS401 ECS414"

This module gives you a practical introduction to C++ and uses this programming language to examine applications in low-level image processing. Areas covered include image representation, examining perception, sampling and display, and image transforms and image enhancement using point and spatial operations. Also considered are image processing methods such as convolution, frequency filtering and image restoration, compression and segmentation.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

C++ for Image Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS756P Semester 2 7 No

C++ for Image Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pengwei Hao
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module gives students a practical introduction to C++ and uses this programming language to examine applications in low level image processing. Areas covered include image representation examining perception, sampling and display, and image transforms and image enhancement using point and spatial operations. Also considered are image processing methods such as convolution, frequency filtering and image restoration, compression and segmentation.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

C++ for Image Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS756U Semester 2 7 No

C++ for Image Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pengwei Hao
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module gives students a practical introduction to C++ and uses this programming language to examine applications in low level image processing. Areas covered include image representation examining perception, sampling and display, and image transforms and image enhancement using point and spatial operations. Also considered are image processing methods such as convolution, frequency filtering and image restoration, compression and segmentation.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7

Cabinet, Premiership and the Conduct of Central Government since 1945 History HST5323 Full year 5 Yes

Cabinet, Premiership and the Conduct of Central Government since 1945

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr James Jinks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine the style of Cabinet Government from Clement Attlee to David Cameron, their management of party, Parliament and media, the changing nature of the role of prime minister and the traditional Cabinet versus prime ministerial government debate. It will also examine Cabinet as the engine room of the British Government. The course believes in a blend of theory and practice, thus the module will some weeks take place in the Houses of Parliament, will offer bonus visits Whitehall and will enjoy guest political and senior civil service speakers.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Cabinet, Premiership and the Conduct of Central Government since 1945 History HST5323A Semester 1 5 Yes

Cabinet, Premiership and the Conduct of Central Government since 1945

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr James Jinks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine the style of Cabinet Government from Clement Attlee to David Cameron, their management of party, Parliament and media, the changing nature of the role of prime minister and the traditional Cabinet versus prime ministerial government debate. It will also examine Cabinet as the engine room of the British Government. The course believes in a blend of theory and practice, thus the module will some weeks take place in the Houses of Parliament, will offer bonus visits Whitehall and will enjoy guest political and senior civil service speakers.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5

Calculus I Mathematical Sciences MTH4100 Semester 1 4 Yes

Calculus I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bill Jackson
Overlap: "ECN114,PHY4121
Prerequisite: None

This is the first of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques and background from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module develops the concepts and techniques of differentiating and integrating with supporting work on algebra, coordinate transformations and curve sketching.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Calculus II Mathematical Sciences MTH4101 Semester 2 4 Yes

Calculus II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rainer Klages
Overlap: "ECN124,PHY4122
Prerequisite: None

This module is the second of three calculus modules, whose collective aim is to provide the basic techniques from calculus for the pure, applied and applicable mathematics modules that follow. This module introduces complex numbers, infinite series including power series, and develops techniques of differential and integral calculus in the multivariate setting.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Calculus III Mathematical Sciences MTH5102 Semester 1 5 Yes

Calculus III

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucas Lacasa
Overlap: PHY4122
Prerequisite: "MTH4101 MTH4103"

The module develops the elements of vector calculus and advanced topics in ordinary and partial differential equations, such as special functions, Fourier series and Laplace's equation, for application in subsequent applied mathematics modules.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Cancer Biology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS703 Semester 2 6 No

Cancer Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Prowse
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990, C431 and with Forensic programmes. This module will define neoplasia, describe the macro and microscopic appearance of range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. Specifically, the causes of the transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The module will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10: Friday 9 am - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Capital Markets 1 Economics and Finance ECN226 Semester 2 5 Yes

Capital Markets 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luigi Ventimiglia Di Monteforte
Overlap: BUS306
Prerequisite: ECN111

The aim of this module is to provide a rigorous training in the theory of investment and capital markets and a good understanding of its central concepts. More specifically, its purpose is to show how firms, individuals and institutions take decisions about optimal investment, and to examine the behaviour of the capital markets in which these decisions are taken.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Career Success for Economics and Finance Students Economics and Finance ECN002 Semester 2 3 No

Career Success for Economics and Finance Students

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Sue Moseley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides students with the opportunity of developing an understanding of the careers paths offered by their degree and of the steps required to maximise their ability to secure a career by the end of their studies. The module will cover topics such as: work experience and internships, the application process with impact, interview skills, careers options, application of economics in the labour market, career confidence and reflection on own progress and achievements.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 9, 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 9, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Cases in Business Finance Economics and Finance ECOM070 Semester 2 7 No

Cases in Business Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Daniela Tavasci
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will address both the theoretical and practical questions of issues such as: how to value companies; recapitalisation, bankruptcy and distress; optimal capital structure; corporate liquidity; raising equity and debt capital; payout policy; investment under constraints, and the use of decision trees, simulations, and real options.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Case Studies in Ethnic Conflict: Northern Ireland Politics and International Relations POL322 Semester 1 6 Yes

Case Studies in Ethnic Conflict: Northern Ireland

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This course aims to analyse the ways in which British and Irish governments have attempted to resolve or regulate the conflict in Ireland and Northern Ireland in the modern era (end of 16th C.). After outlining the historical, religious and political foundations of the conflict, the bulk of the course will focus on the period following partition (1920-21), studying the dynamics of conflict from the Civil Rights era (1960s) until and the negotiation and implementation of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement (1998-).

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Case Studies in EU Policy Making Politics and International Relations POLM072 Semester 2 7 No

Case Studies in EU Policy Making

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Wolff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a detailed analysis of policymaking in practice to supplement the theoretical training received in the core module.

The object is to enrich understanding of the nature and practicalities of the British and European Union policymaking process, based on empirical case studies. After an introduction to the policymaking environment the module focuses each week on a detailed case study of British policymaking in a first part and of European Union policy-making in a second part, with an accent on topicality.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Case studies in EU Policy-making (Distance Learning) Politics and International Relations POLM066 Semester 1 7 No

Case studies in EU Policy-making (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Wolff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is designed to offer students and in-depth analysis of the EU¿s competence in a number of policy areas including the Single Market, competition policy, the Eurozone, the Common Agricultural Policy, employment and social policy, and environmental policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Catalan Avant Garde Art Languages Linguistics and Film CAT602 Semester 2 6 Yes

Catalan Avant Garde Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Elza Adamowicz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will explore the relations between art, society and politics in Catalunya in the twentieth century. The following topics and artists will be studied : Modernisme and the Quatre Gats ; architecture in Barcelona (Gaudi) ; the international avant-garde in Barcelona ; Visual poetry (Junoy, Salvat-Papasseit) ; Paris ¿ Barcelona ; Joan Miró between Montroig and Paris ; Surrealism (Dali, Planells) ; ADLAN ; Catalan artists and the Spanish Civil War ; Antoni Tàpies and ¿pintura materica¿.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am -12 pm

Catalan Cinema Languages Linguistics and Film CAT5007 Semester 2 5 Yes

Catalan Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jordi Larios
Overlap: FLM5007
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on a number of key Catalan films from 1975 to the present day. It reflects on the concept of 'national' cinema in the context of globalisation; it provides critical tools for discussing and writing about the specificities of Catalan cinema as well as for setting it in a Western context; it studies film adaptations of Catalan and/or non-Catalan literary texts; it examines film (re-)constructions of the historical past; it analyses filmic discourses on identity, illness and trauma; and it looks into the relationship between Catalan cinema and Catalan/Spanish/European history and society.

No previous knowledge of Catalan is required, as all the films studied are available in English or with English subtitles.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5

Catalan Cinema Languages Linguistics and Film FLM5007 Semester 2 5 Yes

Catalan Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jordi Larios
Overlap: CAT5007
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on a number of key Catalan films from 1975 to the present day. It reflects on the concept of 'national' cinema in the context of globalisation; it provides critical tools for discussing and writing about the specificities of Catalan cinema as well as for setting it in a Western context; it studies film adaptations of Catalan and/or non-Catalan literary texts; it examines film (re-)constructions of the historical past; it analyses filmic discourses on identity, illness and trauma; and it looks into the relationship between Catalan cinema and Catalan/Spanish/European history and society.

No previous knowledge of Catalan is required, as all the films studied are available in English or with English subtitles.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5

Catalan Culture: History, Language, Art Languages Linguistics and Film CAT4001 Semester 2 4 Yes

Catalan Culture: History, Language, Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jordi Larios
Overlap: COM4001
Prerequisite: None

This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture. Topics covered include: the concepts of 'nation', 'nation state', 'stateless nation', 'nationalism' and 'national identity'; the 'cultural genocide' inflicted on Catalonia by the Spanish state (1714-1975); the politics of language; 'modernista' architecture in the city of Barcelona; the avant-garde art of Salvador Dalí and/or Joan Miró; the impact of 20th- and 21st-century immigration on Catalan national identity and Catalan nationalism. All texts are available in English.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Catalan Culture: History, Language, Art Languages Linguistics and Film COM4001 Semester 2 4 Yes

Catalan Culture: History, Language, Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jordi Larios
Overlap: CAT4001
Prerequisite: None

This module offers a general introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan culture. Topics covered include: the concepts of 'nation', 'nation state', 'stateless nation', 'nationalism' and 'national identity'; the 'cultural genocide' inflicted on Catalonia by the Spanish state (1714-1975); the politics of language; 'modernista' architecture in the city of Barcelona; the avant-garde art of Salvador Dalí and/or Joan Miró; the impact of 20th- and 21st-century immigration on Catalan national identity and Catalan nationalism. All texts are available in English.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Catalan III Languages Linguistics and Film CAT601 Full year 6 Yes

Catalan III

Credits: 30.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CAT512

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6

Catalan II Intensive Languages Linguistics and Film CAT512 Full year 5 Yes

Catalan II Intensive

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Ester Pou
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CAT103 CAT104"

This module is aimed at students who already have a basic knowledge of Catalan. Its focus is on developing oral fluency, improving aural and reading comprehension skills, learning new structures and vocabulary, and writing skills.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Catalan Literature (1900-2010) Languages Linguistics and Film CAT5005 Semester 2 5 Yes

Catalan Literature (1900-2010)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jordi Larios
Overlap: COM5005
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide a thorough introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan literature. Through detailed analysis and discussion of a number of key texts by Catalan women and male writers, the module will explore issues such as the desire for personal emancipation; the construction of female subjectivity; religious fundamentalism and the violence it gives rise to; the representation of modernity and the demise of Western civilization; canonicity and misogyny; the modern and postmodern recycling of myth; and the social construction, as well as the textualization, of illness. All texts are available in English.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Catalan Literature (1900-2010) Languages Linguistics and Film COM5005 Semester 2 5 Yes

Catalan Literature (1900-2010)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jordi Larios
Overlap: CAT5005
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide a thorough introduction to modern and contemporary Catalan literature. Through detailed analysis and discussion of a number of key texts by Catalan women and male writers, the module will explore issues such as the desire for personal emancipation; the construction of female subjectivity; religious fundamentalism and the violence it gives rise to; the representation of modernity and the demise of Western civilization; canonicity and misogyny; the modern and postmodern recycling of myth; and the social construction, as well as the textualization, of illness. All texts are available in English.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS118 Semester 1 5 Yes

Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelika Stollewerk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SBC173 or SBC100 & SBC175 or SBC210

This module is designed to provide you with detailed up-to-date knowledge of cell biological techniques, the structural organisation, development and differentiation of eukaryotic cells as well as key processes in development that are based on cell-cell interactions and cell movements. In the practicals you will learn standard cell biological techniques in histology and immunohistochemistry and you will be familiarised with the preparation of cell material from living organisms. The module provides an invaluable foundation for genetics, biochemistry, molecular, neurobiological, physiological and biomedical programmes.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 11: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 11: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Cell Biology and Physiology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC173 Full year 4 Yes

Cell Biology and Physiology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Rachel O'Callaghan
Overlap: "SBC100,SBC124,
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to cell biology and physiology. At the cellular level it covers pro- and eukaryotic cell structure, the structure and function of the cell membrane, the organelles, the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Interactions between cell components, the cell cycle and cell differentiation from stem cells to specialised cells are all examined in detail. At the physiology level the structure and function of major systems including the nervous, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems are surveyed in a variety of different taxa and physiological functioning including homeostasis, temperature regulation, gas exchange, digestion and the endocrine systems are all reviewed.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Cell Biology and Physiology (Sem A) Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC173A Semester 1 4 Yes

Cell Biology and Physiology (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel O'Callaghan
Overlap: "SBC173,SBC100"
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to cell biology. It covers pro- and eukaryotic cell structure, the structure and function of the cell membrane, the organelles, the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Interactions between cell components, the cell cycle and cell differentiation from stem cells to specialised cells are all examined in detail.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Cell Biology and Physiology (Sem B) Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC173B Semester 2 4 Yes

Cell Biology and Physiology (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel O'Callaghan
Overlap: "SBC173,SBC124"
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to physiology. The structure and function of major systems including the nervous, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems are surveyed in a variety of different taxa and physiological functioning including homeostasis, temperature regulation, gas exchange, digestion and the endocrine systems are all reviewed.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4

Cellular Pathology and Blood Science Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC602 Semester 2 6 No

Cellular Pathology and Blood Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ronald Cutler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to those students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: Tissue Biology (SBC101). This module provides an overview of basic pathological mechanisms including cell injury, wound healing, inflammation and cell adaptations. The process of neoplasia and the characteristics of major solid tumours will be covered including a review of the mechanisms of tumour spread. The Haematology component will cover basic haematopoiesis, anaemia, haemaglobinophathies, thalassaemia, myelodysplasia, haematological malignancies, haemostasis and bleeding and thrombotic disorders of haemostasis. An overview of the history and basis of blood transfusion and its complications will also be provided.The practical sessions will build on the earlier Microanatomy, Histology and Cytology Module in providing exposure to the histological and cytological interpretation of disease.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 7, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 7, 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Ceramics Engineering and Materials Science MAT522 Semester 1 6 Yes

Ceramics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Reece
Overlap: MTRM068
Prerequisite: None

Review to physical and structural origin of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of ceramics. Relate this knowledge to their applications and commercial importance. Review the processing and characterisation of ceramics. (Particular reference will be made to the following structural ceramics: alumina; silicon nitride; zirconia; and silicon carbide.) Review of functional ceramics: varistors; ferroelectrics; piezoelectrics; pyroelectrics; optoelectronics; and ferrites. Throughout the module the students will develop their knowledge so that they can relate structure, properties and applications.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Ceramics Engineering and Materials Science MTRM068 Semester 1 7 Yes

Ceramics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Reece
Overlap: MAT522
Prerequisite: None

Review to physical and structural origin of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of ceramics. Relate this knowledge to their applications and commercial importance. Review the processing and characterisation of ceramics. (Particular reference will be made to the following structural ceramics: alumina; silicon nitride; zirconia; and silicon carbide.) Review of functional ceramics: varistors; ferroelectrics; piezoelectrics; pyroelectrics; optoelectronics; and ferrites. Throughout the module the students will develop their knowledge so that they can relate structure, properties and applications.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Cervantes and the Nature of Fiction Languages Linguistics and Film HSP303 Semester 2 6 Yes

Cervantes and the Nature of Fiction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Trevor Dadson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: HSP141 SML002 HSP233 or equivalent

One of the world's greatest writers of prose fiction, Miguel de Cervantes almost single-handedly created a new literary genre in the early seventeenth century. The module begins by looking at those works which have as their central concern the role of the individual in society, and then proceeds to examine one of Cervantes's recurring themes, the nature of fiction itself. The module consists of a series of seminars and discussion sessions built around (some of) the following texts: the short stories: El celoso extremeño, El licenciado Vidriera, Las dos doncellas, El casamiento engañoso, El coloquio de los perros; the plays: El retablo de las maravillas and El viejo celoso; the novel Don Quijote de la Mancha (Parts I and II).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

CFA Training Economics and Finance ECOM092 Semester 3 7 No

CFA Training

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Francis Breedon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module gives students training and revision tools required to undertake the CFA level 1 exam. The training, supplied by Fitch Learning, will include lectures and e- resources and is designed to prepare students for the December CFA exams (i.e. the December after graduation from the MSc). This training will be assessed through a mock level 1 exam (30 credits). This module is part of a pathway open to MSc in Finance students and can be combined with a 30 credit research essay instead of the 60 credit dissertation taken by students who opt not to take the CFA training pathway.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Challenging Europe's Political and Social Order: the 1848 Revolution History HST5306 Semester 1 5 Yes

Challenging Europe's Political and Social Order: the 1848 Revolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maurizio Isabella
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The 1848 revolutions represented a truly pan-European phenomenon, one which gave rise to several republican experiments, to an unprecedented development of the public sphere and to the politicisation of new sectors of Europe's society.

The module will analyse the causes of the revolutionary wave in Europe and discuss both the commonalities and the regional or national peculiarities of these events. Attention will be devoted to specific case-studies in France, the Habsburg Empire, the Italian and German states. The module will also account for the influence of the European revolutions over British politics, and look at the consequences that the emigration of the revolutionary elites after 1848 had on the development of democratic and socialist ideas. Finally, it will discuss the historiography of the Revolution and the impact that this trans-national event had on European society, politics and political thought in the following decades.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Chaos and Fractals Mathematical Sciences MTH6107 Semester 1 6 Yes

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "MTH4101 MTH4103"

The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Chaos and Fractals Mathematical Sciences MTH6107P Semester 1 6 No

Chaos and Fractals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The main aims are twofold: to illustrate (rigorously) how simple deterministic dynamical systems are capable of extremely complicated or chaotic behaviour; to make contact with real systems by considering a number of physically motivated examples and defining some of the tools employed to study chaotic systems in practice. Discrete and continuous dynamical systems, repellers and attractors, Cantor sets, symbolic dynamics, topological conjugacy for maps, definition of chaos. Fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Chaucer English and Drama ESH250 Full year 5 Yes

Chaucer

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tamara Atkin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to some of the foundational works of English literature, in examining the writings of Geoffrey Chaucer. It will cover a broad range of his work, including the majority of The Canterbury Tales, the dream visions, and his translations from canonical medieval French texts such as the Romance of the Rose. The first semester will deal with The Canterbury Tales in detail, covering ten different tales from a variety of genres. The lectures will offer a variety of ways of approaching the Tales, while the seminars will focus on both textual analysis, and the linguistic skills necessary for the reading of Middle English. The Tales will be used as a means of access to the themes of narrative genre, didacticism and parody, and social hierarchies and heterogeneity, with a focus upon contemporary English society and history. The second semester will broaden the scope of enquiry, looking beyond the Tales to Chaucer's lesser-known works, and placing them firmly in the context of western European medieval and classical literature. It will thus build on the foundations of the first semester, properly situating Chaucer as an author working within a vast literary inheritance and tradition.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Chaucer English and Drama ESH250A Semester 1 5 Yes

Chaucer

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tamara Atkin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to some of the foundational works of English literature, in examining the writings of Geoffrey Chaucer. It will cover a broad range of his work, including the majority of The Canterbury Tales, the dream visions, and his translations from canonical medieval French texts such as the Romance of the Rose. The first semester will deal with The Canterbury Tales in detail, covering ten different tales from a variety of genres. The lectures will offer a variety of ways of approaching the Tales, while the seminars will focus on both textual analysis, and the linguistic skills necessary for the reading of Middle English. The Tales will be used as a means of access to the themes of narrative genre, didacticism and parody, and social hierarchies and heterogeneity, with a focus upon contemporary English society and history. The second semester will broaden the scope of enquiry, looking beyond the Tales to Chaucer's lesser-known works, and placing them firmly in the context of western European medieval and classical literature. It will thus build on the foundations of the first semester, properly situating Chaucer as an author working within a vast literary inheritance and tradition.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Chemical and Biological Sensors Engineering and Materials Science MAT707 Semester 2 7 Yes

Chemical and Biological Sensors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steffi Krause
Overlap: MTRM069
Prerequisite: None

An understanding and appreciation of the principles and applications of chemical and biological sensors is introduced. The basic sensor technology is presented, and this is then augmented by considerations of practical applications and the interfaces in biological systems. The problems of sensing in a biological environment will be highlighted together with examples of the current state of the art and prospects for future development.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Chemical and Biological Sensors Engineering and Materials Science MTRM069 Semester 2 7 No

Chemical and Biological Sensors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steffi Krause
Overlap: MAT707
Prerequisite: None

An understanding and appreciation of the principles and applications of chemical and biological sensors is introduced. The basic sensor technology is presented, and this is then augmented by considerations of practical applications and the interfaces in biological systems. The problems of sensing in a biological environment will be highlighted together with examples of the current state of the art and prospects for future development.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Chemical Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences CHRM006 Full year 7 No

Chemical Research Project

Credits: 150.0
Contact: Prof Geoff Hawkes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 40.0% Dissertation, 60.0% Practical
Level: 7

Chemical Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences CHRM006 Full year 7 No

Chemical Research Project

Credits: 150.0
Contact: Prof Geoff Hawkes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 40.0% Dissertation, 60.0% Practical
Level: 7

Chemistry for Materials Engineering and Materials Science MAT5002 Semester 1 5 Yes

Chemistry for Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Russell Binions
Overlap: MAT309
Prerequisite: None

The role of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics in materials science. The module will begin wilth derivation and description of some fundamental kinematics and thermodynamic phenomena such as Gibbs free energy, rate equations, equilibria etc. The effect of variables such as temperature and pressure will be examined. The module will go and to demonstrate with examples how these can be applied to solve problems for gas, solution, and solid phase scenarios with a particular emphasis on polymer synthesis.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Chemistry Investigative Project Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE601 Full year 6 No

Chemistry Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students work independently on topics set by their project supervisors. The work involves extensive searching, reviewing and critical evaluation of a specific area of the scientific literature. A final dissertation is prepared, based upon the investigative work that has been undertaken. Students are also required to present their work in a variety of other forms, including a poster and seminar appropriate for a specialist audience, and in an alternative format in which the topic is made more accessible to the general public.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical, 60.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Chemistry MSci Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE750 Full year 7 No

Chemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SBC605

The students work independently on research topics set by their project supervisors. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of advanced projects. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared and defended in an oral examination; students also present their work in the form of a poster and as a short oral presentation.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical, 50.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Monday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Chemistry Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE600 Full year 6 No

Chemistry Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Students with an average of 60% or above (combination of first year and second year results) are eligible to register for this module. Overall the module is expected to involve students for approximately 18h/week, for 12 weeks, spent on laboratory and library work, plus additional time spent on data analysis and on writing the dissertation.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical, 65.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Chromosomes and Gene Functions Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC210 Semester 1 4 No

Chromosomes and Gene Functions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: "SBC175A,SBC175
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Pre-req - A-level Biology or equivalent. This module aims to provide Biomedical Sciences students with a basic understanding of genetic inheritance, chromosome structure and function, how the flow of biological information from DNA to RNA to protein gives rise to the recognisable, inherited attributes of living organisms and how genetic mutations affect these processes. It uses seminal experiments to introduce the students to basic classical and molecular genetics, and then expands on these themes to include genetic engineering and genomic approaches to these phenomena. By the end of the module the students should appreciate the power and limitations of genetics, understand how inherited information manifests as phenotypes, and be able to discuss the principles that underlie patterns of inheritance.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Church and Clergy in late Medieval London (c.1350-1540) History HST7333 Semester 2 7 Yes

Church and Clergy in late Medieval London (c.1350-1540)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Virginia Davis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course will explore the role of the church and clergy in late medieval London though three key themes which are the ecclesiastical institutions in the City and its immediate environs; the clergy - secular and regular - and the laity's experience of parish life, including exploration of lay patronage, liturgical changes and music. The module will begin by exploring the administrative structure and general topography of the church in late medieval London, emphasising the richness of the range of major institutions which will include St Paul's cathedral and Westminster Abbey. It will then examine the extremely diverse range of clergy who were to be found in London parishes and institutions who ranged from prelates of national importance to humble parish chantry chaplains and also included monks and friars Friars in particular were popular with London citizens in the late middle ages. The third part of the course will explore parish life within a selected range of the myriad London parishes, looking at issues including as lay engagement with parochial life, especially relating to issues of commenoration, lay paronage of church fabric and gender roles within the parish.

The module will make extensive use of a wide range of source materials including those relating to visual and material culture and involve a series of field visits and archive and museum visits in addition to seminar teaching.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the Museum Languages Linguistics and Film FLM610 Semester 1 6 Yes

Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the Museum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM003

This module explores the relationships of cinema (as an institution, as a space, and as a concept) to the institutional, spatial and conceptual contexts of the museum. The museum has in recent years become a respository for film as a museum object in its own right; however, film has haunted the corridors of museums since its earliest invention. In this module, we explore the connections and disconnections between cinematic and museal spaces, using theoretical concepts of immersion, spatial dynamics, the archive, exhibition and curatorial theory to make sense of the plurality of film and the moving image in museums, and indeed the 'museum' in the moving image. Making use of London as an ideal base for interrogating some of these encounters between cinema, the moving image, and museums, the module will also explore the interventions of film across other disciplines, including Art History, Museology, Anthropology and the Digital Humanities. We will explore both actual and virtual museums, through a range of film material from Europe, North America, the Middle East, drawing upon concepts such as 'film as a virtual museum', 'cinematic exhibition practices', 'film as museology', and 'the ethics of ethnographic film'.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 2 pm

Cities, Space and Power Geography GEG7123 Semester 1 7 Yes

Cities, Space and Power

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the relationships between space and power in different cities in the past and the present. Focusing on debates about the emergence and contestation of urban public space, the module uses a range of materials ¿ poetry, novels, art, film, newspaper stories and fieldwork ¿ to explore how the city¿s geographies have been shaped and reshaped by relationships of power. The course uses London, past and present, as a key example, and develops comparative perspectives through other city examples, such as Los Angeles and colonial and post-colonial Calcutta/Kolkata.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Climate Change Law and Policy Law QLLM096 Full year 7 No

Climate Change Law and Policy

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Malgosia Fitzmaurice
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module complements the existing environmental law modules. It offers a more focused module on one of the most pivotal environmental issues of our time. It seeks to provide a broad analytical view of the problem of climate change law and policy in its broader context, and also in a number of selected country studies.

The module will first examine a number of background topics as well as the main international legal instruments that constitute international climate law and policy. This will include an examination of the underlying principles of climate change law and policy, an introduction to the UN Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol, a focus on specific legal issues arising the context of the UN regime such as liability as well as an analysis of more specific problems such as regional approaches and relations between climate change law and other areas of law such as trade law.

The module will then move on to examine a number of specific problems arising in the context of the law and policy response to climate change both concerning mitigation and adaptation. Specific problems examine will include human rights implications, agriculture and climate change, land-use, forests and biodiversity and climate change, energy and
transport.

The module aims to provide a comprehensive survey of the developments of law and policy in relation to climate change. The module will critically examine interlinkages between normative and substantive developments in a number of law and policy fields relating to climate change including trade, investment, liability and redress, adaptation and development. It will primarily adopt an international perspective but will also draw on regional and country case studies. The latter will provide the basis for comparing the ongoing development of climate change law and policy in countries of the North and South.

Students on completing the module will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of and familiarity with the most salient issues within climate related law and policies. They will be able to show familiarity with key legal and policy developments cross such a broad range: energy sector, land use sector, liability, human rights, adaptation and finance mechanisms. This will give any student an advantage in gaining employment as employees within law firms, governments, businesses and non-state actors seek climate literate candidates to fill this new section of the job market.

Prerequisites: None
Applicable Groupings: N, Q

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Clinical Measurements Engineering and Materials Science DEN406 Semester 2 7 No

Clinical Measurements

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Screen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide an understanding of biopotentials and other biological signals, and identify mechanisms by which they can be measured. It also aims to provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental principals associated with transducers, and comprehensive review of the most widely used techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of disease states

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Clinical Measurements Engineering and Materials Science DENM024 Semester 2 7 No

Clinical Measurements

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hazel Screen
Overlap: MAT406
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide an understanding of biopotentials and other biological signals, and identify mechanisms by which they can be measured. It also aims to provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental principals associated with transducers, and comprehensive review of the most widely used techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of disease states

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Clinical Microbiology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC205 Semester 2 5 No

Clinical Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ronald Cutler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: The Microbial World and Humans (SBC211). In this module you will acquire a basic understanding of modern medical microbiology. You will study the processes by which microorganisms cause human disease, how the pathogens can be identified, and what steps can be taken for the prevention and treatment of infections. There will be a particular emphasis on the development of observational, practical and analytical skills through laboratory work and demonstrations. Your topics will include: pathogens and their interaction with the human host, covering bacteria, protists and viruses and including mechanisms of infection, mechanisms of defense, antibiotic action and antibiotic resistance, the transmission of disease, including public health microbiology, the prevention of infection in hospitals and in the community, and a review of newly emerging diseases. You will be provided with a catalogue of microbial diseases, including infections of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, the nervous system and wounds.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 7: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11, 13, 16: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Clinical Problems in Biomedical Engineering and Materials Engineering and Materials Science MAT4003 Semester 1 4 Yes

Clinical Problems in Biomedical Engineering and Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is to provide a platform for the students in various disciplines of Medical Engineering, Medical Materials and Dental Materials to give them an insight to the range of disciplines at a fundamental level. These topics include understanding the range of clinical problems and the anatomy/structure and physiology/function of biological systems . The students will be expected to carry out group presentations assessed by SEMS academic staff, a PBL exercise and In-class short tests.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Clinical Solutions in Biomedical Engineering and Materials Engineering and Materials Science MAT4004 Semester 2 4 Yes

Clinical Solutions in Biomedical Engineering and Materials

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is to provide a platform for the students in various disciplines of Medical Engineering, Medical Materials and Dental Materials to give them an insight to those disciplines at a fundamental level. The topics covered include the use of materials in the body, the design of implants and their performance, and the analysis of solutions. The students will be expected to carry out group presentations, a PBL exercise and perform in-class short tests.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Coding for Scientists Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM034 Semester 1 7 No

Coding for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a hands-on introduction to computer programming (popularly known as "coding") using scripting languages popular in the field. The focus is on producing robust software for repeatable data-centric scientific work. Key programming concepts are introduced, and these concepts are then brought together in scientifically relevant applications to analyse data, interact with a database and create dynamic web content. Good coding practice, such as the importance of documentation and version control, is emphasised throughout.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Coding Theory Mathematical Sciences MTH6108 Semester 2 6 Yes

Coding Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5112

The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Coding Theory Mathematical Sciences MTH6108P Semester 2 6 No

Coding Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ivan Tomasic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The theory of error-correcting codes uses concepts from algebra, number theory and probability to ensure accurate transmission of information through noisy communication links. Basic concepts of coding theory. Decoding and encoding. Finite fields and linear codes. Hamming codes. Parity checks. Preliminary algebra on vector spaces and finite fields will be included in the module.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC372 Semester 2 6 No

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Hannon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover advanced cognitive and affective neuropsychology. The module will be divided into two main research areas ¿ cognitive and affective neuropsychology. In the first series of lectures, students will be introduced to the overall field of cognitive neuropsychology, followed by a detailed lecture on the anatomy of the visual system which will lay the groundwork for their understanding of subsequent lectures on disorders of attention (the neglect syndrome) and perception (object recognition) . Further lectures on disorders of memory will also be delivered. The second half of the module will cover cognitive affective neuroscience with lectures being delivered on attentional biases in emotion processing, interpretative biases in processing and a series of lectures on language and emotion. All lectures will cover these research areas within a behavioural and neuropsychological framework.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Cognitive Psychology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC201 Semester 1 5 Yes

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isabelle Mareschal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SBC140 & SBC104

This module is only available to students who enter under the C1C8 programme. This module builds upon themes developed in level 4 psychology modules and considers specific cognitive functions and properties of the human mind. The material covered will include traditional cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neuropsychology (the understanding of normal cognitive processes through unique case studies of human brain damage). Cognitive functions examined will include visual, object and spatial perception, psychophysics, memory processes, complex reasoning, language, face processing and the relationship between emotion and these processes. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided throughout.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Cold Environments Geography GEG6202 Semester 2 6 Yes

Cold Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5206

The module selectively addresses processes active in the glacial and the periglacial environment: glaciogenic (both ice and meltwater) erosion, transport, sedimentation, permafrost and ground ice and their effects on fluvial, aeolian and gravitational processes. For each of these processes the resulting landforms, both in active and in fossil form, will be treated, together with features resulting from converging processes. Examples are drawn from the Arctic, the Antarctic and high mountain ranges, while examples of fossil features are mainly drawn from western Europe.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Cold War America 1945-1975 History HST6301 Semester 1 6 Yes

Cold War America 1945-1975

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark White
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the major developments in United States history from the end of the Second World War to Watergate.

The issues to be covered include the onset of the Cold War, McCarthyism, civil rights, Vietnam, 1960s culture and the presidency. The debates amongst historians on these subjects will be addressed. Some primary sources will also be used to further understanding of this period in American history.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Colloidal Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE463 Semester 1 7 No

Colloidal Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE135

Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal systems and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Colloidal Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHEM463 Semester 1 7 No

Colloidal Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal system and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Colonial Literatures, Post Colonial Perspectives Languages Linguistics and Film COM5200 Semester 2 5 Yes

Colonial Literatures, Post Colonial Perspectives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to a selection of novels and short fiction written within the context of the European colonisation of South Asia, South East Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas (within any given year a maximum of three of these regions will be studied). The focus of the module will be upon non-European authors, and by extension upon the experience of colonialism from a non-European perspective. Texts will be contextualised in relation to the history of European colonisation within the relevant regions, and will also involve some consideration of post-colonial theory and its broader relevance to the discipline of Comparative Literature.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Combinatorics Mathematical Sciences MTH6109 Semester 1 6 Yes

Combinatorics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Wilson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5112

Combinatorics involves reasoning about 'discrete' structures, particularly finite sets of objects where there are links or relationships among the objects. The module is largely concerned with concepts and theory, but this is a subject that has many practical applications. Counting, recurrence relations, permutations. Steiner triple systems: construction and properties. Ramsey's theorem and applications. Transversal theory.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Combinatorics Mathematical Sciences MTH6109P Semester 1 6 No

Combinatorics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robin Whitty
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Combustion in Automotive Engines Engineering and Materials Science DEN326 Semester 2 6 Yes

Combustion in Automotive Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: "DEN326,DENM021
Prerequisite: "DEN101 DEN208 and DEN313"

This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Commerce, Luxury and Enlightenment in the Eighteenth Century History HST7611 Semester 2 7 No

Commerce, Luxury and Enlightenment in the Eighteenth Century

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Hopkins
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module surveys the eighteenth-century debate on the challenge posed for political and moral philosophy by the rise of `commercial society¿. Beginning with Fénelon, the great critic of Louis XIV, and concluding with Adam Smith, the module will examine major contributions to this debate by thinkers including Mandeville, Voltaire, Montesquieu, Hume, Rousseau, and the Physiocrats. Students can expect to encounter a range of ideas about sociability, inequality, freedom, civilization, international rivalry and empire that still resonate whenever we try to think about the politics of a world bound together by trade.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Commercial and Consumer Law Law LAW6028 Full year 6 No

Commercial and Consumer Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Dabrowka Grodz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover:

Sale of goods: Nature of a sale of goods contract; Terms implied into the contract of sale by the Sale of Goods Act;
Passing of property and risk in goods; Liability of a seller without the right to sell; Delivery obligations; Remedies of the buyer; Remedies of the seller.

Consumer Credit: Classification of credit agreements under the Consumer Credit Act; Formalities for making regulated agreements; Liability of the creditor/credit broker /supplier to the debtor; Liability of the debtor to the creditor; Termination of regulated agreements; Judicial control of regulated agreements.

Agency: Definition of agency; The agent's authority to bind his principal; The agent's rights and duties; Contractual relationships between the principal, agent, and third party; Termination of the agency.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Commercial and Investment Banking Economics and Finance ECOM049 Semester 1 7 No

Commercial and Investment Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students will study the role of money in the macroeconomy, the behaviour of interest rates, banks and other intermediaries, the regulation of both money markets and the banking system and the operations of central banks. The focus is on the practical aspects of money and banking as experienced by practitioners in financial institutions.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 6 pm - 8 pm

Commercial and Investment Banking Economics and Finance ECCL015 Semester 1 7 No

Commercial and Investment Banking

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students will study the role of money in the macroeconomy, the behaviour of interest rates, banks and other intermediaries, the regulation of both money markets and the banking system and the operations of central banks. The focus is on the practical aspects of money and banking as experienced by practitioners in financial institutions.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 6 pm - 8 pm

Communicating and Teaching Computing: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS641U Semester 2 6 No

Communicating and Teaching Computing: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Marsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will typically begin by observing the teacher¿s handling of the class and progress from this classroom assistant stage through small teaching tasks to at least one opportunity to undertake whole class teaching, possibly for a short part of a lesson. They will represent and promote computing and related subjects more generally as a potential university choice.
Students will undertake and evaluate a special project on the basis of discussion with the teacher. This may involve a specific in-class teaching problem or an extra-curricular project such as a lunchtime club or special coaching periods for higher ability pupils. The student will keep a journal of their own progress in working in the classroom environment, and they will be asked to submit a reflective written report on the special project and other relevant aspects of the school placement experience. This format is standard within the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme (www.uas.ac.uk).

Assessment: 40.0% Practical, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 6

Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme Mathematical Sciences MTH6110 Semester 2 6 No

Communicating and Teaching Mathematics: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthew Fayers
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module allows undergraduates to gain valuable transferable skills whilst exploring the teaching profession first hand by working with a teacher in a local school. The key skills gained include communication and presentation of mathematics, team-working, active listening, time management and prioritisation. The module will be supported by regular classes and assessed by a combination of written reports and an oral presentation. Registration for this module requires validation; places will be limited and interviews to assess suitability will be held during Semester A.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Communication in Science and Technology Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF030 Semester 1 3 No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alan Hart
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am -12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Communication in Science and Technology Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF030 Semester 2 3 No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alan Hart
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Communication in Science and Technology Languages Linguistics and Film SEF030 Semester 1 3 No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alan Hart
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Communication in Science and Technology Languages Linguistics and Film SEF030 Semester 2 3 No

Communication in Science and Technology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alan Hart
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module addresses communication skills for scientists and engineers, and also seeks to reinforce other generic skills of a more technical nature. Topics covered include study skills, academic writing, data presentation and analysis, information retrieval, and oral communication skills. SEFP students who are non-native English speakers and who do not have at least IELTS 6.5 or equivalent must register for SEF009 in Semester 1, and then take this module in Semester 2.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semesters 1, 2 and 3: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Communications and Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS403U Semester 2 4 Yes

Communications and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eliane Bodanese
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This compulsory module covers the basic concepts in communications and networks. It introduces the concept of a communications system and then focusses on specific elements. It covers circuit and switched versus packet switched networks, and the ISO/OSI 7 layer model. Also covered are certain critical network protocols, e.g. TCP/IP and CSMA/CD, key Internet concepts, converged networks, and mobile networks.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Communication Systems Electronics Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS606U Semester 1 6 Yes

Communication Systems Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sayid-Khalid Rajab
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module covers: RF SPECTRUM: Revision of basic RF spectrum. Radio transmission bands. Regulatory considerations.
MODULATION & DEMODULATION: AM & FM modulation principles; basic modulation & demodulation circuits. Digital modulation principles; basic digital modulation & demodulation circuits.
BEHAVIOUR OF ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AT RF: Behaviour of R, L and C at RF; use of reactance plots and reactance charts. Transistor equivalent circuits for RF applications.
COUPLING NETWORKS & FILTERS: The design of RF coupling networks; design of basic Low Pass, High Pass, Band Pass and Band Stop filters.
AMPLIFIERS: Revision of basic amplifier circuits. Multi-stage small-signal linear amplifiers. Class B & C amplifiers; switching amplifiers. R.F. & wideband amplifiers. Noise in amplifiers. Principles of feedback & feedforward. Frequency response.
MIXERS & OSCILLATORS: Mixer and oscillator theory; basic mixer and oscillator circuits. L.C. tanks, quartz crystals and ceramic resonators. Phase Locked Loops & Frequency Synthesizers.

Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Communication Theory Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS701P Semester 1 7 No

Communication Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maged Elkashlan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces the basic principles of modern communication systems. The primary objective is to provide fundamental tools and methodologies used in modelling, analyzing and simulating analog and digital communication systems. The following will be covered: Signal representation and spectral analysis, probability theory and random processes, detection and estimation of analog and digital systems in the presence of noise. Simulations are performed using Matlab.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Communication Theory Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS701U Semester 1 7 Yes

Communication Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maged Elkashlan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces the basic principles of modern communication systems. The primary objective is to provide fundamental tools and methodologies used in modelling, analyzing and simulating analog and digital communication systems. The following will be covered: Signal representation and spectral analysis, probability theory and random processes, detection and estimation of analog and digital systems in the presence of noise. Simulations are performed using Matlab.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Communication Theory Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS701D Semester 1 7 No

Communication Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maged Elkashlan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces the basic principles of modern communication systems. The primary objective is to provide fundamental tools and methodologies used in modelling, analyzing and simulating analog and digital communication systems. The following will be covered: Signal representation and spectral analysis, probability theory and random processes, detection and estimation of analog and digital systems in the presence of noise. Simulations are performed using Matlab.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Community Organising in Practice Geography GEG7401 Full year 7 Yes

Community Organising in Practice

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide students with information and practical experience about the context in which community organising is practised today. The module includes seminars to explore the work of Saul Alinsky, the nature of contemporary citizenship, popular (dis)engagement with democracy, the structures of local politics and urban governance in the UK, urban regeneration, the nature of civil society, the traditions of the Abrahamic faith communities, the education system and the labour movement. These seminars will run alongside student placements as community organisers, working with Citizens UK. Students will work for approximately 10 hours a week (200 hours in total between November and March) with one of the organisations affiliated to Citizens UK. Students will be supported by a practice supervisor from Citizens UK and will attend seminars to explore the issues of leadership, building public relationships, collective action, evaluation and campaigning.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 5 pm - 8 pm

Company Law Law LAW6036 Full year 6 No

Company Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Barnali Choudhury
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The principles of modern Company Law including the formation of companies, the corporate constitution, the protection of persons dealing with a company, corporate financing, management, the duties of directors, corporate governance, the protection of minority shareholders and insolvency.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 13: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 13: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 13: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Company Law Law QLLM011 Full year 7 No

Company Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Meaning of Corporate Personality and distinction between incorporated and unincorporated associations. The quasi-corporation. The nature, types and functions of companies. Historical development of the modern business company. The consequences of incorporation and its practical advantages and disadvantages. The corporate entity principle and exceptions to it. The ultra vires doctrine and the concept of capital. The company's organs and agents and the liability of the company for their acts. Formation and flotation of companies. The nature and classification of company securities. Shares and debentures. Publicity. Meetings and resolutions. Powers of the general meeting. Minority protection. The duties of directors and of the controlling majority and the enforcement of these duties. Reconstructions and amalgamations. Liquidation (in outline only).

Prerequisites: None
Applicable Groupings: B, J

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Company Law A Law LAW6036A Semester 1 6 No

Company Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Barnali Choudhury
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

1. The history of company law
2. The various forms of business organisation
3. The legal personality of companies and -lifting the veil¿ of incorporation
4. Issues of securities and raising capital
5. The company`s constitution
6. The ultra vires principle
7. Majority shareholder rule and the protection of minorities
8. Management of the company
9. Directors` duties
10. Corporate governance

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 13: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 13: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 13: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Company Valuation Business and Management BUS331 Semester 2 6 Yes

Company Valuation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing global managers and corporate consultants as they operate in a global world requiring them to know what an asset is worth and what determines its value where ever the asset is around the world. The postulate for sound investing is that a manager does not pay more for an asset than it is worth. In a global world and under competition managers assessments of value must be backed up by reality which implies that the price we pay should relate to realistic estimates of cash flows and uncertainties faced by global managers. Accordingly the module is arranged around: Estimating Discount Rates, Cash Flows and Growth Rates for Valuation purposes, Differences between firm and equity valuation, Real options corporate managers can come across and their valuation, Valuing companies in distress, Relative valuation , Biases in Valuation their manifestation and reduction, Imprecision and uncertainty in valuation, Payoffs to more versus less detail in valuation and cost of complexity, Principle of parsimony and different approaches to valuation

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Comparative & Integrative Physiology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC222 Semester 1 5 No

Comparative & Integrative Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maurice Elphick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SBC173 or SBS022

The following themes will be covered in this module:
1). Comparative anatomy and evolution of nervous systems
2). Molecular & cellular mechanisms of neuronal signalling.
3). Invertebrates as model systems for understanding mechanisms of neural control of behaviour.
4). An introduction to comparative endocrinology, including the evolution and functions of neuropeptides as regulators of physiological and behavioural processes.
5). Comparative physiology of muscle and connective tissue.
6). Comparative physiology of gas exchange.
7). Comparative physiology of circulatory systems
8). Comparative physiology of osmoregulation
9). Comparative physiology of excretion.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Comparative Decolonization History HST7339 Semester 2 7 Yes

Comparative Decolonization

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Reuben Loffman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

On the eve of the Egyptian Revolution of 1919-1921, the anti-colonial nationalist Saad Zaghloul solemnly reminded his imperial overlords: 'we are going ahead and no-one can stop our march.' Nationalists like Zaghloul challenged ageing Empires the world over ¿ and with some success. By the end of the last century, the territories under European rule had shrunk to a fraction of the size they were before 1914. This module explores some of the key themes involved in decolonization including imperialism and nationalism; social and cultural change in colonial societies as well as debates surrounding terms such as 'post-colonialism' and 'independence.' It takes a comparative perspective on decolonization, enabling students to see transnational connections between independence movements as well as their similarities and differences.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Comparative Employment Relations Business and Management BUSM016 Semester 1 7 No

Comparative Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldine Healy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will concentrate on the following key features: theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of employment relations; the value and difficulties of a comparative approach; the role of the key actors in employment relations; power, conflict and bargaining; convergence and divergence - a consideration of the debates; the complexity of the trade union role from a comparative perspective; a consideration of international solidarity; impact of globalization and transnational companies on national and cross-national management employment strategies; employee involvement and industrial democracy; social partnership and participation; standards in international employment relations; regulation and voluntarism; examining comparative employment relations through a gender, equality and diversity lens; reappraising comparative employment relations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Comparative European Politics Politics and International Relations POL248 Full year 5 Yes

Comparative European Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100 & POL105

The political map of contemporary Europe is changing rapidly and fundamentally, as the traditional boundaries between East and West and between domestic and international governance break down. This course aims to provide a pan-European introduction to the continent¿s politics - one rooted in a comparative rather than a country-by-country approach. After establishing ontological and epistemological foundations in comparative political science and setting the historical and socio-economic context, it moves on to tackle not just institutions (the nation-state, government and policy-making, legislatures, parties, pressure groups and the media) but also issues - participation, immigration, the supposed blurring of the left-right divide, and Europe in the world.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Comparative European Politics Politics and International Relations POL248A Semester 1 5 Yes

Comparative European Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The political map of contemporary Europe is changing rapidly and fundamentally, as the traditional boundaries between East and West and between domestic and international governance break down. This course aims to provide a pan-European introduction to the continent¿s politics - one rooted in a comparative rather than a country-by-country approach. After establishing ontological and epistemological foundations in comparative political science and setting the historical and socio-economic context, it moves on to tackle not just institutions (the nation-state, government and policy-making, legislatures, parties, pressure groups and the media) but also issues - participation, immigration, the supposed blurring of the left-right divide, and Europe in the world.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Comparative European Politics Politics and International Relations POL248B Semester 2 5 Yes

Comparative European Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The political map of contemporary Europe is changing rapidly and fundamentally, as the traditional boundaries between East and West and between domestic and international governance break down. This course aims to provide a pan-European introduction to the continent¿s politics - one rooted in a comparative rather than a country-by-country approach. After establishing ontological and epistemological foundations in comparative political science and setting the historical and socio-economic context, it moves on to tackle not just institutions (the nation-state, government and policy-making, legislatures, parties, pressure groups and the media) but also issues - participation, immigration, the supposed blurring of the left-right divide, and Europe in the world.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5

Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law Law QLLM172 Semester 2 7 No

Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law

Credits: 22.5
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Comparative Law: Asian and African Legal Systems Law LAW6050 Full year 6 Yes

Comparative Law: Asian and African Legal Systems

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover:

This module provides an introduction to the basic nature of African and Asian legal systems in their pre-modern, modern and post-modern settings, and places the subject within the wider debate about the future of non-Western laws in light of globalisation. The focus is on the larger groupings of legal systems under the rubric of African, Hindu, Chinese, Islamic laws. The systems are studied in relation to concepts internal to them and in relation to concepts of Western jurisprudence. There is also a focus on selected state-based or jurisdictional legal systems of African and Asia, coverage of which varies from year to year.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Comparative Law of Patents, Trade Secrets and Related Rights Law QLLP046 Semester 1 7 No

Comparative Law of Patents, Trade Secrets and Related Rights

Credits: 22.5
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Patents are exclusive rights granted for the protection of an invention that offers a new and inventive technical solution or way of doing something. This half module deals with the process of obtaining and enforcing a patent under the provisions of the European Patent Convention (EPC) and the United States Code (USC) Title 35. Students taking the course will acquire detailed knowledge of and compare the law of patents under the EPC USC Title 35.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Comparative Literature Research Project Languages Linguistics and Film COM6201 Full year 6 Yes

Comparative Literature Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Olga Makarova
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Entry to this module will not be automatic. All students wishing to take this module must see the module organiser before registration and must present a written recommendation from their adviser regarding their suitability. It is designed to enable suitably qualified final-year students to pursue a sustained piece of individual or group research on an agreed topic which may not necessarily be covered in the taught modules. Introductory group sessions on research methods will be followed by individual supervision. You will give presentations of your research in the second semester, and should note that failure to provide evidence of satisfactory progress will lead to de-registration.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets Law QLLM191 Semester 2 7 No

Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets

Credits: 22.5
Contact: Mr Nicolas Bernard
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Competition Law Law LAW6048 Full year 6 Yes

Competition Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Maher Dabbah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Law Background

The purpose of this module is to teach you the basic provisions of both EC and UK competition law. The module will provide you with a flavour of the economic and market context in which EC and UK competition law is applied. The module will aim to consider important business phenomena in the market such as anticompetitive agreements, abuse of market dominance and mergers between firms. It is hoped that by the end of the module you will gain a good understanding of the competition rules of the EC and the UK in order to help you identify situations in which such phenomena may arise. The module is taught on the basis of on one-and-a-halfhour lecture each week and one-and-a-half-hour tutorials held biweekly. In addition, the module includes several case studies based on real cases. You will be asked to prepare the case studies beforehand and be ready to discuss them in the class. The case studies will give you a taste of what competition law in practice is really like. They will also provide an excellent guidance on how to approach competition law problems in the examination room and beyond.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Competition Law Law IPLC020 Semester 1 7 No

Competition Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 7, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm

Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation Law QLLM178 Full year 7 No

Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Anne Flanagan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 6 pm - 8 pm

Competition Law A Law LAW6048A Semester 1 6 Yes

Competition Law A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maher Dabbah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Law Background

1. Market definition
2. Article 81 EC
3. Vertical restraints
4. Article 82 EC
5. Competition Act 1998 and Enterprise Act 2002
6. Market investigation references
7. Cartels
8. EC mergers
9. UK mergers
10. Practice, enforcement and procedure
11. Collective dominance

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Competition Law and Licensing I and II Law IPLM032 Full year 7 No

Competition Law and Licensing I and II

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Johanna Gibson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is for MSc students in IP following the business stream.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Complex Networks Mathematical Sciences MTH6142 Semester 2 6 Yes

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: "MTH6105,BUS311
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Complex Networks Mathematical Sciences MTH6142P Semester 2 6 No

Complex Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the basic concepts and results of complex network theory. It covers methods for analyzing the structure of a network, and for modeling it. It also discusses applications to real systems, such as the Internet, social networks and the nervous system of the C. elegans.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Complex Systems Mathematical Sciences MTH743P Semester 2 7 No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser¿s expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Complex Systems Mathematical Sciences MTH743U Semester 2 7 Yes

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Appropriate level-6 mathematical background; consult the module organiser for details

Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser¿s expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Complex Systems Mathematical Sciences MTH743N Semester 2 7 No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser¿s expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Complex Variables Mathematical Sciences MTH5103 Semester 2 5 Yes

Complex Variables

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Oliver Jenkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH4101

The integral and differential properties of functions of a complex variable. Complex differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions. Sequences and series, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities and residues. Complex integration, Cauchy's theorem and consequences, Cauchy's integral formula and related theorems. The residue theorem and applications to evaluation of integrals and summation of series. Conformal transformations.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Composites Engineering and Materials Science MTRM730 Semester 2 7 No

Composites

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Antonius Peijs
Overlap: MAT5030
Prerequisite: None

The role of composites in modern engineering. Starting from the manufacture of glass fibres, carbon fibres, aramid fibres, polyethylene fibres and extending to the manufacturing of polymers composites using processes including for example resin transfer moulding, compression moulding and pultrusion. In addition to fibre reinforced polymer composites, the module will also consider particulate filled composite materials and high temperature metal matrix composite materials. The module will cover the theory that is used to predict the stiffness and strength of composite components, with emphasis on exploring the roles of the three different components encountered in a composite materials of fibre (filler), matrix and the interface.
Inspection and testing, non-destructive methods: ultrasonic inspection, magnetic inspection, acoustic emission monitoring.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Composites for Aerospace Applications Engineering and Materials Science MAT5030 Semester 2 5 Yes

Composites for Aerospace Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Antonius Peijs
Overlap: MTRM730
Prerequisite: None

The role of composites in modern engineering, in particular aerospace applications will be described which will enable the effective selection of a fibre-resin system for a range of applications . The module will include the manufacture of glass, carbon, aramid and polyethylene fibres, extending to the manufacturing of polymer composites using processes including for example resin transfer moulding, compression moulding and pultrusion. The module will also consider particulate filled composite materials and high temperature metal matrix composite materials. The module will cover the theory that is used to predict the stiffness and strength of composite components, with emphasis on exploring the roles of the three different components encountered in a composite materials of fibre (filler), matrix and the interface. A framework for understanding the cost of manufacture to enable the selection of an appropriate manufacturing technology for a part. Comparisons will be made compare to more traditional materials such as metals, in particular in aircraft applications. Failure modes in composites will be described, non-destructive testing methods such as ultrasonics and strategies towards repair of composite structures will be covered.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Computability Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS631U Semester 2 6 Yes

Computability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greta Yorsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS407

This module concerns the limits of what computers can do. The computing methods we study are the simplest models of computers (automata and Turing machines) and of programming languages: Register machines are prototypes of imperative languages (go-to commands) and recursive functions are the base of languages like LISP and SCHEME. We can say, in a precise sense, that certain functions are not computable even in principle, using interesting kinds of argumentation, the so-called 'diagonal arguments'. A related area is complexity theory: what computers can do efficiently. By contrast, computability is about what can be done at all. In complexity theory, we draw a map of the computable realm; in computability theory, we meet the frontier of that realm, and also start to explore the territory beyond it.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Computational Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHE305 Semester 2 6 No

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm

Computational Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences MCHE305 Semester 2 6 No

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6

Computational Engineering Engineering and Materials Science DEN401 Semester 1 7 Yes

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ante Munjiza
Overlap: DENM004
Prerequisite: "DEN121 DEN122 DEN223 DEN201"

This is an advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aeronautical and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Computational Engineering Engineering and Materials Science DENM004 Semester 1 7 No

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ante Munjiza
Overlap: DEN401
Prerequisite: DEN4121

This is advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aero and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Computational Fluid Dynamics Engineering and Materials Science DEN403 Semester 2 7 Yes

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Krabasov
Overlap: DENM010
Prerequisite: "DEN121 DEN122 DEN240 DEN241 DEN242 DEN331"

Following on from an introduction to CFD in DEN331, in this module we deepen our knowledge in various areas. We learn to analyse the properties of discretisations and apply these to simple model equations. We discuss the various aspects of modelling turbulence. In the accompanying laboratory, we learn to generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems on these meshes and perform the relevant analysis of the quality of our simulations.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Computational Fluid Dynamics Engineering and Materials Science DENM010 Semester 2 7 No

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Krabasov
Overlap: DEN403
Prerequisite: "DEM4121 DEN240 DEN241 DEN242 DEN331"

Following on from an introduction to CFD in DEN331, in this module we deepen our knowledge in various areas. We learn to analyse the properties of discretisations and apply these to simple model equations. We discuss the various aspects of modelling turbulence. In the accompanying laboratory, we learn to generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems on these meshes and perform the relevant analysis of the quality of our simulations.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Computational Genomics Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS633U Semester 2 6 Yes

Computational Genomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fabrizio Smeraldi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "ECS401 ECS414"

Genome sequencing projects have a large role to play in biology and medicine. High throughput experiments are generating large quantities of high-dimensional biological data, and computational methods play a key role in analysing, envisioning and understanding this data. This module provides an introduction to the types of data and some commonly used methods of analysis.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am -12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Computational Methods in Finance Mathematical Sciences MTH770P Semester 1 7 No

Computational Methods in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosemary Harris
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 5 pm - 7 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 7 pm - 9 pm

Computational Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTH731U Semester 2 7 Yes

Computational Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Heiko Grossmann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6136

This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Computational Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTHM731 Semester 2 7 No

Computational Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Heiko Grossmann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Computational Statistics Mathematical Sciences MTH731P Semester 2 7 No

Computational Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Heiko Grossmann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids Engineering and Materials Science DEN331 Semester 1 6 Yes

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ante Munjiza
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "DEN101 DEN121 DEN122 DEN102 DEN240 DEN241 DEN242"

This is an introductory module in computational modelling. It covers both computational solids and computational fluids. The most widely used methods such the finite element method are covered. The emphasis is on engineering applications with students being exposed to hands on experience of both solids and fluids commercial packages.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Computer Graphics Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS610U Semester 1 6 Yes

Computer Graphics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pengwei Hao
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned primarily with computer graphics systems and in particular 3D computer graphics. The module will include revision of fundamental raster algorithms such as polygon filling and quickly move onto the specification, modelling and rendering of 3D scenes. In particular the following topics may be covered: viewing in 2D, data structures for the representation of 3D polyhedra, viewing in 3D, visibility and hidden surface algorithms, illumination computations. Some attention will be paid to human perception of colour and interactive 3D such as virtual reality.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Computer Graphics Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS762P Semester 1 7 No

Computer Graphics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pengwei Hao
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course is concerned primarily with computer graphics systems and in particular 3D computer graphics. The course will include revision of fundamental raster algorithms such as polygon filling and quickly move onto the specification, modeling and rendering of 3D scenes. In particular the following topics may be covered: viewing in 2D,data structures for the representation of 3D polyhedra, viewing in 3D, visibility and hidden surface algorithms, illumination computations. Some attention will be paid to human perception of colour and interactive 3D such as virtual reality.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Computer Law Law QLLM017 Full year 7 No

Computer Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Mr Noam Shemtov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the law relating to information and communication technologies (ICTs) products and services. The first half of the module examines the intellectual property rights that form the basis for their legal protection; while the second half examines the contractual mechanisms used to market such products and services, and will involve practitioners experienced in such transactions. As the markets for such products and services are international, the module adopts a comparative approach to the legal issues. While UK Law is taken as the starting point, differences in approach in other jurisdictions are highlighted and contrasted. A particular focus of the module is on the numerous European Community legal developments which affect the ICT sector.

Prerequisites: none
Applicable Groupings: B, E, I, J

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Computers and Language Languages Linguistics and Film SML209 Semester 1 5 Yes

Computers and Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed as an introduction to the application of technology in language education. Providing a balance of theory and practice, it will equip students with the knowledge and skills to make optimum use of computers in their studies and research activities. The module will cover key concepts in the use of digital technologies for language learning and humanities, as well as providing practical experience in the creation of digital materials using a variety of computer-based applications.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am -12 pm

Computer Systems and Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS404U Semester 1 4 Yes

Computer Systems and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Graham White
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides you with a basic understanding of how a computer works and how programs are executed by the CPU at the machine level. As an introduction to computer architecture and systems software, this module presents the concepts needed to understand typical computers at the level of their ';machine-code'; instruction set. It covers Boolean algebra rules and terminology as well as logic gates. The module also examines the use of bits, bytes and data formats to represent integers, text and programs as well as looking at the conventional von Neumann computer architecture (CPU, registers, memory). Assembly language programming and system software are introduced.

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Computing Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF034 Semester 2 3 No

Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Computing module will provide SEFP students with an understanding and practical experience of core areas of computer science: programming and algorithms; underlying theory; software development; computer systems; and networks. It will include hands-on programming experience during supervised lab sessions. The module is designed principally to prepare students for pursuing study in the areas of computer science or electronics; however, it will also provide a basic introduction for students not intending to pursue study in these areas.

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Examination
Level: 3

Concepts and Consequences in Grammatical Theory Languages Linguistics and Film LIN7026 Semester 1 7 No

Concepts and Consequences in Grammatical Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Hagit Borer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Empirical results in a broad range of languages have now made the understanding of the basic building blocks of syntactic theory fundamental to any advanced work in linguistics, not only in syntax and semantics, but within any area of linguistics. This module will familiarize students with the basic elements of syntactic construction, serving at the same time as an introduction for students with less background, and as a critical overview, for those more advanced. Emphasis will be put on the development of argumentation skills and the ability to undertake independent analysis of linguistic data, as well as on the development of critical thinking in evaluating competing approaches to the same paradigms.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Condensed Matter A Physics and Astronomy SPA5228 Semester 2 5 Yes

Condensed Matter A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anthony Phillips
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts in modern condensed matter physics. The atomic structures of both crystalline and non-crystalline substances will be discussed. We will see how these structures can arise from surprisingly simple potential models, and how in turn they influence the interesting and useful properties of materials."

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Condensed Matter B Physics and Astronomy SPA6312 Semester 2 6 Yes

Condensed Matter B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrei Sapelkin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Continuing from Symmetry, Structure and Dynamics in Solids (or in its first year from Structure and Properties of Functional Materials), this module completes an overview of the major concepts in modern condensed matter physics. Many of the assumptions made in previous modules û such as considering only ideal, infinite crystals or isotropic materials û will be relaxed in order to treat more complex but realistic situations. So we will discuss atomic and electronic structure beyond the perfect crystal; see how to use tensors to describe anisotropic properties; discuss useful and interesting electric and magnetic phenomena; and investigate model systems for advanced materials. The module will conclude by examining some active research topics within the Centre for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics."

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Consciousness and Causality Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC614 Semester 2 6 Yes

Consciousness and Causality

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Magda Osman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to give students a scientific overview of the study of consciousness and control (e.g., agency, free will, choice behaviors) by introducing critical theoretical movements and empirical findings in psychology. Both the theory and practice of the science behind studying consciousness and control will be grounded in key philosophical arguments concerning causality and agency. In this way, the module will encourage students to critically evaluate a range of approaches in the study of consciousness and control, and integrate philosophical arguments with scientific methods. Topics covered include: The philosophy of causality and agency (e.g., Hume, Kant, Mackie, Hempel); the historical treatment of consciousness and control in psychology (e.g., Behaviourist, Psychodynamic, Information Processing); current developments and advances in the study of consciousness and control (e.g., neuroscientific techniques ¿ EEG, fMRI), differences between intentions and actions, applied issues concerning consciousness and control (e.g., how do we decide when an error in judgment was not made under our conscious control?).

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Consumer Cultures: The United States from the 1760s to the 1960s History HST7331 Semester 2 7 Yes

Consumer Cultures: The United States from the 1760s to the 1960s

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Cohen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

America's relationship with consumption has always been contentious. Founded on the strength of a consumer boycott in the eighteenth century, the US had become the ultimate nation of consumers by the middle of the twentieth century. How had this transformation taken place and what did it mean for American culture and society? By examining how Americans created their habits of consumption, this module will explore how consumerism shaped multiple aspects of American life: from courtship, sex and gender roles to citizenship and the nation's imperial ambitions. Together, we will use a variety of critical approaches, including the study of economic networks and commodities, the examination of cultural hegemony and gendered histories of consumption and the vast abundance of visual; and material culture to answer the question: what is consumer culture and what effect has it had on American life?

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Consumer Psychology Business and Management BUS318 Semester 1 6 Yes

Consumer Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Danae Manika
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Building on a general understanding of marketing, this module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of psychological theories relevant to the study of consumer behaviour. We start with an overview of the scope of consumer psychology and consumer behaviour and position it against mainstream marketing. Subsequently, we will focus on cognitive and affective processes that drive consumer behaviour. Once an understanding of the basic psychological processes has been gained we will look at various factors that are able to influence these processes. Particular attention is paid to how marketing practice influences consumer perception, evaluation and behaviour. Throughout the module real world hands-on exercises will facilitate understanding and transferability of contents.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Contemporary Art and Society History HST5351 Semester 2 5 Yes

Contemporary Art and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Giovanni Aloi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is an introduction to the socio-historical context and artistic production from 1965 to the rise and fall of Saatchi's Young British Art and today's contemporary art.

As the influence of Abstract Expressionism waned in the 1960s, artists came to question the very philosophy underlying modernism, causing a variety of new movements and styles to dominate the art world. The module will follow the development of painting and sculpture and explore a variety of new artistic media including video, performance, photography and installation, through a focus on art movements like Arte Povera, Minimalism, Pop Art, Conceptual and Performance Art, Environmental Art, and Feminist Art.

Individual art objects will be discussed in detail within their social, religious, intellectual, and historical contexts, and their public reception. Visits to Tate Modern, and other venues in London will constitute integral part of the program.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Contemporary German Studies I Languages Linguistics and Film GER504 Semester 1 5 Yes

Contemporary German Studies I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katerina Somers
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GER117 or equivalent

This module will build on the first year core module and help prepare students for their year abroad. It will be divided into blocks. The first will explore the Federal Ideal in contemporary Germany, and the geographical and cultural specificities of various regions and cities. The second will examine the sounds of German and the phonological system in which these sounds operate. The final unit of the module will focus on the dialectal and regional varieties of German.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Contemporary German Studies II Languages Linguistics and Film GER505 Semester 2 5 Yes

Contemporary German Studies II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Astrid Kohler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GER117 or equivalent

The module will be covering three thematic fields:
1.) Contemporary Berlin
2.) German Speaking Cultures
3.) Working with the Writer in Residence.
In block 1, students will get to analyze a variety of cultural representations of contemporary Berlin. They will also familiarize themselves with sociological approaches to urban culture.
In block 2, this approach will be opened up to other German-speaking metropolises such as Vienna and Zurich, and students engage with non-German (but) German-language cultures. Students will also be introduced to the question of multiculturalism in German speaking countries and to artifacts thematizing trans-cultural experiences.
Block 3 is devoted to work with our writers in residence. By discussing their works, ideas and circumstances with them, students will gain an understanding of current literary and cultural life in Germany.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Contemporary Hollywood Cinema Languages Linguistics and Film FLM308 Semester 1 6 Yes

Contemporary Hollywood Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guy Westwell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Through a detailed examination of a number of contemporary Hollywood movies this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped Hollywood production from the late 1970s to the present day. We will be interrogating contemporary Hollywood movies in order to describe changes in the US film industry since the decline of the studio system and to profile some of the ways in which Hollywood reflects and interacts with American culture and society. This module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which you will select a film of your own choice and across three written assignments situate the film within its industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economy Geography GEG6129 Semester 2 6 Yes

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines significant shifts in South Asian politics, development and society with a particular focus on India. Students will cover nationalism and the "invention" of India, the politics of violence and nonviolence on the sub-continent, processes of economic liberalisation and development in India and its Diaspora. More specifically the module will encourage students to engage with questions concerning: everyday experiences of violence and nonviolence with respect to Hindu nationalism, and Islamist activism in a post 9/11 world; the rise of the middle classes, India¿s cities and citizenship experiences; processes of development including the role of the state and civil society/political society; the nature of political and social transformation in light of caste policies of affirmative action and experiences of education and (un/under)employment and finally the South Asian Diaspora and everyday life in the UK. Throughout the module students will be introduced to different theoretical approaches used by South Asian scholars such as feminist and postcolonial frameworks.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Contemporary Inorganic Chemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences CHEM512 Semester 1 6 No

Contemporary Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6

Contemporary Issues in Accounting Business and Management BUSM061 Semester 2 7 No

Contemporary Issues in Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to some of the key developments and issues in accounting currently discussed by policy makers, the profession, the media and academics. The specific issues addressed will change over time but could include: - On-line Reporting - Accounting and Globalisation - Accounting Regulation: The Convergence Project - Accounting and Poverty - Accounting and Indigenous Peoples - Sustainability Reporting - The Relevance of History - Accounting, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion - Accountants and the Financial Crisis - Accounting in the Community - NGOs and Accountability

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Contemporary Theatre and Performance English and Drama DRA7705 Semester 1 7 No

Contemporary Theatre and Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jen Harvie
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

What is contemporary theatre and performance doing? What are its benefits and problems? What does it tell us about contemporary culture? How is it particularly well suited to articulating and influencing cultural change? This module identifies trends in recent theatre/performance and its analysis, and considers what we might understand to be those trends' value - be it aesthetic, political, social, emotional - as well as what they articulate about contemporary culture. Trends examined might include: postdramatic theatre, relational aesthetics, performative public activism, and responses to contemporary contexts such as ecological activism or globalisation. Study is grounded in critical reading and current and recent theatre, performance and art events, especially in London.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Control Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS601U Semester 1 6 Yes

Control Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tijana Timotijevic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces the principles of control systems, particularly in respect of electronic systems. It covers:
- feedback systems
- modelling dynamic systems
- the steady state response
- the frequency response and s-plane analysis for the transient response
- control of digital systems (sampled data systems)
- use of the z-transform.

Assessment: 5.0% Practical, 25.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 5.0% Practical, 95.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Control Systems Analysis and Design Engineering and Materials Science DEN5200 Semester 2 5 Yes

Control Systems Analysis and Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Henri Huijberts
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4121

This module is focused on the basic principles of control systems analysis and design and its application to engineering systems in relation to mechanical, medical, electro-mechanical and aerospace systems. The students will acquire the skill of designing a control system for a particular application. They will also gain practical experience in analysis and design of a typical control system with MATLAB using the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures and problem solving sessions.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Convergence and Continuity Mathematical Sciences MTH5104 Semester 1 5 Yes

Convergence and Continuity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Reto Mueller
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "MTH4100 MTH4104"

This module introduces some of the mathematical theory behind Calculus. It answers questions such as: What properties of the real numbers do we rely on in Calculus? What does it mean to say that a series converges to a limit? Are there kinds of function that are guaranteed to have a maximum value? The module is a first introduction, with many examples, to the beautiful and important branch of pure mathematics known as Analysis.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Coordination and Social Dynamics Business and Management BUS206 Semester 1 5 Yes

Coordination and Social Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the organization of economic action and interaction. It builds on a revisited theory of rationality that goes beyond the divides between "global" and "bounded" rationality, and between prescriptive and descriptive theories of choice. The course develops a model of multiple rationalities in which agents are expected to adopt different decision strategies that are applicable under different configurations of knowledge and preferences. The course begins by introducing the notion of agents as intentional systems, the structure of their knowledge, and the processes of perception, judgement and decision-making. Focus will then shift to the problem of interdependent action in multi-agent settings, and to the main coordination mechanisms through which agents interact, communicate, and cooperate with one another. Special emphasis will be placed on group decision-making, authority, negotiation, auctions, rules and social norms. Active learning is sustained by case studies, simulations, and exercises that will concentrate primarily on how to compare and combine different coordination mechanisms to govern interdependencies in areas as diverse as industrial process control, electronic commerce, innovative and dynamic activities, and small group interaction.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Copyright and Designs Law Law IPLC022 Semester 1 7 No

Copyright and Designs Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Maria Frabboni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Corporate Finance Economics and Finance ECOM015 Semester 1 7 No

Corporate Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radoslawa Nikolowa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop your understanding of how firms raise external finance and design heir capital structure. n the first three lectures we will examine the assumption that the firm's cash flows are exogenous with respect to financial decisions. In his framework you will study the Modigliani- Miller theorems stating which conditions make capital structure irrelevant, and derive the optimal debt/equity mix in the presence of taxes and costly bankruptcy. The rest of the module addresses the issue of how a firm's financial and governance structure affects its value once information problems between firms' insiders and investors are taken nto account. We first focus on the incentives of he firm's insiders and study how capital structure impacts their agency relationship with outside investors; we then turn to outsiders' incentives, recognising that investors play an mportant monitoring role in the firms they fund. We then study models linking security returns and control rights. Finally, the interaction between firms' financial decisions and product market behaviour is addressed.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Corporate Finance 1 Economics and Finance ECN371 Semester 1 6 Yes

Corporate Finance 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomai Filippeli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN226

This module is part of a two-module sequence that studies how firms make their investment decisions and design their capital structure. This first part deals with Capital Budgeting, building on the asset pricing notions acquired in the Capital Markets 1 module. Topics covered include: finance and the financial manager, present values, the value of bonds and common stocks, superiority of decisions based on present value method, making investment decisions with the net present value rule, risk-return and the cost of capital, recap on portfolio theory, capital budgeting and risk, and practical problems in capital budgeting. Prerequisite: ECN226.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Corporate Finance 2 Economics and Finance ECN372 Semester 2 6 Yes

Corporate Finance 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Radoslawa Nikolowa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN371

This module is part of a two-module sequence that studies how firms make their investment decisions and design their capital structure. This second part deals with issues of capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, and looks at topics of capital structure and asymmetric information and corporate governance. Topics covered include: the Modigliani-Miller theorems, optimal debt/equity mix with taxes and costly bankruptcy, bankruptcy costs and debtholder-equityholder conflicts, managerial incentives, basic credit rationing models with asymmetric information, optimal capital structure and agency costs, the information conveyed by financial decisions, and corporate governance models. Prerequisite: ECN371

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Corporate Finance for Managers Business and Management BUSM030 Semester 2 7 No

Corporate Finance for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The focus of this module is the financing and investment decisions made by the managers of companies in pursuit of corporate goals. It examines how managers can obtain the greatest possible return on investments for the smallest amount of risk. You will acquire the knowledge and understanding of theories, models, tools and techniques to assist in making financial decisions to achieve corporate goals. These will include identification of the cost of capital/rates of return, dividend distribution, investment appraisal, portfolio theory, foreign exchange and interest rate issues.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Corporate Finance Law Law QLLM135 Full year 7 No

Corporate Finance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in corporate finance. This module is a comparative corporate and financial regulation module analyzing transactions using sophisticated methodologies. The module will focus on global issues such as: the use of debt and equity; why merge or acquire a business; core considerations of the process; due diligence, purchase sale agreements and contractual governance; the role of the board of directors in an acquisition/financing transaction; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, the US and the EU; the protection of minority shareholders in civil law and common law jurisdictions; the protection of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions; and, financial assistance regulation in the UK, US and the EU. The views of shareholders, bankers, investment funds, stakeholders, management, and "society" are all considered in the context of the multifaceted dynamics which operate in the international financial markets. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 6 pm - 8 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Corporate Finance Law Law CCLD135 Full year 7 No

Corporate Finance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Primarily the course aims to contribute to a critical understanding of the subject matter through the combined study of theories of regulation in general and the corporate dynamics in particular, with a special focus on the different stakeholders involved in corporate finance. This module is an advanced corporate law and financial regulation module analyzing transactions using sophisticated methodologies. The module will focus on global issues such as: the use of debt and equity; why merge or acquire a business; core considerations of the process; due diligence, purchase sale agreements and contractual governance; the role of the board of directors in an acquisition/financing transaction; the permissibility and regulation of takeover defenses in the UK, the US and the EU; the protection of minority shareholders in civil law and common law jurisdictions; the protection of other constituencies such as employees affected by control transactions; and, financial assistance regulation in the UK, US and the EU. The views of shareholders, bankers, investment funds, stakeholders, management, and "society" are all considered in the context of the multifaceted dynamics which operate in the international financial markets. The course is strongly committed to presenting a global and comparative perspective highlighting the contemporary principles and trends of corporate finance rather than the pointillist and ephemeral details of national rule books.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Corporate Finance Law Law QLLP057 Semester 2 7 No

Corporate Finance Law

Credits: 22.5
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Corporate Governance Business and Management BUSM060 Semester 2 7 No

Corporate Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Butlin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to key theories, concepts and issues in corporate governance. It critically explores corporate governance as an embedded practice and provides insights into how local cultures and developments in local contexts have impacted upon and shaped the development of corporate governance systems and practices and how these local corporate governance systems and practices are challenged by globalisation. Within this broad framework case studies provide detailed insights into specific aspects of corporate governance.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Corporate Insolvency Law Law QLLM114 Full year 7 No

Corporate Insolvency Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The global financial crisis has heightened interest in and seen an increase in the calls for efficiency with respect to corporate insolvency procedures, the insolvency aspects of the taking of security, corporate rescue mechanisms, the accountability of corporate decision makers in the context of corporate insolvency and the structuring of transactions involving corporate credit and security.

The module aims to provide an overview of the principles of English law relating to the treatment of insolvent companies and of those managing or having dealings with such companies. To achieve this aim, the module covers the various procedures available in cases of corporate insolvency, the relationship between the general law of property and obligations and insolvency, corporate credit and security issues in the context of corporate insolvency, and corporate rescue mechanisms.

Prerequisites: None
Applicable Groupings: A, B

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 6 pm - 8 pm

Corporate Law and Governance Business and Management BUS329 Semester 2 6 Yes

Corporate Law and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an understanding of the major principles of UK Company Law with particular reference to the legal and corporate governance rules imposed on the board of directors, the senior management and advisors. The module examines the nature and formation of companies, their constitution and the role of and legal responsibilities of management including the theoretical and practical issues involved in the direction and control of companies. The module considers agency theory and stakeholder theory upon which the modern UK and US corporate governance models are based. It will also review some of the most spectacular failures of governance mechanisms in recent years which led to the development of codes of best practice and legislation in the UK and the USA respectively. In addition specific criminal laws affecting businesses today will be considered such as The Bribery Act 2010 and the Fraud Act 2006 and the active management required of the issues raised as a consequence of such legislation. Learning is sustained by case studies and problem solving scenarios.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Corporate Social Responsibility Business and Management BUS313 Semester 2 6 Yes

Corporate Social Responsibility

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will act as a general introduction into issues of business ethics. The course will approach these issues through the concept of corporate social responsibility. After a general introduction into theories of morality and ethics, the course will introduce key aspects of ethical considerations in business practice, such as those linked to the idea of civil society, globalisation, sustainability, stakeholder relations, corporate accountability & corporate citizenship. This course does not intend to prove that businesses are either ethical or unethical, but rather to illustrate how ethics (both "good" and "bad") can be used as a lens to understand organisations and the dynamics of their relationship to various constituencies (clients, shareholders, competitors, customers, regulators etc.).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Corporate Strategy Economics and Finance ECN302 Semester 1 6 Yes

Corporate Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN214

This module provides an overview of corporate strategy in a global context and will enable you to become familiar with the core concepts of: External environmental analysis; models of internal and external analysis, analysis and management of resources; analysis of corporate strengths and weaknesses; knowledge management; development of strategic choice; elements influencing implementation of strategy.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Corpus Linguistics Languages Linguistics and Film LIN506 Semester 2 5 Yes

Corpus Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Katherine Gupta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: LIN400 LIN4200 or equivalent

This module will introduce you to Corpus Linguistics (CL). It focuses on theoretical aspects underlying CL such as collocation, idiom principle, semantic prosody and pattern grammar. You will be introduced to some of the commonly used software and electronic corpora, and gain hands-on experience in creating and analyzing corpus-data. Finally, the module will demonstrate the ways in which CL can be applied to investigate language structures and use in a variety of registers and contexts, e.g. in diachronic research (language change), synchronic research (language variation), discourse studies (gendered discourse) and in work on language acquisition.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am -12 pm

Cosmology Physics and Astronomy SPA7005U Semester 1 7 Yes

Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Lidsey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Cosmology is a rapidly developing subject that is the focus of a considerable research effort worldwide. It is the attempt to understand the present state of the universe as a whole and thereby shed light on its origin and ultimate fate. Why is the universe structured today in the way that it is, how did it develop into its current form and what will happen to it in the future? The aim of this module is to address these and related questions from both the observational and theoretical perspectives. The module does not require specialist astronomical knowledge and does not assume any prior understanding of general relativity."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Cosmology Physics and Astronomy SPA7005P Semester 1 7 Yes

Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Lidsey
Overlap: PHY6311
Prerequisite: None

"Cosmology is a rapidly developing subject that is the focus of a considerable research effort worldwide. It is the attempt to understand the present state of the universe as a whole and thereby shed light on its origin and ultimate fate. Why is the universe structured today in the way that it is, how did it develop into its current form and what will happen to it in the future? The aim of this module is to address these and related questions from both the observational and theoretical perspectives. The module does not require specialist astronomical knowledge and does not assume any prior understanding of general relativity."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Costume Drama: the Past Performed English and Drama DRA234 Semester 2 5 Yes

Costume Drama: the Past Performed

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bridget Escolme
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores the ways in which British culture has reproduced, appropriated and performed the past through costume and clothing. The 'performance' of the title includes historical plays and plays about history, novel adaptations on film and television and the performance of the self through 'retro' fashion. The module takes the visual cultures of costume and fashion as the starting point for an analysis of the ideological and historically situated meanings we make of the past. It is taught through seminars, video screenings, fieldwork (one piece of which may take place outside London) and at least one theatre visit.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

C Programming Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS501U Semester 1 5 Yes

C Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paula Freire Fonseca
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS401

This module introduces the principles of C Programming to students who already know how to program at a basic level in Java. It provides a knowledge of the theory of C Programming and also its practical use in real engineering systems. The focus is on microprocessor based systems.

Assessment: 40.0% Practical, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Creating Interactive Objects Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS511U Semester 1 5 Yes

Creating Interactive Objects

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Interactive objects are physical devices controlled by microcontrollers using simple sensors and actuators. The module provides students with skills, knowledge, and experience of designing and prototyping interactive physical objects using contemporary microcontrollers. The module covers basic electronics, control circuits, sensors (analogue and digital), output (analogue and digital), microcontrollers, simple networking, and microcontroller programming using the popular Arduino open-source platform. It additionally touches on topics of interaction design and evaluation to provide a framework in which students can prototype and understand interactive objects.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

Creative Group Project Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS520U Semester 2 5 No

Creative Group Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nick Bryan-Kinns
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will be practice-based where students work in a team to produce a creative system for audio-visual content production or interactivity. Students will work in a team to identify the elements in a product development cycle; develop an audio, video, multimedia product with particular attention to its aesthetics, usability and marketability; analyse and present results in qualitative and quantitative measures; report and present findings in a clear and coherent manner.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Dissertation
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Creative Production Languages Linguistics and Film FLM6201 Semester 2 6 No

Creative Production

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: FLM305
Prerequisite: Enrolment on Single hons Film Studies

This is an optional module open to single honours Film Studies. It offers the opportunity to develop and build on knowledge of film making developed during the first two year of the degree, and the opportunity to write a complex and extensive feature film treatment. The module requires considerable commitment in terms of research, independent study and writing.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Credit Ratings Economics and Finance ECOM091 Semester 2 7 No

Credit Ratings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an overview of credit ratings, risk and analysis. It explains the role of rating agencies and goes though the rating process; how credit ratings are assigned and monitored. It provides knowledge of both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of credit analysis. It presents credit rating methodologies and an overview of securitisation and structured finance technology. The module puts considerable emphasis on practical applications. It explains how a transaction is put together by an investment bank as an arranger. Then goes through the steps of how it gets rated by the rating agencies and finally distributed in the markets.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Crete Field Course Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM041 Semester 2 7 No

Crete Field Course

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aristides Moustakas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this field course we will explore the use of statistical methodology in designing, collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting population dynamics experiments and observations.
We will cover elements of experimental design, hypothesis testing and statistical inference, analysis of variance, correlation, and up-to-date regression techniques. Throughout the course the application of statistical techniques within a biological context will be emphasized using data that will be collected in the field merged together with larger datasets available from the Natural History Museum, Crete. Further on site visits to rare species and rare habitats will be made, linking population dynamics problems with practical issues in conservation biology.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 7

Criminal Law Law LAW4002 Full year 4 Yes

Criminal Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof William Wilson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Law Background

This module will cover:

Introduction: the scope and character of the criminal law and its objectives; Deconstructing a typical crime - Criminal Damage; The General Principles of Criminal Responsibility; Criminal conduct - the actus reus; principles of causation; crimes of omission; Criminal fault - the mens rea; General defences; capacity and incapacity; insanity and diminished responsibility, intoxication, duress, necessity, self defence; Particular Crimes; Offences against the person: homicide; wounding and assaults, including assaults aggravated by hatred, sexual offences; Offences against property: theft and fraud; Preliminary or inchoate offences; Conspiracy; Attempt; Assisting and encouraging crime; 6. Participation in crime.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12,

Criminal Law for BA Law Politics Students Law LAW5002 Full year 5 No

Criminal Law for BA Law Politics Students

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof William Wilson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover:

Introduction: the scope and character of the criminal law and its objectives; Deconstructing a typical crime - Criminal Damage;
The General Principles of Criminal Responsibility: Criminal conduct - the actus reus; principles of causation; crimes of omission; Criminal fault - the mens rea; General defences; capacity and incapacity; insanity and diminished responsibility, intoxication, duress, necessity, self defence.
Particular Crimes: Offences against the person: homicide; wounding and assaults, including assaults aggravated by hatred, sexual offences; Offences against property: theft and fraud.
Preliminary or inchoate offences: Conspiracy; Attempt.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12,

Criminology Law LAW6045 Full year 6 Yes

Criminology

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: a module in sociology or psychology

Sociological and psychological approaches to the aetiology of criminal behaviour; questions of criminal justice policy-making. Topics include: the aims and values of the criminal justice system; the definition of crime both in a theoretical and a practical sense; studies of particular types of crime (eg 'white collar' crime and crimes of the powerful, juvenile crime); penal policy with regard to particular types of crime; crime and public opinion; crime and the mass media; police organisation; prisons and the penal crisis; the role of victims of crime. The module focuses on the contemporary British context but adopts historical and comparative perspectives where relevant.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm

Criminology A Law LAW6045A Semester 1 6 Yes

Criminology A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: a module in sociology or psychology

This module will cover:

Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice; Defining crime; Rhetoric and reality of crime; Policing and prosecution of crime; Punishment of crime.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm

Criminology B Law LAW6045B Semester 2 6 Yes

Criminology B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Wayne Morrison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: a module in sociology or psychology

This module will cover:

Origins of criminology; Powerful and powerless in criminology; Variables in crime.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6

Critical Aesthetics English and Drama ESH338 Semester 1 6 Yes

Critical Aesthetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Paul Hamilton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an opportunity to explore the defining problems and questions of critical aesthetics. You are introduced to a variety of philosophical texts and are encouraged to use the arguments in these texts to formulate their own perspectives on the central questions of aesthetics.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Critical Thinking & Writing for Applied Linguistics Languages Linguistics and Film EAL7831 Semester 1 7 No

Critical Thinking & Writing for Applied Linguistics

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is offered to students at level 7 and responds to their linguistic and discipline specific needs in terms of reading, analysis and synthesis, argument structure and essay writing skills. Students joining this module are already at IELTS level 7 (minimum 7.0 in writing), which equates to C1 on the CEFR framework. Queen Mary currently benchmarks this to level 6 on the NQF framework.

This module helps students to deliver what is expected from them in their Applied Linguistics' masters' programmes. The academic skills needed to succeed in the Applied Linguistics programmes have been itemised and are presented in three main strands, namely `study skills¿, `reading and demonstrating knowledge¿, and `critical thinking and writing¿. Students are given the tools to manage their time efficiently and plan their work accordingly. They are guided through the process of understanding and successfully delivering assignments, are encouraged and expected to reflect upon their own practice, and are provided with formative feedback to ensure the learning outcomes are achieved.

The module is needs driven and therefore the syllabus is necessarily flexible and the content delivered in workshop format. However, the basic syllabus is likely to include:
¿ Reading skills (navigating the genre of applied linguistics academic articles)
¿ The process of writing
¿ Revision, proof reading and editing skills
¿ Development of the argument, including synthesis of sources, argument validity, and development of conclusions
¿ Macro structure of a paper, planning and development of a position; micro structure of sections and paragraphs
¿ Coherence and cohesion at macro and micro levels
¿ Readability and recognition of the audience and development of the writer's voice
¿ Referencing
¿ Accuracy (grammar, vocabulary and punctuation)

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Critical Thinking & Writing for Politics and International Relations Languages Linguistics and Film EAL7821 Semester 1 7 No

Critical Thinking & Writing for Politics and International Relations

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is offered to students at level 7 and responds to their linguistic and discipline specific needs in terms of reading, analysis and synthesis, argument structure and essay writing skills. Students joining this module are already at IELTS level 7 (minimum 6.0/6.5 in writing), which equates to B2/C1 on the CEFR framework. Queen Mary currently benchmarks this to level 5/6 on the NQF framework.

These workshops help students to deliver what is expected from them in their Politics and International Relations masters' programmes. After consultation with the School of Politics and International Relations, the academic skills needed to succeed in the Politics and International Relations programmes have been itemised and will be presented in three main strands, namely `study skills¿, `reading and demonstrating knowledge¿, and `critical thinking and writing¿. Students will be given the tools to manage their time efficiently and plan their work accordingly. They will be guided through the process of understanding and successfully delivering assignments, in view of the implications their immediate context bestows upon them. Students will be encouraged and expected to reflect upon their own practice, and will be provided with formative feedback to ensure the learning outcomes are achieved.

The module is needs driven and therefore the syllabus is necessarily flexible and the content delivered in workshop format. However, the basic syllabus is likely to include:
¿ Reading skills (navigating the genre of politics and international relations academic articles)
¿ The process of writing
¿ Revision, proof reading and editing skills
¿ Development of the argument, including synthesis of sources, argument validity, and development of conclusions
¿ Macro structure of a paper, planning and development of a position; micro structure of sections and paragraphs
¿ Coherence and cohesion at macro and micro levels
¿ Readability and recognition of the audience and development of the writer's voice
¿ Referencing
¿ Accuracy (grammar, vocabulary and punctuation).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Critical Thinking and Writing in Law: Literacy Development Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4791 Semester 1 6 No

Critical Thinking and Writing in Law: Literacy Development

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Perrin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 6 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Critical Thinking and Writing in Law: LLM Dissertation Writing Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4792 Semester 2 6 No

Critical Thinking and Writing in Law: LLM Dissertation Writing

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Perrin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 6 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Cryptography Mathematical Sciences MTH6115 Semester 1 6 Yes

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "MTH4104 MTH5112"

Cryptography is fundamental to commercial life; in particular, the principles of public-key cryptography were a major intellectual achievement of the last century. The module will give you a detailed understanding of the subject.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Cryptography Mathematical Sciences MTH6115P Semester 1 6 No

Cryptography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Behrang Noohi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Cuban Poetry and Fiction Post-1980 Languages Linguistics and Film HSP602 Semester 1 5 Yes

Cuban Poetry and Fiction Post-1980

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Dorado-Otero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: HSP141 SML002 or equivalent

The aim of this module is to present Cuban writers (regardless of place of residence) within the literary history of the country. We will also examine issues of exile, history and national identity. Some of the writers included are: Carlota Caulfield, María Elena Cruz Varela, Carlos Díaz Barrios, Lourdes Gil, Amando Fernández, Rosario Hiriart, Senel Paz, Delfín Prats, Lourdes Tomás, Carlos Victoria.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Cuban Society Through Film: Post-1959 Revolution Languages Linguistics and Film HSP640 Semester 2 6 Yes

Cuban Society Through Film: Post-1959 Revolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angela Dorado-Otero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: HSP141 SML002 or equivalent; fluency in Spanish is expected

This module aims to study the different issues raised by Cuba's cultural politics after 1959. We will examine the questions of modernity and postmodernity, sexuality, communism, revolution and counter-revolution, identity, nationalism, exile, and subjectivity versus the state. Students are informed that many films do not have subtitles and attending the screening is essential.

Assessment: 45.0% Coursework, 55.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Cultural Diversity and Law Law LAW6057 Full year 6 Yes

Cultural Diversity and Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores how legal systems manage cultural diversity, which includes religious, ethnic and linguistic diversity. The module takes the English legal system as the core case study and compares it to the experience of other legal systems in the management of cultural diversity. The comparative study of legal approaches to cultural diversity includes an exploration of legal pluralism, the significance of long-standing and newer diversities introduced through immigration, the problems of assimilation and integration, and paradigms of citizenship, multiculturalism and secularism.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Cultural Diversity and Law Law QLLM170 Semester 1 7 No

Cultural Diversity and Law

Credits: 22.5
Contact: Dr Prakash Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores, in comparative perspective, how different legal systems manage cultural diversity, which includes religious, ethnic and linguistic diversity. The module is based on the English legal system as the core case study and compares it to the experience of other legal systems in the management of cultural diversity. The comparative study of legal approaches to cultural diversity includes an exploration of legal pluralism, the significance of long-standing and newer diversities introduced through immigration, the problems of assimilation and integration, and paradigms of citizenship, multiculturalism and secularism. We select among and examine conceptual and substantive issues including assimilation, integration, pluralism and secularism; ethnicity; legal pluralism; immigration; family relations; education; blasphemy and religious hatred; mental health; discrimination; and criminalisation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Cultural Geography in Practice Geography GEG7122 Semester 1 7 Yes

Cultural Geography in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on what could be described as creative and public cultural geographies. It explores the ways in which cultural geography is being undertaken and disseminated through forms of creative practice, participatory approaches and collaborative projects. These include collaborations between cultural geographers and creative practitioners and collaborative relationships with public cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries. Through class discussions and on site explorations of current examples, the module explores the contexts, approaches, practical strategies, possibilities and challenges of creative and public cultural geographies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Cultural Industries English and Drama DRA7703 Semester 2 7 No

Cultural Industries

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Drama
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores cultural industries - both their practices, and the issues (ethical, practical, political, economic, etc.) they raise. It examines the political and economic contexts and practices that give rise to and affect them. It evaluates their aims as well as the practices they do and might employ to achieve those aims. Module convenor(s) facilitate students' placements with an appropriate industry partner and students develop industry-based projects to complete within the context of the industry partner's work. Students' work on this module will be partly seminar-based, and partly based on work with the industry partner.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Cultural Legacies of the First World War English and Drama ESH7203 Semester 1 7 No

Cultural Legacies of the First World War

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Michele Barrett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines both the contemporary and the present-day cultural importance in Britain of the first world war. The literature and culture of the period 1914-1930 are a substantive focus; the categories of modernism and humanism a thematic one. The war was also an important catalyst for change in understanding sanity (through the widespread phenomenon of temporary mental breakdown), and in the development of modern technological cultures of violence. There is attention in the second part of the module to the continuing cultural importance of the war. In exploring the significance of the war to post-modern culture, we aim to rework theoretical issues about modernity, humanism, tradition, and the machine in the interpretation of the war. This module is interdisciplinary in methodology and it draws on elements of cultural history, literary criticism and art history. The module assumes that students will have read Paul Fussell's book, The Great War and Modern Memory (OUP 1975 and many reprintings). We will discuss it in the first session. Unless students have already read it, it would be very helpful if they would read it over the vacation before we start the module. The first session is based on some of the most well-known literary material from the war, which students will probably have come across in the past. If not, theyshould look at the war poems of Wilfred Owen in preparation for our first meeting. The module will be looking at some of the visual art of the war, which students may not be familiar with. The most useful reference book on this is Richard Cork's comprehensive survey A Bitter Truth: Avant-garde Art and the Great War (1994, Yale UP, New Haven and London).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Culture, Performance and Globalisation English and Drama DRA304 Semester 1 6 Yes

Culture, Performance and Globalisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Drama
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will consider the practice and problematic of performance in and between different cultures, particularly in relation to the apparently pan-cultural phenomenon of 'globalisation'. Students will be introduced to, and will discuss key issues from discourses which seek to critique cross- and inter- cultural artistic practice (specifically those of post-colonialism and globalisation). They will seek to situate issues concerning culture within the practice of performance, whether this is from the perspective of the spectator, or the performer him/herself. The module will examine and formulate theory in relation to play texts, historical accounts of performance, video recordings and live performances.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Culture and Identity in Renaissance Italy History HST7335 Semester 2 7 Yes

Culture and Identity in Renaissance Italy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Katherine Lowe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will engage with Renaissance texts and with recent historical work on Renaissance Italy concerned with analysis of the context of people¿s lives ¿ both the lives of the elite and rulers, and the lives of others, whether members of an occupational group or of a regional or `national¿ grouping, such as the Florentines or `Germans¿. These lives will be refracted through notions of culture and identity, and examined where possible through physical spaces such as a house, a church or a neighbourhood, through material objects, through ritual and ceremonial, through relationships, or through visual and textual representations. In what ways were the various strands of Renaissance culture integrated into their lives and experienced by them? And how did their social relations and social networks reflect their cultural understandings? To what extent were people able to construct their identities, and how did they differentiate themselves from others? What part did dress, food, personal possessions, manuscripts and books, works of art, religious and political cultures play? How much did gender, status and locality matter? The module will include visits to museums, galleries and exhibitions where relevant.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Culture and Society in Medieval Spain: Christians, Jews and Muslims Languages Linguistics and Film HSP205 Semester 1 5 Yes

Culture and Society in Medieval Spain: Christians, Jews and Muslims

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rosa Vidal Doval
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Spanish; HSP176 or HSP19 recommended

This module aims to provide an insight into medieval Spanish culture and society, in particular the interaction between Christians, Jews and Muslims through the study of a series of literary works. These introduce students to key genres (poetry, ballads, short stories and miracle collections) and key themes in the history and culture (conquest and reconquest, love and sexuality, and religion) of Medieval Spain.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Cultures of Comparison - Theory of Practice Languages Linguistics and Film SML7052 Full year 7 No

Cultures of Comparison - Theory of Practice

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Leonard Olschner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This core module looks at the history of the discipline, important debates during its existence, and recent interventions about its place in the Humanities today. Comparison leads to numerous questions of cross-cultural expression ¿ literary, cultural and theoretical: the tensions of identity and difference, the nature of texts, the rôle of the author, mythology, post-colonial theory, gender studies, philosophical issues, translation studies, and other art forms such as music and fine art.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Cultures of Sleep English and Drama DRA342 Semester 2 6 Yes

Cultures of Sleep

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tiffany Watt-Smith
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

From Aristotle¿s `Sleeping and Dreaming¿ (350BC) to Christopher Nolan¿s 'Inception' (2010), this interdisciplinary module explores the cultural history of sleep and dreaming, and is designed for students doing both English and Drama. We will investigate how medical interventions (eg: psychoanalysis) and technologies (eg: polysomnography) have shaped changing understandings of slumber, and how literary, philosophical and theatrical explorations of sleep and its maladies have informed medical ideas. Topics may include insomnia, night-terrors, exhaustion and day-dreaming. We will explore a range of materials which might include Thomas Nashe's 'The Terrors of the Night' (1584), William Shakespeare's 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', Sigmund Freud's, 'The Interpretation of Dreams' (1900), August Strindberg's 'A Dream Play' (1901), `The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders¿ (1994) and Duckie's 'Lullaby' (2010). Students may be encouraged to keep a sleep diary.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Current Issues in International Copyright Law Law QLLP049B Semester 1 7 No

Current Issues in International Copyright Law

Credits: 22.5
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The course covers the following aspects in order to provide the student with an understanding of copyright law from a comparative and international perspective: (a) the fundamental principles of European Union law, and how it applies to national copyright law; (b) the notion of "European Union copyright law", as drawn from the directives in this area; (c) a comparative review of laws in France, Germany, UK and US in relation to limitations and exceptions, with an emphasis on (i) parody and freedom of expression, and (ii) the 3-step test as applied under the Berne/TRIPs treaties; (d) a detailed study of rights in performances, sound recordings, films and broadcasts under national and international laws; (e) an analysis of the jurisprudence concerning compilations and databases, with an emphasis on (i) the EU database right, and (ii) a comparison of this approach with that under the US copyright/misappropriation laws; (f) national and international aspects of the collective administration of rights; (g) Internet issues including, Peer-to-peer file sharing, Social networks, User-generated content, Internet Service Provider liability, and technological protection measures; (h) Current issues in and future developments of copyright law in the 21st Century; (i) Copyright and development.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Current Topics in Psychology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC160 Semester 1 4 No

Current Topics in Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tiina Eilola
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce the students to the wide range of research methods and approaches that can be applied to investigate human cognition, emotion and behaviour. The module will provide an overview of the research that is conducted in Psychology at Queen Mary, University of London through a series of lectures on a range of topics, such as vocal communication in mammals, language and emotions in multicultural society, human cultural evolution, psychobiology of sexuality, economics of sociality, visual information processing and blindness, and decision-making in everyday contexts. The topics are unified in their focus on demonstrating how biological framework and experimental methods enable us to develop an increasingly sophisticated and complex understanding of human psychology.

Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am -12 pm

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation Languages Linguistics and Film LLU7013 Semester 1 7 No

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation is an optional module in the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. The first half of the module focuses on aspects of curriculum design, including language policies and pedagogies, by exploring: historical perspectives; environmental and situational analysis; needs analysis. The module also examines the relationship between curriculum ideology and learning outcomes and how this impinges on syllabus design, the role of teachers, and materials. The second half of the module presents an overview of language programme evaluation with a focus on: approaches to evaluation; evaluation practice and research; materials evaluation and multimedia materials evaluation. The module develops and deepens students understanding of issues in curriculum development by providing practice in evaluating language curricula and language teaching materials.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Cyberspace Law Law QLLM105 Full year 7 No

Cyberspace Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Julia Hornle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to address all policy and regulatory issues raised by the internet and technology applications enabled by the internet. The borderless nature of the internet and the possibility to transmit information quickly on a global basis has raised difficult questions of state jurisdiction and regulation which this module will explore in depth. The topic of this module affects many different areas of law (IP protection, privacy, content regulation, criminal law, competition law, administrative law) and is therefore a pervasive theme, which lawyers cannot ignore. The module is therefore aimed both at lawyers wishing to specialise in technology/IP law and at lawyers studying other subjects (such as human rights, media law, administrative law or commercial law). The subject of internet regulation will be taught from a policy perspective (rather than a transactional perspective).

Prerequisites: None
Applicable Groupings: B, E, H, I, N

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Dance Theatre English and Drama DRA237 Semester 2 5 Yes

Dance Theatre

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martin Welton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The history of both modern and post-modern performance practice has been marked by performances which have troubled the distinction between 'dance' and 'theatre'. However, dance and theatre have often been supposed to have radically different aesthetics and to cater to different audiences. This module will consider dance as a theatrical practice, and more specifically, performances and practitioners of 'dance-theatre' - why might we consider them in terms of this hyphenated category? The module will draw on a wide range of international examples, but will also require you to attend contemporary performance in London.

Assessment: 40.0% Practical, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Data Analysis Geography GEG7205 Semester 2 7 Yes

Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of numerical, statistical land modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in specific approaches to data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 5 pm

Data Analysis Geography GEG725U Semester 2 7 Yes

Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of numerical, statistical land modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in specific approaches to data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Database Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS519U Semester 2 5 Yes

Database Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Roelleke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is an introduction to databases and their language systems in theory and practice. The main topics covered by the module are: the principles and components of database management systems; the main modelling techniques used in the construction of database systems; implementation of databases using an object-relational database management system; the main relational database language; Object-Oriented database systems; future trends, in particular information retrieval, data warehouses and data mining.There are two timetabled lectures a week, and one-hour tutorial per week (though not every week). There will be timetabled laboratory sessions (two hours a week) for approximately five weeks.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Database Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS740P Semester 2 7 No

Database Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Roelleke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to databases and their language systems in theory and practice.

The main topics covered by the module are:

The principles and components of database management systems.
The main modelling techniques used in the construction of database systems.
Implementation of databases using an object-relational database management system.
SQL, the main relational database language.
Object-Oriented database systems.
Future trends, in particular information retrieval and data warehouses.

There are 2 timetabled lectures a week, and 1 hour tutorial per week (though not every week). There will be timetabled laboratory sessions (2 hours a week) for approximately 4 weeks.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Database Systems Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS740D Semester 2 7 No

Database Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Roelleke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to databases and their language systems in theory and practice.

The main topics covered by the module are:

The principles and components of database management systems.
The main modelling techniques used in the construction of database systems.
Implementation of databases using an object-relational database management system.
SQL, the main relational database language.
Object-Oriented database systems.
Future trends, in particular information retrieval and data warehouses.

There are 2 timetabled lectures a week, and 1 hour tutorial per week (though not every week). There will be timetabled laboratory sessions (2 hours a week) for approximately 4 weeks.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Data Mining Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS607U Semester 1 6 Yes

Data Mining

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Hospedales
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Data that has relevance for decision-making is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the Internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and electronic patient records. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist decision-makers to make intelligent use of these repositories. The field of data mining has evolved from the disciplines of statistics and artificial intelligence.

This course will combine practical exploration of data mining techniques with a exploration of algorithms, including their limitations. Students taking this module should have an elementary understanding of probability concepts and some experience of programming.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Data Mining Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS766P Semester 1 7 No

Data Mining

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Hospedales
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Data Mining Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS766U Semester 1 7 No

Data Mining

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Hospedales
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 35.0% Coursework, 65.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Democracy and Justice Law LAW6154 Semester 1 6 Yes

Democracy and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Democratic government is commonly assumed to be essential to a just legal system. But is that assumption always correct? Do our traditions of active and vigorous legislation, zealous litigation, and professional lawyering guarantee justice? Are there ways in which they wholly undermine justice? What about public discourse, arts or the media? Do they always promote the kind of open, free society in which law and justice thrive? These questions receive sharp scrutiny in the writings of Plato. In this module, we examine how some classic ideas about justice and democracy, have shaped law and society for centuries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Describing and Measuring Prosody Languages Linguistics and Film LIN6200 Semester 1 6 Yes

Describing and Measuring Prosody

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Esther De Leeuw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prosody can be viewed as "language glue" as the sounds, i.e. segments, and constituents of language can be seen to be "glued" together by prosody. In this module, students will be introduced to the different ways in which components of language are "glued" together through learning how to describe and measure tempo, tone, stress, intonation, and rhythm. In doing so, students will build on their previously acquired knowledge of frequency, duration and intensity in segmental elements of the acoustic signal. Much of the module will involve lab work and students will be given the opportunity to work both with guidance and independently on assignments related to current questions in research on prosody, such as (1) Does speech tempo encode sociolinguistic variation? (2) Why do some languages have tones and others don't? (3) Why is stress placement crucial in second language acquisition? (4) How does intonation disambiguate syntactic ambiguity? (5) What role does rhythm play in the process of first language acquisition? In doing so, a range of languages (including but not limited to English) will be examined more closely. For the final assignment students will develop a research project related to prosody. This module builds on the second year module Acoustic Analysis of Speech LINtbc

Assessment: 30.0% Practical, 70.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Description of Language Languages Linguistics and Film LLU7014 Semester 1 7 No

Description of Language

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Description of Language provides you with an overview of the nature and extent of linguistics and enables you to apply the systems of syntax, lexis, practical phonetics, and discourse to the language learning classroom. From your understanding of language, you then explore and evaluate the range of language learning materials and the sequencing of materials for language teaching and learning. The module allows you to apply your newly acquired knowledge of language and materials to the language learning classroom, both through micro-teaching with your peers, and through opportunities to observe language teaching in either English or another language.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Design and Build Project in Electronic Engineering Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS514U Semester 2 5 No

Design and Build Project in Electronic Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Akram Alomainy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A group project for second-year electronic engineering students to enable them to learn practical skills in solving engineering problems using electronics. Not open to Associate Students or students from other departments.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design Project Engineering and Materials Science DEN419 Full year 7 No

Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN327 and DEN329

Students will be engaged in a self-initiated project of some weight; evolving their own practice and producing new and meaningful design work. Students will be expected to produce design work, which is appropriately contextualised and also produced to high professional standard. The student will experience the critical decision making in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also demonstrate project management skills and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Design for Human Interaction Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS638U Semester 1 6 Yes

Design for Human Interaction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pat Healey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Technology can support new forms of human communication. Embodied robotics, virtual avatars and social software applications (e.g. Twitter, Facebook and Flikr) create new forms of human interaction and new social economies ('crowdsourcing', 'prosumers', 'GPL licensing'). This research-led course introduces psychological theories of human communication that help us to understand how technology can enrich and transform human interaction. It also introduces the tools and techniques necessary for a principled approach to the design and evaluation of such technology.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Design for Human Interaction Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS712P Semester 1 7 No

Design for Human Interaction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pat Healey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Developments in information technology have radically altered the nature of human communication. Spatial and temporal constraints on communication have been weakened or removed and new structures and forms of communication have developed. For some technologies, such as video conferencing, text messaging and online communities, the importance of understanding their effect on human communication is clear. However, even the success of 'individualistic' technologies, such as spreadsheets, can be shown to depend partly on their impact on patterns of interaction between people. Conversely, some technologies, such as videophones, that are specifically designed to enhance communication can sometimes make it worse. Currently, there is no accepted explanation of how technologies alter, and are altered by, the patterns and processes of human communication. Such an explanation is necessary for effective design of new technologies. This research led module explores these issues by introducing psychological theories of the nature of human communication and socio-historical perspectives on the development and impact of communication technologies. These models are applied to the analysis of new communications technologies and the effects of those technologies on communication patterns between individuals, groups and societies. A variety of different technologies are introduced ranging from systems for the support of tightly-coupled synchronous interactions through to large-scale shared workspaces for the support of extended collaborations. Detailed studies of the effects of different technologies on task performance, communication processes and user satisfaction are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the notion of communicative success and to the development of metrics that can be used in assessing it. Frameworks for analysing the communicative properties of different media will be introduced as well as approaches to the analysis of communication in groups and organisations.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Design for Human Interaction Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS712U Semester 1 7 Yes

Design for Human Interaction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pat Healey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Developments in information technology have radically altered the nature of human communication. Spatial and temporal constraints on communication have been weakened or removed and new structures and forms of communication have developed. For some technologies, such as video conferencing, text messaging and online communities, the importance of understanding their effect on human communication is clear. However, even the success of 'individualistic' technologies, such as spreadsheets, can be shown to depend partly on their impact on patterns of interaction between people. Conversely, some technologies, such as videophones, that are specifically designed to enhance communication can sometimes make it worse. Currently, there is no accepted explanation of how technologies alter, and are altered by, the patterns and processes of human communication. Such an explanation is necessary for effective design of new technologies. This research led module explores these issues by introducing psychological theories of the nature of human communication and socio-historical perspectives on the development and impact of communication technologies. These models are applied to the analysis of new communications technologies and the effects of those technologies on communication patterns between individuals, groups and societies. A variety of different technologies are introduced ranging from systems for the support of tightly-coupled synchronous interactions through to large-scale shared workspaces for the support of extended collaborations. Detailed studies of the effects of different technologies on task performance, communication processes and user satisfaction are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the notion of communicative success and to the development of metrics that can be used in assessing it. Frameworks for analysing the communicative properties of different media will be introduced as well as approaches to the analysis of communication in groups and organisations.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Design For Manufacture Engineering and Materials Science DEN5101 Semester 2 5 Yes

Design For Manufacture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "DEN4001 MAT4002 DEN5100"

This module will examine how 3D CAE can be used to create detailed design drawings, create simple assemblies, manufacture prototypes, real parts and also how analytical models such as finite element analysis geometries can be used to evaluate designs. A wide range of different processing techniques such as moulding, forming, cutting, welding, turning and milling will be examined. Various different strategies such as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) that can be used to evaluate the design risk, especially in areas with extensive legislation in place, to determine 'safe' design. The role of inspection and statistical process control techniques in ensuring a robust design and manufacturing process will be examined.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 7, 8: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 7, 8: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 7, 8: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Design of Experiments Mathematical Sciences MTH6116 Semester 2 6 Yes

Design of Experiments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6134

Experiments are carried out in all areas of business, industry, science and medicine. To obtain reliable information, the experiments must be carefully planned. This module introduces the statistical side of the design of experiments from consultation to interpretation.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Design of Experiments Mathematical Sciences MTH6116P Semester 2 6 No

Design of Experiments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hugo Maruri-Aguilar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Designs and Copyright Law Law IPLC008 Full year 7 No

Designs and Copyright Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Copyright and Design for intending trade mark attorneys. Compulsory for those undertaking M2C1 PG Cert Trade Mark Law and Practice. Can be taken as an individual option for those undertaking individual modules under M1EP occasional/associate programme.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 7, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Desk Study Geography GEG705U Semester 2 7 Yes

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary environmental science issue or specialised area of environmental science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Desk Study Geography GEG7305 Semester 2 7 No

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary environmental science issue or specialised area of environmental science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing an Academic Career (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7010 Full year 7 No

Developing an Academic Career (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Andrew
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Academic practice is frequently perceived as a catalogue of discrete topics and activities rather than being approached from a holistic perspective. Developing an academic career involves engaging with a range of responsibilities and activities which develop over time, not in a linear path but in a complex interconnected pattern. At the heart of an academic career are research and teaching which are often seen as conflicting demands, but at other times research-led teaching is seen as a strength of institutions like Queen Mary - moving beyond the conflict is an important step in building an academic career. Increasingly, however, other similarly contradictory possibilities present themselves - module leadership leading to institutional management roles, research leadership, 3rd stream activities and knowledge transfer, public and media roles and book and other publication all add to the complexity of the career. All open up possibilities and close down others - making the ability to analyse the possibilities and make clear decisions crucial for developing academics. This module aims to enable the participants to explore the possibilities for their academic careers and to make informed decisions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing an Academic Career (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7010 Full year 7 No

Developing an Academic Career (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Andrew
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Academic practice is frequently perceived as a catalogue of discrete topics and activities rather than being approached from a holistic perspective. Developing an academic career involves engaging with a range of responsibilities and activities which develop over time, not in a linear path but in a complex interconnected pattern. At the heart of an academic career are research and teaching which are often seen as conflicting demands, but at other times research-led teaching is seen as a strength of institutions like Queen Mary - moving beyond the conflict is an important step in building an academic career. Increasingly, however, other similarly contradictory possibilities present themselves - module leadership leading to institutional management roles, research leadership, 3rd stream activities and knowledge transfer, public and media roles and book and other publication all add to the complexity of the career. All open up possibilities and close down others - making the ability to analyse the possibilities and make clear decisions crucial for developing academics. This module aims to enable the participants to explore the possibilities for their academic careers and to make informed decisions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing Learning and Teaching in Medicine and Dentistry (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ADP7002 Full year 7 No

Developing Learning and Teaching in Medicine and Dentistry (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Fitzpatrick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will enable participants to evaluate and develop their learning and teaching in the context of both the university and their discipline.
The module addresses the following Area of Activity from the UK Professional Standards Framework, in line with accreditation by the Higher Education Academy:
6. Evaluation of practice and continuing professional development.
In addition, the module enables participants to engage with another area of activity:
5. Integration of scholarship, research and professional activities with teaching and supporting learning.
The face-to-face taught elements of the module consist of five workshops. Four of the workshops are chosen by participants from a wide variety of options focussing, on different areas of teaching and learning within the university. The choices are made in light of the participant's evaluation of their development needs and interests. The final workshop, scheduled later in the year brings the course cohort together (after having studied the specified workshops for the co-requisite module, Fundamentals of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, together earlier in the year). This workshop is chosen each year to provide an opportunity for participants to discuss and investigate together a topic in relation to their contexts and disciplines. Teaching observations by peers and tutors will provide further feedback and support for development.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing Learning and Teaching in Medicine and Dentistry (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ADP7002 Full year 7 No

Developing Learning and Teaching in Medicine and Dentistry (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Fitzpatrick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will enable participants to evaluate and develop their learning and teaching in the context of both the university and their discipline.
The module addresses the following Area of Activity from the UK Professional Standards Framework, in line with accreditation by the Higher Education Academy:
6. Evaluation of practice and continuing professional development.
In addition, the module enables participants to engage with another area of activity:
5. Integration of scholarship, research and professional activities with teaching and supporting learning.
The face-to-face taught elements of the module consist of five workshops. Four of the workshops are chosen by participants from a wide variety of options focussing, on different areas of teaching and learning within the university. The choices are made in light of the participant's evaluation of their development needs and interests. The final workshop, scheduled later in the year brings the course cohort together (after having studied the specified workshops for the co-requisite module, Fundamentals of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, together earlier in the year). This workshop is chosen each year to provide an opportunity for participants to discuss and investigate together a topic in relation to their contexts and disciplines. Teaching observations by peers and tutors will provide further feedback and support for development.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines The Learning Institute ESDM011 Full year 7 No

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines

Credits:
Contact: Dr Ian Forristal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The core business of academics is to develop student learning, and to facilitate and identify that learning. This can be done through the appropriate design of curricula at both module and programme level, through careful design and application of assessment, and through evaluation of both student learning and staff teaching and facilitation.

This module encourages participants to engage in a process of curriculum design, based around Biggs concept of Constructive Alignment, to ensure that assessment and evaluation are made as important to the design process as delivery methods and content.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines The Learning Institute ESDM011 Full year 7 No

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines

Credits:
Contact: Dr Caroline Walker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The core business of academics is to develop student learning, and to facilitate and identify that learning. This can be done through the appropriate design of curricula at both module and programme level, through careful design and application of assessment, and through evaluation of both student learning and staff teaching and facilitation.

This module encourages participants to engage in a process of curriculum design, based around Biggs concept of Constructive Alignment, to ensure that assessment and evaluation are made as important to the design process as delivery methods and content.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines The Learning Institute ESDM011 Full year 7 No

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines

Credits:
Contact: Dr Caroline Walker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The core business of academics is to develop student learning, and to facilitate and identify that learning. This can be done through the appropriate design of curricula at both module and programme level, through careful design and application of assessment, and through evaluation of both student learning and staff teaching and facilitation.

This module encourages participants to engage in a process of curriculum design, based around Biggs concept of Constructive Alignment, to ensure that assessment and evaluation are made as important to the design process as delivery methods and content.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7011 Full year 7 No

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Walker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The core business of academics is to develop student learning, and to facilitate and identify that learning. This can be done through the appropriate design of curricula at both module and programme level, through careful design and application of assessment, and through evaluation of both student learning and staff teaching and facilitation.

This module encourages participants to engage in a process of curriculum design, based around Biggs concept of Constructive Alignment, to ensure that assessment and evaluation are made as important to the design process as delivery methods and content.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7011 Full year 7 No

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Walker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The core business of academics is to develop student learning, and to facilitate and identify that learning. This can be done through the appropriate design of curricula at both module and programme level, through careful design and application of assessment, and through evaluation of both student learning and staff teaching and facilitation.

This module encourages participants to engage in a process of curriculum design, based around Biggs concept of Constructive Alignment, to ensure that assessment and evaluation are made as important to the design process as delivery methods and content.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines (Distance Learning) The Learning Institute ESD7011 Full year 7 No

Developing the Curriculum in the Disciplines (Distance Learning)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Walker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The core business of academics is to develop student learning, and to facilitate and identify that learning. This can be done through the appropriate design of curricula at both module and programme level, through careful design and application of assessment, and through evaluation of both student learning and staff teaching and facilitation.

This module encourages participants to engage in a process of curriculum design, based around Biggs concept of Constructive Alignment, to ensure that assessment and evaluation are made as important to the design process as delivery methods and content.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Developmental Psychology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC204 Semester 2 5 No

Developmental Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Pluess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "SBC104 SBC142 & SBC141"

This module surveys developmental psychology, covering human development across the whole life span but with a more detailed focus on development in the early years (infancy/childhood). The aim of the module is to introduce the key questions, theories, concepts, methodology, studies and research findings within developmental psychology, regarding different domains of psychological functioning including social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioural development. The module will also cover the prenatal period, physical, motor, and sensory development, learning theory, moral development, and development of the self (identity).

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Development Economics Economics and Finance ECN370 Semester 1 6 Yes

Development Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jose Albala-Bertrand
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN206 ECN211

This module is concerned with the analysis of economic problems faced by developing countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It focuses, on the one hand, on the meaning, measurements and comparability of growth and development across countries (ie income per capita, income distribution and poverty) and, on the other, on the availability and characteristics of resources (ie labour, land, capital, savings), and the problems with their use in the context of developing countries vis-a-vis OECD countries. The above is presented in the analytic context of (historical) alternative development models and globalisation issues. Although the module does not demand advanced mathematics it does require the use of some mathematics and a fair amount of reading. Prerequisite: ECN206, ECN211.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Development Futures: Mumbai Unbound Geography GEG6120 Semester 1 6 No

Development Futures: Mumbai Unbound

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5111

This innovative fieldwork-based module is unique among Geography departments in the UK. Operationalised thorugh an empirical focus on urban change in Mumbai, India's financial capital, it challenges the long-standing academic division between 'economic' and 'development' geography, and instead builds an alternative hybrid approach. The module will focus on a series of core themes: (i) Mumbai's dual economy, in which low-end, low-paid service providers underpin the success of high profile multinational corporations; (ii) gender and work in India's high profile Business Process Outsourcing - IT-Enabled Services Industry; (iii) the growth of India's new middle classes, their patterns of consumption and the inscriptions of these in the urban fabric; (iv) poverty and hope in Mumbai's slums, focusing around informal economies of survival amongst different social and ethnic groups in Dharavi and NGO projects seeking to improve well-being and quality of life within Mumbai's slums.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

DH Lawrence: Controversy and Legacy English and Drama ESH381 Semester 1 6 Yes

DH Lawrence: Controversy and Legacy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Suzanne Hobson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The shadow cast by D.H. Lawrence over the history and study of literature in the 20th century is a long one. In his own lifetime, he engaged both positively and negatively with some of the most fashionable literary and intellectual currents of the day (he was, for example, both a Modernist and a Georgian poet, a Nietzschean and a critic of war, an Anti-Imperialist and a Primitivist). After his death, his writings were claimed for tradition of working-class writing in England, both for and against feminist campaigns against the suppression of female sexuality and for a new 'postcolonial' approach to early twentieth-century texts. Most famously the 'Lady Chatterley' trial in 1960 gained iconic significance as the event that marked the beginning of a new period of sexual freedom. This module aims to reconsider Lawrence's writings in the light of this history of rediscovery and controversy. It takes seriously (and where necessary not so seriously) Lawrence's claims to be a poet and a thinker, reading his philosophical writings alongside two of his models, Nietzsche and Schopenhauer, and traces the important shifts in his fiction writing from the early provincial stories to the later 'leadership' novels. It looks at influential responses to Lawrence in the 1950s and 60s and considers what these responses might reveal about how literary legacies are shaped and how this changes the way we read Lawrence's texts in the present.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Dickens and the City English and Drama ESH208 Semester 1 5 Yes

Dickens and the City

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cornelia Cook
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dickens is above all London&s novelist. The module will explore, through the critical study of seven of Dickens&s major novels and several shorter writings, Dickens&s representation of London and his use of fiction to urge social or political reform. You will read contemporary writings by Henry Matthew, Thomas Carlyle, Friedrich Engels, J.S. Mill, Karl Marx and others in order to situate Dickens&s fiction within a context of current opinion, documentation and debate. From time to time further handouts will add recommended primary or secondary readings. Maps will be used in class; the Dickens Walk (which is optional) and the group project (which is not!) will require walking exploration of the City. You are advised to keep a map at hand to clarify for yourselves the locations used in Dickens&s writings.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Differential and Integral Analysis Mathematical Sciences MTH5105 Semester 2 5 Yes

Differential and Integral Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Mueller
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5104

This module provides a rigorous basis for differential and integral calculus.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Differential Equations Mathematical Sciences MTH5123 Semester 2 5 Yes

Differential Equations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yan Fyodorov
Overlap: MTH4102
Prerequisite: "MTH4101 MTH5112"

Differential equations frequently arise in application of mathematics to science, engineering , social science and economics. This module provides an introduction to the methods of analysis and solution of simple classes of ordinary differential equations. The topics covered will include first- and second-order differential equations, autonomous systems of differential equations and analysis of stability of their solutions.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Digital Arts Documentary Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS748P Semester 2 7 No

Digital Arts Documentary

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the technical, creative and critical skills needed to produce a professional quality documentary. It introduces contemporary studio production techniques including digital recording and editing. Students, working in groups of three, will research and produce an arts-based video documentary of 12-15 minutes in length. This work will be a content-based research output which either itself implements an innovative digital production technique or reflects and explores an area of contemporary digital production practice.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 6 pm

Digital Audio Effects Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS623U Semester 2 7 No

Digital Audio Effects

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joshua Reiss
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the entire field of digital audio effects, including some depth in the subfields and related subjects. It is concerned with the use of digital signal processing and its applications to the creation or modification of sounds and sound effects. It explains what can be done in the digital processing of sounds in the form of computer algorithms and sound examples resulting from these transformations. It describes signal processing concepts and software implementations, as well as advances in filters, delays, modulators, and time-frequency processing of sound. It primarily covers time-domain, non- linear, time-segment, time-frequency, source-filter, spectral, bitstream signal processing, spatial effects, time and frequency warping, and the control of audio effects.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Digital Audio Effects Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS730P Semester 2 7 No

Digital Audio Effects

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joshua Reiss
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the entire field of digital audio effects, including some depth in the subfields and related subjects. It is concerned with the use of digital signal processing and its applications to the creation or modification of sounds and sound effects. It explains what can be done in the digital processing of sounds in the form of computer algorithms and sound examples resulting from these transformations. It describes signal processing concepts and software implementations, as well as advances in filters, delays, modulators, and time-frequency processing of sound. It primarily covers time-domain, non- linear, time-segment, time-frequency, source-filter, spectral, bitstream signal processing, spatial effects, time and frequency warping, and the control of audio effects.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Digital Audio Effects Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS730D Semester 2 7 No

Digital Audio Effects

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joshua Reiss
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the entire field of digital audio effects, including some depth in the subfields and related subjects. It is concerned with the use of digital signal processing and its applications to the creation or modification of sounds and sound effects. It explains what can be done in the digital processing of sounds in the form of computer algorithms and sound examples resulting from these transformations. It describes signal processing concepts and software implementations, as well as advances in filters, delays, modulators, and time-frequency processing of sound. It primarily covers time-domain, non- linear, time-segment, time-frequency, source-filter, spectral, bitstream signal processing, spatial effects, time and frequency warping, and the control of audio effects.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Digital Circuit Design Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS412U Semester 1 4 Yes

Digital Circuit Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Athen Ho Ma
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module covers: Number Systems and Codes; Boolean Algebra and Basic Logic Functions; MAP minimisation; Combinational Logic; Synchronous Sequential Logic; VHDL

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Digital Electronics Engineering and Materials Science MELM004 Semester 2 7 No

Digital Electronics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Frederico Carpi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide a thorough introduction to digital electronics, the art of digital circuit design and the importance of such techniques within medical electronics.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Digital History History HST5612 Semester 2 5 Yes

Digital History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Sparks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

From technology giants to government security agencies, the collection and analysis of large volumes of data using computerised methods is increasingly shaping the world in which we live. For some years now, historians have also been turning to computers and the Web to support their research and to communicate it to the public. Digital History is a skills-based module which will introduce you to developments in this exciting new area of historical study, and will equip you with practical skills that can be used in your own research. Classes will be workshop based and will introduce you to the principles of database design and as well as the use of web-based tools to communicate historical research. An understanding of these practical elements will enable you to understand and engage with the methodological issues with which historians grapple when using technology and to engage critically with the products of this sort of research. The major part of the assessment for this module will take the form of the development of a small-scale practical project using real historical datasets. No prior knowledge or skills are necessary.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Digital Intellectual Property Law Law QLLP005 Semester 2 7 No

Digital Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 22.5
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The course introduces students to major problem areas concerning intellectual property in a digital environment. Following an initial introduction into the scope and function of relevant IP rights such as copyright, trade marks and patents the course will the specific forms of protection available to ¿digital¿ products and services such as computer programs and databases. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the role of copyright law as it applies on the internet, taking a comparative approach whilst using European law as a starting point. Topics encompass aspects such the extent of exclusive rights and their overlaps, the role and extent of specific limitations including general consideration sunder international copyright law, the protection of technological protection measures and the increasingly pivotal role of external factors limiting copyright law, in particular as based on antitrust laws and human rights aspects.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Digital Media and Social Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS637U Semester 2 6 Yes

Digital Media and Social Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Online Social Networks (OSN)
Characteristics of OSNs
Basic Graph Theory
Small World Phenomenon
Information propagation on OSNs
Influence and Content Recommendation
Sentiment Analysis in Social Media
Privacy and ethics

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Digital Media and Social Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS757P Semester 2 7 No

Digital Media and Social Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Online Social Networks (OSN)
Characteristics of OSNs
Basic Graph Theory
Small World Phenomenon
Information propagation on OSNs
Influence and Content Recommendation
Sentiment Analysis in Social Media
Privacy and ethics

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Digital Media and Social Networks Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS757U Semester 2 7 No

Digital Media and Social Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laurissa Tokarchuk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Online Social Networks (OSN)
Characteristics of OSNs
Basic Graph Theory
Small World Phenomenon
Information propagation on OSNs
Influence and Content Recommendation
Sentiment Analysis in Social Media
Privacy and ethics

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Digital Signal Processing Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS602U Semester 1 6 Yes

Digital Signal Processing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Plumbley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is a Level 6 module, which builds upon the signal processing theory introduced in ELE374, Signals and Systems Theory. The main part of the module covers the theory of digital signal processing techniques and digital filter design. The module concludes with an examination of some applications of digital signal processing.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Digital Systems Design Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS615U Semester 1 6 No

Digital Systems Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Luc Arnaut
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: %
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Digital Worlds: Cartography, GIS and Modelling Geography GEG5202 Full year 5 No

Digital Worlds: Cartography, GIS and Modelling

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: GEG5102
Prerequisite: GEG4208

This module will build on existing mapping and surveying techniques introduced in GEG4208. It will consist of three connected blocks of teaching centred on digital techniques that all represent key skills in Physical Geography: Digital cartography and remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and numerical modelling approaches. Lectures will introduce the theories underlying each of these blocks, and laboratory practicals will be used to provide ¿hands-on¿ experience of key software packages and the handling of digital data. Seminar presentations will be used to test the understanding of the subject matter and to discuss key issues in each of the three blocks.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 13: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Directing Drama Languages Linguistics and Film FLM204 Semester 1 5 No

Directing Drama

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eugene Doyen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Enrolment on Film Studies degree programme

Directing Drama is an optional module at level 5 for students taking BA Hons Film Studies. (It is not available to joint Honours Film students.) The module involves developing a practical understanding of and the ability to apply skills related to preparing a script for performance, casting, rehearsing, directing actors on set and blocking techniques for performance.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Discrete Mathematics [Foundation] Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF015 Semester 2 3 No

Discrete Mathematics [Foundation]

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Mueller
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to arithmetic beyond the integers and rational numbers: modulo arithmetic, and the arithmetic of polynomials, matrices, logical propositions and sets. Applications of these concepts in prepositional logic, relational algebra and graph theory will also be covered. Prerequisite: SEF026 Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Disraeli, Democracy and Empire History HST5308 Semester 1 5 Yes

Disraeli, Democracy and Empire

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Brooks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine half a century of British history, essentially between the first and third parliamentary reform acts of 1832 and 1884-5 respectively. Partly by focussing on Disraeli's own career, it will consider key developments for this country in terms both of domestic politics and of imperial and international affairs. Particular attention will be given to Chartism, the repeal of the Corn Laws, the Crimean war, the Indian mutiny, the second parliamentary reform act and Disraeli's second ministry of 1874-80.

Suggested reading:
Shannon, R., Gladstone: Heroic Minister 1865-1898 (1999)
Lyons, F. S. L., Charles Stewart Parnell (1977)

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Dissertation Law LAW6035 Full year 6 No

Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Eric Heinze
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The content of the dissertation is determined by the student, with limited guidance by a supervisor.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Dissertation Engineering and Materials Science MTRM004 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 105.0
Contact: Dr Steven Dunn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A 105 credit project specific to MRes programmes of study. The project is undertaken over a full calendar year and researches a materials topic in depth and is associated with an academic staff member's research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Politics and International Relations POLM017 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Masters' Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics completed over the summer months (May-August) of your degree programme. It is a compulsory element of your degree amounting to sixty credits (providing one-third of the credits for your degree). It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student's specific research interest in an area not covered by other module modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the department who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Economics and Finance ECOM024 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Leone Leonida
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Languages Linguistics and Film SMLM005 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation English and Drama ESH7000 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation offers students an opportunity to develop and demonstrate their research and writing skills while engaging with a topic suggested by their work on the core and option modules. It provides a preparation for doctoral research. The research topic must be feasible, academically sound, and related to the concerns of the programme. The dissertation must develop an appropriate research methodology and demonstrate an advanced understanding of historical and/or theoretical issues. It must also demonstrate an ability to analyse and present complex evidence and to shape and sustain a coherent, persuasive critical argument at masters level. It must observe appropriate stylistic and bibliographic conventions.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation English and Drama PFRM027 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Kimberley Solga
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This independent research project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words. Working with the support of a supervisor, students pursue their own independent investigation of the theory and practice of performance. Research development is also encouraged by a dissertation colloquium in late May/early June, in which students present their research in progress and receive feedback from academic staff and other graduate students. Recent dissertation topics have included studies of illness and performance, performance and second language acquisition, the performance of rural spaces and identities, contemporary performance and relational aesthetics, circus performance in Victorian Britain, cultural value and performance and performance and social conflict.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Geography GEG7402 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will involve students completing a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic related to community organising. This can be either (1) a humanities-style thesis that scrutinises key ideas in relation to their deployment by broad-based community organisations (including the use of secondary data, and if appropriate, some original empirical material); (2) a social sciences-style thesis that sets out to answer a number of research questions pertinent to the work of broad-based community organisations through the acquisition of original research data; or (3) an action research project that is based on a collective project with members of a community organisation whereby the group focuses on a particular topic and devises their own methods for collecting data with the support and assistance of the student. In this case, students will write up the action research work that was undertaken and reflect on the experience as well as the results. Students will meet an academic supervisor once a month from January to July for support in planning, executing and completing the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Economics and Finance ECOM075 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Carriero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Law QLLM200 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A dissertation project within a legal field of students choosing on the General

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Law QLLM201 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A dissertation project within a specific legal field. This module option and project title has to be approved in advance of selection by the LLM Programme Coordinator.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation Law CCDD007 Full year 7 No

Dissertation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Loukas Mistelis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Write a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic area with in either Arbitration or Mediation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: Banking and Finance Law Law QLLP200 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: Banking and Finance Law Law QLLP200 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: Intellectual Property Law Law QLLP201 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: Intellectual Property Law Law QLLP201 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: International Business Law Law QLLP204 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: International Business Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: International Business Law Law QLLP204 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: International Business Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: International Dispute Resolution and Economic Law Law QLLP203 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: International Dispute Resolution and Economic Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation: International Dispute Resolution and Economic Law Law QLLP203 Full year 7 No

Dissertation: International Dispute Resolution and Economic Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Law.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation (Aquatic Ecology by Research) Biological and Chemical Sciences SBCM003 Full year 7 No

Dissertation (Aquatic Ecology by Research)

Credits: 135.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation is a substantial piece of original research involving empirical laboratory and / or field-based studies. Students will be encouraged to choose a project from a diverse range of subjects closely aligned to existing cutting edge research programmes in the Aquatic Ecology research groups of SBCS. Some may have ties to external agencies such as the Environment Agency. Projects will involve a substantial component of lab and / or field data collection.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Coursework, 60.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation (Aquatic Ecology by Research) Biological and Chemical Sciences SBCM003 Full year 7 No

Dissertation (Aquatic Ecology by Research)

Credits: 135.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation is a substantial piece of original research involving empirical laboratory and / or field-based studies. Students will be encouraged to choose a project from a diverse range of subjects closely aligned to existing cutting edge research programmes in the Aquatic Ecology research groups of SBCS. Some may have ties to external agencies such as the Environment Agency. Projects will involve a substantial component of lab and / or field data collection.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Coursework, 60.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation (Distance Learning) Politics and International Relations POLM077 Full year 7 No

Dissertation (Distance Learning)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Masters¿ Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student¿s specific research interest in an area not covered by other course modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation 15,000 Words Geography GEG7107 Full year 7 No

Dissertation 15,000 Words

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation 22,500 Words Geography GEG7118 Full year 7 No

Dissertation 22,500 Words

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation 30,000 Words Geography GEG7108 Full year 7 No

Dissertation 30,000 Words

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for Accounting and Finance Business and Management BUSM066 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for Accounting and Finance

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

You will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.
Students undertaking a dissertation based on qualitative methods within the School of Business and Management are required to attend Qualitative Research Methods Workshops in Semester 2.

Students undertaking a dissertation within the School of Economics are required to attend Data Analysis for Research classes will take place throughout Semester 2

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Dissertation for Accounting and Management Business and Management BUSM105 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for Accounting and Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for International Business Business and Management BUSM103 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for International Business

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for International Financial Management Business and Management BUSM101 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for International Financial Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment Relations Business and Management BUSM102 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment Relations

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Maria Koumenta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for Management Business and Management BUSM100 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Maxine Robertson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for Management and Organisational Innovation Business and Management BUSM104 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for Management and Organisational Innovation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Maxine Robertson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation for Marketing Business and Management BUSM106 Full year 7 No

Dissertation for Marketing

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas O'Shaughnessy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law Law QLLM210 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Banking and Finance Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Banking and Finance Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate Law Law QLLM211 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Commercial and Corporate Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Commercial and Corporate law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution Law QLLM212 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Comparative and International Dispute Resolution

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Competition Law Law QLLM213 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Competition Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Competition Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Computer and Communications Law Law QLLM214 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Computer and Communications Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Computer and Communications law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Economic Regulation Law QLLM215 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Economic Regulation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation in the legal field: Economic Regulation

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources Law QLLM230 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Energy and Natural Resources

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of Energy and Natural Resources. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Environmental Law Law QLLM226 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Environmental Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Environmental Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in European Law Law QLLM216 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in European Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: European law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Human Rights Law Law QLLM217 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Human Rights Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Human Rights law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Immigration Law Law QLLM231 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Immigration Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7

Dissertation in Insurance Law QLLM228 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Insurance

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Media law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law Law QLLM218 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Intellectual Property Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Intellectual Property Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in International Business Law Law QLLM219 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in International Business Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: International Business Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in International Shipping Law Law QLLM229 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in International Shipping Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Gabriel Gari
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation ¿ independent research. An advanced, in depth examination of a particular area of law: the chosen topic should relate to a relevant issue within the academic field of International Shipping Law. The particular subject area within this field is the student¿s own choice, guided and agreed by their allocated supervisor.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Legal Theory Law QLLM232 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Legal Theory

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Mr Jonathan Griffiths
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7

Dissertation in Linguistics Languages Linguistics and Film LIN7006 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Linguistics

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Devyani Sharma
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

During this module, students (in coordination with a supervisor) will select a topic for advanced study; collect and analyze data to adequately address the chosen topic; and write a 15,000 word dissertation. Through the dissertation, students will synthesize various aspects of the knowledge they will have obtained through the degree and demonstrate their ability to conduct and present high quality original research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Media Law Law QLLM227 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Media Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Media law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Medical Law Law QLLM222 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Medical Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: medical law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Public International Law Law QLLM223 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Public International Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Public International law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Public Law Law QLLM224 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Public Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Public Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation in Tax Law Law QLLM225 Full year 7 No

Dissertation in Tax Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Ms Angie Raymond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Dissertation within the legal field: Tax Law

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation - MA European Jewish History History HST7606 Full year 7 No

Dissertation - MA European Jewish History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Wildmann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation for the MA in MA European Jewish History is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 15,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation - MA Global and Imperial History History HST7610 Full year 7 No

Dissertation - MA Global and Imperial History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Kim Wagner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Worth 60 credits, i.e. a third of the MA¿s overall credits, the 15,000 word MA dissertation is defined as an advanced piece of historical enquiry, normally based on extended primary source research, which is set within historiographical context and foundations. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of global and imperial history which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student¿s specific research interest in an area not covered by other course modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation - MA History History HST7605 Full year 7 No

Dissertation - MA History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Christina Von Hodenberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation for the MA in History is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 15,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation - MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual History History HST7603 Full year 7 No

Dissertation - MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Richard Bourke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation for the MA in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 12,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

For HST7604, Dissertation - MA Islam and the West the text should be:

The dissertation for the MA in Islam and the West is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 15,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation - MA Modern and Contemporary British History History HST7601 Full year 7 No

Dissertation - MA Modern and Contemporary British History

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr James Ellison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation for the MA in Modern and Contemporary British History is worth 60 credits and should be a maximum of 15,000 words. It is undertaken by independent research on a topic formulated in consultation with your adviser, with in-put, as required, from module options teachers. Your topic is formulated early in Semester Two, with titles and brief outlines submitted in March. You are then assigned to an appropriate supervisor. Students are able to discuss plans and drafts with their supervisor in a minimum of three supervision meetings arranged between the beginning of the exam period and the end of June. Tuition takes the form of one-to-one supervision.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Dissertation - MPA Business and Management BUSM083 Full year 7 No

Dissertation - MPA

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation provides students with an opportunity to carry out independent research into a topic of their choice related to the aims of the MPA, subject to guidance from the dissertation supervisor. Each student will be required to have a registered dissertation topic and have been allocated a supervisor by the middle of the spring semester. NB. Students are prepared for the dissertation by taking the compulsory MPA module entitled ""Policy evaluation and research methods"" which includes lectures and classes on research design and methods. Additional methods support may be provided by dissertation supervisors in this module as required.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 6 pm - 7 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Dissertation Proseminar Languages Linguistics and Film LIN7005 Semester 2 7 No

Dissertation Proseminar

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anita Szakay
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Research at postgraduate level places special demands on the developing researcher, for which appropriate training is needed. The two primary goals of this module are to prepare students for the practical challenges of postgraduate research (including the development of a research question/agenda, advanced library research, ethics and practical dimensions of research collection, outlining and writing a dissertation, abstract-writing, oral presentation, and other related skills) and to initiate students into specialised research in their chosen dissertation area. The first part of the module (before reading week) will cover core, generic postgraduate training for all students on the MA, taught through group sessions. The second part of the module (after reading week) will require students to apply this knowledge (as well as knowledge from core modules in Semester 1) to their chosen area of research by pursuing independent reading and research towards their potential dissertation topics (to be completed during the summer term), taught through individual meetings with supervisors.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Distributed Systems and Security Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS608U Semester 2 6 Yes

Distributed Systems and Security

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Graham White
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module we cover the basic technical elements of distributed systems, with a focus on basic technologies for security in distributed computing because of their technical and social significance. Concretely we discuss fundamental characteristics of distributed systems, including: openness, geographic distribution, heterogeneity, communication delay and failure; key elements for networking and internetworking, including: layered protocols (centring on the TCP/IP protocol suit), addressing and routing, naming service; server-client models, remote procedure calls (RPC) and remote method invocation (RMI), taking Java and CORBA as examples; basic ideas of distributed file service, including basic architecture/mechanisms, name space management, cache management and concurrency control; and finally models and mechanisms of security, in particular fundamental ideas of security, symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, authentication mechanisms, basic cryptographic protocols and algorithms, protection domains, access control, firewall, and real-world examples of security including web commerce and Kerberos.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Distributed Systems and Security Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS760P Semester 2 7 No

Distributed Systems and Security

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Graham White
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module we shall cover the basic technical elements of distributed systems, with a focus on basic technologies for security in distributed computing because of their technical and social significance. Concretely we discuss fundamental characteristics of distributed systems, including: openness, geographic distribution, heterogeneity, communication delay and failure; key elements for networking and internetworking, including: layered protocols (centring on the TCP/IP protocol suit), addressing and routing, naming service; server-client models, remote procedure calls (RPC) and remote method invocation (RMI), taking Java and CORBA as examples; basic ideas of distributed file service and distributed transaction, including basic architecture/mechanisms, name space management, cache management and concurrency control; and finally models and mechanisms of security, in particular fundamental ideas of security, symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, authentication mechanisms, basic cryptographic protocols and algorithms, protection domains, access control, firewall, and real-world examples of security including web.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Diversity and Ecology Science and Engineering Foundation Programme SEF033 Semester 2 3 No

Diversity and Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alan Mcelligott
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles of evolution and to develop an appreciation of the dynamic nature of ecological systems. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Ecology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology, Genetics, and Biology.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Documentary Film - Theory and Practice Languages Linguistics and Film SML7050 Semester 1 7 No

Documentary Film - Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Documentary in its simplest of forms is a recording of an act. The film camera is first and foremost a recording instrument, whether it captures 'life caught unawares' or a fictional scenario. This module examines the history of 'non-fiction' filmmaking in the 20th and 21 st century through the understanding of documentary styles and genre. Political, social, ethical and historical issues will be addressed through the engagement of theory and practice.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Documentary Production Project Languages Linguistics and Film SML7053 Semester 2 7 No

Documentary Production Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is an elective/optional module for the MA in Documentary Practice. Utilising knowledge and research skills developed in the first semester core module Documentary Film: Theory and Practice SML7 050, students taking the Documentary Production Project will independently research a documentary topic and from this produce and complete a 23 minute documentary production. Assessment will be based on the documentary production project and on a research report that accounts for the research methodology and the resulting form and style of the completed production.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Office
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Dramaturgy and Translation English and Drama DRA306 Semester 1 6 Yes

Dramaturgy and Translation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Drama
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to investigate key questions around the areas of theatre writing, adaptation and translation through practical application. In the first half of the semester, issues around the cultural and linguistic transfer and relocation of dramatic material will be explored as you work both individually and in groups on dramaturgical projects. The second half of the semester will allow for you to begin work on your own play/translation/adaptation, providing the space for scenes to be revised as they are read and presented within a laboratory environment. You will be encouraged to locate and read a variety of new plays as well as neglected pieces from earlier this century in the hope of sharpening your evaluation and critical skills and of introducing you to as wide a body of international writing as possible.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Student-led teaching
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Drug Design and Development Biological and Chemical Sciences CHEM400 Semester 2 7 No

Drug Design and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aim of the module is to focus on drug discovery and development using a number of case studies and the most recent advances in the pharmaceutical chemistry approaches. At the end of this module students should be able to discuss the physical and chemical approaches to the design and development of new drugs and be aware of the physiological/pharmacological issues that need to be considered before a drug can be used clinically.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7

Drug Design and Development Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC400 Semester 2 7 No

Drug Design and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students in the fourth year of the F152 MSci programme in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and will be offered as an option. Pre-requisite 18 modules passed in F152. The aim of the module is to introduce you to the approaches currently employed in the pharmaceutical industry for drug discovery and development using a number of recent case studies as exemplars. The module will introduce you to the physical and chemical approaches used in the design and development of new drugs and will make them aware of the physiological/pharmacological issues that need to be considered before a drug can be used clinically.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Dynamical Systems Mathematical Sciences MTH744P Semester 1 7 No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wolfram Just
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Dynamical Systems Mathematical Sciences MTH744U Semester 1 7 Yes

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wolfram Just
Overlap: "MAS424,MTH715"
Prerequisite: Appropriate level-6 mathematical background; consult the module organiser for details

A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Dynamic Models of Engineering Systems Engineering and Materials Science DEN5108 Semester 1 5 Yes

Dynamic Models of Engineering Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Henri Huijberts
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "DEN4121 DEN4108"

This module introduces techniques to model and analyse the behaviour of dynamic systems encountered in Engineering practice. It studies plane kinematics of rigid bodies, the modelling of one- and two-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems using energy-based methods, vibrations of mainly two-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems and introduces the modelling and analysis of dynamic systems using partial differential equations.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Early Modern Archival Skills English and Drama ESH7704 Full year 7 No

Early Modern Archival Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mr Robert Ellis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course provides students with the skills necessary for scholarly archival research. In the first semester students are introduced to manuscript materials. They learn how to access these documents and how to read, transcribe and interpret them. In the second semester the focus shifts from manuscript archives to the early modern printed book. Students learn how to use research libraries, construct scholarly bibliographies and footnotes, analyse and describe early modern books and finally obtain the skills involved in the critical editing of printed texts.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Early Modern Art in the Twentieth Century, 1900-1950 History HST5309 Semester 1 5 Yes

Early Modern Art in the Twentieth Century, 1900-1950

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sean Willcock
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cezanne is considered today as being of enormous importance to the development of modern art. His geometrized landscapes and still life paintings inspired Picasso and Braque to develop Cubism, one of the most influential 20th century avant-garde art movements that revolutionized European painting and sculpture.

Change was fast and intense at the beginning of the century. The world was being transformed by a flood of new inventions and new concepts: movies and radio, assembly lines and suburbs, comic strips, psychoanalysis; a scientific utopia which promised a never ending and perfect life. The module will focus on how these changes were captured and addressed in the works of key avant-garde movements like Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, Bauhaus and Abstract Art that so strongly marked the artistic directions of the period.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Early Modern Contexts English and Drama ESH7706 Semester 1 7 No

Early Modern Contexts

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - English
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to equip students with conceptual and practical awareness of interdisciplinary research in medieval and early modern studies in the period 1300-1700. This will involve understanding texts and materials across cultures, media and disciplines. Though the emphasis is on reading and habits of reading, we shall also consider how contemporary communities engaged with a variety of cultural practices, and attended to performance and spectacle across literary, visual and material media.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Early Modern Drama in Performance English and Drama PFRM023 Semester 1 7 No

Early Modern Drama in Performance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Richard Schoch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores ways in which performance produces meaning in the early modern drama - in its early production, its performance history and in recent performance. The module is underpinned by two questions: How does research into performance conditions in the early modern period enhance our understanding of the drama? and what meanings have been made of the early modern drama in production since? The module aims to develop ways of thinking and writing about early modern drama in historical and current performance, and approaches a range of scholarly issues in the field of early modern drama through theatre practice. The module&s approach is both historicist and presentist; it situates the works under consideration in their historical moment, examines what has been made of them since, and acknowledges that the productions, editions and readings of those works are in themselves productive of meaning.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Early Modern Fantasies English and Drama ESH360 Semester 1 6 Yes

Early Modern Fantasies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andrea Brady
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to the fantastic worlds of early modern Europe. We will read a variety of canonical and popular texts, examine art works and consider how history, geography, scientific experiment and religious belief was infused with fantasy and fiction in this period. The module is designed to encourage creative and independent research of an interdisciplinary nature. It builds on the historical knowledge developed at levels 1 and 2, but offers a new perspective on the early modern works of the imagination. It will also encourage students to think again about our own contemporary context, by revealing how blurred the line between fantasy and reality, fiction and scientific fact often was in the Renaissance. Topics of study may include, but are not limited to, the following: fantasies of style; fantastic voyages and brave new worlds; religious fervours: new ways of imagining God; scientific fictions I: alchemy, chemistry, and the wondrous new science; science fictions II: ghosts, demons and witches as scientific specimens; cabinets of curiosities; sexual fantasies: gender and desire; political fantasies; wonders and portents; theatrical fantasies.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Early Modern Studies: Research Preparation English and Drama ESH7806 Semester 2 7 No

Early Modern Studies: Research Preparation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jerry Brotton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will extend the work undertaken both on the Core Course in semester 1 and the Archival Skills course. You will read a broad range of texts within their original historical and material contexts, and consider the way that the study of manuscripts and early printed books has changed in the digital age. Often the fields of `material culture¿ and `digital humanities¿ are figured as a binary opposition. This course seeks to show that analogue and digital analysis are part of a critical continuum. Weeks 1-8 are organised thematically to consider the practical skills and the critical frameworks we need to discuss the entities of the manuscript, the printed book, the scribe, the printer, the editor, and the letter. Later in the semester we will consider the textual life of a single year ¿ 1557 ¿ in order to unpack ideas about critical merit and literary worth. The weekly topics are designed to encourage a degree of self-reflexivity: when looking at the editor, for example, we will be examining both early modern editors and modern scholarly editorial projects (both analogue and digital) in order to consider how you might go about producing your own edition. In the final three weeks of the course we will guide you through your own portfolio project, designed to extend and develop your work on one of the topics covered earlier in the module.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Early Modern Theories of State History HST7203 Semester 2 7 Yes

Early Modern Theories of State

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Quentin Skinner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Some early-modern political theorists locate the authority to make laws and exercise political control in the figure of the ruler or prince. The seminar will begin by examining the most celebrated example, Machiavelli¿s The Prince (1513). Others locate these powers in the body of the republic or people. Thomas More¿s Utopia (1516) and Machiavelli¿s Discourses (c1519) offer contrasting examples, and the next four sessions of the seminar will focus on these texts. The second half of the course will then turn to Hobbes¿s contrasting claim in Leviathan (1651) that these powers lie instead with the fictional person of the state. The main aim of the seminar will thus be to engage in a close reading of four classic texts of early-modern political thought.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Earth Surface Science Geography GEG4209 Semester 1 4 Yes

Earth Surface Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Earth System Cycles Geography GEG5203 Full year 5 Yes

Earth System Cycles

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4208

The module takes an integrative approach to the understanding of material cycles that are fundamental to the functioning of the Earth system: the hydrological cycle, the carbon cycle, nutrient cycles, and cycles of human-derived organic and metal pollutants. Emphasis is placed on understanding the key processes within each cycle and the links between the different cycles. The framework for understanding the cycles is the catchment-coastal continuum, and detailed consideration is given to the cascading of water and sediment through this system. Key hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes involved in the cycles are also explored, partly through data interpretation exercises. The course considers the role of humans in the cycles and how this role can be evaluated at local to global scales. The course is delivered through lectures, workshops, practicals, and seminars.

Assessment: 40.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Earth Systems Cycles Geography GEG5203A Semester 1 5 Yes

Earth Systems Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cycles of water, sediments and nutrients determine how the Earth functions but all are increasingly being affected by human activities. This module examines these key material cycles, and those of human-made pollutants such as metals, fertilizers and pesticides and reviews how hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes characterise each of the cycles. Stores and transfers of water, carbon, nutrients and pollutants are considered from the hillslopes, through rivers and wetlands to the estuaries and the coast, along the catchment-coast continuum, and the impact of humans is examined at the local, regional and global scales. The focus will be on the hydrological cycle and the transfer and stores of sediments.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5

Earth Systems Cycles Geography GEG5203B Semester 2 5 Yes

Earth Systems Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Storrar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cycles of water, sediments and nutrients determine how the Earth functions but all are increasingly being affected by human activities. This module examines these key material cycles, and those of human-made pollutants such as metals, fertilizers and pesticides and reviews how hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes characterise each of the cycles. Stores and transfers of water, carbon, nutrients and pollutants are considered from the hillslopes, through rivers and wetlands to the estuaries and the coast, along the catchment-coast continuum, and the impact of humans is examined at the local, regional and global scales. Following an introduction to the chemistry of the environment, the focus will be on carbon, nutrient and pollutant processes.

Assessment: 40.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 5

Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving Image Languages Linguistics and Film FLM609 Semester 1 6 Yes

Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving Image

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM003

Ecocinemas is a single-semester level 6 module focusing on the intersections between cinema and the natural world. The module explores film's embeddedness in the physical world from a number of perspectives: film as an environmental practice in its own right, as a vehicle for exploring the relationship between the human and the nonhuman world, and as a more-than-human projection. The module covers a diverse range of themes: the key role of nonhuman animals and the natural world in the development of the cinematic medium, the representation of animals and nature in film, cinema¿s environmental footprint, and film as an ecological advocacy tool.

The first part of the module looks at the history and theory of the visual representation of nature and animals, from pre-cinematic forms such as cave paintings, to photographic studies of animal locomotion and early scientific cinema. The subsequent blocks introduce students to the principal strands of eco-criticism and ecocinema via a variety of case studies, including the wildlife film, environmental and animal advocacy documentaries, and fictional representations of animals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC322 Semester 1 6 No

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yannick Wurm
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SBS633///Co-requisite SBS642

Research in ecology and evolution has addressed many important issues as empirical and theoretical levels. However, relatively little is known about the genomic basis underlying phenotypic change. This module will highlight recent developments in ecological and evolutionary genomics, including major research questions and approaches used to address them. Coursework will include formal lectures, extensive critical reading of primary literature (peer-reviewed publications) and extensive in-class contributions by students.

Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 10, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM040 Full year 7 No

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc EEG modules, by conducting a novel piece of genome analysis work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Ecological Interations Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC224 Semester 2 5 No

Ecological Interations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Kratina
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological principles and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations. You will develop understanding of (i) distribution, growth and regulation of single species populations; (ii) interacting species pairs such as competition, predation, herbivory, parasitism; and (iii) structure and dynamics of multitrophic systems such as food webs, ecological communities and ecosystems. The topics will also cover spatial aspect of ecological systems in the metapopulation and metacommunity context, highlighting relationships between biodiversity, stability and ecosystem function. The module includes lectures and a residential field course.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Ecological Theory and Applications Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM029 Semester 1 7 No

Ecological Theory and Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rob Knell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module we look at the theory behind our understanding of ecological systems and how that theory can be applied to ecological problems in the real world. Starting with populations of a single species we will progress to understanding twospecies interactions including predation, competition and parasitism and then to whole communities of interacting organisms. We will then study how ecological theory, used in concert with population genetics and evolutionary theory, can be applied to understanding ecological issues such as the conservation of small populations, harvesting natural populations and predicting responses to environmental change.

Assessment: 25.0% Practical, 75.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Ecology Biological and Chemical Sciences SBC176 Semester 2 4 No

Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the essentials and fundamental concepts of population and community ecology as well as applied issues such as conservation. There is an one-week residential field course where students will study organisms in their natural environments, rather than in the laboratory.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Field Course Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM030 Semester 2 7 No

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Field Course

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Rossiter
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This will include visits to some of Africa¿s largest and most important game reserves and conservation areas, as well as an introduction to some of the day-to-day problems faced by ecologists / conservation biologists in developing nations. You will design and apply census techniques to animals in a natural ecological setting with a focus on large mammals, birds, insects or macroinvertebrates.

Elements covered include:
Safari
Contrasting African ecosystems
Quantification of animal behaviour
Population/community monitoring skills

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 90.0% Coursework
Level: 7

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM031 Full year 7 No

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM044 Full year 7 No

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group Project Biological and Chemical Sciences SBSM039 Semester 2 7 No

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same genomic or transcriptomic data set that must be analysed by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate analysis pipeline, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real data analysis environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

e-Commerce Law Law QLLM025 Full year 7 No

e-Commerce Law

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Prof Christopher Reed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aim of this module is to critically and comprehensively analyse the legal issues pertaining to e-commerce and is addressed to lawyers wishing to act for and advise ebusinesses (and other information society service providers), whether in private practice or as in-house counsel. The module takes a practical, transactional and multijurisdictional perspective. However, this perspective does not deduct from the academic rigour of this module. The aim is to provide an in-depth analysis and examination of the adequacy of the legal framework to cope with the practical issues raised by e-commerce. In particular, this module will examine where there are gaps, conflicts and compliance issues within the current and developing legal framework on e-commerce and to what extent the existing legal framework impacts on new and emerging technologies.

Prerequisites: none
Applicable Groupings: B, E, F, I, J

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

e-Commerce Law Law CCDM027 Semester 1 7 No

e-Commerce Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Laura Edgar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the legal issues pertaining to e-commerce and is addressed to lawyers wishing to act for and advise e-businesses (and other information society service providers), whether in private practice or as in-house counsel. The course takes a practical, transactional and multi-jurisdictional perspective while maintaining academic rigour. The aim is to provide an in-depth analysis and examination of the ways in which the legal framework deals with the practical issues raised by e-commerce. In particular, this course will examine gaps, conflicts and compliance issues within the current and developing legal framework on e-commerce and to what extent the existing legal framework impacts on new and emerging technologies.

Level: 7

Econometrics 1 Economics and Finance ECN224 Semester 1 5 Yes

Econometrics 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Miss Sarah Mouabbi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "ECN121 ECN124"

This module builds on students' basic understanding of statistics acquired in their first year to introduce them to the basic theoretical and practical principles of econometrics analysis. There are two main goals: to strengthen and widen students' knowledge and understanding of statistical analysis, and to provide a solid grounding of the theory and practice of simple and multiple regression analysis. Prerequisite ECN121, ECN114

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 2 pm - 2 pm

Econometrics 2 Economics and Finance ECN225 Semester 2 5 Yes

Econometrics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN224

Econometrics 2 builds on Econometrics 1 module, providing students with the knowledge of further econometrics methods in standard use in current applied econometrics. Topics covered include: nonlinear regression functions, instrumental variables regression, stationary and nonstationary time series, panel data and regression with binary dependent variable. Prerequisite ECN224.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Econometrics A Economics and Finance ECOM003 Semester 1 7 No

Econometrics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Marco De Benedetto
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to provide students with the necessary tools for formalising a hypothesis of interest and testing it, writing a simple econometric model, estimating it and conducting inference. The module starts with a review of the classical linear model. We then analyse finite sample and asymptotic properties of ordinary least squares, instrumental variables and feasible generalised least squares, under general conditions. Classical tests, as well as general Hausman tests, and moment's tests are covered. The case of dependent stationary observations is also covered. Finally nonlinear estimation methods, and in particular the generalised method of moments, are covered.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Econometrics A Economics and Finance ECCL003 Semester 1 7 No

Econometrics A

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Marco De Benedetto
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to provide students with the necessary tools for formalising a hypothesis of interest and testing it, writing a simple econometric model, estimating it and conducting inference. The module starts with a review of the classical linear model. We then analyse finite sample and asymptotic properties of ordinary least squares, instrumental variables and feasible generalised least squares, under general conditions. Classical tests, as well as general Hausman tests, and moment's tests are covered. The case of dependent stationary observations is also covered. Finally nonlinear estimation methods, and in particular the generalised method of moments, are covered.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Econometrics B Economics and Finance ECOM032 Semester 2 7 No

Econometrics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

(Macroeconometrics) This module is designed to provide you with a general knowledge and the basic methods used in the current practice of macroeconometrics. The module covers the following lecture topics: A brief history of macroeconometrics and current methodological issues in macroeconometrics; the main characteristics of macroeconometrics and fundamental tools. It examines two important aspects: dynamics and interdependence; and interpretation of econometric results: expectation and exogeneity. It then goes through basic models with cointegrated time series and discusses how to link macroeconometric models to macroeconomic theory. Prerequisites: ECOM 003 Econometrics A

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Econometrics B Economics and Finance ECCL007 Semester 2 7 No

Econometrics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Emmanuel Guerre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

(Macroeconometrics) This module is designed to provide you with a general knowledge and the basic methods used in the current practice of macroeconometrics. The module covers the following lecture topics: A brief history of macroeconometrics and current methodological issues in macroeconometrics; the main characteristics of macroeconometrics and fundamental tools. It examines two important aspects: dynamics and interdependence; and interpretation of econometric results: expectation and exogeneity. It then goes through basic models with cointegrated time series and discusses how to link macroeconometric models to macroeconomic theory. Prerequisites: ECOM 003 Econometrics A

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Econometrics for Finance Economics and Finance ECOM072 Semester 1 7 No

Econometrics for Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Haroon Mumtaz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will cover fundamental methods for the empirical analysis of financial data. Some prior knowledge of general econometrics will be assumed, and the focus will be on building an understanding of the ideas behind, and the application of, those methods that are most heavily relied upon in the empirical analysis of financial data. A majority of the topics treated will be related to empirical asset pricing and portfolio choice, although other areas of finance will also be covered.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm

Economics Languages Linguistics and Film IFP3805 Full year 3 No

Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will explore the question of how economics affects our everyday lives, from the individual to inter-governmental. It introduces students to basic economic concepts and models, and provides them with the skills needed to apply this knowledge in analytical studies of real-life economic situations. The module will explore both micro- and microeconomic issues, discuss the roles of fiscal and monetary policies in achieving governmental goals, and examine the importance of money and the banking system and international trade.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Economics Languages Linguistics and Film IFP3905 Full year 3 No

Economics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will explore the question of how economics affects our everyday lives, from the individual to inter-governmental. It introduces students to basic economic concepts and models, and provides them with the skills needed to apply this knowledge in analytical studies of real-life economic situations. The module will explore both micro- and microeconomic issues, discuss the roles of fiscal and monetary policies in achieving governmental goals, and examine the importance of money and the banking system and international trade.

Assessment: 10.0% Practical, 30.0% Examination, 60.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 2 and 3: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Economics and Finance Languages Linguistics and Film IFP6804 Full year 6 No

Economics and Finance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to the range and level of knowledge in the areas of micro- and macroeconomics, and finance and investment required for entry to the MSc Finance and Investment or similar programmes. Students will also learn to apply appropriate mathematical models in a financial market context and demonstrate awareness of the limitations of these models, as well as demonstrate the ability to analyse and comment on financial issues in an informed and coherent manner in both written work.

Assessment: 35.0% Examination, 65.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Economics and Finance Languages Linguistics and Film IFP6904 Full year 6 No

Economics and Finance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr George Makedonis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to the range and level of knowledge in the areas of micro- and macroeconomics, and finance and investment required for entry to the MSc Finance and Investment or similar programmes. Students will also learn to apply appropriate mathematical models in a financial market context and demonstrate awareness of the limitations of these models, as well as demonstrate the ability to analyse and comment on financial issues in an informed and coherent manner in both written work.

Assessment: 35.0% Examination, 65.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 2 and 3: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy Engineering and Materials Science DEN433 Semester 2 7 Yes

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: DENM023
Prerequisite: None

This module will equip you with the fundamental tools of economics and management principles. You will learn about their application to conventional and sustainable energy conversion powerplants; systems and their components; and life cycle analyses of energy systems. In addition to understanding the key aspects of international energy supply and demand economics, (and their effect on fuel prices and energy sources), you will also consider the effects of national and international energy policy and emissions regulations on the overall energy scene, analyse developments in the energy markets, and assess the overall impact on environmental issues.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy Engineering and Materials Science DENM023 Semester 2 7 No

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: DEN433
Prerequisite: None

This module describes the global energy scene including a historical review of energy supply and demand trends, fossil fuels and climate change, what is renewable energy and a review of sustainable energy sources. It describes Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, accounting and management principles, the free market structure, cartels, barriers to entry, and example applications in the energy field. Applications related to energy vectors and technologies for power plants are included. Policy and climate change issues are discussed, including the emissions regulations. A thermo-economic analysis of various conventional and renewable power plants and their components is included.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Economics for Business Business and Management BUS017 Semester 2 4 Yes

Economics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucia Corno
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explains how firms, consumers and government interact in markets and how business decision-making is shaped by internal factors such as costs and by external market conditions. The unit examines the main concepts of economic theory and explores the importance of these within a business context, with emphasis on the applicability of economic theory to an understanding of the internal dynamics of business organisations.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Economics for Business and Society Business and Management BUS108 Semester 1 4 No

Economics for Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pedro Martins
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Economics of Development Business and Management BUSM073 Semester 2 7 No

Economics of Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lucia Corno
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces contemporary theories and the empirical literature of the economics of developing countries with specific reference to public policy delivery. The course will address the problems with public policy delivery in developing countries and what solutions and strategies have been identified in the literature. The course will deal with debates such as centralised and decentralised delivery methods, political economy issues of corruption and state capture, and the role of incentives among politicians and bureaucrats in service delivery.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Economics of Public Policy Business and Management BUSM074 Semester 1 7 No

Economics of Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pedro Martins
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces contemporary theories and the empirical literature of the economics of public policy. The course will highlight topics on theories of public goods, public good provision, optimal taxation and redistributive taxation, inequality in incomes and wealth, the global growth and wealth distribution. A large part of the modern literature is empirical, and the course will address the empirical methods which are popularly used in this literature. It will also identify the problems facing public policy delivery and what solutions and strategies are discussed in the literature to address these problems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Economics of Social Issues Economics and Finance ECN231 Semester 1 5 Yes

Economics of Social Issues

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN111

This is a module in the applied microeconomic analysis of social issues of topical importance in the UK. Issues examined will vary according to topicality, but the following subjects illustrate the range of the module: income inequality and poverty, labour market policies, education, pensions, crime, pollution.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Economics of Technology and Innovation Economics and Finance ECN344 Semester 2 6 Yes

Economics of Technology and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Aniol Llorente-Saguer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECN211

This module examines the challenges and the opportunities that technological innovation and information management present companies and managers. The emphasis is on the development and application of conceptual models that clarify the interactions between information management, technological change, competition, firm positioning and the structure and development of internal firm capabilities. Topics addressed include: understanding information technology markets, technology discontinuities, technology forecasting, network externalities and standards competition, profiting from innovation, new market entry strategy and organising to innovate. Pre-requisite: ECN211

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Economics Project I Economics and Finance ECN326 Semester 1 6 No

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: ECN325
Prerequisite: ECN206 ECN211

Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Economics Project I Economics and Finance ECN326 Semester 2 6 No

Economics Project I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: ECN325
Prerequisite: ECN206 ECN211

Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature, and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Economics Project II Economics and Finance ECN325 Full year 6 No

Economics Project II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Francesca Cornaglia
Overlap: ECN326
Prerequisite: ECN206 ECN211

An expansion of Economics Project I ECN326. Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211. Not available to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6

Ecosystem Structure and Functioning Biological and Chemical Sciences SBCM004 Semester 1 7 No

Ecosystem Structure and Functioning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jon Grey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) has called for an integrative understanding of aquatic systems, including river basins, lakes, estuaries and coastal ecosystems. This new module will introduce ecological concepts from an aquatic perspective, developing ideas introduced in the more general ecology modules you will have taken previously. This module will introduce the student to the dynamic biological, physical and chemical attributes of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., both marine and freshwater) and thus unite these often separately taught disciplines to produce a more holistic insight into the structure and functioning of such systems. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the linkages and subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial systems, particularly in response to the EU WFD.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Effective Participation in Seminars Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4660 Semester 1 4 Yes

Effective Participation in Seminars

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop your oral and aural communication skills for appropriate and fluent participation in academic seminars. It will enable you to effectively research the assigned seminar questions and prepare your notes for a seminar. It will empower you by showing you how to focus a topic, find an effective key proposition and organise supporting evidence on the seminar topic. Effective preparation techniques will build your confidence and help you overcome fear of speaking in public.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 5 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 5 pm - 7 pm

Effective Participation in Seminars Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4660 Semester 2 4 Yes

Effective Participation in Seminars

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop your oral and aural communication skills for appropriate and fluent participation in academic seminars. It will enable you to effectively research the assigned seminar questions and prepare your notes for a seminar. It will empower you by showing you how to focus a topic, find an effective key proposition and organise supporting evidence on the seminar topic. Effective preparation techniques will build your confidence and help you overcome fear of speaking in public.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Effective Presentation Skills Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4650 Semester 1 4 Yes

Effective Presentation Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop your skills in presenting and communicating information. It shows you what is expected of a presentation in an academic environment, how you should focus and structure your talk, manage your time, make effective use of visual aids, and handle questions. You will learn to use a variety of presentation and communication media, develop public speaking skills and produce a presentation script in preparation for a presentation of your choice.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Effective Presentation Skills Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4650 Semester 2 4 Yes

Effective Presentation Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop your skills in presenting and communicating information. It shows you what is expected of a presentation in an academic environment, how you should focus and structure your talk, manage your time, make effective use of visual aids, and handle questions. You will learn to use a variety of presentation and communication media, develop public speaking skills and produce a presentation script in preparation for a presentation of your choice.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 7: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Electrical Power Engineering Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS618U Semester 2 6 No

Electrical Power Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alan Pearmain
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Electric and Magnetic Fields Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS504U Semester 2 5 Yes

Electric and Magnetic Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tijana Timotijevic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the basic laws of electric and magnetic fields, their application to elementary problems involving steady and time changing fields and currents, and an introduction to electromagnetic radiation. The Maxwell Equations, which explain the relationships between time varying electric and magnetic fields, will be introduced. The emphasis is on physical intuition and visualisation supported by mathematical modelling and analysis and labs.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Electric and Magnetic Fields Physics and Astronomy SPA4210 Semester 2 4 Yes

Electric and Magnetic Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Lidsey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the basic laws of electromagnetism: electric force and field; electric potential and energy; capacitance; electromotive force; magnetic force and field; the Lorentz force; electromagnetic induction; mutual and self inductance; magnetic energy; Maxwell's equations; introduction to electromagnetic waves; applications in science and engineering.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics Physics and Astronomy SPA7006U Semester 2 7 Yes

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guillem Anglada Escude
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics Physics and Astronomy SPA7006P Semester 2 7 Yes

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guillem Anglada Escude
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm

Electromagnetic Theory Physics and Astronomy SPA7007P Semester 1 7 Yes

Electromagnetic Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bernard Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Classical electrodynamics as a Lorentz covariant and gauge invariant theory. Vectors and tensors in Special Relativity. Potentials and the field strength tensor. Motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field. The action principle for electrodynamics. The stress tensor. Conservation laws. Radiation from point sources and extended sources. Scattering of electromagnetic waves, the Born approximation, Rayleigh scattering, scattering from density fluctuations. Causality, Kramers-Kronig relations and the optical theorem."

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Electromagnetic Theory Physics and Astronomy SPA7007U Semester 1 7 Yes

Electromagnetic Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Bernard Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Classical electrodynamics as a Lorentz covariant and gauge invariant theory. Vectors and tensors in Special Relativity. Potentials and the field strength tensor. Motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field. The action principle for electrodynamics. The stress tensor. Conservation laws. Radiation from point sources and extended sources. Scattering of electromagnetic waves, the Born approximation, Rayleigh scattering, scattering from density fluctuations. Causality, Kramers-Kronig relations and the optical theorem."

Assessment: 10.0% Coursework, 90.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Electromagnetic Waves and Optics Physics and Astronomy SPA5222 Semester 2 5 Yes

Electromagnetic Waves and Optics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kevin Donovan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The course is aimed at giving a coverage of electromagnetic wave theory and of optics. It will act as a bridge between a first year course of introductory electromagnetism and a course on vibrations and waves to give an understanding of optics in terms of electromagnetic waves.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Electronic Devices and Applications Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS517U Semester 1 5 Yes

Electronic Devices and Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tijana Timotijevic
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ECS409

This module describes the physical basis behind common semiconductor devices including the pn junction diode, bipolar junction transistor, MOSFET and related devices (NMOS, PMOS, CMOS) and Operational Amplifiers. Basic circuits using these devices are discussed including rectifiers, amplifiers, inverters, integrators, differentiators, and summing circuits.

Assessment: 20.0% Practical, 80.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Electronic Engineering Mathematics I Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS408U Semester 1 4 No

Electronic Engineering Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Donnison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Mathematics primarily for electrical and electronic engineers. Purely a techniques module, involving several topics with variable amounts of overlap. Differentiation and applications, partial derivatives. Integration and applications. Vectors, complex numbers, series.

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Electronic Structure Methods Physics and Astronomy SPA7008P Semester 2 7 Yes

Electronic Structure Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alston Misquitta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Electronic structure methods - that is, computational algorithms to solve the Schrodinger equation - play a very important role in physics, chemistry and materials science. These methods are increasingly treated on a equal footing with experiment in a number of areas of research, a sign of their growing predictive power and increasing ease of use. This course will cover the fundamental theoretical ideas behind these methods. Topics will include Hartree-Fock, correlated methods like Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled-cluster as well as density-functional theory. The theoretical ideas will be complemented with a hands-on computational laboratory using state-of-the-art programs with the aim of providing our students with a basic understanding of the technical implementations and strengths and shortcomings of these methods."

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Electronic Structure Methods Physics and Astronomy SPA7008U Semester 2 7 Yes

Electronic Structure Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alston Misquitta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Electronic structure methods - that is, computational algorithms to solve the Schrodinger equation - play a very important role in physics, chemistry and materials science. These methods are increasingly treated on a equal footing with experiment in a number of areas of research, a sign of their growing predictive power and increasing ease of use. This course will cover the fundamental theoretical ideas behind these methods. Topics will include Hartree-Fock, correlated methods like Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled-cluster as well as density-functional theory. The theoretical ideas will be complemented with a hands-on computational laboratory using state-of-the-art programs with the aim of providing our students with a basic understanding of the technical implementations and strengths and shortcomings of these methods."

Assessment: 40.0% Coursework, 60.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Elementary Particle Physics Physics and Astronomy SPA6306 Semester 2 6 Yes

Elementary Particle Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcella Bona
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: PHY215 or equivalent introductory module in quantum physics

"An introduction to the standard model of particle physics - the strong and electroweak interactions between the basic constituents of the world, quarks and leptons, via the exchange of gluons, photons and W and Z particles. Recent results on CP violation and neutrino mixing. The search for the Higgs particle. Beyond the standard model - Grand unified theories and supersymmetry."

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Elements of Accounting Economics and Finance ECN120 Semester 2 4 Yes

Elements of Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Male
Overlap: BUS021
Prerequisite: None

This module will offer you a grounding in financial accounting from basic book keeping to the preparation of financial statements for sole traders and limited companies and an understanding of the way in which accounts are analysed using accounting ratios. You will also learn the basic concepts of accounting and international accounting standards.

Assessment: 20.0% Coursework, 80.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Elements of Contract Law Law LAW4005 Full year 4 Yes

Elements of Contract Law

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mrs Christina Perry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Law Background

This module begins with a consideration of the elements necessary to form a binding contract, including offer and acceptance, intention, certainty of terms and consideration. The major elements capable of vitiating a contract are examined, namely duress, mistake and misrepresentation (in relation to the Misrepresentation Act 1967). The incorporation of contractual terms, and their general regulation through the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977 and the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999, is considered. The module concludes with the consideration of the performance of contracts, the methods by which contracts can be discharged, the relief available for a contract discharged through frustration and the remedies available for a breach of contract.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16

Elements of Islamic Law Law QLLM164 Semester 1 7 No

Elements of Islamic Law

Credits: 22.5
Contact: Dr Costanza Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Islamic law constitutes the expression of Allah¿s command for Muslim society and permeates every aspect of it. It is applied to all ranges of legal areas from criminal to commercial to family law. Islamic law is gaining increased momentum and it has resulted in various jurisdictions having to adopt special regimes for the regulation of certain sectors, or adapting their existing ones (eg for financial services).
Drawing upon a very well established legal tradition, this module will introduce students to the essential doctrines and procedures of Islamic law. Students will explore the development of Islamic law from its origins to the modern period. In addition to secondary works on Islamic law readings will include translations of a variety of Islamic legal texts.
In the first part of the module, students with be provided with an overview of Islamic history and Islamic law, its origins and its continuous developments within modern society. It will then move forward to cover the main sources (al-masadir) and guiding principles (al-usul) of Islamic law. More specifically, Qur¿¿n (scripture); Sunna (tradition); Ijm¿ (consensus); Qiy¿s (analogical reasoning) will be covered.
Also, given that Islamic law is based upon the legal tradition of different schools, the genesis and development of the latter will be investigated (Madhahib), together with a thorough analysis of the institutions of Islamic law (ie Courts and Judges (Q¿¿is))
The second part of the module will be focused on specific legal sectors such as commercial law, criminal law and family law. Attention will be given to Islamic banking and finance as well. The module would indeed provide the basic knowledge of the subject matter that will be more specifically developed in the module on Islamic Finance and Commercial law. In recent years in fact, these areas have grown remarkably and Islamic institutions have become big players and alternative source of funding for many financial and non financial institutions. However, despite the special nature of Islamic finance, banking and commerce, these service providers may still pose certain risk to financial markets which will be duly investigated.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

E-Marketing Business and Management BUSM044 Semester 2 7 No

E-Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Miles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module has been designed to provide the student with an introduction into the fundamental principles of Marketing. Understanding the dynamics and interrelationships between the key marketing variables in the process of defining and executing effective marketing strategies in an Internet context are at the heart of this course. Throughout the module, the participants will have the opportunity to develop their skills and understanding in how to effectively communicate marketing strategies using real-world examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Emerging Topics in Learning and Vision Electronic Engineering and Computer Science ECS767P Semester 2 7 No

Emerging Topics in Learning and Vision

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Hospedales
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Empire, Race and Immigration Geography GEG7109 Semester 2 7 Yes

Empire, Race and Immigration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shompa Lahiri
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will include a historically specific thick case study approach, as well as a broader chronological perspective, to examine how individuals and groups of colonial and racial migrants experienced, contested and negotiated Britain and the types of reactions they provoked over the last three hundred years. Not only does this provide postgraduate students with a unique opportunity to interrogate the historical orthodoxy of an ethnically homogeneous white nation prior to 1948; it also highlights the need for rethinking the relationship between Empire and metropolis.

The first half of the module familiarises students with a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of empire, race and migration. This is followed by an analysis of the multifarious strategies adopted by colonial sojourners and settlers in Britain and the popular and official reactions they inspired. Particular emphasis will be placed on how empire, race, class and gender informed both colonial experience and metropolitan attitudes. The remainder of the module considers the racialisation of immigration in the post-colonial period and concludes by examining the legacies of empire, race and immigration on the metropolis.

It is intended that students from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds including Geography, History, English, Politics) will utilise the knowledge and theoretical expertise gleaned from the module to produce a course paper, which could, if preferred, focus not just on the British experience, but on comparable locations and temporal periods.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Empirical Finance Economics and Finance ECOM042 Semester 2 7 No

Empirical Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Renato Faccini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will revisit the Efficient Market Hypothesis in finance and its relationship to the random walk model. It will then discuss statistical tests for the random walk hypothesis and their applications to weekly returns on common stocks. It will then go deeper into the empirical analysis of asset returns data so as to uncover the main stylised facts in finance using simple descriptive statistics. To explain the stylised facts in the data, the lectures will then apply asset pricing models from the two main strands of modern finance: market microstructure theory and behavioural finance. Prerequisites: ECOM050

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Empirical Macroeconomics Economics and Finance ECOM056 Semester 2 7 No

Empirical Macroeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Galvao Soares Ferreira
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module studies modern econometric methods to estimate, evaluate and forecast with structural macroeconomic models. It covers methods that are popular in Central Banks and in policy institutions. The methods covered allow us to extract cyclical information, solve and estimate structural models, evaluate the effect of monetary policy, and forecast variables such as inflation and output growth using econometric software. Prerequisites: Econometrics A and Macroeconomics A (or equivalent; contact the lecturer before registering if you have only Econometrics A).

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Empirical Microeconomics Economics and Finance ECOM089 Semester 2 7 No

Empirical Microeconomics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ghazala Azmat
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will analyze the problems faced by organizations, presenting both the relevant theories and the empirical evidence used to evaluate them. The main emphasis is on the decisions made by firms, for example their decisions regarding internal organization and authority structures. The module also introduces students to a number of empirical methods commonly used to study microeconomic data.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Employment Relations Business and Management BUS320 Semester 2 6 Yes

Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Koumenta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to provide a critical understanding of the employment relations field of study, give insight into relevant conceptual and theoretical approaches and provide a sound knowledge base.
The module content will include:
1. theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of employment
relations; the role of history in shaping contemporary employment relations; power, conflict and the nature of the employment relationship.
2. the role of the key actors in employment relations (trade unions,
employer, the state);
3. the processes of employment relations in union and non-union firms:
employer strategies; collective bargaining; employee involvement, social partnership and industrial democracy; dispute resolution, grievance and disciplinary procedures;
4. employment relations and the equality project;
5. employment relations from a comparative perspective: convergence and divergence; employment relations across national boundaries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Endocrine Physiology and Biochemistry Biological and Chemical Sciences SBS517 Semester 1 6 Yes

Endocrine Physiology and Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Joy Hinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers hormone definitions, including the range of structures and roles; methods in endocrinology; receptors, concept and significance of high affinity; hormone dynamics; hormone signalling; and modes of action. You will also look at mammalian endocrine glands and hormones: pituitary, thyroid, pancreas. The endocrinology of reproduction; the adrenal gland, and renin/angiotensin system; the paracrine and autocrine systems; growth factors; locally produced hormones; local regulation of hormonal action; and tissue differentiation are also covered. The relationship between hormones and cancer will be discussed.

Assessment: 25.0% Coursework, 75.0% Examination
Semester 1 Associate Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 11: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Energy Conversion Analysis Engineering and Materials Science DEN5107 Semester 2 5 Yes

Energy Conversion Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "DEN4006 DEN107"

This module will develop the ideas introduced in DEN4006 Energy Conversion Systems and study how energy conversion systems can be analysed quantitatively. To do this it will use many of the concepts and fundamental laws introduced in DEN107. It will also analyse reacting flows with particular reference to combustion and their application to the analysis of internal combustion engines.

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Energy Conversion Systems Engineering and Materials Science DEN4006 Semester 1 4 Yes

Energy Conversion Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an introduction to the role of the Mechanical Engineer. It sets out the basic concepts of engineering science including statics, dynamics, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics and their application to simple engineering systems. It includes an introduction to energy generation from conventional and renewable / sustainable sources, methods of heating and cooling, and the application of the above ideas to an integrated engineering system (the automobile).

Assessment: 30.0% Coursework, 70.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Energy Economics Law QLLM166 Full year 7 No

Energy Economics

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Leon Vinokur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Policies will be scrutinised from the perspective of market-based environmental regulation and security, recommended with respect to climate change and human well-being, and estimated by considering both social costs of traditional sources and benefits of alternative energy production.

That is topics like the nuclear industry, the environmental impacts of fossil fuels and the usage of sustainable recourses will be studied along with policies that have to mitigate any possible negative effects by the introduction of carbon prices, emissions targets, efficiency requirements and investments, and renewable portfolio standards.

Within the context, then, of diverse economic, legal and environmental implications of energy production, distribution and use the aim of the module will be to expand our comprehension of and reasoning skills related to energy choices, issues and policies.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Energy Regulation and Policy Law QLLM146 Semester 1 7 No

Energy Regulation and Policy

Credits: 22.5
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course covers energy regulation and policy including the impact of pending climate change legislation and proposed Environmental Protection Agency climate change rules and regulations. Energy regulation decisions and technologies are strongly influenced by economics and federal and state politics. The policy choices are particularly important with respect to electricity regulation. The energy use of individual countries and of the global system as a whole reflect the accumulation of decades of policy choices and have significant impacts on local, regional and global economies and the environment. Because electricity and natural gas policies cannot be fully examined without an understanding of the mechanics of rate regulation, the first part of this course will provide a basic foundation in the economic, legal, and political aspects of energy regulation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency. The second part will address the major U.S. energy legislation since World War II and proposed implications of the Environmental Protection Agency¿s proposed green house gas rules and regulations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7: Tuesday 12 pm - 4 pm

Engaging Critically with Writing 1 Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4750 Semester 1 4 Yes

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop writing in different genres by studying the grammatical structures and lexis in context. Students examine varieties of English from a historical and cultural perspective. Students develop their writing in different genres including cyber communication, work-related texts and print media. They read and discuss texts and analyse the relationship between audience, purpose and content. Students also examine issues of fluency, clarity and correctness. This leads to personal and work-related writing tasks both in and out of class. There is regular feedback from the class tutor and from peers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Engaging Critically with Writing 1 Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4750 Semester 2 4 Yes

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop writing in different genres by studying the grammatical structures and lexis in context. Students examine varieties of English from a historical and cultural perspective. Students develop their writing in different genres including cyber communication, work-related texts and print media. They read and discuss texts and analyse the relationship between audience, purpose and content. Students also examine issues of fluency, clarity and correctness. This leads to personal and work-related writing tasks both in and out of class. There is regular feedback from the class tutor and from peers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Engaging Critically with Writing 1 Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4820 Semester 1 4 Yes

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop writing in different genres by studying the grammatical structures and lexis in context. Students examine varieties of English from a historical and cultural perspective. Students develop their writing in different genres including cyber communication, work-related texts and print media. They read and discuss texts and analyse the relationship between audience, purpose and content. Students also examine issues of fluency, clarity and correctness. This leads to personal and work-related writing tasks both in and out of class. There is regular feedback from the class tutor and from peers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4

Engaging Critically with Writing 1 Languages Linguistics and Film EAL4820 Semester 2 4 Yes

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and de