Directory of Modules 2017-18

Modules below are listed alphabetically. You can search and sort by title, key words, academic school, module code or semester. Details about the module, including timetabling information, can be found by clicking on the green plus icon.

For a full explanation of the module information, please refer to our guidance notes.

If timetable information is not listed for modules running in Semester 1 or Semester 2 (A or B versions of Full Year courses), look for the 'Full Year' version of the module in the timetable, which does not have the trailing 'A' or 'B' in the module code e.g. for HST5324A look at HST5324 for timetable information.

Note: while every effort is made to keep the directory up to date, module details are sometimes subject to change, and timetable information in particular is provisional.

QMUL Administrators: If you wish to update information in the module directory please see the ARCS website.

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TitleSchoolCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Clinical MicrobiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD231Semester 25No

Clinical Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Wareham
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BMD117, BMD231"

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Prerequisites: The Microbial World and Humans (SBC211). In this module you will acquire a basic understanding of modern medical microbiology. You will study the processes by which microorganisms cause human disease, how the pathogens can be identified, and what steps can be taken for the prevention and treatment of infections. There will be a particular emphasis on the development of observational, practical and analytical skills through laboratory work and demonstrations. Your topics will include: pathogens and their interaction with the human host, covering bacteria, protists and viruses and including mechanisms of infection, mechanisms of defense, antibiotic action and antibiotic resistance, the transmission of disease, including public health microbiology, the prevention of infection in hospitals and in the community, and a review of newly emerging diseases. You will be provided with a catalogue of microbial diseases, including infections of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, the nervous system and wounds.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 4, 8: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 4, 8: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 9: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 9: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 10: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Basic ImmunologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD251Semester 25No

Basic Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sian Henson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BIO171, BIO163"

Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017), Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008), The Diversity of Life (SBS005). This module will cover the principles of innate and acquired immunity, as well as the structure and function of cells and organs of the immune system. Antigens, immunoglobins, complement, and immunoassays and the molecular basis of Bcell and Tcell responses are also covered. Other topics include major histocompatibility complex, antigen presentation, cellcell interactions and cytokines. Transplantation, tolerance, autoimmunity, infectious diseases, inflammation and hypersensitivity reactions are also considered.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Cellular and Molecular NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD261Semester 15No

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BIO161, BMD123"

This module will develop students' understanding of electrical and chemical signalling in neurons and synaptic transmission. Students will learn about the mechanisms of excitability of nerve cells, voltage-dependent membrane permeability, ion channels and synaptic transmission. Neurotransmitters and their receptors will be covered and students will gain an understanding of intracellular signalling and synaptic modulation. The module will provide an critical understanding of the regulation of neuronal signalling, necessary for advanced study of neuronal circuitry/network function.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Systems NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD265Semester 25No

Systems Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arturas Volianskis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BMD163, (BMD113 or BMD121), (BMD261 or PSY121)"

This module aims to provide an overview of integrated systems which control cognition and behaviour. Topics include the organisation and planning of movement, visual processing, smell and taste perception, cognition, learning and memory. Students will gain understanding of techniques used in systems neuroscience including tract tracing of interacting groups of neurons, immunohistochemistry and extra-cellular electrophysiology. Practical sessions and workshops will give students experience in designing experiments, using apparatus, collecting and interpreting data.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

Cell BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO111Semester 14Yes

Cell Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kenneth Linton
Overlap: BMD115
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to cell biology. It covers pro and eukaryotic cell structure, the structure and function of the cell membrane, the organelles, the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Interactions between cell components, the cell cycle and cell differentiation from stem cells to specialised cells are all examined in detail.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

EvolutionBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO113Semester 14Yes

Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers essential topics of whole-organism biology, introducing the theory and mechanisms of evolution and speciation, the fossil record and human evolution.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

EcologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO123Semester 24Yes

Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the essentials and fundamental concepts of population and community ecology as well as applied issues such as conservation. There is an one-week residential field course where students will study organisms in their natural environments, rather than in the laboratory.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

PhysiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO125Semester 24Yes

Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Szulgit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to physiology. The structure and function of major systems including the nervous, digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems are surveyed in a variety of different taxa and physiological functioning including homeostasis, temperature regulation, gas exchange, digestion and the endrocrine systems are all reviewed.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm

Basic BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO161Semester 24Yes

Basic Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Overlap: BMD123
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover amino acids, the fundamentals of protein structure, isolation and purification of proteins, modification of proteins, and methods of determining protein conformation. You will also cover the basics of enzyme catalysis and kinetics with specific case studies. Other topics include ion transport, and other transport proteins, and the utilisation of proteins and soluble cofactors to generate and store metabolic energy. You will cover the basics of metabolism in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, as well as ATP synthesis and membrane bound electron transfer in mitochondria. Chloroplasts in plants and algae, and molecular motors, such as muscles, that consume metabolic energy are also covered. A detailed module synopsis will be handed out in the first lecture, and summary outlines of subsequent lectures will be available on the school teaching website for guidance.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Molecular GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO163Semester 14Yes

Molecular Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: BMD111
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of an introduction to genetics, a description of the process by which genetic information is converted into the molecules that make up living things, and a review of the essential properties of those molecules. Genetics topics covered include DNA structure, classical and molecular genetics and genomics. We then examine how information flows from DNA to RNA and then to protein to give the recognisable phenotypic features of living things.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Tuesday 9 am -11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Practical Molecular and Cellular BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO191Semester 14No

Practical Molecular and Cellular Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for molecular and cellular biology. This module is structured around four main themes:

(1) Acquiring Practical Skills in Molecular and Cellular Biology.
The module will start by introducing basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, it will then move on through DNA extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques.

(2) Acquiring Essential Skills for Molecular and Cellular Biology.
This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as experimental report and essay writing, data and information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations. Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support biology.

(3) Considering the role of Biology in the ¿real world¿.
Through personal investigations and talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biology in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(4) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professionals from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 75.0% Practical, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Wednesday 10 am -11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 11: Wednesday 10 am -11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Practical BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO193Semester 24No

Practical Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: BIO199
Prerequisite: None

This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biologists. This module is structured around four main themes:

(1) Acquiring Practical Skills in Biology.
Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then move on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and finally studies involving whole multicellular organisms.

(2) Acquiring Essential Practical Skills for Biology.
This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as experimental report and essay writing, data and information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations. Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support biology.

(3) Considering the role of Biology in the ¿real world¿.
Through personal investigations and workshops on critical thinking, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biology in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(4) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations.

Assessment: 75.0% Practical, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Practical BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO199Semester 24No

Practical Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ewan Main
Overlap: BIO193
Prerequisite: None

This module teaches the practical and analytical skills required for biochemists. This module is structured around four main themes:
(1) Acquiring Practical Skills in Biochemistry. Starting with basic laboratory safety and routine laboratory procedures, the module then move on through protein extraction and purification to microbiological and physiological techniques and techniques of practical chemistry.
(2) Acquiring Essential Practical Skills for Biochemistry. This module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as experimental report and essay writing, data and information handling, oral and written communication skills, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations. Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support biochemistry.
(3) Considering the role of Biochemistry in the ¿real world¿. Through personal investigations and workshops on critical thinking, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biochemistry in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.
(4) Exploring Career Pathways. Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations.

Assessment: 75.0% Practical, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 10: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Professional Placement in BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO200Full year5No

Professional Placement in Biochemistry

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the "Year in Industry/Research" programmes in the field of biochemistry offered by SBCS.
Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.
Successful applicants are supported by the School's placement coordinator and an academic tutor, who will keep in contact with students throughout the placement. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance.
It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

Biochemistry CommunicationBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO201Semester 25No

Biochemistry Communication

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Guy Hanke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Most of the teaching will be via small-group tutorials where students will develop an appreciation and experience in various aspects of communication in biochemical science. The module will focus on types and structure of scientific literature, as well as types of journals and the process of peer review. Tutorials will cover approaches to effective short essay writing and delivering scientific talks. Attendance at research seminars is required and a library workshop to developing literature search skills. Tutorials will require a high level of student participation.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Research Methods and CommunicationBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO209Semester 25No

Research Methods and Communication

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Le Comber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module we look at how to design experiments, how to analyse and present the data obtained and how to communicate those results to others. The lecture and workshop component includes the principles of experimental design, statistical analysis including t-tests, correlation and regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA and non-parametric tests and discussion of how to interpret and present data. The tutorial component consists of a series of writing exercises designed to teach how to structure an argument and how to communicate ideas effectively.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Animal and Plant DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO211Semester 15Yes

Animal and Plant Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will consist of lectures and workshops. Collectively these will cover the diversity of organisms on Earth (with a primary emphasis on animals) including previous diversity (the fossil record) their relationships and key characteristics. During the semester there will be workshops consisting of trips to the Natural History Museum, Grant Museum and London Zoo to allow further study of extant and fossil animals.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Cell Biology and Developmental GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO213Semester 15Yes

Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angelika Stollewerk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BMD115, BIO111"

This module is designed to provide you with detailed up-to-date knowledge of cell biological techniques, the structural organisation, development and differentiation of eukaryotic cells as well as key processes in development that are based on cell-cell interactions and cell movements. In the practicals you will learn standard cell biological techniques in histology and immunohistochemistry and you will be familiarised with the preparation of cell material from living organisms. The module provides an invaluable foundation for genetics, biochemistry, molecular, neurobiological, physiological and biomedical programmes.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Comparative & Integrative PhysiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO215Semester 15No

Comparative & Integrative Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maurice Elphick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO111

The following themes will be covered in this module:1). Comparative anatomy and evolution of nervous systems. 2). Molecular & cellular mechanisms of neuronal signalling. 3). Invertebrates as model systems for understanding mechanisms of neural control of behaviour. 4). An introduction to comparative endocrinology, including the evolution and functions of neuropeptides as regulators of physiological and behavioural processes. 5). Comparative physiology of muscle and connective tissue. 6). Comparative physiology of gas exchange. 7). Comparative physiology of circulatory systems 8). Comparative physiology of osmoregulation 9). Comparative physiology of excretion.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 12: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Evolutionary GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO221Semester 15Yes

Evolutionary Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nichols
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BIO113, BIO163"

Prerequisites: Evolution (SBS110) and Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008). This module provides an overview of the evolution of sex, and covers the following topics: Genetic diversity (eg cheetahs in Africa, gulls in Britain, Partula in the Pacific); reconstructing evolutionary history from genetic data; the geographic distribution of Cepaea genes (eg neutralism, frequency dependence in selection, founder events, environmental grain); pre- and post zygotic reproductive isolation, speciation illustrated by Hawaiian Drosophil; Polyploidy (eg occurrence, barriers and consequences); DNA amount (eg variability and ecological effects); meiotic and mitotic defects, tri and monosomies; B chromosomes; 'parasitic' chromosomes; and the evolution of the human genome.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Genes and BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO223Semester 15No

Genes and Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Hurd
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BIO163, BMD111"

Prerequisites:Heredity and Gene Action (SBS008) or Chromosomes and Gene Function (SBC210). Genes occupy most of a bacterial genome, but very little of the three million kb of DNA in the 23 pairs of chromosomes in the human genome, so what is a gene? This module provides a molecular view. Gene structure is illustrated in the context of how a gene is transcribed to produce RNA, how the RNA is processed and translated to produce protein and how these processes are regulated through other DNA sequences and proteins. An introduction to bioinformatics will explain how to recognise, compile and identify genes, and infer protein sequence, from DNA sequence, including procedures for interrogating public sequence databases and phylogenetic analysis.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Human Genetic DisordersBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO227Semester 15No

Human Genetic Disorders

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jayne Dennis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163

This module explores human hereditary disease in terms of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and clinical management. We will look at key examples of chromosomal abnormalities (i.e. Trisomy 21), monogenic disease (e.g. cystic fibrosis, Huntington¿s disease and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy) and common disease (e.g. coronary artery disease). Students will be introduced to methods and techniques for identifying genetic loci associated with disease (e.g. homozygosity mapping, genome-wide association studies, DNA sequencing). Finally, we will discuss issues around genetic screening, testing and counselling.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 11: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 8, 11: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 8, 11: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Microbial Physiology and GrowthBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO231Semester 25Yes

Microbial Physiology and Growth

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Mullineaux
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites:EITHER General Microbiology (SBS758) OR Basic Biochemistry (SBS017) plus one Chemistry Year 1 option. Diversity of microbial metabolisms. Bacterial growth and replication, including organization and division of the chromosome, yield and responses to temperature and nutrient availability. Photolithotrophy, photoorganotrophy, chemilithotrophy and chemoorganotrophy. Fermentation and anaerobic respiration. Growth and extension metabolism of fungi. Nitrogen transformations by microorganisms in free-living and mutualistic settings. Microbiological standards in public health. Clean water processing and waste-water treatment. Practical work will cover prokaryote photosynthesis, bacterial fermentation, fungal digestion of wood and nitrogen transformations in sediments, and microbiological water quality. There will be a brief consideration of clean water processing and waste-water treatment.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Transmission GeneticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO241Semester 25Yes

Transmission Genetics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163

The aim of this module is to provide the students with an understanding of how the gene paradigm has changed with time. By examining a number of seminal experiments in detail, and reviewing the development of genetics and reverse genetics in different model organisms, the first half of the module explains how classical approaches to genetics are gradually giving way to a genomics-based approach to this subject. The second half of the module explores the molecular mechanisms involved in ensuring that DNA, the repository of inherited information, achieves the difficult balance of change (mutation and recombination) and stability (repair) necessary for evolution to occur. The various techniques involved in modern genetic analysis are covered as the module progresses. These include plasmids, restriction enzymes, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern and Northern blots, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), cDNA and genomic libraries, and targeted gene knockout technologies.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Membrane and Cellular BiochemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO263Semester 25Yes

Membrane and Cellular Biochemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Mullineaux
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO161

Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017). This module coves a range of topics: Membrane functions and subcellular organelles; lipid structures; membrane proteins; mobility in membranes and methods for its measurement; cell signalling.; membranes and cancer; endocytosis and exocytosis; protein import; building membranes; mitochondria and chloroplasts; oxidative phosphorylation; the chemiosmotic hypothesis; membrane transport; ion channels.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Metabolic PathwaysBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO265Semester 25Yes

Metabolic Pathways

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Bob Janes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO171

Prerequisites: Basic Biochemistry (SBS017). This module covers a range of topics including: Chemical reactions - Biochemical logic. Biochemistry of some vitamin and coenzyme catalysed reactions. Glycogen synthesis and degradation. Pentose phosphate pathway. Gluconeogenesis. Amino acid metabolism and the urea cycle. Fatty acid synthesis and breakdown. Prostaglandin and steroid biosynthesis. Purine, pyrimidine and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Control and regulation of metabolism.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Techniques for Biological and Chemical SciencesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO269Semester 15Yes

Techniques for Biological and Chemical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO161

The module introduces the modern techniques used by the biochemist to study proteins and other macromolecules at the atomic level. The module is divided into the 3 broad themes: Techniques for purification and characterisation of macromolecules; Spectroscopic methods to study macromolecules; and Methods to determine 3D structures, crystallographic and NMR.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Marine and Animal DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO291Semester 14No

Marine and Animal Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Le Comber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is a basic marine biology course that covers the biology of the marine animals at the phyletic level. The course will equip the students with an understanding of the taxonomy, phylogeny and basic biology of species from over 20 invertebrate phyla that they will experience directly on the field course. The module will also touch on some marine vertebrates (eg pinnipeds [seals], cetaceans [whales and dolphins] and birds). The module is entirely taught on a 10-day field course, with lectures covering functional morphology and evolutionary relationships complementing the practical work focussing on identification, classification, anatomy, ecology and behaviour. The field course will take place in the September preceding commencement of the level 5 taught modules.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

Ecological InteractionsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO293Semester 25No

Ecological Interactions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Kratina
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module you will obtain knowledge of basic ecological principles and learn to integrate theory with empirical observations. You will develop understanding of (i) distribution, growth and regulation of single species populations; (ii) interacting species pairs such as competition, predation, herbivory, parasitism; and (iii) structure and dynamics of multitrophic systems such as food webs, ecological communities and ecosystems. The topics will also cover spatial aspect of ecological systems in the metapopulation and metacommunity context, highlighting relationships between biodiversity, stability and ecosystem function. The module includes lectures and a residential field course.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Advanced Biochemical Research MethodsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO491Full year7No

Advanced Biochemical Research Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an advanced training in techniques in biochemistry. In addition to lectures from members of staff and seminars from external speakers, there will be computer and practical workshops to teach methods in molecular biology, structural biology, biophysics and synthetic biology. Assessment will be 50% coursework and 50% examination..

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 7: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 9 am - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Bioinformatics Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO702PFull year7No

Bioinformatics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc Bioinformatics modules, by conducting a novel piece of bioinformatics work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at a partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO703PFull year7No

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post-doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL or in partner institutions within London. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in ecology and evolutionary biology. Dissertations may be undertaken with the assistance and guidance of relevant external organisations with the proviso that a suitable SBCS supervisor is also identified. The dissertation aims to make a novel contribution to scientific knowledge. It should demonstrate familiarity with the relevant literature and current scientific / environmental management debates to which the research contributes. In undertaking such an extensive project, you are expected to demonstrate a sound understanding of project design, sample collection, data analysis, and the ability to produce a coherent and well structured piece of written reporting. During Semester A, you are encouraged to talk with potential supervisors and `shadow¿ our current PhD students. From February through to the end of July, you should be undertaking lab or field work, and then writing up in August for an early September submission. At the beginning of August, each student will prepare and give a research seminar based upon their work to an audience of staff members & peers, during which there will be plenty of time for questions

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO704PFull year7No

Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an opportunity to further develop and apply skills learned during the previous MSc EEG modules, by conducting a novel piece of genome analysis work, typically within an active research group either within QMUL or at partner organisation. The specific nature of each project will be determined through discussions between the student, the course organiser and the project supervisor but will always involve data analysis and/or software development in a cutting edge area of biological or biomedical research. This serves as excellent preparation for future employment or PhD.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO709PFull year7No

Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Andrew Leitch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO743P

This module involves a novel piece of research, typically combining field sampling or use of Kew's biological collections, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Students can benefit from close alignment with current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups, both at QMUL and in RBG Kew. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that high quality supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in plant and fungal biology, ecology and evolution.

Assessment: 90.0% Dissertation, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation (Aquatic Ecology by Research)Biological and Chemical SciencesBIO711PFull year7No

Dissertation (Aquatic Ecology by Research)

Credits: 135.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is typically a novel piece of research, often involving field sampling, experimentation, laboratory work, and data analysis. Most projects are offered to students so that they can benefit from closer alignment to current PhD or Post Doctoral research within specific research groups. The diversity of expertise of lecturers involved with the programme means that good supervision can be found for a broad range of studies in freshwater, coastal or oceanic environments. During Semester A, students will be encouraged to talk with potential supervisors and `shadow¿ PhD students or other members of the Aquatic Ecology Research Group. A substantive literature review on the chosen topic is due in for the start of Semester B which will be assessed at this stage. From January through to the end of July, students should be undertaking lab or field work, and then writing up in August for an early September submission. At the beginning of August, each student will prepare and give a research seminar based upon their work to an audience of the Centre for Aquatic & Terrestrial Environment members, and following appraisal of the thesis by the supervisor and External Examiner, attend an oral examination viva.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Genome BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO721PSemester 17No

Genome Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yannick Wurm
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the analysis of DNA sequence data. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as sequence assembly, gene finding and genome annotation, phylogenetics, analysis of genomic variance among populations, genome wide association studies and prediction of gene structure and function. Practical exercises are used to gain experience with relevant existing bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Coding for ScientistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO723PSemester 17No

Coding for Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a hands-on introduction to computer programming (popularly known as coding) using scripting languages popular in the field. The focus is on producing robust software for repeatable data-centric scientific work. Key programming concepts are introduced, and these concepts are then brought together in scientifically relevant applications to analyse data, interact with a database and create dynamic web content. Good coding practice, such as the importance of documentation and version control, is emphasised throughout.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5: Friday 9 am - 5 pm

Post-Genomic BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO725PSemester 17No

Post-Genomic Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to bioinformatics, focusing specifically on the management and analysis of data produced by so-called post-genomic methods such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Lectures cover the bioinformatics methods, algorithms and resources used for tasks such as the identification and quantitation of transcripts, proteins and metabolites, and analysis of the interactions between these key biological molecules. Practical exercises are used to gain experience with bioinformatics tools, data formats and databases that have been developed for this field.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm

Bioinformatics Software Development Group ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO727PSemester 27No

Bioinformatics Software Development Group Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Conrad Bessant
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same written specification for a piece of software that must be delivered by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate software architecture and development plan, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real software development environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Frontiers in Evolutionary BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO731PSemester 17No

Research Frontiers in Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the frontiers of research in evolutionary biology. Topics covered will include: incongruence in phylogenetic trees, neutral versus selective forces in evolution, the origin of angiosperms, the origin of new genes, the evolution of sociality, the significance of whole genome duplication and hybridisation. Current method being used to tackle these areas will be taught, with an emphasis on DNA sequence analysis and bioinformatics. This module aims to inspire students to seek a career in scientific research, and equip them to choose areas of research that are of current interest. Whereas undergraduate degrees commonly focus on what we know, this Master¿s course will shift the focus onto what we don¿t know. Students will explore the current frontiers of knowledge, and the questions that currently lack answers, or whose answers are currently debated. Students will learn to ask relevant questions themselves, and design approaches to seeking answers to those questions

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO733PSemester 27No

Ecology and Evolutionary Genomics Group Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Buggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module, students are organised into small teams (~3-4 members per team). Each team is given the same genomic or transcriptomic data set that must be analysed by the end of the module. Each team must design an appropriate analysis pipeline, with specific tasks assigned to individual team members. The project involves elements from the previous bioinformatics modules (genomics, post-genomics, coding and statistics) as well as new topics that are introduced during the module. This module serves as a simulation of a real data analysis environment, providing invaluable experience for future employability.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Ecological Theory and ApplicationsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO735PSemester 27No

Ecological Theory and Applications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Axel Rossberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module we look at the theory behind our understanding of ecological systems and how that theory can be applied to ecological problems in the real world. Starting with populations of a single species we will progress to understanding twospecies interactions including predation, competition and parasitism and then to whole communities of interacting organisms. We will then study how ecological theory, used in concert with population genetics and evolutionary theory, can be applied to understanding ecological issues such as the conservation of small populations, harvesting natural populations and predicting responses to environmental change.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 10 am -12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Ecosystem Structure and FunctioningBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO737PSemester 17No

Ecosystem Structure and Functioning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

While we have long appreciated the structure of ecosystems, the importance of ecosystem functioning has lagged behind somewhat. This module aims to redress the balance by exploring the use of modern tools which allow us to thoroughly integrate measures of ecological structure and functioning. Aspects of the Metabolic Theory of Ecology, body-size relationships, stable isotope analysis and DNA bar- coding will all be covered in relation to topics such as photosynthetic and chemosynthetic primary production; the impacts of invasive species; aquatic-terrestrial linkages and cross ecosystem boundary subsidies; biogeochemistry and nutrient dynamics; plankton dynamics and organismal physiology in a changing world.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Friday 9 am - 2 pm

Science into Policy & ManagementBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO739PSemester 17No

Science into Policy & Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mark Trimmer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Without knowledge, there can be no application. This module is designed to bring you `face to face¿ with the regulators, policies and their science base, as these potential employers (e.g. CEFAS, Defra, the Environment Agency, Natural England) will give lectures on topical issues. The focus is on human impacts upon ecosystems, including pollution and habitat alteration and how these can be mitigated. National and international legislation and directives are considered (e.g. EU Water Framework Directive). Guest lecturers will also include consultants who will be able to advise on career paths. As a detailed case study, you will visit the River Communities Group based in Dorset for one week and investigate the link between successful science and policy: for example, contemporary aspects of the EU Water Framework Directive will be considered, including underlying methodology behind bioassessment and biomonitoring (e.g. RIVPACS). This will be closely linked to how the Environment Agency is working with Defra Test Catchments (DTCs).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Plant Taxonomy and DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO741PSemester 17No

Plant Taxonomy and Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an overview of global plant diversity, with a particular focus on flowering plants. It will be taught at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew by leading botanists, affording students the opportunity to explore the outstanding collections and facilities housed there. Topics will range from taxonomic principles and methodology, plant systematics and comparative biology (including morphology, chemistry and genomics), phylogenetics, biogeography and evolution. The module will have a practical component, providing excellent hands-on experience for students.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Statistics and BioinformaticsBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO781PSemester 17No

Statistics and Bioinformatics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rob Knell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is focussed on teaching data analysis using the statistical programming language R. The module covers the basics of using R; drawing publication-standard graphs with R; experimental design; exploratory data analysis; the fundamentals of statistical testing including t-tests and chi-square tests; ANOVA and Regression; fitting and interpreting general linear models; the basics of bioinformatic analysis in R. The module is taught with a mix of theory and practice, with a typical day including roughly two hours of theory instruction in the morning followed by a practical session in the afternoon, often involving hands-on analysis of real experimental data sets.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Biochemistry MSci Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO790Full year7No

Biochemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Dr John Viles
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students work independently on a topic in biochemistry in which their supervisor is a recognized expert. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of this advanced research project. A thesis (dissertation) is written by the student describing the work undertaken, and placing it in context of other research in the field. The dissertation is defended in an oral examination, which includes a short oral presentation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Field CourseBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO792PSemester 27No

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Field Course

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Rossiter
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module comprises a residential field course lasting approximately 12 days, designed to allow students to develop their field skills in situ. Teaching will comprise a combination of lectures, demonstrations and practical assignments. These will span topics in taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, conservation and evolution. Students will also undertake their own mini-project. This field-based module will include coverage of ecological processes in tropical rainforests (decomposition, pollination and seed dispersal), rainforest structure and defining characteristics (including the importance of rainforests as centres of biodiversity), and anthropogenic factors affecting rainforests (including disturbance, forest fragmentation and agriculture).
(The changes in detailed content are inevitably reflected in a change to the Recommended Reading for this module).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Fungal Taxonomy and DiversityBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO743PSemester 17No

Fungal Taxonomy and Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will focus on fungal diversity and it will be taught at RBG, Kew by leading mycologists. Kew has the largest collection of fungal specimens in the world that will be available to the students during the course. The module will give an overview of the systematics and taxonomy of major fungal groups, of basic concepts in mycology, field collecting, and culturing and fungarium techniques. In addition, front-line research on the ecology of fungi (e.g., symbiosis, `rotters and recyclers¿, pathogens), fungal biogeography, and fungal evolutionary genomics, will be explored through study of contemporary research. The module will have a practical component, providing excellent hands-on experience for students.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Conservation and Ecosystem ScienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO745PSemester 27No

Conservation and Ecosystem Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the role and application of plant and fungal science in integrated conservation and management of biodiversity, in the delivery of ecosystem services and livelihoods, and in the development of mechanisms for their maintenance and restoration in the context of a changing planet. Drawing on the exceptional breadth of expertise, collections and facilities across Kew's sites, and building on the fundamental understanding of plant and fungal taxonomy and diversity, it will provide an essential introduction to a range of technical approaches including policy development, species and habitat prioritisation, protected area management, conservation genetics, ecosystem service research, seed banking and propagation, application of traditional knowledge, and integrated conservation for biodiversity and livelihoods.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Marine Mammals and TurtlesBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO794PSemester 27No

Marine Mammals and Turtles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module focuses on the diversity, behaviour, ecology, physiology, conservation and management of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), and marine turtles. It covers such issues as the life history and migrations of turtles, their diving ability and behaviours, the social behaviour of dolphins, and the conservation of whales. It also includes (even though they are not mammals or reptiles!) a brief look at the sea-birds and sharks that will likely also be seen during field excursions. For part of the module you will be taught in the archipelago of Cape verde, with boat trips for whales and shark observations, sea turtle monitoring. Mornings will be dedicated to lectures and workshops while afternoons and evening will be dedicated to hands-on practical experience

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Quantitative Techniques for Surveying and Monitoring in EcologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO795PSemester 17No

Quantitative Techniques for Surveying and Monitoring in Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christophe Eizaguirre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Through a series of lectures, workshops and data analyses classes in the first week, you will learn the theory behind designing and initiating surveys and monitoring campaigns for blue skies science, conservation & for management. In the subsequent week, you will be able to put the theory into practice at a field location such as Lake Windermere and environs, undertaking electric-fishing and hydroacoustic surveys for fish populations, a census for aquatic birds, and camera-trapping for aquatic mammals. Other skills like telemetry will be demonstrated.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Field study skills in a biodiversity hotspotBiological and Chemical SciencesBIO799PSemester 27No

Field study skills in a biodiversity hotspot

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This Madagascar Field Course Module will provide an introduction to practical field work, including botanical surveys and flowering plant identification and how they can be applied to solving practical problems of conservation management as well as biodiversity research. It will be taught by botanists from the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC) in Antananarivo and local conservationists and researchers from collaborating institutions. Several site visits to conservation projects and some taught case studies will give an over-view of conservation in Madagascar. We reserve the right to change the location of this course if advice on travel to Madagascar from the Foreign Commonwealth Office changes, or for logistical reasons. For students unable to travel to Madagascar for this module, an alternative method of assessment will be undertaken.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Essential Skills for Biomedical ScientistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Biomedical Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Preece
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers some of the fundamental skills required by biomedical scientists. This module is structured around three main themes:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills for Biomedical Sciences.
The module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as data and information handling, oral and written communication skills (including essay writing), experimental design, literature search techniques and appropriate use of referencing and citations in the biomedical sciences. The module will explain how certain aspect of mathematics and chemistry underpin biomedical sciences and will support students in acquiring basic numerical and chemical skills (including SI units, order of magnitude, basic geometry, calculation of concentration and molarity, scales in time, linear and logarithmic equations and graphs). Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support biomedical sciences.

(2) Considering the role of biomedical sciences in the ¿real world¿.
Through personal investigations, workshops on critical thinking and a series of talks from professionals, students will be encouraged to consider the role of biomedical sciences in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 9: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 11; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 8, 9, 10, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Chromosomes and Gene FunctionsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD111Semester 14No

Chromosomes and Gene Functions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan Curran
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme. Pre-req - A-level Biology or equivalent. This module aims to provide Biomedical Sciences students with a basic understanding of genetic inheritance, chromosome structure and function, how the flow of biological information from DNA to RNA to protein gives rise to the recognisable, inherited attributes of living organisms and how genetic mutations affect these processes. It uses seminal experiments to introduce the students to basic classical and molecular genetics, and then expands on these themes to include genetic engineering and genomic approaches to these phenomena. By the end of the module the students should appreciate the power and limitations of genetics, understand how inherited information manifests as phenotypes, and be able to discuss the principles that underlie patterns of inheritance.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 8, 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Human AnatomyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD113Semester 14No

Human Anatomy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Le Comber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

B990 students only. In this module you will cover human anatomy from a systems-based perspective. Human anatomy will be introduced through review of the major systems. You will study material relating to systemic anatomy, especially the lymphatic and integumentary systems. You will be introduced to comparative hominid anatomy, and the evolution of human anatomy, especially in relation to the skull, skeleton and dentition.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

The Human CellBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD115Semester 14No

The Human Cell

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Michael Philpott
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module you will study the structure, functions and organisation of a generalised human cell based on microscopical techniques. You will study membrane structure and dynamics, mitochondria, Golgi, smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes and peroxisomes, the nuclear envelope, nuclear organisation, chromatin, nucleolus and the cell cycle. You will be introduced to endocytosis, exocytosis, cilial movement, the role of the cytoskeleton in cell shaping and motility, apotosis and cell differentiation from stem cells to examples of specialised cells. You will gain knowledge on how to use various microscopes and how to record visual information. You will use the Web to obtain and analyse ultrastructural images. The module work is designed to improve your planning, problem solving and organisational skills.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

The Microbial World and HumansBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD117Semester 14No

The Microbial World and Humans

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shane Wilkinson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the B990 programme The module is an introduction to microbiology and will provide a general knowledge of archaea, bacteria, fungi and protists. There are also selective discussions in greater detail, for example of motility, adherence and metabolic diversity, as well as the bases for methodologies for asepsis and infection control. Microbial ecology is presented as a discipline which explores the roles of microorganisms in natural processes and mutualistic associations. Practicals allow students to observe living bacteria, fungi and protists and to gain experience in the safe handling and culture of microorganisms.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 11: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and IntegrationBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD121Semester 24No

Biomedical Physiology I - Exchange, Movement and Integration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Szulgit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "BMD113, BMD115"

This module provides an introduction to major non-cardiovascular/respiratory physiological systems involved in human homeostasis for students reading for the degree in Biomedical Science. Topics covered will include: microanatomy and histology of the major human tissues; feedback control, temperature regulation, cell exchange processes; function and integration of nervous, muscle, gastrointestinal, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. The module will describe some of the major human physiological diseases, disorders and dysfunctions of these systems, and some parasitic diseases.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Biomolecules of LifeBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD123Semester 24No

Biomolecules of Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module offers a grounding in a good range of biochemical topics including the structure function relationship of protein, carbohydrates and lipids; fundamentals of enzyme catalysis and kinetics; transport of molecules across biomembranes; biochemical reactions involved in the generation and storage of metabolic energy; in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle; mitochondrial electron transfer and ATP synthesis; and molecular motors.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Routes to Medical ProgressBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD151Semester 14No

Routes to Medical Progress

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Malcolm Law
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The most common causes of death and disease have changed dramatically over time. In this module you will explore how careful observation, experiment and analysis may eventually lead to improvement in health and in our ability to treat disease. Using examples of medical success stories you will look at the processes of scientific discovery and the many factors involved in moving from the discovery to the implementation of measures to prevent or treat disease. You will learn about the importance of statistical analysis in testing the effect of treatments or changes in behaviour. You will also look at the costs and benefits of medical research, who decides what research should be done, and who pays for it.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 10: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Exploring NeuroscienceBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD161Semester 14No

Exploring Neuroscience

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces leading topics of interest in neuroscience, through study of which students will gain essential skills in academic and scientific writing, reading scientific literature and writing short reports. An introduction to research methods and statistics will also be provided. The module will aim to give a historical and scientific overview of neuroscience from early anatomists studying the nervous system to the significant contribution to the discipline made by Nobel laureates.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Practical, 9.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Functional NeuroanatomyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD163Semester 24No

Functional Neuroanatomy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Greg Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to the development and anatomy of the nervous system. Topics will include the principles of nervous system development, axonal and dendritic growth. The anatomical organisation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including blood supply and functionally important neural circuits will also be covered. Lectures will be accompanied by practical workshops designed to encourage accurate observation and annotation skills and mastery of functional neuroanatomy.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Introduction to PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD171Semester 24No

Introduction to Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Egle Solito
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce to the students the concept of the interaction of drugs and other exogenous chemicals with living organisms. It will introduce students to the basic pharmacological principles and concepts which will define drug activity within the body including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These introductory lectures will give students a broad overview into approaches used in drug discovery, medicinal chemistry, main drug targets, drug absorption and routes of administration, drug metabolism and elimination, phamacokinetics, drug treatment of major medical conditions and rationale for prescribing a particular drug, the role of biotechnology in drug discovery, preclinical pharmaceutical development, understanding of the use of animals in pharmacology and adverse drug reactions. Lectures will be delivered by experts in both academia and industry. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, we will provide practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 5, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Research Skills for PharmacologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD175Semester 14No

Research Skills for Pharmacologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Whiteford
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will cover some basic laboratory skills including experimental design and hands-on experience of a range of laboratory practical (such as quantification of drugs in biological fluids) techniques enabling them to develop skills of working safely and accurately in the laboratory. This module will also provide a basic knowledge of the appropriate statistical ideas and methods to use in the collection, presentation and analysis of pharmacological data, and the use of statistical software. Students will also learn about Informatics (finding the correct information online), bioinformatics (how computers can be used to analyse genomes, genes and gene products), general scientific reading and writing skills (including how to avoid plagiarism), ethics and drug trial design as well as presentation skills in a scientific context.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 7: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Tissue BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD181Semester 24No

Tissue Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Helen Rifca Le Dieu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module you will be introduced to the embryological development of the major organs and study the nature of different cell types, the structure of different organs and the structure-function relationship of major organs. Your work will include studies on connective tissue, muscle, blood vessels, circulatory system, skin, respiratory system gastrointestinal system, liver and pancreas, urinary system, endocrine system, male reproductive system, female reproductive system, central nervous system, skeletal system, lymphoreticular system, cytology and embryology. In practicals you will be using microscopes to learn the identification of normal tissues and organs.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem SolvingBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD201Full year5No

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

B990 students only. This module is a pre-requisite for the 3rd year SBS320. The SBS320(X) modules comprise 6 Biomedical Science clinical case histories at both levels 5 and 6. The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour assessment sessions. The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS320(X) modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology, anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials. The module is examined in SBS320 year 3 and the 2nd year coursework marks will comprise 10% of the coursework marks for SBS320 3rd year.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 8; Semester 2: Weeks 5, 8: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 8; Semester 2: Weeks 5, 8: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Human Molecular BiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD211Semester 15No

Human Molecular Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Krysov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO163

In this module you will look at the following: Structure and organisation of eukaryotic genes; replication and repair of DNA; gene transcription; RNA processing; translation and post-translational processing; control of eukaryotic gene expression; generation of antibody diversity; recombinant DNA technology; basic principles of human molecular genetics; the Human Genome Project; pharmacogenetics and pharmagogenomics; transgenic and knockout mice; and gene therapy.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Techniques in Biomedical SciencesBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD219Semester 15No

Techniques in Biomedical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Patricia Munroe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is restricted to B990 students. In this module you will improve your ability to handle information, to conduct independent study and to extract information from the scientific literature. The work will lead you to better appreciate and understand the principles that underlie the techniques used in biomedical science research and analysis laboratories in academia and the NHS. You will cover topics that include: pH, ionisation, buffers, cellular bioscience, immunohistochemistry and cytochemistry, cytometry, proliferation assays, immunological, isolation IGS, monoclonals, Ab and Ag assays, immunoassays, ELISA, endrocrine. You will assay hormones/Growth factors/cytokines and receptors, and learn methods in molecular biology, PCR, northerns, Southerns, microarrays, in situ hybridisation, clinical enzyme assays, electrophoretic techniques, and details of Biosensors.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and RespiratoryBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD221Semester 15No

Biomedical Physiology II - Cardiovascular and Respiratory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Patricia Munroe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is for students who enter under the B990 programme only. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy (SBC102), The Human Cell (SBC100). This module provides an introduction to the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Topics covered will include: structure, function and regulation of cardiovascular activity and respiration. It will include descriptions of some of the major diseases, conditions, abnormalities anddysfunctions of the human cardiovascular and respiratory systems and problems associated with aerospace travel and diving.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 6, 9: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 7, 10: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Essential Biochemistry for Human LifeBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD223Semester 25No

Essential Biochemistry for Human Life

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anthony Michael
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD123

Prerequisites: Biomolecules of Life (SBC323). This module is only open to students on the Biomedical Sciences degree programme and to suitably qualified associates. The module aims to provide biochemical information on selected specialised structural and functional bulk proteins including: selected human physiological processes; monosaccharide, fatty acid, steroid, amino acid and nucleotide metabolic pathways; regulation of metabolic pathways; tissue specialisation; and metabolic diseases.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD225Semester 25No

Biomedical Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Preece
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD121

This module provides an introduction to the subject of pharmacology, the study of drug action on biological systems. Initial lectures focus on important general pharmacological principles, including a consideration of how drugs are absorbed, distributed and then removed from the body. Subsequent lectures focus on the therapeutic action of drugs on example disease states of specific physiological systems.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990HistoryHST5324Full year5Yes

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Christina Von Hodenberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a systematic account of German history in the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country up to today.

In the beginning, special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. The module then turns to the Allied occupation, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification.

Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Suggested reading:
M. Fulbrook, The Divided Nation: A History of Germany 1918-1990 (1991)

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990HistoryHST5324ASemester 15Yes

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christina Von Hodenberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a systematic account of German history in the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country up to today.

In the beginning, special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. The module then turns to the Allied occupation, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification. Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990HistoryHST5324BSemester 25Yes

A Century of Extremes: Germany 1890 - 1990

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christina Von Hodenberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a systematic account of German history in the twentieth century. It aims at a better understanding of the major developments in society, politics, culture, and economy which shaped the country up to today.

In the beginning, special attention will be paid to the origins and consequences of World War I, the challenges facing the Weimar republic, Hitler's rise, the National Socialist Regime, World War II, and the Holocaust. The module then turns to the Allied occupation, Germany's division into two states on opposing sides of the Cold War, the Westernization of the West and Sovietization of the East, and the unexpected reunification. Class readings include historical research and original sources as well as some literary texts and films. Different approaches, arguments, and controversies will be presented.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Infection, Immunology & InflammationBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD269Semester 25No

Infection, Immunology & Inflammation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Olivier Marches
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115 or BIO111

The module starts with an investigation of key characteristics of viruses, bacteria and other micro-organisms causing infections in humans. The mechanisms by which micro-organisms cause disease and evade the immune system are considered. It then explores the principle components of the immune system, describing the molecules and cells that protect against infection and cancer, and their contribution to innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of the immune system in disease is illustrated with examples of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 12: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm

Computational StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH731USemester 27Yes

Computational Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6136

This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTH734USemester 17Yes

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Ellis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5121

Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739NSemester 17No

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vincenzo Nicosia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739PSemester 17No

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vincenzo Nicosia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Topics in Scientific ComputingMathematical SciencesMTH739USemester 17Yes

Topics in Scientific Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Vincenzo Nicosia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Appropriate level-6 mathematical background; consult the module organiser for details

This module focuses on the use of computers for solving applied mathematical problems. Its aim is to provide students with proper computational tools to solve problems they are likely to encounter while doing their MSc or MSci, and to provide them with a sound understanding of a programming language used in applied sciences. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise, with a view to emphasize applications rather than theory.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Advanced CombinatoricsMathematical SciencesMTH742PSemester 17No

Advanced Combinatorics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module builds on the combinatorial ideas of the modules Combinatorics and Extremal Combinatorics and introduces some of the more advanced tools for solving combinatorial and graph theoretic problems. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise but significant emphasis will be on the techniques used as well as the results proved.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced CombinatoricsMathematical SciencesMTH742USemester 17Yes

Advanced Combinatorics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6109

This module builds on the combinatorial ideas of the modules Combinatorics and Extremal Combinatorics and introduces some of the more advanced tools for solving combinatorial and graph theoretic problems. The topics covered will depend on the module organiser's expertise but significant emphasis will be on the techniques used as well as the results proved.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743NSemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser¿s expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743PSemester 27No

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser¿s expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Complex SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH743USemester 27Yes

Complex Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Appropriate level-6 mathematical background; consult the module organiser for details

Complex systems can be defined as systems involving many coupled units whose collective behaviour is more than the sum of the behaviour of each unit. Examples of such systems include coupled dynamical systems, fluids, transport or biological networks, interacting particle systems, etc. The aim of this module is to introduce students with a number of mathematical tools and models used to study complex systems and to explain the mathematical meaning of key concepts of complexity science, such as self-similarity, emergence, and self-organisation. The exact topics covered will depend on the module organiser¿s expertise with a view to cover practical applications using analytical and numerical tools drawn from other applied modules.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744PSemester 17No

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Joyner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Dynamical SystemsMathematical SciencesMTH744USemester 17Yes

Dynamical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Joyner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Appropriate level-6 mathematical background; consult the module organiser for details

A dynamical system is any system which evolves over time according to some pre-determined rule. The goal of dynamical systems theory is to understand this evolution. For example: fix your favourite function f from the unit interval to itself (for example cos(x)); now choose some point x(0) in the interval, and define x(1)=f(x), x(2)=f(f(x)), etc (i.e. x(n) is the result of applying the function f to the point x(0) n times). How does the sequence of points x(n) behave as n tends to infinity? How does this behaviour change if we choose a different initial point x(0)? What if we investigate a system which evolves continuously over time? Dynamical systems theory seeks to answer such questions. The more interesting systems are the 'chaotic' ones, where varying the initial point x(0) leads to very different behaviour of the sequence x(n).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745PSemester 27No

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Further Topics in AlgebraMathematical SciencesMTH745USemester 27Yes

Further Topics in Algebra

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr John Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH5100

This module provides exposure to advanced techniques in algebra at an MSc or MSci level. Algebra encompasses familiar objects such as integers, fields, polynomial rings and matrices and has applications throughout mathematics including to geometry, number theory and topology. The module will complement the algebra module offered in Semester A and will cover topics either in commutative or noncommutative algebra. Included will be basic definitions and theorems in either case, normally with rings or fields as a starting point.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750PSemester 17No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH750USemester 17Yes

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Processes on NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH751PSemester 27No

Processes on Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Networks characterize the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the Internet to social networks and the brain. On these networks dynamical processes take place. For example, we search and navigate the Internet, opinions spread on social networks, while neurons in the brain synchronize their dynamics. In this module students will learn the fundamental results on various dynamical processes defined on complex networks, including random walks, percolation, epidemic spreading and synchronization.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Processes on NetworksMathematical SciencesMTH751USemester 27Yes

Processes on Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Networks characterize the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the Internet to social networks and the brain. On these networks dynamical processes take place. For example, we search and navigate the Internet, opinions spread on social networks, while neurons in the brain synchronize their dynamics. In this module students will learn the fundamental results on various dynamical processes defined on complex networks, including random walks, percolation, epidemic spreading and synchronization.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Pre-sessional Basics of ProgrammingMathematical SciencesMTH753PSemester 17No

Pre-sessional Basics of Programming

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Leon Danon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The course will cover basic computing concepts and tools such as programming languages, compilers, interpreted code, random numbers, and computational modelling. The course will cover: variables, arithmetic operations, assignments; built-in functions, plotting; vectors and matrices, operations on matrices; functions and procedures; repeated and conditional execution; recursive functions; applications.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Pre-sessional Probability and StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH768PSemester 16No

Pre-sessional Probability and Statistics

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module recaps the basics of probability and statistics which are important tools of modern finance. If you are a science or engineering graduate it will provide a concise introduction into the probabilistic way of thinking, and if you are a mathematics graduate it will refresh your knowledge of the subject. It will prepare you for assimilating more advanced probability concepts and mastering their applications in finance, to be developed in the core modules of the MSc Mathematical Finance programme.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 6
Timetable:

Computational Methods in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH770PSemester 17No

Computational Methods in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Overlap: MTH6150
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide you with the necessary numerical skills and tools to investigate a variety of problems in mathematical finance. It is based on C++, the programming language of choice for many practitioners in the finance industry. You will learn about basic concepts of the C part of C++ such as loops, arrays, functions, and branching statements, and then be introduced to the object-orientated programming part of C++. As an application you will deal with binomial trees in C++ and the pricing of various types of options in this context.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH771PSemester 17No

Foundations of Mathematical Modelling in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide you with an introduction to important concepts from probability theory and stochastic processes that are useful in modelling asset price dynamics. The introduction of more advanced tools will be preceded by a brief review of basic probability theory. Important stochastic processes that underlie many models in finance, such as random walks, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, and the Poisson process, are discussed. An informal overview on Ito stochastic calculus and its application in finance will be given. By the end of this introductory course you will have achieved a sufficient level of competence of selected mathematical methods to facilitate further studies in Mathematical Finance.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Stochastic Calculus and Black-Scholes TheoryMathematical SciencesMTH772PSemester 27No

Stochastic Calculus and Black-Scholes Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alexander Gnedin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module enables you to acquire a deeper knowledge about the Ito stochastic calculus as applied to mathematical finance. You will learn about the role of the Ito integral in solving stochastic differential equations, and its role in developing the Black-Scholes theory for option pricing. You will also obtain a clear understanding of the simplifying assumptions in the Black-Scholes model. The course will develop pricing methologies for both vanilla options (European call and put options) as well as exotic options such as barrier options. The aim is to get a thorough understanding of Ito calculus as encountered in financial market modelling.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Computing in FinanceMathematical SciencesMTH773PSemester 27No

Advanced Computing in Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Phillips
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is a follow-up course of 'Computational Methods in Finance'. Your knowledge of C++ will be further enhanced and further topics of interest in mathematical finance will be numerically investigated. An important topic for this module is the use of Monte Carlo simulations for pricing various types of options. The Black-Scholes theory and its connection with PDEs will be revisited in a numerical context. Moreover, at the end of this course you will also investigate models beyond the Black-Scholes theory, based on stochastic volatility, which touches current research.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Portfolio Theory and Risk ManagementMathematical SciencesMTH774PSemester 27No

Portfolio Theory and Risk Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christian Beck
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A very important general problem in finance is to balance investment risk and return. In this module you will acquire skills and techniques to apply modern risk measures and portfolio management tools. Mathematically this involves the maximization of the expectation of suitable utility functions which characterizes the optimum portfolio. You will learn about the theoretical background of optimization schemes and be able to implement them to solve practical investment problems.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Mathematical Finance DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH775PFull year7No

Mathematical Finance Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Each MSc Mathematical Finance student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematical Finance Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematical Finance Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in financial mathematics or economics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTH776PSemester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MTH6136

The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Financial ProgrammingMathematical SciencesMTH777PSemester 27No

Financial Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

Part I: Programming skills
- Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
- Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
- Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
- Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
- Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
- Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
- Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
- Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
- Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
- Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
- Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

Part II: The development framework
- Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
- Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
- Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
- Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

(note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Financial ProgrammingMathematical SciencesMTH777USemester 27No

Financial Programming

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A preliminary outline of the course contents is as follows:

Part I: Programming skills
- Lesson 1 (2h) Introduction. Trading and risk management system requirements. Typical layout of technology components. Low level/high level coding.
- Lesson 2 (2h) Excel fundamentals. Layout of a sheet. Overview of in-built functions. How to build a basic pricing sheet in Excel.
- Lesson 3 (2h) Source Code repositories. What is a source code repository and why do we need it ? How to use TortoiseSVN. Implications for controls and regulatory processes. The Excel XML format.
- Lesson 4 (2h) Industry strength Excel. Named cells, data validation, maintainability considerations in a production environment, error codes.
- Lesson 5 (2h) VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) Functions. Recording macros. Data types and data scope. ByRef/ByVal. Setting breakpoints and using the debug window.
- Lesson 6 (2h) VBA Subroutines Controls to trigger and manage code execution. Excel as a pure front end for a financial system. Handling error conditions.
- Lesson 7 (2h) VBA Object Oriented Code. Introduction to OOP, the Excel object model, types, classes, property get and set, data validation.
- Lesson 8 (2h) Practical session Building a risk management sheet using Excel/VBA.
- Lesson 9 (2h) Basics of C/C++. Introductory to the basic language features, emphasizing plain C functions, data types etc. Building a basic console EXE application
- Lesson 10 (2h) Basics of C/C++ DLLs. Connecting Excel/VBA to a C/C++ calculator DLL (Dynamically Linked Library).
- Lesson 11 (2h) Practical Session Building a derivatives pricing tool based on an Excel thin front end, VBA middleware and a core calculator in a DLL developed in C/C++.

Part II: The development framework
- Lesson 12 (2h) Low level items Compiled code, C/C++/Assembly language. Binary representation of data. Using Windows kernel C/C++ DLLs.
- Lesson 13 (2h) Impact of bugs. Testing protocols. Static tests, nightly regressions. Peer review. Coding policies.
- Lesson 14 (2h) High performance programming. FPGAs, GPUs, grid computing, multithreading, low level optimizations
- Lesson 15 (2h) Overview of other technologies: Java, COM, Python, .NET, C#, F#

(note that there are some overlaps with other modules, e.g. C++,designed to offer additional support with some more difficult key topics)

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

MSc Financial Computing DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH778PFull year7No

MSc Financial Computing Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sebastian Del Bano Rollin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Each MSc Financial Computing student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Financial Computing Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Financial Computing Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in financial computing, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles and/or performing computation or simulations. An MSc project may also involve collaboration with a collaborator based in industry. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research. An oral presentation of the results of the dissertation might also be requested.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

MSc DissertationMathematical SciencesMTH780PFull year7No

MSc Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Each MSc Mathematics of Networks student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematics of Networks Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematics of Networks Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted. A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in networks, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles and/or performing computation or simulations. An MSc project may also involve collaboration with a collaborator based in industry. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

MSci Independent Study in MathematicsMathematical SciencesMTH799UFull year7No

MSci Independent Study in Mathematics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Prellberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is an independent study module, in which the emphasis is on independent learning of an area of level-7 mathematics by working through an appropriate textbook, examined by a combination of assessments. It is distinguished from a project module by the inclusion of regular assessed coursework, an in-term test and an assessed presentation and oral examination. As in a project module, students will need to liaise with academic staff for choice of topic and selection of supervisor. They will be accepted onto this module only after agreement between adviser, module organiser, and module supervisor. They will normally be expected to have a third-year average of at least 60% to be accepted.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination, 25.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Applied StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTHM002Semester 17Yes

Applied Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The semester will be divided into three four-week periods. In each a genuine application of statistics will be studied, led by a different lecturer with at most two lectures per period. The list of topics will vary from year to year and you should obtain the current list from the module organiser. You can find out more about this module on the Maths website

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Measure Theory and ProbabilityMathematical SciencesMTHM007Semester 27No

Measure Theory and Probability

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Joyner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory module on the Lebesgue theory of measure and integral with application to probability. You are expected to know the theory of Riemann integration. Measure in the line and plane, outer measure, measurable sets, Lebesgue measure, nonmeasurable sets. Sigma-algebras, measures, probability measures, measurable functions, random variables. Simple functions, Lebesgue integration, integration with respect to general measures. Expectation of random variables. Monotone and dominated convergence theorems, and applications. Absolute continuity and singularity, Radon-Nikodym theorem, probability densities. Possible further topics: product spaces, Fubini's theorem.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Topics in Probability and Stochastic ProcessesMathematical SciencesMTHM012Semester 17Yes

Topics in Probability and Stochastic Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Ellis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Topics will be chosen from the following list: (i) Borel-Cantelli lemma, Kolmogorov's inequalities, strong law of large numbers; (ii) Weak convergence of distributions. The Central Limit Theorem; (iii) Recurrent events and renewal theory; (iv) Further topics in random walks; (v) General theory of Markov chains. Classification of states and ergodic properties; (vi) Continuous time Markov Processes. Please see the module organiser before registering.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Group TheoryMathematical SciencesMTHM024Semester 17Yes

Group Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Leonard Soicher
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to advanced group theory. The aim is to explore the theory of finite groups by studying important examples in detail, such as simple groups. In particular, the projective special linear groups over small fields provide a rich vein of interesting cases on which to hang the general theory.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Project DissertationMathematical SciencesMTHM038Full year7No

Project Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Each MSc Mathematics student is required to complete a 60 credit project dissertation. A student must find a potential supervisor and fill out an MSc Mathematics Project Approval Form by the end of Semester B. The supervisor and project must be approved by the MSc Mathematics Exam Board Chair, in consultation with the MSc Mathematics Programme Director, and the process for this, which may involve an interview with the student, takes place as approval forms are submitted.

A typical MSc project dissertation consists of about 30 word-processed pages, securely bound, covering a specific research-level topic in mathematics or statistics, usually requiring the student to understand, explain and elaborate on results from one or more journal articles. An MSc project may also involve computation. An MSc project should help prepare a good student for PhD research and even allow an excellent student the possibility of doing some research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Computational StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTHM731Semester 27No

Computational Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Griffin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces modern methods of statistical inference for small samples, which use computational methods of analysis, rather than asymptotic theory. Some of these methods such as permutation tests and bootstrapping, are now used regularly in modern business, finance and science.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Graphs and NetworksMathematical SciencesMTHM750Semester 17No

Graphs and Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vito Latora
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Networks characterise the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the internet to social netwroks and the brain. This module is desgined to teach students the mathematical language needed to describe complex networks, characterise their basic properties and construct mathematical models of complex networks.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Processes on NetworksMathematical SciencesMTHM751Semester 27No

Processes on Networks

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ginestra Bianconi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Networks characterize the underlying structure of a large variety of complex systems, from the Internet to social networks and the brain. On these networks dynamical processes take place. For example, we search and navigate the Internet, opinions spread on social networks, while neurons in the brain synchronize their dynamics. In this module students will learn the fundamental results on various dynamical processes defined on complex networks, including random walks, percolation, epidemic spreading and synchronization.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

The Medieval World: Structures and MentalitiesHistoryHST4102Semester 24Yes

The Medieval World: Structures and Mentalities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Denley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module offers a broad introductory overview of some characteristics of the medieval world. It explores the institutional and mental framework within which society operated, and examines features of everyday life and material culture in that light. The topics covered include belief and the church, communities and individuals, marriage, family, gender, age, education, the material world, technology, time and space. Classes focus on an extensive range of short excerpts of documents, and students focus on a particular topic for their essay.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Europe 1000-1500: The Middle Ages and their LegacyHistoryHST4107Semester 14Yes

Europe 1000-1500: The Middle Ages and their Legacy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Merle Rubin
Overlap: HST4105
Prerequisite: None

Medieval institutions, ideas and practices still greatly influence the shape of modern Europe. Europe¿s languages, rituals, religious beliefs, political institutions, urban infrastructure and universities are deeply marked by their medieval origins. This module offers an introduction to Europe¿s medieval past in its full diversity and complexity. It will introduce men and women, laypeople and priests, warriors, traders and farmers, offering learners information and insights into the continent¿s formative past.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Bayesian StatisticsMathematical SciencesMTHM042Semester 27No

Bayesian Statistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lawrence Pettit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to introduce you to the Bayesian paradigm. The module will show you some of the problems with frequentist statistical methods, show you that the Bayesian paradigm provides a unified approach to problems of statistical inference and prediction, enable you to make Bayesian inferences in a variety of problems, and illustrate the use of Bayesian methods in real-life examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Research Methods in Mathematical SciencesMathematical SciencesMTHM700Semester 17No

Research Methods in Mathematical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Wajid Mannan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is an introduction to methods often used in research in general, which will provide preparation for the MSc project. You will learn how to review critically and evaluate scientific writing, from books to research papers. You will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style and structure, and will learn how to make and deliver oral presentations. Additional topics will be included so that you are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These will include reading recent papers, and specific exercises in acquiring data, analysis, using computational mathematics tools and analysis packages, scientific word processing, project planning and teamwork. You will also be exposed to research in industry through talks by external collaborators.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Reformation to Revolution: Europe and the World, 1500-1800HistoryHST4202Semester 24Yes

Reformation to Revolution: Europe and the World, 1500-1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Katherine Lowe
Overlap: HST4201
Prerequisite: None

The period 1500-1800, covering from the Reformation to the American and French Revolutions, is of formative importance in the origins of the modern world. Key topics include Reformation and Counter-Reformation, the early modern state, gender and family, literacy and print, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment and the advent of the age of revolution. Particular emphasis will be placed on the global expansion of Europe (including England), and the impact this had not only on the rest of the world but also on Europe itself.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801HistoryHST4308Full year4Yes

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801

Credits: 30.0
Contact: David Geiringer
Overlap: HST4306
Prerequisite: None

How have Britain and the British changed over the last two centuries? This module gives students a deep and wide-ranging introduction to modern British history since 1801, guiding them through the major political, social, international and imperial developments in a chronological format. It gives those who have not previously studied the subject the grounding they need to undertake more specialist modules in the second and third years, and challenges those with prior knowledge by presenting new interpretations and critical appreciations from the cutting edge of British history.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801HistoryHST4308ASemester 14Yes

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801

Credits: 15.0
Contact: David Geiringer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

How have Britain and the British changed over the last two centuries? This module gives students a deep and wide-ranging introduction to modern British history since 1801, guiding them through the major political, social, international and imperial developments in a chronological format. It gives those who have not previously studied the subject the grounding they need to undertake more specialist modules in the second and third years, and challenges those with prior knowledge by presenting new interpretations and critical appreciations from the cutting edge of British history.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801HistoryHST4308BSemester 24Yes

Unravelling Britain: British History since 1801

Credits: 15.0
Contact: David Geiringer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

How have Britain and the British changed over the last two centuries? This module gives students a deep and wide-ranging introduction to modern British history since 1801, guiding them through the major political, social, international and imperial developments in a chronological format. It gives those who have not previously studied the subject the grounding they need to undertake more specialist modules in the second and third years, and challenges those with prior knowledge by presenting new interpretations and critical appreciations from the cutting edge of British history.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Europe in a Global Context since 1800HistoryHST4309Full year4Yes

Europe in a Global Context since 1800

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Elena Baachin
Overlap: HST4305
Prerequisite: None

In the period covered by this module Europe rose to global dominance and then entered a gradual process of relative decline which is still underway. Any history of Europe in the period must also, therefore, take account of Europe's interactions - military, economic and intellectual - with the wider world. During the period of expansion Europeans envisaged themselves as embodying a superior civilisation which exemplified ideals of modernity and progress. But these ideals also had darker side which resulted in Europeans perpetrating upon each other and on others, acts of the most extreme violence. In the nineteenth century, the ideals of nationalism were associated with progress, emancipation and liberalism but in the twentieth century they became vectors of exclusion, authoritarianism and even genocide. Since 1945 ideas of a united Europe have taken root, but Cold War, local wars and inter-ethnic conflicts have emerged and some have endured. These are some of the themes and contradictions that this module will seek to explore.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Europe in a Global Context since 1800HistoryHST4309ASemester 14Yes

Europe in a Global Context since 1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Elena Baachin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In the period covered by this module Europe rose to global dominance and then entered a gradual process of relative decline which is still underway. Any history of Europe in the period must also, therefore, take account of Europe's interactions - military, economic and intellectual - with the wider world. During the period of expansion Europeans envisaged themselves as embodying a superior civilisation which exemplified ideals of modernity and progress. But these ideals also had darker side which resulted in Europeans perpetrating upon each other and on others, acts of the most extreme violence. In the nineteenth century, the ideals of nationalism were associated with progress, emancipation and liberalism but in the twentieth century they became vectors of exclusion, authoritarianism and even genocide. Since 1945 ideas of a united Europe have taken root, but Cold War, local wars and inter-ethnic conflicts have emerged and some have endured. These are some of the themes and contradictions that this module will seek to explore.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Europe in a Global Context since 1800HistoryHST4309BSemester 24Yes

Europe in a Global Context since 1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Elena Baachin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In the period covered by this module Europe rose to global dominance and then entered a gradual process of relative decline which is still underway. Any history of Europe in the period must also, therefore, take account of Europe's interactions - military, economic and intellectual - with the wider world. During the period of expansion Europeans envisaged themselves as embodying a superior civilisation which exemplified ideals of modernity and progress. But these ideals also had darker side which resulted in Europeans perpetrating upon each other and on others, acts of the most extreme violence. In the nineteenth century, the ideals of nationalism were associated with progress, emancipation and liberalism but in the twentieth century they became vectors of exclusion, authoritarianism and even genocide. Since 1945 ideas of a united Europe have taken root, but Cold War, local wars and inter-ethnic conflicts have emerged and some have endured. These are some of the themes and contradictions that this module will seek to explore.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Building the American Nation: 1756-1900HistoryHST4310Semester 24Yes

Building the American Nation: 1756-1900

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanna Cohen
Overlap: HST4303
Prerequisite: None

This course examines the turbulent development of the United States from the mid-eighteenth century through to 1900. We begin with the country¿s origins as a band of disparate colonies and go on to chart the establishment of the United States and its expansion into the West. We then explore the nation¿s disastrous descent into Civil War and finally examine the postwar ascendancy of a newly powerful capitalist nation at the end of the century. Focusing particularly on America¿s diverse and often diverging culture and society, the course explores the limits and fragility of American democracy, both as a way of politically empowering citizens and as a political system that held the nation together.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

History in PracticeHistoryHST4602Semester 14No

History in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Condos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

There are four questions all historians must address. What is History? Who makes History? What shapes History? Finally, why study History at all? This module will enable students who are embarking on their degree course to answer these key questions for themselves. At the same time the module will provide training in the skills of historical research and the art of historical writing, two key components of successful historical practice. By the end of the semester, students will have acquired the conceptual framework and the tools that they will need to succeed as historians at Queen Mary.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 1 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

The Foundations of Modern Thought: Introduction to Intellectual HistoryHistoryHST4603Semester 14Yes

The Foundations of Modern Thought: Introduction to Intellectual History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Bourke
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this module is to give students some practical experience of studying intellectual history, to introduce them to a range of texts which have a special relevance to the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, and to expose them to some essential methodologies employed by intellectual historians. The module will cover key figures in the history of ideas from the Renaissance to the twentieth century, including Machiavelli, Rousseau and Marx, and it will examine the work of figures who have contributed innovatively to the theory and practice of the history of thought, such as Nietzsche, Weber and Skinner. By the end of the module students will have a good knowledge of the primary reading material for the module together with some of the major interpretative debates surrounding such controversial figures as Machiavelli, and a good familiarity with the variety of methods employed by leading intellectual historians since the nineteenth century. Students will also have improved their research and writing skills.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Global Encounters: Conquest and Culture in World HistoryHistoryHST4604Semester 24Yes

Global Encounters: Conquest and Culture in World History

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Layton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module offers an introduction to encounters between civilizations, cultures and societies in world history, based on examples drawn from the medieval, early modern and modern periods. It seeks to develop understanding of patterns in world history and an introduction to approaches within the field of global history. It will chronologically introduce specific case-studies, from the Arab conquest of Muslim Spain and Chinese exploration of the Indian Ocean, through colonial encounters in Africa, America and India, to the Balfour Declaration in 1917.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Latin for Medievalists IIHistoryHST5106Semester 25Yes

Latin for Medievalists II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Harrap
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: HST5605

This module builds on the foundations provided by HST5106 Latin for Medievalists I and provides further tuition in Latin geared to the needs of students studying medieval history. It provides a practical grounding intended to enable students to take advanced medieval history modules.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

The Crusades (1095-1291)HistoryHST5111Semester 25Yes

The Crusades (1095-1291)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Asbridge
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In the eleventh century, a vast Christian army, summoned to holy war by the pope, rampaged through the Muslim world of the eastern Mediterranean, seizing possession of Jerusalem, a city revered by both faiths. Over the two hundred years that followed this First Crusade, Islam and the West fought for dominion of the Holy Land, clashing in a succession of brutal wars, both firm in the belief that they were at God's work. In this course students will examine this epic struggle from the perspective of both Christians and Muslims, reconstructing the experiences and attitudes of those on either side of the conflict. Students will be asked to consider what drove Muslims and Christians alike to embrace the ideals of jihad and crusade, and to assess how these holy wars reshaped the medieval world and why they continue to echo in human memory to this day.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Women and Gender in Late Medieval England, c.1300-c.1500HistoryHST5114Semester 25Yes

Women and Gender in Late Medieval England, c.1300-c.1500

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Virginia Davis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Having established the religious and legal context in which women were operating, this module will explore the different stages in a woman¿s lifecycle, childhood and youth, married life and old age, most often as a widow. Attention will be paid to the different experiences of aristocratic and peasant women, rural and urban women. The alternative option of a life devoted to religion will be considered. Issues covered will include women¿s experiences of work, in both a rural and an urban environment, education, literacy and cultural patronage and the course will conclude with an examination of women on the margins of society, as criminals and prostitutes.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

From Muhammad to the Ottomans: A History of Medieval Islamic SocietiesHistoryHST5116Semester 15Yes

From Muhammad to the Ottomans: A History of Medieval Islamic Societies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yossef Rapoport
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course offers an introduction to the history of medieval Islamic societies, from the rise of Islam up to 1500 AD. It will follow the major political events in the history of the Muslim community, and explore the development of key religious trends, cultural concepts and social institutions. The course will highlight the range of literary, artistic and scientific achievements of medieval Islamic civilizations. By using critical historical tools for examination of the Islamic past, it will seek to draw a multi-dimensional picture of complex and dynamic societies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Medieval London: Pubs, Plague-pits and CathedralsHistoryHST5120Semester 15Yes

Medieval London: Pubs, Plague-pits and Cathedrals

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Buck
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Taught by seminars, site visits and museum sessions, this course introduces students to life in medieval and renaissance London. The central themes of royal power, gender, marginality, the Black Death and popular revolt, will be studied in class and in the streets of London. Students will visit key monuments of medieval London (such as Westminster Abbey), trace the path of rebels in 1381, or handle medieval and early modern artifacts in the Museum of London. Sites, monuments, topography and artifacts will lead to a new understanding of politics, devotional practices, trade and family life. Please note that this module involves class visits to various locations in London. When timetabling please allow yourself an hour¿s travel time either side of the class.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Architecture in London I 1600 - 1837HistoryHST5200Semester 15Yes

Architecture in London I 1600 - 1837

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Beech
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Taught by lectures and building visits, this course is intended to introduce the study of architecture in both its historical context and its stylistic development. The course will cover buildings in the London area chronologically, from the beginnings of the Stuart dynasty to the accession of Queen Victoria, dealing mainly with the rise and development of the classical style in both domestic and public architecture. The classical style will be studied in greater depth than certain others, partly because of the lavish availability of monuments, but also so that students may better develop their knowledge of the variety of forms in which that particular style can appear, and be able to assess the significance of such varieties within that style.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

The Georgians: Society and Culture in Eighteenth Century EnglandHistoryHST5209Semester 25Yes

The Georgians: Society and Culture in Eighteenth Century England

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Alice Dolan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Georgian period was an era of startling contrasts: elegance and squalor, politeness and prostitution, `patricians' and `plebs', landed privilege and a booming economy. This was an epoch of startling change in trade and industry, town and countryside, culture and manners. We examine concepts of `An Age of Manufactures' and the `birth of a consumer society'; the flowering of towns and polite culture; the interlinked worlds of rich, poor and striving middling sort; bloody criminal justice and the criminal underworld; literacy, letter-writing and the rise of the novel; gender relations, sex and the family. Were the British a polite and commercial people, or an ungovernable rabble? Was this an 'Ancien Régime', or the first modern, industrial society? This course introduces students to the cultural, social and economic history of one of the most vibrant centuries in British history and reveals the Georgians in all their colour and contradictions.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Power, politics and religion in Britain, 1530-1649HistoryHST5216Full year5Yes

Power, politics and religion in Britain, 1530-1649

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Cerianne Law
Overlap: HST4201
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the political, religious and cultural history of Britain from reformation to civil war. Key themes include the nature and expression of monarchy, religious change (and its political consequences), the role of 'public opinion' in the early modern period, and the foreign and domestic pressures that these regimes faced. With a strong emphasis on contemporary source material, we will consider the relationship between rulers and ruled, examining the ways that people in early modern Britain understood, received and contested political and religious change.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Art in France from Louis XIV to the RevolutionHistoryHST5217Semester 15Yes

Art in France from Louis XIV to the Revolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hannah Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

From Louis XIV's Court at Versailles to the streets of Revolutionary Paris, this module explores the history of early modern France through its art, architecture, and material culture. Encompassing an age of absolutist monarchy, Enlightenment thinking, and the tumultuous French Revolution, this module investigates the crucial role played by objects and spaces in the social, political, and cultural life of France in the 17th and 18th centuries. We will examine iconic spaces (Versailles, the Louvre, the Panthéon), celebrated artists (e.g. Watteau, Boucher, David, Vigée-Lebrun), key cultural critics and artistic patrons (e.g. Diderot, Voltaire, Mme de Pompadour), and fundamental transformations in European cultural life, from the establishment of the French Academy, to the birth of art exhibitions, and the iconoclasm of the Revolution.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Architecture in London II 1837 - to the PresentHistoryHST5302Semester 25Yes

Architecture in London II 1837 - to the Present

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Beech
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Taught by lectures and building visits, this course is intended to introduce the study of architecture in both its historical context and its stylistic development. The course will cover buildings in the London area roughly chronologically along thematic lines. Taking the ascension of Queen Victoria to the throne as a starting point, it will explore the effects of Imperialism, the Industrial Revolution, the Second World War, the Welfare State and the more recent rise of the financial elite on the built fabric of London. It is intended that students should gain a good understanding of English architecture in the period considered.

Please note that this module involves class visits to various locations in London. When timetabling please allow yourself an hour¿s travel time either side of the class.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

British Horror: Film, Television and LiteratureHistoryHST5305Semester 15Yes

British Horror: Film, Television and Literature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Matthew Jacobsen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

British cinema is often celebrated for its social realism, yet it has made significant and influential though often overlooked contributions to the horror, fantasy and sci-fi film genres. This module will investigate this alternative history or `repressed underside¿ of British cinema. While horror is often side-lined as having little artistic worth, this module aims to reassess the genre's aesthetic, philosophical and intellectual value. It will examine British horror films from key periods in cinema history within their cultural production context and alongside developments in cinema worldwide, from Hammer Studios in the 1960s to the reinvigorated British interest in horror and fantasy film and TV in the 2000s. Students will engage with debates on the cultural appeal and social significance of the genre, and the nature of horror film audiences and spectatorship. With an emphasis on cinema, students will also compare the writing of several authors with film adaptations of their work.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Madness and Medicine in Modern BritainHistoryHST5314Semester 15Yes

Madness and Medicine in Modern Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Jennifer Wallis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Psychiatry has been fundamental to our understanding of a wide range of modern concepts from identity and responsibility through to illness and agency. This module will provide a broad overview of the discipline of psychiatry from the beginning of state-regulated asylums through to the advent of care in the community. Using a mixture of secondary sources and a selection of primary texts, we will examine how the diagnosis and treatment of madness has been shaped through the rich interaction of social, scientific, economic and cultural factors.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Race in the United States: Slavery To Civil RightsHistoryHST5317Semester 25Yes

Race in the United States: Slavery To Civil Rights

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Noam Maggor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is a survey of race relations in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. It focuses primarily on African-American history especially plantation slavery, the causes of the Civil War, Reconstruction, segregation, turn-of-the-century race reform, the migration north, Black Nationalism, and the Civil Rights Movement. The module will also examine government policy toward Native Americans, European immigration and the making of whiteness, Hispanos and U.S. imperial expansion, the impact of Asian immigration, and nativist initiatives including the Ku Klux Klan.

Assessment: 65.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Translation into FrenchLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4203Semester 24No

Translation into French

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: "FRE403, FRE5200"
Prerequisite: FRE4200 simultaneously

The module provides an introduction to translation into French. Through weekly translation exercises based both on sentences and on texts, students will learn to think systematically about language structure and language use in French (and English), and acquire a more in-depth understanding of register, style, idioms and cultural specificity and the ways in which arguments are constructed. The module is open to first-year single honours French students, and first-year French with Business Management students only. Priority will be given to first-year single honours French students.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and ArtLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5001Semester 25Yes

Memories of WWII In French Literature, Film and Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: COM5002
Prerequisite: FRE468 or equivalent

This module introduces you to French experiences of the 'annees noires' (the 'dark years') of the German Occupation of France and more especially to the ways in which these have been remembered, represented and interpreted in the art, film and literature of post-war France. It examines the reasons for this period's uneasy status as 'unfinished history' and explores some of the creative representations and reinterpretations of events that have been produced from the aftermath of war through to the present day. The module also involves the study of contemporary theories about cultural memory, from France and elsewhere. It considers how these theories have evolved and explores productive ways of drawing upon them to interpret the primary works studied.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

From the Tsars to the Bolsheviks: Russia 1801-1921HistoryHST5327Full year5Yes

From the Tsars to the Bolsheviks: Russia 1801-1921

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Jonathan Smele
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module concerns itself with a question that continues to intrigue historians: How was it that the most powerful and most autocratic state in Europe and the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Russian Empire, begat the world's first Communist state, the USSR, at the beginning of the twentieth century? Following an introduction to imperial Russian politics and society (the geographical setting, the nature of absolutism and the persistence of serfdom) and the rise of Russia as a multi-national empire, the course examines the challenges posed to the existing tsarist order through the rise of liberalism, socialism, populism and nationalism, as well as the enduring and particular problems of industrial and agricultural modernisation and development in Russia. Attention is paid also to Russia's role in the European state system, from the triumph over Napoleon of Alexander I to the disasters of Russia¿s campaigns of First World War overseen by Nicholas II ("Nicholas the Last"). The module concludes with a discussion of the origins and outcomes of the revolutions of 1917 and the subsequent civil wars and an analysis of historical interpretations of the Bolshevik victory.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Cultures of ComparisonLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7200Semester 17No

Cultures of Comparison

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This core module looks at the history of the discipline, important debates during its existence, and recent interventions about its place in the Humanities today. Comparison leads to numerous questions of cross-cultural expression ¿ literary, cultural and theoretical: the tensions of identity and difference, the nature of texts, the rôle of the author, mythology, post-colonial theory, gender studies, philosophical issues, translation studies, and other art forms such as music and fine art.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Exilic Writing and the Making of World LiteratureLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7201Semester 27No

Exilic Writing and the Making of World Literature

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Galin Tihanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module introduces students to exile as one of the foundational discourses of modernity that interrogates memory, identity, and language. Today¿s notion of world literature is inseparable from a transnational and cosmopolitan perspective, which is intimately ¿ and in a characteristically contradictory manner ¿ linked to exilic experiences and the practice of exilic writing. In this course, we will analyse artifacts (literature, but also some paintings, two texts which fall in the genre of ¿philosophy of history¿, a play, and a film) by European, Indian, Japanese, and American authors in order to begin to think about how exile and exilic writing have been inscribed in the very notion of world literature with which we work today."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Mapping Twentieth-Century Latin American FictionLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7202Semester 27No

Mapping Twentieth-Century Latin American Fiction

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Patricia D'Allemand
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The material covered in this Cultural History course is approached from a trans-Latin American comparative perspective. The module explores the various paths to literary modernisation which the Latin American novel undertook in the second half of the twentieth century, across the historically defined Caribbean, Andean, River Plate and Brazilian cultural regions. Focusing upon major landmarks of modern Latin American fiction, the course provides students with an understanding of these texts in the light of both the specific socio-political processes and the theoretical and aesthetic debates to which they are articulated."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Postcolonial Studies TodayLanguages Linguistics and FilmCOM7203Semester 27No

Postcolonial Studies Today

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shital Pravinchandra
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Why, after having such a massive impact on the study of literature, is postcolonial studies now thought by some to be obsolete? This module will consider multiple explanations for the so-called crisis in postcolonial studies today. We will examine the views of scholars who have taken the field to task for its restricted canon and capitulation to the global marketplace (Lazarus, Huggan, Brouillette). In addition, we will study alternative models such as "world literature" and environmental studies (Moretti, Nixon). Are these approaches more suited to address the economic, cultural and ecological disparities thrown up by globalisation? We will meditate these questions with the help of a range of postcolonial literary works by Amitav Ghosh, Derek Wacott, Mahasweta Devi and J.M. Coetzee, among others.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Engaging Critically with Writing 1Languages Linguistics and FilmEAL4750Semester 14Yes

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr William Tweddle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop writing in different genres by studying the grammatical structures and lexis in context. Students examine varieties of English from a historical and cultural perspective. Students develop their writing in different genres including cyber communication, work-related texts and print media. They read and discuss texts and analyse the relationship between audience, purpose and content. Students also examine issues of fluency, clarity and correctness. This leads to personal and work-related writing tasks both in and out of class. There is regular feedback from the class tutor and from peers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Engaging Critically with Writing 1Languages Linguistics and FilmEAL4750Semester 24Yes

Engaging Critically with Writing 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr William Tweddle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore and develop writing in different genres by studying the grammatical structures and lexis in context. Students examine varieties of English from a historical and cultural perspective. Students develop their writing in different genres including cyber communication, work-related texts and print media. They read and discuss texts and analyse the relationship between audience, purpose and content. Students also examine issues of fluency, clarity and correctness. This leads to personal and work-related writing tasks both in and out of class. There is regular feedback from the class tutor and from peers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Exploring Spoken EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL4760Semester 14Yes

Exploring Spoken English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students who want to improve their spoken English in both formal and informal settings. Seminars consider the importance of audience, purpose, and non-verbal signals in a variety of situations. Students have opportunities to participate in workshops in which they are involved in activities such as discussions, role-plays and class presentations. The class tutor monitors these activities and gives feedback on features of spoken English including levels of formality, prosodic features and lexical appropriateness.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Exploring Spoken EnglishLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL4760Semester 24Yes

Exploring Spoken English

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students who want to improve their spoken English in both formal and informal settings. Seminars consider the importance of audience, purpose, and non-verbal signals in a variety of situations. Students have opportunities to participate in workshops in which they are involved in activities such as discussions, role-plays and class presentations. The class tutor monitors these activities and gives feedback on features of spoken English including levels of formality, prosodic features and lexical appropriateness.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Critical Thinking and Writing for Film StudiesLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL4822Semester 24No

Critical Thinking and Writing for Film Studies

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Philippa Kennedy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module has been designed by the Language Centre with input from the Film Studies Department as a non-credit-bearing option for first year undergraduates studying Film as single honours or in joint honours combinations. The module aims to improve students¿ writing and study skills through exercises that are discipline-specific and closely linked to the content of the level 4 Film Studies curriculum. Currently, Film students have the option of attending English language and study skills modules in the Language Centre that cater to students in all subjects. Following the model of the successful EAL7821 `Critical Thinking and Writing for Politics and International Relations¿, the proposed module seeks better to meet the particular needs of Film students. The module will be capped at 20, to keep the convenor¿s workload manageable. Students will be able to self-refer or will be directed to the module by markers after feedback on their semester 1 assignments for FLM4200, FLM401 and FLM402.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Morphology of British CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL5600Semester 15Yes

Morphology of British Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: SML208
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce advanced non-native speakers of English to British cultural history from the late Victorian era until the present. Key aspects covered will be the following themes: the British understanding of culture; the discourses of Empire; British culture during the World Wars; the class system; post-war British popular culture; the migrant experience in post-war Britain; contemporary discourses on Britishness in relation to multiculturalism, the European Union and devolution.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Morphology of British CultureLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL5600Semester 25Yes

Morphology of British Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Christopher Mansfield
Overlap: SML208
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce advanced non-native speakers of English to British cultural history from the late Victorian era until the present. Key aspects covered will be the following themes: the British understanding of culture; the discourses of Empire; British culture during the World Wars; the class system; post-war British popular culture; the migrant experience in post-war Britain; contemporary discourses on Britishness in relation to multiculturalism, the European Union and devolution.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Languages in the Classroom 1: Theoretical Approaches to TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL6011Semester 16Yes

Languages in the Classroom 1: Theoretical Approaches to Teaching

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: FRE/GER/HSP6011
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces you to language teaching at school. It is the first of two 15 credit modules, and it focuses on the theoretical aspects of language teaching - whereas the other module (which runs during the second semester) focuses on practical matters.

Through the completion of this module, you will gain an understanding of key aspects of Applied Linguistics and Psycholinguistics. You will focus on theoretical aspects of second / foreign language acquisition and their implications for teaching approaches and the design of teaching materials. This will involve planning, producing and delivering teaching materials. This module will also enable you to develop a range of transferable and professional skills such as organisational skills, communication skills, team-work, time management and problem-solving skills.

Important: If you are planning to attend the module EAL6012 (Languages in the Classroom 2: Teaching and Reflective Practice) in semester 2, you will be required to complete a placement in a local school and will therefore require clearance from the UK's Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/disclosure-and-barring-service towards the end of the first semester. Please contact the course organiser for further information.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Approaches and Methods in Language TeachingLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7201Semester 17No

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Falco Pfalzgraf
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching is a compulsory module on the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students are presented with a comprehensive overview of the main approaches and methods in language teaching, and have the opportunity to put these into practice: each week there is a lecture/interactive seminar to discuss the theoretical underpinnings of language teaching, followed by a practical session in which students will try out the different approaches in a peer/micro-teaching learning environment. Students will receive practical and formative feedback on their teaching sessions from both teachers and peers. The areas to be covered include: common assumptions of language teaching; the natural, oral and audio-lingual approaches; situational language teaching; social and cognitive construction; communicative language teaching; content-based Instruction; and task-based teaching.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Second Language AcquisitionLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7202Semester 27No

Second Language Acquisition

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Agnieszka Knas Lyons
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Second Language Acquisition is a compulsory module on the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students are presented with a comprehensive overview of theories and current research in second language acquisition; in addition, students have opportunities to put language learning strategies into practice by being required, as part of this module, to learn a language which is not their own. Students can choose from: French, Spanish, German, Arabic, Japanese or Mandarin (depending on timetable constraints). Proficiency in the chosen language is not assessed, but we ask you to reflect on the learning strategies that you use while following your language course. The module explores: the history of language learning; goals of language teaching; the L2 user and the native speaker; individual learner differences; motivation and aptitude; learner strategies; multiple intelligences and multi-competences; group dynamics; general models of L2 learning; the interaction approach; socio-cultural SLA theory.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Dissertation in English Language Teaching / Standard (Research) PathwayLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7203Full year7No

Dissertation in English Language Teaching / Standard (Research) Pathway

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is one of the two possible core modules in the MA in applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. With your supervisor's guidance, you will select a topic for advanced study. You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your ability to justify the topic, to synthesise knowledge from the modules you have studied during the programme, to narrow your topic to research questions following a close reading of literature, to design and implement a research plan, to collect quantitative and/or qualitative data and to analyse and interpret this data in order to answer your research questions. You will also be able to demonstrate your ability to structure an extended piece of written work, and to construct an argument which supports your conclusions. Your dissertation will be 10,000 to 12,000 words, and you will be supported by guidance from your supervisor on a one-to-one basis."

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation in English Language Teaching (Professional Qualification Pathway)Languages Linguistics and FilmEAL7204Full year7No

Dissertation in English Language Teaching (Professional Qualification Pathway)

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is one of the two possible core modules in the MA in applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. Students who wish to attend the Level 5 Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) course or Trinity Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CertTESOL) course will be given the opportunity to critically reflect on their learning in a 10,000 to 12,000 word dissertation. Students may choose this option at their own additional expense, and at an institution of their choice, but the CELTA/CertTESOL must be studied after the end of the second semester modules. Students will not be assessed on the professional qualification but will be assessed on their ability to write and reflect on their own teaching and learning: the teaching practice they have gained in the professional qualification course and the micro-teaching opportunities provided on the MA programme, together with the learning experiences they have gained on the MA programme as learners of another language, both integrated with the theories, concepts and methodologies they have discussed in the subject areas studied in the MA programme."

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Methods in Applied LinguisticsLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7205Semester 27No

Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelya Koteyko
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The module examines the various approaches to research and research design, providing guidance as to the appropriateness of certain methodologies in differing research scenarios. The module will provide an overview of key approaches with a critical discussion of the quantitative/qualitative divide and convergence. In the first part of the module we focus on quantitative methods and SPSS-based analysis. The second part focuses on qualitative methods and software-assisted coding. By the end of the module, and in readiness for their Masters dissertation, students should be able to understand the main research methods employed in Applied Linguistics for data collection and be able to input and analyse quantitative data using SPSS and qualitative texts using NVivo."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

Curriculum Design and Materials EvaluationLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7206Semester 17No

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Saima Sherazi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation is an optional module in the MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. The module initially focuses on aspects of curriculum design, including language policies and pedagogies, by exploring: historical perspectives; environmental and situational analysis; needs analysis. The module also examines the relationship between curriculum ideology and learning outcomes and how this impinges on syllabus design, the role of teachers, and materials development. The second focus of the module is to present students with an overview of language program evaluation discussing at length: approaches to evaluation; evaluation practice and research; materials evaluation and multimedia materials evaluation. The module develops and deepens students understanding of issues in curriculum development by providing practice in evaluating language curricula and language teaching materials."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm

Description of LanguageLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7207Semester 17No

Description of Language

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Richardson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Description of Language provides you with an overview of the nature and extent of linguistics and enables you to apply the systems of syntax, lexis, practical phonetics, and discourse to the language learning classroom. From your understanding of language, you then explore and evaluate the range of language learning materials and the sequencing of materials for language teaching and learning. The module allows you to apply your newly acquired knowledge of language and materials to the language learning classroom, both through micro-teaching with your peers, and through opportunities to observe language teaching in either English or another language."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Multimedia Materials DevelopmentLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7208Semester 27No

Multimedia Materials Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Martin Barge
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is designed to provide an introduction to the pedagogical applications of multimedia in the language classroom. The course will focus on key issues and developments in the field of language teaching with multimedia and will explore practical approaches to exploiting, creating, adapting and developing multimedia materials for language teaching purposes. Participants will be given opportunities to develop practical lesson ideas and materials and will be encouraged to pursue their particular interests in the subject area."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Teaching English in Professional and Academic SettingsLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7209Semester 27No

Teaching English in Professional and Academic Settings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Weronika Gorska-Fernando
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This optional module provides a focused route for students who wish to develop advanced knowledge and skills in teaching both English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP). The module starts with the exploration of theoretical approaches and key research as well as pedagogical developments in the fields of ESP/EAP in the UK and across other national and international contexts. This in-depth introduction then moves on to the discussion of the principles of ESP/EAP course design, placing particular emphasis on practical knowledge of syllabus content/structure, material development and assessment methods."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Methods of Text and Corpus AnalysisLanguages Linguistics and FilmEAL7210Semester 17No

Methods of Text and Corpus Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nelya Koteyko
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Corpus linguistics provides methods for the study of collections of electronic texts. It has had a growing impact within linguistics since 1970s, and also has spawned diverse applications in language teaching, media studies and communication research. Corpus-based studies of discourse in these areas have offered precise, systematic and reliable insights in a variety of registers and settings. This module will introduce students to this new and innovative field of enquiry called corpus-assisted discourse analysis. The module consists of two parts. The first part of the module will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects underlying discourse analysis. The second part will introduce students to the key principles and theoretical constructs developed within corpus-assisted discourse analysis, as well as to some of the most widely used software and electronic corpora."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM003Full year5Yes

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM4200 or equivalent

This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 3 pm

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM003ASemester 15Yes

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM4200 or equivalent

This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 3 pm

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM003BSemester 25Yes

What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM4200 or equivalent

This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 3 pm

Introduction to British CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM005Semester 15Yes

Introduction to British Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Charles Drazin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module looks at some of the key films of the British cinema from the 1930s through to the 1950s, providing both a historical and critical overview of this rich period. While most of the films that will be screened during the module have been chosen as examples of the work of distinguished directors, room has also been made for films more squarely in the tradition of popular cinema. The aim is to provide an opportunity for the analysis of some of the characteristics of British national cinema, and to question some of the assumptions relating to that cinema, such as that it is too literary or theatrical. The chosen films will provide a focus for discussion in the seminars of such topics as British auteurs (e.g., Hitchcock), stars (e.g., James Mason), genre (e.g., the Gainsborough melodrama), form (e.g. the tensions between realist and expressionist approaches to film-making), censorship, the influence of the documentary tradition and the industry's links with theatre, broadcasting and the state.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Scriptwriting: Adaption and Original ScriptLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM205Semester 25No

Scriptwriting: Adaption and Original Script

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Eugene Doyen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Enrolment on Film Studies degree programme

This is a level five module offered as an option for single honours and joint honours Film
Studies students only. The module offers the opportunity to study practice and techniques
related to both script adaptation and original scriptwriting and their inter-relationship is
an important step for anyone wishing to establish their creative writing skills above a
foundation level. Both types of scriptwriting will be given equal weight as topics and
assessed accordingly.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

German Film 3: Contemporary German CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM302Semester 16Yes

German Film 3: Contemporary German Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

his module will allow you to analyse the state of contemporary filmmaking in Germany, exploring film cultures in the GDR and FRG immediately prior to unification, as well as the issues surrounding the re-establishment of a single national cinema after the fall of the Wall. The module encourages you to study developments in recent German cinema in the context of the increasing globalisation of media industries and images. You will explore the dynamics of recent German filmmaking, including its relationship to Hollywood and other European cinemas, its approach to questions of transnationalism and transculturalism, particularly concerning the emergence of Turkish-German filmmaking, its approach to the representation of politics, history and the national past, of gender and sexuality, and also its use of genre and popular commercial film styles.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Contemporary Hollywood CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM308Semester 26Yes

Contemporary Hollywood Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guy Westwell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Through a detailed examination of a number of contemporary Hollywood movies this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped Hollywood production from the late 1970s to the present day. We will be interrogating contemporary Hollywood movies in order to describe changes in the US film industry since the decline of the studio system and to profile some of the ways in which Hollywood reflects and interacts with American culture and society. This module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which you will select a film of your own choice and across three written assignments situate the film within its industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Production SkillsLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM403Semester 24No

Production Skills

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: FLM016
Prerequisite: Film Studies single hons only

A foundation in the technical, teamwork and planning skills required for production. The technical skills covered will include camera, lighting, sound and editing. The production skills will include shooting continuity footage, crewing and scheduling. The module will introduce you to the development of the continuity system from early cinema to the present day. You will be encouraged to reflect and evaluate your practice in relation to your teamwork, planning and production skills. The module will include formative assessments.

Assessment: 50.0% Practical, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Concepts and HistoryLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM4200Full year4Yes

Concepts and History

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: FLM100
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to foster a sense of the historical development of the cinema in America from its origins in the late nineteenth century through to the rise of the studio system in the 1930s and 1940s and its eventual disaggregation in the late 1950s. As well as tracking this strand of film history the module will also introduce students to a number of different conceptual frames such as performance, sound, narrative, mise-en-scène, censorship, genre, editing, and technology. By the end of the module you will be able to approach individual films, and film in general, as a complex object of study that can be profitably described via these conceptual frames. This module counts as 15 credits towards the QMUL Model.

Assessment: 50.0% Practical, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Scriptwriting: Creativity and TechniqueLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM4201Semester 14Yes

Scriptwriting: Creativity and Technique

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: FLM402
Prerequisite: Film Studies single hons only

Students will produce an essay and an original script. The module will establish the ability to write a short original film script with coherent dialogue, exposition and structure. It will also develop knowledge of scriptwriting: format, structure, character, dialogue, exposition, and how to assess a script using appropriate terminology such as back story, suspense and set-ups and pay-offs.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Reading German Film 2Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM5025Semester 25Yes

Reading German Film 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alasdair King
Overlap: GER5025
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce you to filmmaking in the divided Germany of the post-war period. It will examine the re-establishment of German cinema by the Allies, and look at the role of cinema in the denazification and democratisation of Germany. It aims to allow you to conduct a comparative analysis of cinema in the two German states, and to consider definitions of German national cinema(s). The module aims to introduce the cinematic traditions, styles and genres associated with East and West German cinema, including their respective approaches to the representation of politics, history and the national past, of gender and sexuality, youth and non-conformity, and also their use of genre and popular, art house and experimental styles.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 1 pm

German Narrative Fiction in Text and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5027Semester 25Yes

German Narrative Fiction in Text and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Astrid Kohler
Overlap: "GER5027, FLM6027, GER6027"
Prerequisite: Any level 4 film or literature module

What are the specific qualities of the media film and novel? How is a story changed when it moves from one medium to the other? Is it even still the same story?
Using texts from the German canon, students will explore what happens to the parameters of prose fiction when they are transferred to the medium of film. This includes not only the way the plot is realized, but many other factors which affect the intellectual and emotional responses elicited.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework, .0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

From Page to ScreenLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5035Semester 25Yes

From Page to Screen

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ricardo Rato Rodrigues
Overlap: POR5035
Prerequisite: None

Nobel laureate José Saramago (Portugal) and director of 'City of God' (Fernando Meirelles, Brazil) came together in the film adaptation 'Blindness'. Gael García Bernal was the protagonist of a transposition to contemporary Mexico of a major 19th century novel by renowned Eça de Querirós, set in 2005 in another adaptation. This module analyses text to screen adaptations, offering a panorama of film and literature in the Portuguese-speaking world. We examine authorship and narrative in Camões's epic 'The Lusiads', in the work of modernist Fernando Pessoa and in the cinema of Manoel de Oliveira, also considering the implications of spatial and temporal relocations, as well as the presence of cinematic stars in these films.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Memories of the Holocaust and Colonialism in French CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM508Semester 15Yes

Memories of the Holocaust and Colonialism in French Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: FLM300
Prerequisite: None

This module explores how memories of the Holocaust and colonial crimes ¿ two of the most extreme instances of violence in modern history ¿ have circulated and sometimes overlapped in French-language cinema, including landmark films such as Alain Resnais's Night and Fog, Chris Marker's The Pier, Claude Lanzmann's Shoah and Michael Haneke's Hidden. It investigates the capacity of cinema to act as witness to atrocity, to mediate testimony, to model psychic trauma and repression, to challenge myths about the national past, and to probe the connections between seemingly disparate types of violence. Students will also gain an understanding of critical debates about these issues in French and wider contexts. All films will be available in subtitled versions and all key reading will be in English.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 7 pm

Research Methods (Film)Languages Linguistics and FilmFLM509Semester 25No

Research Methods (Film)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM4200 / FLM100. FLM003 to be taken simultaneously.

This is a single-semester module (15 credits) focusing on developing the research skills you will need to succeed at Level 6 and in the world of work. In the first part of the module, you will work in small groups to adopt and edit a Wikipedia page on a particular film; in the second part of the module you will work on a proposal for a possible dissertation/research project. The module involves elements of formal teaching, group-led and independent study, weekly reading and preparation, and peer review; and a range of assessments, including the editing of a Wikipedia page, group and individual presentations, and written assignments. It is strongly recommended that students planning to take either FLM601 Script Development and Research or FLM304 Film Studies Research Project at Level 6 take this module.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Friday 11 am - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

The Visual EssayLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM511Semester 15No

The Visual Essay

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: FLM5200
Prerequisite: Film Studies single hons only: FLM016 or FLM403 required.

The Visual Essay is a single-semester module (15 credits) which interrogates the links between the essay form and visual media. The module explores how film, still and moving image work can be constructed to produce arguments, debates, and other rhetorical forms. The module allows students to develop a short moving-image or video essay, focusing on its visual elements to create an essay, argument or other poetic form. Students will also acquire a broader historical and theoretical understanding of the essay form, in text, photography, illustration, film, video and digital media. Beginning with the essays of Montaigne, students will be introduced to the visual essay as a hybrid form that navigates the personal and the political, expression and argument, feeling and reason, in cinematic language. The module forms part of the production pathway for Single Honours Film Studies, and as a result requires students to have undertaken production modules at Level 4.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Film CurationLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5205Semester 25No

Film Curation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM003 concurrently

Film Curation is a one-semester module which enables students to explore the theory and practice of film curation and film programming. In small groups you will ultimately produce a curated programme of films with accompanying portfolio. Broadly themed around issues to do with collecting, curating, argument and interpretation, you will learn how to develop a thematic, question-based approach to film curation, developing an understanding of audiences and film communities. You will be able to make full use of the ample film culture in London, and will have the opportunity to explore rare and relatively unknown film material as you assemble your film curation project.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Digital Film MakingLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM5206Semester 25Yes

Digital Film Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Louis Jackson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Available to Associate students only

This course provides a wide-ranging introduction to technical aspects of digital film making. Through workshops, exercises and assignments, students will develop a foundation in technical filmmaking and a understanding of the equipment used in the production process: camera, audio, lighting and post-production. These skills will be developed in a series of short filmmaking exercises and an assessed short film, which is produced by students working in small groups. There is an individual written report as part of the assessment.

Assessment: 75.0% Practical, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Contemporary Russian FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6017Semester 16Yes

Contemporary Russian Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: RUS6017,RUS5017
Prerequisite: None

Through the analysis of films produced since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union and creation of Russia, this course aims to equip students to be able to comment on contemporary Russian films as they are released. Teaching and assessment focuses on identifying key industrial, thematic and genre trends and issues in contemporary Russian cinema, with a focus on the intersection of the national and transnational. Those without Russian will be able to participate fully in this course, although a reading knowledge can be useful for working on less well-known films. The secondary reading is in English, and all key films are subtitled.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

German Narrative Fiction in Text and FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6027Semester 26Yes

German Narrative Fiction in Text and Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Astrid Kohler
Overlap: "GER6027, FLM5027, GER5027"
Prerequisite: Any level 4 film or literature module

What are the specific qualities of the media film and novel? How is a story changed when it moves from one medium to the other? Is it even still the same story?
Using texts from the German canon, students will explore what happens to the parameters of prose fiction when they are transferred to the medium of film. This includes not only the way the plot is realized, but many other factors which affect the intellectual and emotional responses elicited.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework, .0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6036Semester 26Yes

Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Else Vieira
Overlap: POR6036
Prerequisite: None

Looking at cinema as an increasingly prominent medium for the transmission of historical knowledge (Deleuze, Sorlin, Landy, etc.), this module analyzes the representation of history in African Cinema in three key moments of the continent¿s history. It initially focuses on Mozambique¿s major post-independence audio-visual initiative, headed by Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Rouch and Ruy Guerra ¿ the National Institute of Cinema ¿ and the role of film in nation-building. It then addresses film representations of historical trauma and the reconstruction of shattered lives in the context of Civil Wars in Mozambique and Angola, contrasting them with Sebastião Salgado¿s photographic documentation of the impact of war on African children and civilians. It also analyzes Guinea-Bissau¿s post-independence engagement in dialogue with the West through the musical, for the projection of an African identity and the tensions between tradition and modernization. It finally addresses the dearth of images of slavery in African Cinema and the way resistance to power imbalances and the communities of run-away slaves finds space on the Brazilian screen and, more recently, in tri-continental co-productions. No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. All films have subtitles in English.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Forms of Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6038Semester 16No

Forms of Film Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Eastwood
Overlap: FLM7038
Prerequisite: Film Studies single hons only

Mainstream narrative cinema has always benefitted from the formal innovations taking place at the margins of film practice. The formal, aesthetic and technical experiments conducted by the avant-garde were soon appropriated by the commercial film industry. Risks taken in the documentary field have led to new attitudes towards truth and actuality. This module focuses on what forms film practice can take beyond fiction and storytelling. The module aims to broaden the students' skills-base by focusing on documentary filmmaking and artists¿ moving image, encouraging formal experimentation and an active critique of the ways in which mainstream cinema and conventional televisual formats construct meanings and representations.

The module covers a range of practices, production procedures, technologies and techniques for concept development, and is structured to develop creative thinking, collaboration, crew dynamics and practical abilities. It is designed to ground the student in appropriate research and development methods along with practical and aesthetic skills to produce a short documentary or experimental film. Students choose from two short film project options: either a documentary portrait of a person, place or event, or a film that engages with process, concept and aesthetics, rather than with explicitly narrative content. In parallel, students produce an essay consisting of a close reading of a filmmaker or filmmakers working in a mode that relates to their short film production.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Film ArchaeologyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM604Semester 26Yes

Film Archaeology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Janet Harbord
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The origins of cinema, key moments of transformation and recent challenges to its form in the wake of digital technologies are the subjects examined in this module. Far from being simply a conflict between the magical tradition of Méliès and the documentary account of the Lumière brothers, cinema archaeology reveals the connections between various nineteenth century inventions concerned with movement, perception and transmission, and the advent of cinema. The course explores the various cultural influences that have contributed to the idea of 'cinema' at a particular time, such as those from painting, literature and theatre. Perhaps more significant are the moments of crisis brought about by the prospect of adding to film, such as the qualities of sound and colour. Most illuminating of all is film's competitive relation to its 'rivals': television, video, digital production and youtube. The course examines the question of whether film is a specific medium with enduring qualities, or whether its component parts are remade with every decade.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving ImageLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM609Semester 26Yes

Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving Image

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anat Pick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM003 or equivalent

Ecocinemas is a single-semester level 6 module focusing on the intersections between cinema and the natural world. The module explores film's embeddedness in the physical world from a number of perspectives: film as an environmental practice in its own right, as a vehicle for exploring the relationship between the human and the nonhuman world, and as a more-than-human projection. The module covers a diverse range of themes: the key role of nonhuman animals and the natural world in the development of the cinematic medium, the representation of animals and nature in film, cinema¿s environmental footprint, and film as an ecological advocacy tool.

The first part of the module looks at the history and theory of the visual representation of nature and animals, from pre-cinematic forms such as cave paintings, to photographic studies of animal locomotion and early scientific cinema. The subsequent blocks introduce students to the principal strands of eco-criticism and ecocinema via a variety of case studies, including the wildlife film, environmental and animal advocacy documentaries, and fictional representations of animals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm

Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the MuseumLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM610Semester 16Yes

Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the Museum

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jennifer Chamarette
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FLM003 or equivalent

This module explores the relationships of cinema (as an institution, as a space, and as a concept) to the institutional, spatial and conceptual contexts of the museum. The museum has in recent years become a respository for film as a museum object in its own right; however, film has haunted the corridors of museums since its earliest invention. In this module, we explore the connections and disconnections between cinematic and museal spaces, using theoretical concepts of immersion, spatial dynamics, the archive, exhibition and curatorial theory to make sense of the plurality of film and the moving image in museums, and indeed the 'museum' in the moving image. Making use of London as an ideal base for interrogating some of these encounters between cinema, the moving image, and museums, the module will also explore the interventions of film across other disciplines, including Art History, Museology, Anthropology and the Digital Humanities. We will explore both actual and virtual museums, through a range of film material from Europe, North America, the Middle East, drawing upon concepts such as 'film as a virtual museum', 'cinematic exhibition practices', 'film as museology', and 'the ethics of ethnographic film'.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Contemporary French CinemaLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6205Semester 16Yes

Contemporary French Cinema

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sue Harris
Overlap: FLM507
Prerequisite: None

Through a detailed examination of a number of recent and contemporary French films this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped French film production since major changes to cultural policy were implemented in France by the socialist Mitterrand administration in 1981. We will profile some of the ways in which French cinema reflects and interacts with French culture and society, and evaluate this in the light of social, political and cultural shifts in late 20th and 21st century French life. The module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which students will select a film of their own choice, and across three written assignments they will progressively develop material about the film that situates it within its historical, industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster FilmLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6206Semester 26Yes

Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster Film

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Pate
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the Japanese yakuza-eiga (gangster film) in terms of its narrative form and ideological functions, including socio-political commentary on Japanese society from the 1930s to the present day. We will look at the work of such filmmakers as Ozu, Kurosawa, Suzuki, Fukasaku, Kitano and Miike to explore a range of issues, including the post-war occupation and 'democratisation' of Japan, its rapid industrialisation and the 'economic miracle', the mass migration from rural to urban areas and its social consequences, and the disengagement of large sections of society from the political, bureaucratic and business elite which runs the country. Students will also discuss such concepts as 'giri' (duty), 'ninjo' (honour) and 'jingi' (code) as facets of both the yakuza and national myth, and explore the themes of loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice, and the clash of traditional values with modernity. Finally, the module will consider the relationship between the Japanese and Hollywood gangster traditions through an examination of hybrid films which comment on the clash of codes and cultures.

Students will attend a weekly lecture and seminar; in addition there will be a scheduled screening of each week's main film.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am -12 pm

Creative ProductionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6201Semester 26No

Creative Production

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: FLM305
Prerequisite: A Practical Film Making Module

This is an optional module open to Film Studies students with an experience in practice (Production Skills and/or Directing Drama/Directing Fiction). It offers the opportunity to develop and build on knowledge of film making developed during the first two years of the degree, and the opportunity to make one short film in any style the student wishes to explore. The film is made by a group and not an individual. The module has a mixture of group meetings and whole class lectures and workshops.

Assessment: 80.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Film Studies Research ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM6202Full year6No

Film Studies Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Libby Saxton
Overlap: Students are not normally permitted to take more than one Research Project module
Prerequisite: FLM003

Students must consult with the module organiser before finalising registration for this double module. It is designed as an optional module for Final Year students of Film Studies joint and single Honours programme. The aim of the module is to offer students on the Film Studies programmes an introduction to independent study by pursuing a sustained piece of research on a subject agreed with the module organiser and an assigned supervisor. The module will provide training in the research skills and methodologies that this demands via group sessions and individual supervision.

Assessment: 85.0% Dissertation, 15.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Forms of Film PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7038Semester 17No

Forms of Film Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Steven Eastwood
Overlap: FLM6038
Prerequisite: None

Mainstream narrative cinema has always benefitted from the formal innovations taking place at the margins of film practice. The formal, aesthetic and technical experiments conducted by the avant-garde were soon appropriated by the commercial film industry. Risks taken in the documentary field have led to new attitudes towards truth and actuality. This module focuses on what forms film practice can take beyond fiction and storytelling. The module aims to broaden the students' skills-base by focusing on documentary filmmaking and artists¿ moving image, encouraging formal experimentation and an active critique of the ways in which mainstream cinema and conventional televisual formats construct meanings and representations.

The module covers a range of practices, production procedures, technologies and techniques for concept development, and is structured to develop creative thinking, collaboration, crew dynamics and practical abilities. It is designed to ground the student in appropriate research and development methods along with practical and aesthetic skills to produce a short documentary or experimental film. Students choose from two short film project options: either a documentary portrait of a person, place or event, or a film that engages with process, concept and aesthetics, rather than with explicitly narrative content. In parallel, students produce an essay consisting of a close reading of a filmmaker or filmmakers working in a mode that relates to their short film production.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Final ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7200Full year7No

Final Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Mr Eugene Doyen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Launching in semester two of your programme and running the course of the summer, the Final Project module guides you to deepen your research skills and realise an ambitious, high-production, festivals-ready documentary film drawing on the methods and modes given attention to over the duration of the MA. The documentary film production is supported by a research portfolio and an academic essay in giving detailed and theoretically informed context to the topic and the form of the film produced.

Assessment: 60.0% Practical, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Documentary Film - Theory and PracticeLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7201Semester 17No

Documentary Film - Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Ms Athena Mandis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Documentary in its simplest of forms is a recording of an act. The film camera is first and foremost a recording instrument, whether it captures 'life caught unawares' or a fictional scenario. This module examines the history of 'non-fiction' filmmaking in the 20th and 21 st century through the understanding of documentary styles and genre. Political, social, ethical and historical issues will be addressed through the engagement of theory and practice.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Documentary Production ProjectLanguages Linguistics and FilmFLM7202Semester 27No

Documentary Production Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Steven Eastwood
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module challenges some of the key tenets and ideas of documentary film (such as transparency, truth, reality, and representational practices) with a view to pushing the boundaries of the documentary form. We will explore different modes of documentary practice, including the performative documentary, artists¿ moving image documentary in the gallery, the animated documentary, archival and found footage film and the essay film. These non-traditional modalities of nonfiction are designed to enhance and reconfigure your own documentary practices, and enable you to test out new theoretical, aesthetic and rhetorical strategies in your production work.
To make the most of the module, you are encouraged to read extensively around documentary film theory and practice, thinking through the myriad formal, political and ethical ways the moving image encounters and represents the lived world. To broaden your horizons, please make sure to keep abreast of the extra-curricular suggestions for recommended viewing, and make the most of the artistic, cinematic, and socially engaged events Queen Mary University and the many communities of London have to offer. Please check your email and social media daily for updates.
Sessions will commonly be divided into two parts. In the first part, there will be a screening covering a particular mode of documentary film that challenges traditional approaches to documentary filmmaking, followed by a lecture and discussion of the film and the assigned reading material. The second part of the session will focus on the practical aspects of planning the production of your film ¿ from concept to completion.

Assessment: 70.0% Practical, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Film Screening
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 5 pm

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Study PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE292Semester 15No

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Study Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Study PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE292Semester 25No

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Study Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Study PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE294Semester 15No

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Study Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Study PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE294Semester 25No

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Study Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE295Semester 15No

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE295Semester 25No

Semester Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Year Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE296Full year5No

Year Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Year Abroad - French Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE297Full year5No

Year Abroad - French Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE293Semester 15No

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Work PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE293Semester 25No

Semester Abroad - French Erasmus Work Placement

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Year Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Study PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE298Full year5No

Year Abroad - French Non-Erasmus Study Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Year Abroad - French Erasmus Study PlacementLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE299Full year5No

Year Abroad - French Erasmus Study Placement

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: FRE5202 or equivalent

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Lovers and Libertines: Eighteenth Century French FictionLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE304Semester 26Yes

Lovers and Libertines: Eighteenth Century French Fiction

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Will Mcmorran
Overlap: COM606
Prerequisite: FRE468 or Equivalent

This module explores the poetics and ethics of libertine fiction, and features short stories and novels including Les Liaisons dangereuses and the works of the Marquis de Sade

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Paris in ArtLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4023Semester 14Yes

Paris in Art

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Cary Mackay
Overlap: COM4023
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to the historical, political, social and artistic life of Paris (19th ¿ 21st century), through the study of a range of visual media, including painting, photography, film, posters, bande dessinée, as well as related texts. Topics will include: representations of Paris by artists from Impressionism to Surrealism; International Exhibitions; Paris as spectacle; Paris and revolution (1848, 1968); imagining Paris tomorrow. Students will acquire analytical tools to discuss visual documents in relation to historical and cultural issues.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200Full year4No

French I

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE411
Prerequisite: A-level French or equivalent.

Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language. The entire module counts towards the QMUL model.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200ASemester 14No

French I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE411
Prerequisite: A-level French or equivalent.

Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

French ILanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE4200BSemester 24No

French I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elsa Petit
Overlap: FRE411
Prerequisite: A-level French or equivalent.

Basic grammatical structures are revised and reinforced. Practice in comprehension and composition is given using a wide variety of source material in contemporary French, designed to develop appropriateness and accuracy in the spoken and written language.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Economics for Business and SocietyBusiness and ManagementBUS108Semester 14No

Economics for Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pedro Martins
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Work and EmploymentBusiness and ManagementBUS124Semester 24No

Work and Employment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces core ideas relating to work. It applies theories and concepts to the analysis of business situations. It makes use of perspectives drawn from sociology, social psychology, industrial relations, organisation theory and human relations. The dominant theme is to explore work and employment from the employee's point of view rather than that of management. Different perspectives are integrated by focussing on particular work situations and problems.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUS127Semester 24No

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gerard Hanlon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to basic psychological concepts in organizational behaviour including personality and intelligence, motivation and job design, perception and communication, learning, memory and training, decision making , attitudes and job satisfaction. Five metaphors of organizations including the organization as a machine, an organism, a brain, a psychic prison and instrument of domination will be considered in terms of what these offer to our understanding of their effects on individual and group behaviour in organizations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Applied EconomicsBusiness and ManagementBUS128Semester 14No

Applied Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Pedro Martins
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives."

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

The Story of my Life?: Twentieth-century French AutobiographyLanguages Linguistics and FilmFRE5002Semester 25Yes

The Story of my Life?: Twentieth-century French Autobiography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: COM5002
Prerequisite: FRE468 or equivalent

The word `autobiography¿ is often understood as the story of one¿s life. But do our lives have a story, and can this story be told? This module will consider how writers grapple with the problems and possibilities of self-representation. You will be introduced to a range of critical reflections on life-writing (eg. feminist and postcolonial perspectives), as well as learning to engage closely with the chosen texts. Over the course of the module, we will consider issues such as: the complexity of memory, the difficulty of representing traumatic experience, the role played by gender, culture and class in self-representation, and the meaning of fantasy and invention in life-writing. In the age of social-media, many of us are accustomed to producing our own public persona. This module will invite you to think about what is at stake personally and politically in acts of self-representation. Students will also have the opportunity to produce a short piece of life-writing themselves.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Statistical PhysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA6403Semester 26Yes

Statistical Physics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Starting from the atomic and quantum descriptions of matter the module uses statistical principles to explain the behaviour of material in bulk. It thus relates microscopic to macroscopic quantities and provides a microscopic explanation of thermodynamics. It provides the bridge between microscopic quantum physics and the behaviour of matter as we know it daily.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Quantum Mechanics BPhysics and AstronomySPA6413Semester 16Yes

Quantum Mechanics B

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Andreas Brandhuber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SPA5218

"This module is both an introduction and revision, followed by an extended exposition of the basic principles and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include: Operators and the general structure of quantum mechanics, observables, orthonormality of eigenstates, expansion theorem, commuting operators, theory of measurement; The harmonic oscillator; Angular momentum theory, the rigid rotator and applications to rotation-vibration spectra of diatomic molecules; Spin in quantum mechanics illustrated with spin1/2: matrix representations, Stern-Gerlach experiments and measurement theory exemplified; Indistinguishable particles in quantum mechanics: Bosons and Fermions; Spherically symmetric potentials and the Hydrogen atom."

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Group Project for PhysicistsPhysics and AstronomySPA6543Semester 26Yes

Group Project for Physicists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mark Baxendale
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module places students in small groups (3 to 6 people) and each group is allocated a short duration project (~12 weeks) which has been set by either an external collaborator (e.g. industry, NHS, local authority, commercial entity) or by one of the research groups within the School of Physics and Astronomy. The students are initially briefed by the ""client"", who has set the project, and then attend weekly meetings with their academic supervisor and (more importantly) with each other where formal minutes (including action lists) are kept. The research is carried out using the school's laboratory and computing facilities as well as external facilities where applicable. Each group has to produce a formal, technical written report as well as presenting its findings orally to the ""client"" at the end of the project. The projects are assessed by the academic supervisor with input from the external collaborator."

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Independent ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA6709Semester 16No

Independent Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module provides you with the experience of working, independently, on a problem within physics (often using the resources found within a research group of the department). These may be problems in experimental, computational or theoretical physics or a project in astronomy. A list of projects is available on the extensive projects homepage and this contains brief descriptions of the projects on offer, and the supervisors of those projects. You shall arrange a project by reading these pages and meeting with potential supervisors. Associated with the project is a weekly seminar to which you will contribute."

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Extended Independent ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA6776Full year6No

Extended Independent Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"You will initially register for the extended project PHY776. This module provides you with the experience of working, independently, on a problem within physics (often using the resources found within a research group of the department). These may be problems in experimental, computational or theoretical physics or a project in astronomy. A list of projects is available on the extensive projects homepage containing a brief description of the projects on offer and the supervisors of those projects. You shall arrange a project by reading these pages and meeting with potential supervisors. Associated with the project is a weekly mandatory seminar to which you will occasionally be expected to contribute. In the light of adequate progress during the first semester you may, after producing a report, be relegated to a 15 credits Independent Project following careful consideration by a panel of staff (Supervisor, CO and DCO)."

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Physics Review ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA6913Full year6No

Physics Review Project

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

You will examine a specialised area of physics by directed reading and independent study. You will learn to use scientific research literature databases. You will develop the skill of writing a scientific review summarising current knowledge in a field of physics. You may enrol for this project only with the permission of the Module Organiser for MSci projects. Open only to 3rd year MSci students.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7001PSemester 27Yes

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Advanced Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7001USemester 27Yes

Advanced Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanjaye Ramgoolam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module gives a broad exposition of the modern frame work for the unification of special relativity and quantum theory -- relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Lagrangian formulation and canonical quantisation of free fields with spin = 0, 1/2, 1 are revised. The construction of interacting quantum field theories is devoloped with special focus on phi^4-theory and quantum electrodynamics (QED). Perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams is developed systematically, and important concepts such as regularisation and renormalisation are introduced. These tools are applied to the calculation of simple tree-level and one-loop S-matrix elements and cross-sections in phi^4 theory and QED, corrections to the electron magnetic moment and the running coupling. The course will also touch on more advanced topics such as anomalies, non-Abelian gauge theories, and modern methods for the calculation of S-matrix elements. "

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 1 pm

Astrophysical PlasmasPhysics and AstronomySPA7004NSemester 27No

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 6 pm - 9 pm

CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA7005NSemester 17No

Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Cosmology is a rapidly developing subject that is the focus of a considerable research effort worldwide. It is the attempt to understand the present state of the universe as a whole and thereby shed light on its origin and ultimate fate. Why is the universe structured today in the way that it is, how did it develop into its current form and what will happen to it in the future? The aim of this module is to address these and related questions from both the observational and theoretical perspectives. The module does not require specialist astronomical knowledge and does not assume any prior understanding of general relativity."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 6 pm - 9 pm

CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA7005PSemester 17Yes

Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne
Overlap: SPA6311
Prerequisite: None

"Cosmology is a rapidly developing subject that is the focus of a considerable research effort worldwide. It is the attempt to understand the present state of the universe as a whole and thereby shed light on its origin and ultimate fate. Why is the universe structured today in the way that it is, how did it develop into its current form and what will happen to it in the future? The aim of this module is to address these and related questions from both the observational and theoretical perspectives. The module does not require specialist astronomical knowledge and does not assume any prior understanding of general relativity."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 6 pm - 9 pm

CosmologyPhysics and AstronomySPA7005USemester 17Yes

Cosmology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Mulryne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Cosmology is a rapidly developing subject that is the focus of a considerable research effort worldwide. It is the attempt to understand the present state of the universe as a whole and thereby shed light on its origin and ultimate fate. Why is the universe structured today in the way that it is, how did it develop into its current form and what will happen to it in the future? The aim of this module is to address these and related questions from both the observational and theoretical perspectives. The module does not require specialist astronomical knowledge and does not assume any prior understanding of general relativity."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 6 pm - 9 pm

Electromagnetic Radiation in AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7006NSemester 27No

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guillem Anglada Escude
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Astrophysical PlasmasPhysics and AstronomySPA7004PSemester 27Yes

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 6 pm - 9 pm

Astrophysical PlasmasPhysics and AstronomySPA7004USemester 27Yes

Astrophysical Plasmas

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"A plasma is an ionized gas where the magnetic and electric field play a key role in binding the material together. Plasmas are present in almost every astrophysical environment, from the surface of pulsars to the Earth's ionosphere. This module explores the unique properties of plasmas, such as particle gyration and magnetic reconnection. The emphasis is on the plasmas found in the Solar System, from the solar corona and solar wind to the outer reaches of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Fundamental astrophysical processes are explored, such as the formation of supersonic winds, magnetic energy release, shock waves and particle acceleration. The module highlights the links between the plasmas we can observe with spacecraft and the plasmas in more distant and extreme astrophysical objects."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 6 pm - 9 pm

Electromagnetic Radiation in AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7006PSemester 27Yes

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guillem Anglada Escude
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Electromagnetic Radiation in AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7006USemester 27Yes

Electromagnetic Radiation in Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Guillem Anglada Escude
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module is an introduction to understanding the origin, propagation, detection and interpretation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from astronomical objects. In this module students will learn: how to describe EM radiation and its propagation through a medium to an observer; the main processes responsible for line and continuum emission and how they depend on the nature and state the emitting material; the effects of the earth's atmosphere and the operation of the detection process at various wavelengths. The material will be illustrated by examples from optical, infrared and radio portions of the EM spectrum."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Electronic Structure MethodsPhysics and AstronomySPA7008PSemester 27Yes

Electronic Structure Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alston Misquitta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Electronic structure methods - that is, computational algorithms to solve the Schrodinger equation - play a very important role in physics, chemistry and materials science. These methods are increasingly treated on a equal footing with experiment in a number of areas of research, a sign of their growing predictive power and increasing ease of use. This course will cover the fundamental theoretical ideas behind these methods. Topics will include Hartree-Fock, correlated methods like Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled-cluster as well as density-functional theory. The theoretical ideas will be complemented with a hands-on computational laboratory using state-of-the-art programs with the aim of providing our students with a basic understanding of the technical implementations and strengths and shortcomings of these methods."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Electronic Structure MethodsPhysics and AstronomySPA7008USemester 27Yes

Electronic Structure Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alston Misquitta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Electronic structure methods - that is, computational algorithms to solve the Schrodinger equation - play a very important role in physics, chemistry and materials science. These methods are increasingly treated on a equal footing with experiment in a number of areas of research, a sign of their growing predictive power and increasing ease of use. This course will cover the fundamental theoretical ideas behind these methods. Topics will include Hartree-Fock, correlated methods like Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled-cluster as well as density-functional theory. The theoretical ideas will be complemented with a hands-on computational laboratory using state-of-the-art programs with the aim of providing our students with a basic understanding of the technical implementations and strengths and shortcomings of these methods."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysics and AstronomySPA7009NSemester 27No

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysics and AstronomySPA7009PSemester 27Yes

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical DiscsPhysics and AstronomySPA7009USemester 27Yes

Extrasolar Planets and Astrophysical Discs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sijme-Jan Paardekooper
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Ever since the dawn of civilization human beings have speculated about the existence of planets outside of the Solar System orbiting other stars. The first bona fide extrasolar planet orbiting an ordinary main sequence star was discovered in 1995, and subsequent planet searches have uncovered the existence of more than one hundred planetary systems in the Solar neighbourhood of our galaxy. These discoveries have reignited speculation and scientific study concerning the possibility of life existing outside of the Solar System. This module provides an in depth description of our current knowledge and understanding of these extrasolar planets. Their statistical and physical properties are described and contrasted with the planets in our Solar System. Our understanding of how planetary systems form in the discs of gas and dust observed to exist around young stars will be explored, and current scientific ideas about the origin of life will be discussed. Rotationally supported discs of gas (and dust) are not only important for explaining the formation of planetary systems, but also play an important role in a large number of astrophysical phenomena such as Cataclysmic Variables, X-ray binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. These so-called accretion discs provide the engine for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. The second half of this module will describe the observational evidence for accretion discs and current theories for accretion disc evolution."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm

The GalaxyPhysics and AstronomySPA7010NSemester 27No

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

The GalaxyPhysics and AstronomySPA7010PSemester 27Yes

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

The GalaxyPhysics and AstronomySPA7010USemester 27Yes

The Galaxy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Cooper
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The module considers in detail the basic physical processes that operate in galaxies, using our own Galaxy as a detailed example. This includes the dynamics and interactions of stars, and how their motions can be described mathematically. The interstellar medium is described and models are used to represent how the abundances of chemical elements have changed during the lifetime of the Galaxy. Dark matter can be studied using rotation curves of galaxies, and through the way that gravitational lensing by dark matter affects light. The various topics are then put together to provide an understanding of how the galaxies formed."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

MSc Physics Research ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7012PFull year7No

MSc Physics Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Francesca Di Lodovico
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The MSc research Project is at the heart of the MSc programme. It is an independent project undertaken by the student within a working research group in the School. The project runs over three semesters in order to allow for the student to both design their project (using available literature etc.), be trained in the relevant techniques and carry out a reasonably substantial piece of research based on an actual (real) research problem. The presentation of the student findings is based both on a formal, technical written report (75 page maximum length) and on an oral presentation (e.g. powerpoint talk) and examination."

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Phase TransitionsPhysics and AstronomySPA7013PSemester 17Yes

Phase Transitions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Dove
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Phase transitions are so common in materials that our understanding of condensed matter is incomplete without understanding the physics of phase transitions. Furthermore, it is often the existence of phase transitions that give materials their properties that are exploited in technological applications. This module will survey the wide range of phase transitions observed experimentally, including ferroelectric and other displacive phase transitions, magnetic transitions, and atomic ordering transitions. Various models with be described to account for the existence of these phase transitions and their properties."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm

Phase TransitionsPhysics and AstronomySPA7013USemester 17Yes

Phase Transitions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Dove
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Phase transitions are so common in materials that our understanding of condensed matter is incomplete without understanding the physics of phase transitions. Furthermore, it is often the existence of phase transitions that give materials their properties that are exploited in technological applications. This module will survey the wide range of phase transitions observed experimentally, including ferroelectric and other displacive phase transitions, magnetic transitions, and atomic ordering transitions. Various models with be described to account for the existence of these phase transitions and their properties."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm

Physics Investigative ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7015UFull year7No

Physics Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Physics Research ProjectPhysics and AstronomySPA7016UFull year7No

Physics Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Craig Agnor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"You will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. You will learn to write scientific reports summarising results of an independent investigation and placing them in a physics context, and detailing the methods used and the results obtained. The project will run through both semesters and will involve an interim report at the end of semester 1 as well as the final reports at the end of semester 2."

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Project/DissertationPhysics and AstronomySPA7017PFull year7No

Project/Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The MSc project involves a critical review of a chosen topic in modern astrophysics, and may include some original research. Students write a dissertation summarising current research in that chosen field and the extent of their own investigations."

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA7018PSemester 17Yes

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module provides a first introduction into the unification of last century's groundshaking revolutions in physics: Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins are derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions are analyzed. Students will learn about the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, starting with classical field theory, quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac field and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Then interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. Finally, the quantisation of the electro-magnetic field is discussed and the relativistic cross sections for various physically relevant examples are calculated."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Relativistic Waves and Quantum FieldsPhysics and AstronomySPA7018USemester 17Yes

Relativistic Waves and Quantum Fields

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gabriele Travaglini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module provides a first introduction into the unification of last century's groundshaking revolutions in physics: Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. Relativistic wave equations for particles of various spins are derived and studied, and the physical interpretations of their solutions are analyzed. Students will learn about the fundamental concepts of quantum field theory, starting with classical field theory, quantisation of the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac field and the derivation of the Feynman propagator. Then interactions are introduced and a systematic procedure to calculate scattering amplitudes using Feynman diagrams is derived. Finally, the quantisation of the electro-magnetic field is discussed and the relativistic cross sections for various physically relevant examples are calculated."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Relativity and GravitationPhysics and AstronomySPA7019PSemester 17Yes

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzchild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Relativity and GravitationPhysics and AstronomySPA7019USemester 17Yes

Relativity and Gravitation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Timothy Clifton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module offers an explanation of the fundamental principles of General Relativity. This involves the analysis of particles in a given gravitational field and the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a gravitational field. The derivation of Einstein's field equations from basic principles is included. The derivation of the Schwarzchild solution and the analysis of the Kerr solution inform discussion of physical aspects of strong gravitational fields around black holes. The generation, propagation and detection of gravitational waves is mathematically analysed and a discussion of weak general relativistic effects in the Solar System and binary pulsars is included as a discussion of the experimental tests of General Relativity."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Research Methods for AstrophysicsPhysics and AstronomySPA7020PSemester 17No

Research Methods for Astrophysics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Burgess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Research in astrophysics builds on a vast body of literature and archived data. This module is an introduction to research methods which exploit existing information sources in astrophysics. The module serves as preparation for the research project which forms a major part of the MSc programme. In this module students will learn how to review and evaluate with critical insight, the current state of research of a chosen area in astrophysics. They will receive training in writing academic reports in an appropriate style, and will learn how to convey research material in a presentation. Additional topics will be included so that students are prepared for project work at an advanced level. These can include specific exercises in using astronomical data archives, scientific word processing, mathematical skills, using mathematical and data analysis packages, project planning, etc."

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 6 pm - 9 pm

Solar SystemPhysics and AstronomySPA7022NSemester 17No

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carl Murray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Solar SystemPhysics and AstronomySPA7022PSemester 17Yes

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carl Murray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Solar SystemPhysics and AstronomySPA7022USemester 17Yes

Solar System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Carl Murray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"As the planetary system most familiar to us, the Solar System presents the best opportunity to study questions about the origin of life and how enormous complexity arise from simple physical systems in general. This module surveys the physical and dynamical properties of the Solar System. It focuses on the formation, evolution, structure, and interaction of the Sun, planets, satellites, rings, asteroids, and comets. The module applies basic physical and mathematical principles needed for the study, such as fluid dynamics, electrodynamics, orbital dynamics, solid mechanics, and elementary differential equations. However, prior knowledge in these topics is not needed, as they will be introduced as required. The module will also include discussions of very recent, exciting developments in the formation of planetary and satellite systems and extrasolar planets (planetary migration, giant impacts, and exoplanetary atmospheres)."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysics and AstronomySPA7023NSemester 17No

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysics and AstronomySPA7023PSemester 17Yes

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Stellar Structure and EvolutionPhysics and AstronomySPA7023USemester 17Yes

Stellar Structure and Evolution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Richard Nelson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"Stars are important constituents of the universe. This module starts from well known physical phenomena such as gravity, mass conservation, pressure balance, radiative transfer of energy and energy generation from the conversion of hydrogen to helium. From these, it deduces stellar properties that can be observed (that is, luminosity and effective temperature or their equivalents such as magnitude and colour) and compares the theoretical with the actual. In general good agreement is obtained but with a few discrepancies so that for a few classes of stars, other physical effects such as convection, gravitational energy generation and degeneracy pressure have to be included. This allows an understanding of pre-main sequence and dwarf stages of evolution of stars, as well as the helium flash and supernova stages."

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Functional Methods in Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7024PSemester 27Yes

Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will introduce Feynman's path integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics and apply it to study of Quantum Field Theory (QFT). Emphasis will be given to the role of symmetries (Ward identities), the renormalisation group and the idea of effective action. The concept of Wilson's effective action and the different nature of (ir)relevant/marginal terms will be discussed. Simple scalar theories will provide the example where to apply the concepts and the techniques introduced. The course will also touch on some more advanced topics, such as quantum anomalies and conformal field theories.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Functional Methods in Quantum Field TheoryPhysics and AstronomySPA7024USemester 27Yes

Functional Methods in Quantum Field Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rodolfo Russo
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will introduce Feynman's path integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics and apply it to study of Quantum Field Theory (QFT). Emphasis will be given to the role of symmetries (Ward identities), the renormalisation group and the idea of effective action. The concept of Wilson's effective action and the different nature of (ir)relevant/marginal terms will be discussed. Simple scalar theories will provide the example where to apply the concepts and the techniques introduced. The course will also touch on some more advanced topics, such as quantum anomalies and conformal field theories.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Euromasters Project/DissertationPhysics and AstronomySPA7026PFull year7No

Euromasters Project/Dissertation

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Francesca Di Lodovico
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will develop design, experimental, computational or analytical skills through the independent study of a problem in physics. They will learn to write a scientific report summarising results of an independent investigation, placing them in a physics context, and detailing the methods used and the results obtained. The project will run through both semesters and will involve a report and an oral presentation.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Mathematics IScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF001Semester 13No

Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Pachol
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers mathematical topics such as algebra, functions, geometry and trigonometry, and an introduction to the techniques of calculus. Students are generally expected to have prior knowledge comparable to that obtained from having taken AS-level or A2-level Mathematics (if taking the module in Semester 1), or to have already completed the SEF014 module (if taking the module in Semester 2). SEFP students must register for either SEF014 (Semester 1) and SEF001 (Semester 2), or SEF001 (Semester 1) and SEF002 (Semester 2), according to the assignments made by the Academic Director, SEFP.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Mathematics IScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF001Semester 23No

Mathematics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Pachol
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers mathematical topics such as algebra, functions, geometry and trigonometry, and an introduction to the techniques of calculus. Students are generally expected to have prior knowledge comparable to that obtained from having taken AS-level or A2-level Mathematics (if taking the module in Semester 1), or to have already completed the SEF014 module (if taking the module in Semester 2). SEFP students must register for either SEF014 (Semester 1) and SEF001 (Semester 2), or SEF001 (Semester 1) and SEF002 (Semester 2), according to the assignments made by the Academic Director, SEFP.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Mathematics IIScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF002Semester 23No

Mathematics II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Pachol
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF001

This module aims to provide students with a more extensive knowledge of calculus (especially in techniques of integration) and an introduction to complex numbers, numerical methods, differential equations, vector analysis and power series. It is appropriate for those students progressing onto degree programmes in mathematical sciences, and those degree programmes in physical science and engineering which require a more thorough and comprehensive grounding in mathematics. SEFP students must register for either SEF014 (Semester 1) and SEF001 (Semester 2), or SEF001 (Semester 1) and SEF002 (Semester 2), according to the assignments made by the Academic Director, SEFP.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Introductory ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF003Semester 13No

Introductory Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarantos Marinakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces essential principles and concepts in chemistry, including atomic structure, electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, stoichiometry of reactions, measures of concentration, oxidation states and redox chemistry, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

A Closer Look at ChemistryScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF004Semester 23No

A Closer Look at Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF003

This module expands upon topics covered in SEF003 and provides a further introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry; including topics such as thermochemistry, reaction kinetics and equilibria, molecular structure, aspects of organic chemistry, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: SEF003 Introductory Chemistry

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Physics (Mechanics and Materials)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF005Semester 13No

Physics (Mechanics and Materials)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Theodore Kreouzis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is one of three modules providing a detailed introduction to concepts of physics. This module covers the following topics: Newtonian mechanics, including statics, linear and rotational dynamics; forces and energy, and their role in the molecular structure of matter, properties of liquids and gases; basic concepts of thermodynamics.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Physics (Fields and Waves)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF006Semester 23No

Physics (Fields and Waves)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrei Sapelkin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF005

The role and characteristics of fields, in particular gravitational and electromagnetic fields. The description of natural phenomena and the widespread occurrence of oscillations and wave motion, with examples taken from the physics of sound and light. Prerequisite - SEF005

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Physics (Electricity and Atomic Physics)Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF007Semester 23No

Physics (Electricity and Atomic Physics)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Richard Donnison
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF005

Aspects of electrical theory (current and charge, resistance, capacitors, circuits and meters); atomic structure and properties of the electron; the nucleus, radioactive decay and nuclear energy; introduction to quantum physics. Prerequisite - SEF005

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Principles of MathematicsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF014Semester 13No

Principles of Mathematics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Anna Pachol
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module reviews mathematical notation, basic principles of arithmetic and algebra, functions and graphs, coordinate geometry and trigonometry; and demonstrates how these principles may be applied to solve problems in science and mathematics. Students are expected to have at least GCSE Mathematics or an equivalent background in basic mathematics SEFP students must register for either SEF014 (Semester 1) and SEF001 (Semester 2), or SEF001 (Semester 1) and SEF002 (Semester 2), according to assignments made by the Academic Director, SEFP.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Discrete Mathematics [Foundation]Science and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF015Semester 23No

Discrete Mathematics [Foundation]

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Thomas Mueller
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF026

This module introduces students to arithmetic beyond the integers and rational numbers: modulo arithmetic, and the arithmetic of polynomials, matrices, logical propositions and sets. Applications of these concepts in prepositional logic, relational algebra and graph theory will also be covered. Prerequisite: SEF026 Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Introduction to EngineeringScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF024Semester 23No

Introduction to Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF005

This module aims to introduce students to the application of scientific principles to solve practical engineering problems; it includes discussion of the development of the engineering field and standards, as well as basic engineering principles, mechanical applications and stress analysis.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Essential Foundation Mathematical SkillsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF026Semester 13No

Essential Foundation Mathematical Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Shahn Majid
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to strengthen manipulative skills in elementary arithmetic and algebra; includes consideration of integers, fractions, decimal representations, estimation, polynomials, rational functions, square roots, inequalities, linear and quadratic equations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Form and Function in BiologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF031Semester 13No

Form and Function in Biology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chris Faulkes
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to introduce you to the basic biology of microbes, plants and animals. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology and Ecology. It is also suitable for students who wish to study the more microbial and molecular aspects of biology.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Molecules to CellsScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF032Semester 23No

Molecules to Cells

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Viji Draviam Sastry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF003

This module is designed to introduce you to the study of Biology at the molecular level. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Biological Information Technology. It is also suitable for students wishing to study microbiology or more general biology degree programmes.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 7, 11: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Diversity and EcologyScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF033Semester 23No

Diversity and Ecology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: SEF031

This module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles of evolution and to develop an appreciation of the dynamic nature of ecological systems. It is particularly suitable for students who wish to study Ecology, Zoology, Marine and Freshwater Biology, Genetics, and Biology.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 8: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 8: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

ComputingScience and Engineering Foundation ProgrammeSEF034Semester 13No

Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Dharini Krishnamoorthy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Computing module will provide SEFP students with an understanding and practical experience of core areas of computer science: programming and algorithms; underlying theory; software development; computer systems; and networks. It will include hands-on programming experience during supervised lab sessions. The module is designed principally to prepare students for pursuing study in the areas of computer science or electronics; however, it will also provide a basic introduction for students not intending to pursue study in these areas.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 3
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Fundamentals of ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS001Semester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS107

This module aims to provide an introduction to Business Management and Administration. It offers an understanding of the external and internal business environment, the different contexts of business, an analysis of markets and issues within business management. The approach is informative but also seeks to provoke discussion and reflection and the desire to explore this area in depth. This module serves as a general introduction to the structure and functioning of business organisations. The internal and external environments of business are examined with particular emphasis on political, economic, sociological, technical, legal and ethical issues.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Operations ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS002Semester 15Yes

Operations Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module in Operations Management (BUS002) has been designed to provide students with a clear understanding of the most important issues in OM (such as process design, capacity planning and control, supply chain management, just in time and total quality management) through a blend of theoretical approaches and seminar-based activities. Students are also encouraged to analyse the relationship between the production of services and goods and the reproduction of technical and managerial knowledge, and the implications of such a relationship in terms of governance and strategic decisions.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm

Quantitative Research Methods for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS005Semester 24No

Quantitative Research Methods for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to develop an appreciation of the role and practice of research methods, both in business and in research about business, and to prepare students for subsequent project work. It provides a first understanding of probability and of statistical inference, and develops skills in presentation of quantitative information. A subsidiary aim is to enhance student's familiarity with the use of spreadsheets.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Research MethodologyBusiness and ManagementBUS007Semester 15Yes

Research Methodology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Panagiotopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide students with an introduction to a range of methodologies and to help them conduct independent research whilst being sensitive to the scientific, political and cultural problems with different approaches. The course develops students' knowledge of research methods and the reliability of their outcomes, with an understanding of wider concerns with truth, logic and the sociology of knowledge.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS011Semester 25Yes

Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores the foundational concepts, practices, and processes of creating value through marketing and marketing management. This introductory module in marketing provides a broad overview of marketing practice, introducing the core marketing tactics and strategies including marketing research, segmentation, branding, ethics, targeting and positioning and the marketing mix activities. Interactive and socially engaged this module requires good preparation and active involvement with the module content and case studies to achieve the learning goals.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS014Semester 25Yes

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Mike Noon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will introduce you to the key processes concerned with the management of people within organisations. It will reveal the choices that managers are faced with when designing systems to regulate and control the use of human resources. It will assess the problems and difficulties with managing people and explore the variation in practice across different organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Economics for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS017Semester 24Yes

Economics for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explains how firms, consumers and government interact in markets and how business decision-making is shaped by internal factors such as costs and by external market conditions. The unit examines the main concepts of economic theory and explores the importance of these within a business context, with emphasis on the applicability of economic theory to an understanding of the internal dynamics of business organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS021Semester 14Yes

Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This Course introduces you to and explores the purpose, nature and operation of the Financial Accounting function within businesses, particularly limited liability companies in the UK. It reveals, illustrates and explores how the financial accounting systems operate when tasked with measuring and recording the financial value of the transactions, events and activities of a business. In so doing, it examines the nature and scope of financial accounting and the underlying conceptual framework of accounting conventions and standards. It further looks at the ratio analysis and associated interpretation of published financial statements from the perspectives of a range of differing users of financial accounting information. Accordingly, the module seeks to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable you to identify and record the financial value of business transactions, events and activities, and to generate financial information through the construction of Balance Sheets, Income Statements (Profit Statements) and Cash Flow Statements, and through the use of financial ratios.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Managerial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS022Semester 25Yes

Managerial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

An intensive one semester module in managerial accounting. It examines how costs are identified and measured and explores differing views of the nature and definition of cost. Such considerations are important when managers are seeking to make decisions relating to cost determination, cost management, pricing, budgets and budgetary control, standard costing, and investment appraisal. These areas, together with aspects such as marginal and incremental costing and cost of capital and risk, are reflected within the considerations. The resultant financial information is placed in the context of the complexities of the business and economic environments of the world as managers seek to make to make appropriate decisions.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Introduction to Marketing and CommunicationsBusiness and ManagementBUS101Semester 14No

Introduction to Marketing and Communications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module forms a key building block which introduces the field of marketing to students and is compulsory for all students in the Business and Management (NN12) undergraduate programme. It introduces key concepts in marketing and forms the basis upon which students can build their knowledge of the field in marketing-related modules in the ensuing years.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Accounting for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS106Semester 14No

Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides insights into how accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context and how accounting is shaped by this context and in turn shapes this context. Adopting this broader perspective the module elaborates accounting concepts in the context of decision-making, control and governance. Key concepts and methods of accounting are discussed by focusing on the reporting of the financial position and the financial performance of business organisations, the analysis of the financial statements produced by business organisations and the use of accounting information by management for planning, decision making and control purposes.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Business and SocietyBusiness and ManagementBUS107Semester 14No

Business and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Bove
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS001

The module covers the main aspects of the business environment. It covers: nature and types of business and other organisations; business and society: relationship between work organisations and society; business and governments: government as control, consumer, supplier; business and politics: managing influence; business and people: consumers, clients, employees, the public perceptions; business and the physical environment - sustainability in the business context; business and the technological environment; the social and ethical responsibilities of business; business in emerging economies; the and the international context ( regional economic blocs, World Trade Organization).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Brand ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM026Semester 27No

Brand Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will focus on the strategic role that brands play in the successful marketing of products and services. It aims to introduce current academic thinking and business practice of contemporary branding to students introducing key concepts such as brand equity, brand identity and corporate branding. In addition the course aims to introduce and show the actual process of brand management and the issues and dilemmas that contemporary brand managers and stewards have to face. It aims to comprehensively cover these areas and will deal with topics such as brand identity, brand development, brand strategy, organisational support for branding, brand features and personality, brand portfolios and the internet and branding. The focus of the course will be a final presentation and report that students both in groups and as individuals will have to prepare on analysing a failing brand and proposing ideas to reposition and revitalise it. The brand itself will be taken from the contemporary business world and so will provide the students with opportunities to carry out challenging and relevant research.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 2 pm

Multinationals and Global BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUSM028Semester 27Yes

Multinationals and Global Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martha Prevezer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines multinationals and global business in the era of globalization, offering a broad overview of the process of globalisation and the changing nature of global business over time. The course provides a dynamic and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of global business, its origins and development, the theories of multinational corporations, international trade, market selection and modes of entry. The course will examine the context of global business and the changing context of multinational operation through the changing nature
of the global political economy and through the influence of cultures and institutions. The course explores how the changing global environment affects the decisions of managers and the strategies, structures and activities of firms operating in the global market place.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Corporate Finance for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUSM030Semester 17Yes

Corporate Finance for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The focus of this module is the financing and investment decisions made by the managers of companies in pursuit of corporate goals. It examines how managers can obtain the greatest possible return on investments for the smallest amount of risk. You will acquire the knowledge and understanding of theories, models, tools and techniques to assist in making financial decisions to achieve corporate goals. These will include identification of the cost of capital/rates of return, dividend distribution, investment appraisal, portfolio theory, foreign exchange and interest rate issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

International Macroeconomics and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM041Semester 17No

International Macroeconomics and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to basic Concepts in Macroeconomics and Finance; Overview of the financial market, its institutions and instruments. Central banking and the Money supply process; conduct of monetary policy; Exchange rates and Monetary Policy; The International Financial System and Financial Crisis; The Euro and European Monetary policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Marketing Theory and PracticeBusiness and ManagementBUS129Semester 14No

Marketing Theory and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This introductory module is designed to familiarise first year students with key concepts and theories of marketing by exploring its intimate relationship with communication platforms, consumer behaviour, strategies and markets in a connected world. The module will be delivered through a mix of lectures and seminars designed to engage students in the core concepts and theories. Through a combination of case studies from local and international contexts, the module seeks to move theory to empirical analysis of contexts and how other factors including indigenous cultures, values and beliefs can present different challenges in developed and developing countries. The incorporation of a mix of detailed case studies aims to move theory into application and deconstruction of both the strategies and challenges faced by organisations."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Business in Social and Historical ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS130Semester 14No

Business in Social and Historical Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Bove
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The module aims to introduce the idea that we are social rather than natural beings and this impacts upon how we produce, consume, labour, etc. It also means that there are different versions of whether we are collective, individualistic rational, or for how we should treat nature and that all of this shapes how a market society is organised and perceived and the role that the market can and should play within this framework. This directly links to how organisations, the state, management, etc. are encountered i.e. there are ways of viewing the market and its relationship to development, business, organisation, social cohesion, etc. which are important to any degree that purports to develop management education. It is also proposed that students would receive a reading pack and would be expected to make use of the library and develop their reading, interpretative and analytic skills."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Work and Employment in ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS132Semester 24No

Work and Employment in Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The module aims to provide an introduction to the study of the world of work and employment by giving insight into relevant conceptual and theoretical approaches. The course takes a multi-level approach to understanding work and employment. This means that we will be exploring work and employment relations at three levels. At the macro level, wider social, economic, political and cultural context of work nationally and internationally will be explored."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am

Organisation StudiesBusiness and ManagementBUS133Semester 24No

Organisation Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gerard Hanlon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to basic psychological concepts in organizational behaviour including personality and intelligence, motivation and job design, perception and communication, learning, memory and training, decision making, attitudes and job satisfaction. Five metaphors of organizations including the organization as a machine, an organism, a brain, a psychic prison and instrument of domination will be considered in terms of what these offer to our understanding of their effects on individual and group behaviour in organizations

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Quantitative Analysis for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS135Semester 24No

Quantitative Analysis for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module focuses on some of the core skills required to succeed in this digital age: the course focuses on concepts needed to understand and undertake simple statistical analysis of data to extract insights hidden by randomness and the complexity of human interaction. The course provides a first understanding of probability, statistical inference and modelling, and develops skills in presentation of quantitative information. A secondary aim is to enhance student¿s familiarity with the use of spread sheets and statistical software."

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Marketing PrinciplesBusiness and ManagementBUS136Semester 14No

Marketing Principles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This introductory module is designed to familiarise first year students with key concepts and theories of marketing by exploring its intimate relationship with communication platforms, consumer behaviour, strategies and markets in a connected world. The module will be delivered through a mix of lectures and seminars designed to engage students in the core concepts and theories. Through a combination of case studies from local and international contexts, the module seeks to move theory to empirical analysis of contexts and how other factors including indigenous cultures, values and beliefs can present different challenges in developed and developing countries. The incorporation of a mix of detailed case studies aims to move theory into application and deconstruction of both the strategies and challenges faced by organisations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am

StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUS204Semester 15Yes

Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module employs five strategic categories to introduce students to the historical and theoretical foundations of contemporary strategy. Those five categories are the future, regulation, growth, leadership, and choice.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Business LawBusiness and ManagementBUS205Semester 15Yes

Business Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This unit provides an understanding of: the English legal system, the principles of the law of contract and of the tort of negligence as they apply to business. The unit also provides an understanding of the part law plays in enabling the conduct of business generally; its regulation, and the achievement of commercial aims.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Economics for Business ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS137Semester 24No

Economics for Business Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: BUS017
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an overview of themes and results in both microeconomics and macroeconomics of relevance from the perspective of a first-year business and management student. In the first part of the module, the topics addressed include economics principles, market supply and demand, elasticities, firm behaviour and production, pricing and market structures. In the second part, on macroeconomics, the topics include aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, and fiscal, monetary and supply-side policies. The topics will be approached not only from a private, profit-maximisation perspective but also taking into account the public and social perspectives.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Financial InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUS201Semester 15Yes

Financial Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Chunling Xia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Financial Institutions examines the function, characteristics and operation of various financial institutions e.g. banks, other deposit-taking institutions as well as non-deposit-taking institutions. This involves not only an examination of the nature and characteristics of their services or products they offer via different markets eg money markets, bond markets, equity markets, foreign exchange markets, derivative markets and the credit markets in order to meet the needs of different market participants, but also of why financial crises emerge in the operation of these markets.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Microeconomics for ManagersBusiness and ManagementBUS208Semester 15Yes

Microeconomics for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Almudena Sevilla Sanz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module applies microeconomics to problems confronting managers, in particular general managers. It focuses on markets, prices and market structure in two different situations, those in which markets are generally competitive, being large, impersonal and anonymous, and those in which identities matter. Examples of the latter are large firms in which the identities of competitors, suppliers, and sometimes customers matter, and more personal economic relations such as that between employer and employee in which identities always matter. Analysis of markets in which identities matter involves a focus on topics such as information, reciprocity, credibility, reputation and transactions costs.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Ethics and BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS212Semester 15Yes

Ethics and Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Ethics and Business introduces students to different understandings of ethics and its relation to business in society. Deontological and descriptive approaches to ethics are introduced and applied to analyses of a selection of case studies. These are organised around three main developments that affect contemporary business: changes in the labour market, the knowledge economy, and the environment. Amongst the issues covered are: value; rationality; self-interest; self-love and self-realisation; the gist economy; utilitarianism and hedonism; growth, wealth and sustainability.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

AdvertisingBusiness and ManagementBUS213Semester 25Yes

Advertising

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores advertising as an evolving category of social communication within a convergent media landscape. A strategic managerial perspective is taken to generate insight into the development of advertising and the roles and processes so entailed. The consumer perspective is also considered in the light of advertising¿s role as a vehicle for cultural meaning. Media consumption issues are also important to consider given the rapid growth in expenditure on digital (especially mobile) advertising communication. The module takes a multi-disciplinary approach drawing on socio-cultural, psychological and anthropological perspectives.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Accounting for BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS216Semester 25Yes

Advanced Accounting for Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sean Mccartney
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module builds on the foundation provided by BUS106 Accounting for Business in Year 1. In the area of Financial Accounting, the proposed module focuses on Financial Reporting by companies, and impact of company law and accounting standards. In Management Accounting the module looks at different approaches to costing, and the concept of identifying relevant costs for management decision-making; the appraisal of investment opportunities (capital budgeting) and accounting as a control mechanism.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Persuasive Strategies in MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS220Semester 15Yes

Persuasive Strategies in Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUS101

This module investigates the techniques adopted by professionals in marketing, sales, as well as general business negotiation environments in order to change stakeholder behaviour and attitudes, influence outcomes, and gain compliance. Students will explore, compare and integrate a variety of theories of persuasion grounded in research from the fields of linguistics, psychology, sociology, and rhetoric. Case studies and examples are used heavily throughout the module in order to highlight common practice and explore ethical dilemmas in the practice of persuasion across different business, national and ethnic cultures. Students are encouraged to recognise the techniques that they themselves use to gain compliance in common conversation as well as to analyse the ways in which commercial and public organisations attempt to influence their behaviour and attitudes. In addition to analytical proficiency, students are expected to demonstrate the creative and efficient use of various techniques of persuasion in negotiation and marketing simulations. The module considers the extent to which persuasion is a part of all communication interactions, the relationship between dialogue and influence, and the possible alternatives that exist to the persuasive paradigm in business.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS222Semester 25Yes

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore various theoretical to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the ""traditional"" competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, cognitive approaches and strategy-as-practice. Throughout the course we will examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations as well as firms.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am

International Corporate ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUS224Semester 15No

International Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of international accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organizations such as the EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB. Also how corporate reporting has evolved from nationally specific practices to a more convergence towards IASB standards and why and how this has been sponsored.
Students would understand and appreciate how financial statements have evolved to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income . The evolution of international accounting standards --financial instruments and fair value reporting and debates on the accounting conceptual framework. How changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for international integrated corporate reporting (including Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting)

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Corporate Finance and StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUS225Semester 25No

Corporate Finance and Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will develop a student's understanding of the nature of corporate finance in terms of the sources of finance and nature of internal calculations that are employed to allocate financial resources into strategic investment projects. Students will appreciate how the techniques of financing and allocation of financial resources have evolved. This understanding will be blended with an appreciation of the strategic management literature on how financial resources are deployed strategically to both create and capture value.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Strategic MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS226Semester 15No

Strategic Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module extends conceptually and operationally the core concepts of segmentation, targeting and positioning introduced in BUS101. Specifically, students will learn develop 'go to market' strategies, including the practice of, and critical evaluation of, the concepts and techniques that frame the process of marketing strategy development. An important part of this is applying and critically reflecting on the methods of analysing data to make marketing strategy decisions.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

International MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS227Semester 25No

International Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

International marketing requires leaving behind the assumptions of the domestic market. Firms frequently struggle to adapt to the social and economic practices that shape markets outside their sphere of experience. Firms' internationalisation also can influence the nature of those practices (for better and for worse). This module examines they nature of the problems and theory that guides developing solutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Entrepreneurial LearningBusiness and ManagementBUS230Semester 15No

Entrepreneurial Learning

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yossef Lichtensein
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an integrated introduction to the processes and management of emerging businesses with a specific concentration upon entrepreneurial learning in the earlier stages of entrepreneurial activity. The taught component will introduce key perspectives on the recognition and nature of entrepreneurial opportunities, evaluation of resources and relations, and roles of entrepreneurial creativity and legitimation processes. The experiential learning component enables students to explore and evaluate different approaches to entrepreneurial learning and develop entrepreneurial skills through working in small-groups to collectively create, develop and legitimate their own entrepreneurial opportunities.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

Creative IndustriesBusiness and ManagementBUS233Semester 25Yes

Creative Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to engage students through a practically oriented overview of creative industries technical and media infrastructures and their histories, organisational behaviour of creative industry firms, legal and policy framework for developing creative industries, as well as the emerging frameworks in which culture and creativity is seen as a central site for creating new value. Throughout we will pay close attention to how marketing, management, and supply chain processes in the creative industries create value through cultural production. This introductory overview of creative industries takes a critical look at the tactics and strategies that define the history of capitalist cultural production. Interactive and socially engaged, this module requires good preparation and active involvement with the module content and case studies to achieve the learning goals.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am

International Business FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUS235Semester 25Yes

International Business Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

On completion of this course, students should have gained understanding of the following topics: the international financial systems, the opportunities in international FX investments, the relevance of hedging in the management of currency risk, country risk and international diversification. Students should be able to learn the importance of international financial theories to finance practitioners; acquire numerical and problem-solving skills required by managers in the context of globalization and the growing integration of the international economy.
Topic 1: The Internationalization of Business and Finance - valuation of a multinational firm
Topic 2: Currency Systems and Valuation; Currency Markets and Derivatives
Topic 3: Parity Conditions in International Finance and Monetary Approach to Exchange Rate Determination
Topic 4: FX market microstructure and Forecasting exchange rates
Topic 5: Foreign Exchange Exposure: Types of Risk, Measurement and Management
Topic 6: Managing International Risks - Hedging with forwards and futures; Country Risk Analysis and Trade Finance
Topic 7: Multinational Financial Management: International Investment and Diversified Portfolios

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Psychology of LeadershipBusiness and ManagementBUS236Semester 25No

Psychology of Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores leadership from a psychological perspective by critically reviewing theory development in this field: trait theory to transformational leadership, leader follower relationships, transformational/transactional leadership, leadership and power, leadership and diversity, and developing effective leadership. It looks at leadership in terms of how power and influence is exercised in organisations, raising questions about unitary versus pluralistic models of leadership. The module draws on social psychological theory and research that accounts for how leaders acquire and exercise social influence in a manner that contributes to their credibility and the motivation of their followers, plus how individual differences in leader behaviour acquire significance in different contexts. In particular, the module explores how diversity in terms of gender and culture shapes leadership processes. The emphasis of the module will be on comparing and contrasting ideas and perspectives on leadership, and application of leadership theory to case studies.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Corporations and Social ResponsibilityBusiness and ManagementBUS237Semester 25No

Corporations and Social Responsibility

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Corporations and Social Responsibility will deliver a comprehensive introduction to students interested in issues of social justice and specifically in Corporate Social Responsibility or CSR. CSR is an applied field of management theory that is becoming increasingly important for both academics and managers to consider. It is an area of corporate self-regulation that integrates sustainability into the business model. Whereas in the past, there has been a clear distinction between the roles of government, the third sector and the corporate sector in responding to social issues (such as workers rights and the environment), today corporations exist in a business context where these sectors have not only merged, but also, actively impinge on each others responsibilities to society. CSR is a business policy response to this changing relation between the corporate sector and society and includes activities such as 'greening' management (reducing emissions, waste management, protecting biodiversity), workers rights (trade unions, ILO, outsourcing, supply-chains), sustainable consumption (ethical marketing, corporate lobbying, consumerism), and promoting democratic processes (governance, accountability, stakeholder dialogue).

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

International Financial AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUS238Semester 25No

International Financial Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sean Mccartney
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUS134 or BUS106

This module extends the financial accounting component of BUS134 Introduction to Financial and Management Accounting (or BUS106 Accounting for Business) in Year 1 (Level 4) to introduce the preparation and analysis of corporate financial statements. The content includes the function and content of the main published statements under UK company law and International Financial Reporting Standards, the analysis of these statements to assess company performance, and discussion of a number of key reporting issues and the relevant Standards.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Management Accouting for Decision MakingBusiness and ManagementBUS239Semester 15No

Management Accouting for Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Chandres Tejura
Overlap: BUS216
Prerequisite: BUS134 or BUS106

The module explores key aspects of Management Accounting in the context of its key pillars planning, control, internal decision making and governance.

Students will be able to understand the interaction of Management Accounting with organization/business and society.
Learners will appreciate the manner by which Management Accounting is embedded in a socio-economic, political and cultural context within an organisation.

Critically blending professionalism with intellectualism in Management Accounting practices to ensure broad-based Management Accounting education and the enhancement of learning required in any modern organisation.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Services marketingBusiness and ManagementBUS240Semester 15No

Services marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Services marketing, which typically refers to both business to consumer (B2C) and business to business (B2B) services, and includes marketing of services such as telecommunications services, financial services, all types of hospitality services, car rental services, air travel, health care services and professional services. Services are (usually) intangible economic activities offered by one party to another. This module will begin with providing an overview of the concept of services and how people traditionally view services and why services are important. Services is closely interlinked with customer behaviour and this module will pay close attention to the difficulty of customers in accessing services. It will introduce the 4Ps and its extension the 7Ps, in order for students to gain a deep understanding of what is services marketing. Students will learn to develop, design and implement services; as well as how to price and value services, in order to create a service blueprint. Knowledge on managing services (demand and supply), assessing service quality and managing service recovery will follow. The module will then provide an overview of what is happening in present developments in services marketing, specifically SDL and its implications. Finally the module will introduce some specialised topics such as services in manufacturing companies and the importance of HR for services management. This is a module that combines theoretical value and practical knowledge and therefore will generate the students' interest in marketing as a field given its evident linkages to the real world of marketing and management.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Innovation and EntrepreneurshipBusiness and ManagementBUS300Semester 26Yes

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines how to cultivate an entrepreneurial mind set and increase your awareness of the routes available to turning your ideas into business ventures. The module covers intellectual property rights, financial planning, business planning and how to sell yourself and your ideas.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am -11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUS304Semester 26Yes

International Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lutao Ning
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module offers a broad overview of the process of globalisation and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm set in the context of trends in the world economy, with particular emphasis on the period since the 1970s. It provides a critical and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins and development, the theory, policy and practice of international trade and direct foreign investment, conceptualisations of international supply chains/global production networks and the logistics revolution, and the social and political effects of multinational activities. These issues will be illustrated through case studies in the areas of manufacturing, agri-business and intellectual property.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm

Managing DiversityBusiness and ManagementBUS305Semester 16No

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines theories of equality and diversity and of occupational segmentation. It explores diversity and equality across the dimensions of gender, race, disability, age and sexual orientation and considers the organisational processes which produce and reproduce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups. The module also considers national and European legislative frameworks; policy approaches and implications at organisational level.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUS306Semester 16Yes

Financial Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Relationship between the financial manager and the capital markets; Investment appraisal, single and multi-period capital rationing, and risk analysis; Capital asset pricing model; Types of sources of finance and their characteristics; Efficient Markets Hypothesis; Dividend growth model and Business valuation; Weighted average cost of capital; Issues in capital structure and financial gearing.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Wednesday 3 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Business Management DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUS314Full year6No

Business Management Dissertation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUS007

In order to take this module students must have attained 65% or over in module BUS007. A dissertation is a piece of independent research carried out by the student under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Research can be carried out in any area of business and management, broadly defined, as long as there is sufficient expertise in the School of Business and Management to supervise the research. The student is expected to identify and review the relevant literature, identify a research problem and conduct original empirical research on primary data, or conduct original analysis of secondary data.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Social and Political MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS316Semester 16Yes

Social and Political Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Bove
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module seeks to develop students understanding of effective social and political marketing. We tackle specific marketing problems facing today's political public sector:

-The relationship between voters and government, and the degree to which political communication is able to influence in the context of a sophisticated and media-aware society.
-The mixed track record of success and failure in the use of marketing techniques by government, single-issue groups and public sector organizations.

The module builds on contemporary cases to develop both theoretical and practical perspectives on public/ political marketing. It is particularly relevant to those with an interest in the use of propaganda and political lobbying; public sector organisations, and the not-for-profit sector, including pressure groups, social cause, and other charities.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am

Consumer PsychologyBusiness and ManagementBUS318Semester 16Yes

Consumer Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Building on a general understanding of marketing, this module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of psychological theories relevant to the study of consumer behaviour. We start with an overview of the scope of consumer psychology and consumer behaviour and position it against mainstream marketing. Subsequently, we will focus on cognitive and affective processes that drive consumer behaviour. Once an understanding of the basic psychological processes has been gained we will look at various factors that are able to influence these processes. Particular attention is paid to how marketing practice influences consumer perception, evaluation and behaviour. Throughout the module real world hands-on exercises will facilitate understanding and transferability of contents.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

The Management of Human ResourcesBusiness and ManagementBUS324Semester 26Yes

The Management of Human Resources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rowland Curtis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Organisations often claim that their most valuable resources are their employees, but one of the most difficult tasks of management is to ensure that employees feel valued. This module examines the main theories, concepts and processes that are considered central to the management of human resources. The course combines theoretical analysis with examples of practical application to encourage students to think critically about the management of people. The course draws upon a range of literature and illustrative case studies to engage students and provides them with an opportunity to assess their own experiences of work.

This module has been designed specifically for 'with business students who study human resource management in their third year and is not available for students taking NN12.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Global Supply ChainsBusiness and ManagementBUS326Semester 16Yes

Global Supply Chains

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module investigates companies' outsourcing strategies, i.e. the growing practice of parcelling out, delegating, or purchasing at least part of their activities from foreign suppliers, whether dependent or independent actors. The main focus is on primary sectors, namely energy, agriculture, non-energy minerals, and forestry/fisheries. It critically examines what value creating activities firms tend to outsource, how, why and to whom, and the relative implications. Outsourcing strategies are understood in a wider international context as characterised by multiple players, in particular global institutions, global private players, states, consumers, trade unions and social movements. For the analysis of global supply chains the module explores and applies different mainstream and non-mainstream theoretical frameworks from different disciplines, namely global supply chain management (business studies) and global value/commodity chains (economic sociology, development studies, economic geography).

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Gender, Management and LeadershipBusiness and ManagementBUS327Semester 26Yes

Gender, Management and Leadership

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Tessa Wright
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines contemporary issues concerning equality and diversity in management and leadership in international context. It explores developing equality approaches and strategies affecting management and leadership in private and public sector organisations in different national contexts, including analysis of changing legislative frameworks for equality. The theoretical underpinnings of such strategies are examined, exploring a range of conceptual approaches to inequality on the basis of gender, ethnicity, class and sexuality among other grounds, while critically engaging with developing theories of intersectionality.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am

Corporate Law and GovernanceBusiness and ManagementBUS329Semester 26Yes

Corporate Law and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Min Yan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an understanding of the major principles of UK Company Law with particular reference to the legal and corporate governance rules imposed on the board of directors, the senior management and advisors. The module examines the nature and formation of companies, their constitution and the role of and legal responsibilities of management including the theoretical and practical issues involved in the direction and control of companies. The module considers agency theory and stakeholder theory upon which the modern UK and US corporate governance models are based. It will also review some of the most spectacular failures of governance mechanisms in recent years which led to the development of codes of best practice and legislation in the UK and the USA respectively. In addition specific criminal laws affecting businesses today will be considered such as The Bribery Act 2010 and the Fraud Act 2006 and the active management required of the issues raised as a consequence of such legislation. Learning is sustained by case studies and problem solving scenarios.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Macroeconomics Modelling and PolicyBusiness and ManagementBUS330Semester 16No

Macroeconomics Modelling and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module, we will cover selected principles and policies that characterise the macroeconomy. The course will focus on theories and applications of economic growth and income inequality, unemployment and inflation, in particular. The theories will be tested using empirical methods popular in the literature. The student will be able to address questions popular in the new empirical macroeconomic literature such as, what causes a nation¿s economic activity to fluctuate, what causes unemployment, what are the new empirics of global income inequality, inflation, and unemployment, and what are the spatial distributions of economic growth and unemployment across the world.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Company ValuationBusiness and ManagementBUS331Semester 26Yes

Company Valuation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ni Peng
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing global managers and corporate consultants as they operate in a global world requiring them to know what an asset is worth and what determines its value where ever the asset is around the world. The postulate for sound investing is that a manager does not pay more for an asset than it is worth. In a global world and under competition managers assessments of value must be backed up by reality which implies that the price we pay should relate to realistic estimates of cash flows and uncertainties faced by global managers. Accordingly the module is arranged around: Estimating Discount Rates, Cash Flows and Growth Rates for Valuation purposes, Differences between firm and equity valuation, Real options corporate managers can come across and their valuation, Valuing companies in distress, Relative valuation , Biases in Valuation their manifestation and reduction, Imprecision and uncertainty in valuation, Payoffs to more versus less detail in valuation and cost of complexity, Principle of parsimony and different approaches to valuation

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Business to Business and Relationship MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUS335Semester 26No

Business to Business and Relationship Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Darryn Mitussis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Firms in industrial (business to business) markets form a much larger percentage of GDP and operate in different ways to business to consumer markets. There are key differences in buyer decision-making (collective rather than individual), the nature of interactions between buyers and sellers (often relational rather than transactional) and the possibility for alliances to influence behaviour. Together these observations lead to a relationship and network centric understanding of industrial marketing practice.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Business ComputingBusiness and ManagementBUS337Semester 26No

Business Computing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Panagiotopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will broadly explore the impact of computing applications on organisations and individuals. Traditional themes in information systems management will first be examined such as the role of information and how it relates to decision making, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Customer Relationship Management (CRM), e-commerce, IT planning and data applications.
The module will then cover more contemporary aspects of business computing including business intelligence, mobile devices information ethics and the emerging phenomenon of the crowd economy.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm

Comparative Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM016Semester 17No

Comparative Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldine Healy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will concentrate on the following key features: theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of employment relations; the value and difficulties of a comparative approach; the role of the key actors in employment relations; power, conflict and bargaining; convergence and divergence - a consideration of the debates; the complexity of the trade union role from a comparative perspective; a consideration of international solidarity; impact of globalization and transnational companies on national and cross-national management employment strategies; employee involvement and industrial democracy; social partnership and participation; standards in international employment relations; regulation and voluntarism; examining comparative employment relations through a gender, equality and diversity lens; reappraising comparative employment relations.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Managing DiversityBusiness and ManagementBUSM017Semester 17No

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gill Kirton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines theories of equality and diversity and of occupational segmentation. It explores diversity and equality across the dimensions of gender, race, disability, age and sexual orientation and considers the organisational processes, which produce and reproduce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups. The course also considers equality and diversity policy and practice at organisational level. Different national contexts are investigated.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Finance for DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM020Semester 27Yes

Finance for Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Rowman Matousek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the problems that developing countries face in the process of development, in particular, in financing their development programmes, and the measures they take in an attempt to overcome the difficulties. In order to study the problems closely and the respective strategies that are adopted by different developing countries, the primary focus of this course is on India, South Korea and China.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm

The Global EconomyBusiness and ManagementBUSM022Semester 17No

The Global Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the Global Economy; World Trade; International Factor Movements and the Multinational Enterprise; The Political Economy of Trade Policy; Controversies in Trade Policy ; The Global Capital Market; International Macroeconomic Policy; Economic Growth; Economic Inequality and Poverty; Role of the International Financial Institutions In the Global Economy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Firm Governance and Strategy in the Institution ContextBusiness and ManagementBUS338Semester 16No

Firm Governance and Strategy in the Institution Context

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Martha Prevezer
Overlap: BUS211
Prerequisite: BUS211

This is an optional third year module for undergraduates enrolled in the BSc programmes in Business Management NN12, Marketing and Management 4G44, and Accounting and Management 4P20. The module introduces students to the concepts of governance and to the coevolution of governance, firms' strategies and structures, and institutions. It explores this theme for both developed countries and emerging markets, looking at both historical periods and the current period.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm

Quantitative Research MethodsBusiness and ManagementBUSM014Semester 17No

Quantitative Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides a relatively non-technical overview of the use of statistical methods in business research. There is an emphasis on practical work and interpretation, and there will be extensive use of Stata, a leading statistics/econometrics package. The course covers the basic elements of: descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, inference, and multivariate regression analysis.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

International Marketing CommunicationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM024Semester 27No

International Marketing Communications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the role of marketing communications in a global environment and the processes through which organisations can effectively communicate with their various publics in order to enhance both customer value and company returns. The course will start with an in-depth discussion of the integrated marketing communications mix (advertising, PR, personal selling, sales promotion, direct marketing). It moves on to a series of considerations such as the development of an effective marketing communications mix, the role of marketing communications in the establishment of long-term customer relationships and equitable brands. Throughout the module, the relationship between marketing communications and brand equity will be discussed with particular reference to problems faced by marketers in the context of a global economy.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm

Social PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY215Semester 15Yes

Social Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janelle Jones
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "PSY115, PSY109, PSY121"

Have you ever wondered what influences our perceptions, emotions, thoughts, and behaviours? This module in Social Psychology will provide an overview of the classic and contemporary scientific theories and methods used to address how other people and different contexts can shape these processes. Topics covered will include the self, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, social influence, group processes, and stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 5.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Animal Cognition and BehaviourBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY221Semester 15No

Animal Cognition and Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathan Emery
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the C1C8 or C800 programme This module builds upon the theme of psychology as a biological science explored in previous modules. It develops this aspect further by specifying the evolutionary and comparative context of contemporary psychology. The module reviews areas such as animal cognition, animal behaviour, evolutionary psychology, developmental processes in the human infant and child, how comparative work may inform developmental psychology, and the extent to which it could be argued that humans are unique in the animal kingdom.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Developmental PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY223Semester 25Yes

Developmental Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Michael Pluess
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "PSY115, PSY109, PSY121"

This module surveys developmental psychology, covering human development across the whole life span but with a more detailed focus on development in the early years (infancy/childhood). The aim of the module is to introduce the key questions, theories, concepts, methodology, studies and research findings within developmental psychology, regarding different domains of psychological functioning including social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioural development. The module will also cover the prenatal period, physical, motor, and sensory development, learning theory, moral development, and development of the self (identity).

Assessment: 85.0% Examination, 15.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Evolutionary PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY227Semester 25Yes

Evolutionary Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Lachlan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BIO113

For students on C800 Psychology. This module builds on the theme of psychology as a biological science presented in the Exploring Psychology module and develops them further by specifying the evolutionary and comparative context of contemporary psychology. Broad topic areas covered include animal cognition, animal behaviour, evolutionary psychology, and developmental processes in the human infant and child, how comparative work may inform developmental psychology, and whether humans are unique in the animal kingdom: 1) Evolution and psychology: the importance of evolution for the behavioural sciences, natural selection, sexual selection, kin selection and reciprocity. 2) How does behaviour develop?: adaptationism and modularity, cognitive ethology, animal learning theory, behavioural ecology.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Positive PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY229Semester 15Yes

Positive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Janelle Jones
Overlap: SBC502
Prerequisite: PSY115, PSY109

This module builds on themes developed in level 4 psychology modules and considers a unique area of psychological research: Positive Psychology which focuses on psychological well-being and optimal functioning as well as the individual and social determinants thereof. The aim is to introduce this field of psychology and explore its relationship to other areas of psychology. Key studies, and their ethical dimensions, from both classic and modern biological, experimental and intervention perspectives are provided throughout.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

Drug Target and IdentificationBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD275Semester 15No

Drug Target and Identification

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadani Cooray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD115 or BIO111

This module will cover the main drug targets including receptors, enzymes and transporters and molecular therapeutic drug targets such as DNA, rRNA and mRNA. Lecture content will include, topics such as receptor theory, GPCR structure and function, nuclear receptor structure and function, ligand-gated ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases, signalling pathways including Jak/STAT pathway, an overview of developmental signalling, hedgehog pathway, Wnt pathway, TGF beta/BMP, Notch and FGF pathways and crosstalk between these pathways. Lectures will be followed by interactive sessions in specialised areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers and reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 10: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 5: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem SolvingBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD301Full year6No

Biomedical Science Case Approach to Problem Solving

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matthias Dittmar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

B990 students only. The SBS320(X) modules comprise 6 Biomedical Science clinical case histories at both levels 5 and 6. The case histories will be analysed in group tutorials with subsequent self-directed learning and 6 one hour assessment sessions. The clinical case histories studied will be chosen from a bank of histories and will embrace, over the entirety of the SBS320(X) modules in years 2 and 3, the disciplines of human physiology, anatomy and development, metabolism, molecular biology and genetics and pharmacology. The tutorial will comprise a 1 hour problem analysis and tutor facilitation session. Assessment of the case history will follow a 3 week period of self directed learning founded on the learning objectives defined in the tutorials. The module is examined in SBS320 year 3 and the 2nd year coursework marks will comprise 10% of the coursework marks for SBS320 3rd year.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Advanced ImmunologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD351Semester 16No

Advanced Immunology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Andrew Stagg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BMD251 (SBS803)

This module will build on the second year Basic Immunology course, to provide in-depth knowledge of fundamental immune processes, of the ways in which these interact as a complex system that provides protection against infection disease but can also cause disease when dysregulated and of the importance of immunology in modern medicine. There will be emphasis on molecular immunology and the key signalling pathways that underpin immunological mechanisms. Lectures in specialised areas of the subject will be given by experts in their field, providing a sense of the frontiers of their subject. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-examine research papers.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

The Business of PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD271Semester 25No

The Business of Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Christoph Thiemermann
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will bring together pharmacology knowledge and apply it in the context of commercialisation. Students will examine and compare small and start up enterprises, including University spin outs alongside larger pharmaceutical companies. This module will also introduce aspects of finance, intellectual property rights, business law and marketing for business development.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Clinical Pharmacology and the Assessment of Drug SafetyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD273Semester 25No

Clinical Pharmacology and the Assessment of Drug Safety

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Atholl Johnston
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to the drugs that work on systems including the neurological, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular disorders and cancer and their mechanisms of action. It will also consider drugs of abuse including cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana and their harmful effects and post marketing safety of pharmaceuticals and pharmacovigilance. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 16.0% Coursework, 9.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 11: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 11: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Drug Discovery and DesignBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD371Semester 26No

Drug Discovery and Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Gareth Sanger
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will be given an introduction to the principles of drugs design. This will include an analysis of the principles of identification of new compounds with the potential to be drugs, and their development for therapeutic use, and quantification of drug efficacy. Students will develop the ability to critique the importance of drug-receptor affinity and selectivity. The economic, social and ethical aspects of drug discovery will be analysed and discussed. Lectures in specialised areas will be given by experts in their field, providing a sense of the frontiers of their subject. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide seminars and tutorials with opportunities to critically examine research papers.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 5 pm

Clinical PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD372Semester 16No

Clinical Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Fulvio D'Acquisto
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce to the students the mechanisms of action and clinical use of commonly used drugs in the context of the progression of diseases they are used to treat. Introductory lectures will be followed by lectures in specialized areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures and interactive seminars, the course will provide tutorials with opportunities to critically evaluate research methods and papers. We will offer practical workshop sessions to reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 12 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 7, 9: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 8, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Receptors and Mechanisms of Cell SignallingBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD373Semester 16No

Receptors and Mechanisms of Cell Signalling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter King
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will consider the general properties of receptors, signal transduction pathway, and the regulation of their activity. Emphasis will be given to G-protein coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases and nuclear receptors. Introductory lectures will be followed by interactive sessions in specialised areas of the subject given by experts in their field. In addition to formal lectures, the course will provide tutorials and seminars with opportunities to critically-evaluate research papers and reinforce the lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 8, 10: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 5: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Clinical Trials and Regulatory AffairsBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD378Semester 26No

Clinical Trials and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Olivia Carvalho
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to the whole spectrum of the clinical trials process from first-time-in-human-beings studies through to post-marketing studies that examine whether clinical trial promises translate to 'real-life' benefits for patients, with reliable evidence that benefits are likely to exceed their harms. The stringent processes for establishing and appraising the evidence with be critically discussed, together exploring the issues of the global market-place for medicines, the roles and challenges of regulators responsible for approving new drugs for public.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 2: Weeks 5: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 9, 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Molecular Basis of Personalised MedicineBiological and Chemical SciencesBMD383Semester 26No

Molecular Basis of Personalised Medicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Angus Cameron
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will build on basic information on the pathological processes and cancer biology provided in other modules to provide an in-depth analysis of the tools available to analyse heterogeneity in disease (gene expression arrays, SNP analysis, next generation sequencing), and how these can be used to stratify disease and then exploited to develop individualised treatment. It will examine strategies being developed to refine treatment programmes and also investigate how such analyses can be used to predict risk and so develop preventive strategies. It will be lecture based, delivered by experts in the field, and supplemented with seminar sessions describing approaches to analysing data and interrogating the literature.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Essential Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is intended for students studying on chemistry-based degree programmes (including F100, F103, 9A32, F152, 2L22 and F154).

This module is structured around three main key areas:

(1) Acquiring mathematical skills for problem solving in chemistry.
The module will explain how mathematics underpin chemistry and will support students in acquiring a variety of key mathematical skills used to solve problem in chemistry. The material covered in this module includes: basic numeracy skills, units and order of magnitude, simple mathematical calculations, introductory calculus (differentiation/integration), complex numbers, matrices, geometry, application of probability theory in chemistry and statistical analysis of data.

(2) Considering the role of Chemistry in the ¿real world¿ and Developing graduate skills.
Through personal investigation and series of talk of professional Chemists, students will be encouraged to consider the role of chemistry in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline. Students will also develop through this module, oral and written communication skills and some basic literature search technique.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional Chemists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 9; Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 9: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 5, 8, 10: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Foundations of Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE101Full year4No

Foundations of Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarantos Marinakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is appropriate to first-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training in the principles and practice of key techniques of practical chemistry - including analytical methods, synthetic procedures, methods of purification, and the use of a range of instrumental techniques. Topics such as good laboratory practice, health and safety in the laboratory, the preparation of laboratory reports amd data analysis techniques are also covered.

Assessment: 100.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Foundations of Practical Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE101ASemester 14No

Foundations of Practical Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarantos Marinakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is for associate (study-abroad) students only. It provides training in the principles and practice of techniques of practical chemistry - including analytical methods, basic synthetic procedures, methods of purification and various instrumental techniques. Topics such as good laboratory practice, health and safety in the laboratory, the preparation of laboratory reports and data analysis techniques are also covered.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Foundations of Practical Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE101BSemester 24No

Foundations of Practical Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sarantos Marinakis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is for associate (study-abroad) students only. It provides training in the principles and practice of techniques of practical chemistry - including analytical methods, basic synthetic procedures, methods of purification and various instrumental techniques. Topics such as good laboratory practice, health and safety in the laboratory, the preparation of laboratory reports and data analysis techniques are also covered. Students wishing to register for this module must be able to demonstrate some prior experience of the basic techniques of practical chemistry, equivalent to that provided by the CHE101A module.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE102ASemester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stellios Arseniyadis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level chemistry (or equivalent)

This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Fundamentals of Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE102BSemester 24Yes

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathalie Lebrasseur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level chemistry (or equivalent)

This module is designed to introduce first year students to the fundamental principles underpinning organic chemistry. A substantial introduction, covering topics such as stucture, bonding, stereochemistry, acidity and curved arrow formalism will provide students with basic tools required to explain and predict the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Focus is then given to reactivity, using a mechanistic approach to discuss topics such as nucleophillic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophillic addition, aromatic chemistry and carbonyl chemistry.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Fundamentals of SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE104Semester 14Yes

Fundamentals of Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maxie Roessler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level chemistry (or equivalent)

Spectroscopic techniques have revolutionised our understanding of matter at the molecular level and are essential tools in chemical research and in the development of the subject. This module aims to provide students with a coherent and rigorous introduction to the principles and applications of spectroscopic techniques, in a way that spans the traditional fields of chemistry. It covers the more common techniques, including IR, UV-VIS and NMR spectroscopy, and lays the foundations for more detailed coverage of spectroscopic techniques in subsequent years of the degree programme.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 10, 11: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Professional Placement in ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE200Full year5No

Professional Placement in Chemistry

Credits: 120.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module involves an extended placement in a professional workplace and is a core module on the "Year in Industry/Research" programmes in the field of chemistry offered by SBCS.
Students are helped to secure a work placement through a range of employability-initiatives that are already in place at the SBCS.
The placement will normally be a 10-12 months in duration (and must not be less than 6 months in length). This is accommodated within a BSc programme extended to four years duration.
Successful applicants are supported by the School's placement coordinator and an academic tutor, who will keep in contact with students throughout the placement. SBCS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer to provide local support and to monitor student performance.
It is anticipated that students will undertake a wide range of activities during the placement, so as to gain an awareness of professional practice. Students must complete a training diary during the placement and submit a report at the end of their placement, as well as giving a presentation to fellow students.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

Practical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE201Full year5No

Practical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CHE101A, CHE101B"

This module is designed for second-year students undertaking degree programmes in the chemical sciences. It provides training at an intermediate-level in the principles and application of techniques of practical chemistry, and spans the traditional disciplines of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry. Students will gain experience in a range of analytical methods, synthetic procedures, instrumental techniques and computational techniques. The module also includes training in the preparation of laboratory reports and data analysis techniques, as well as aspects relating to health and safety in the laboratory.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE202ASemester 15Yes

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Jones
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CHE102A, CHE102B"

This module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: enolate chemistry, introduction to radical chemistry, oxidation and reduction reactions. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 9, 11: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE202BSemester 25Yes

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathalie Lebrasseur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CHE102A, CHE102B"

This course aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: reactivity of conjugated systems, pericyclic reactions and introduction to heterocyclic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will also be considered.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 9, 11: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 9, 11: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE203ASemester 15Yes

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CHE103A, CHE103B, CHE104"

This module introduces key aspects of inorganic chemistry, including crystal chemistry, crystallography, electronic structure of solids and main group chemistry. Periodic trends in the p-block are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed, with emphasis on aluminosilicates and boron hydrides. In addition, characterisation techniques such as X-ray diffraction and multi-nuclear NMR are introduced.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE203BSemester 25Yes

Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CHE103A, CHE103B, CHE104"

This module introduces key aspects of transition metal chemistry. Periodic trends in the transition metals are considered. Synthesis, structure and bonding are discussed in transition metal complexes. In addition, characterisation techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy are introduced, and d-d transitions and spectroscopic term symbols discussed.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10, 12: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE204ASemester 15Yes

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: CHE204
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces key concepts of quantum mechanics in a chemical context, explaining how the theories of quantum mechanics can be applied to atoms and molecules so as to rationalise the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of such entities.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE204BSemester 25Yes

Physical & Quantum Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Devis Di Tommaso
Overlap: CHE204
Prerequisite: None

This module considers the fundamental role of molecular symmetry in bonding and in determining molecular properties. A range of spectroscopic techniques are then considered in detail, with emphasis on developing understanding of the theoretical principles and the applications of the techniques in studying molecular structure and chemical reactivity.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Problem Solving in ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE205Full year5No

Problem Solving in Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Fornili
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for second-year students on the main chemistry degree programmes. The main purpose of this module is to reinforce and integrate existing chemical knowledge, to develop communication skills and information technology skills, and to provide experience of group work and problem solving. Students will also acquire experience in the use of scientific databases and the use of computational approaches in solving problems.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 8, 9: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6, 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5, 6: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE206ASemester 15Yes

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem A)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "CHE102A, CHE102B"

This module provides an introduction to the action of medicinal drugs. The topics covered include receptors, concentration-response relationships, drug disposition and pharmacokinetics and elementary structure-activity relationships.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 8, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 8, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE206BSemester 25Yes

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Sem B)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lesley Howell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE206A

Major classes of drugs, and their mechanism of actions in treating disease, are reviewed in this module. Prototypical drugs and those developed to refine the properties of earlier examples are also considered. The rationale for developing, or prescribing, a particular drug is presented. Undesireable effects of drugs and drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 8, 10: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Practical Chemistry 1Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE301Semester 16No

Advanced Practical Chemistry 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Cristina Giordano
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

A module of practical work designed to familiarise chemistry students with modern experimental methods and techniques in inorganic and organic chemistry. This module will build upon the practical skills acquired during the first two years. A report based on a literature search will also form part of the module, and instruction in the technique of searching the literature will be provided.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Organic SynthesisBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE302PSemester 17No

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Bray
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers the techniques used to plan the syntheses of organic compounds, together with a selection of reaction types that may be used in organic synthesis. The aim is to provide you with sufficient knowledge and experience to analyse and evaluate the design of syntheses of molecules of pharmaceutical relevance. The second half is specifically designed to give students an understanding of advanced heterocyclic chemistry, again covering examples that are appropriate to the pharmaceutical industry. The aim here is to enable you to design syntheses of a range of types of heterocyclic compounds and to predict the reactivity of these compounds with a variety of common reagents.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Organic SynthesisBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE302USemester 16No

Organic Synthesis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE202B

The module aims to provide a wide understanding of the occurrence, synthesis and behaviour of organic compounds. Topics to be covered include: theory and application of retrosynthetic analysis, modern heteroatom chemistry, reactive intermediates & aromatic chemistry. The use of spectroscopic techniques as a tool for structure determination in organic chemistry will be embedded within the course. The module builds upon the knowledge of structure and reactivity of organic molecules gained in CHE202.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE303USemester 16No

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isaac Abrahams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Atomic, Molecular and Ionic Structure (CHE111), Transition Metal Chemistry (CHE312). This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE304PSemester 16No

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the properties of interfaces and the behaviour of molecules at interfaces, and experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems. This will include discussion of topics such as the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, the structure of solid surfaces and experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 10, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE304USemester 16No

Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the theory of ionic solutions, the properties of interfaces and the behaviour of molecules at interfaces, and experimental methods for the investigation and characterisation of such systems. This will include discussion of topics such as the conductivity and electrochemistry of ionic solutions, molecular adsorption at interfaces and self-assembly, the structure of solid surfaces and experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 5, 10, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Computational ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE305PSemester 26No

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE303PSemester 16No

Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module covers aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. It is essentially divided into two parts viz: modern solid state chemistry and aspects of modern organometallic chemistry. A basic introduction to each topic is given before specialist topics are discussed. The specialist topics vary from year to year.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Computational ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE305USemester 26No

Computational Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module discusses key approaches in modern theoretical and computational chemistry, including HF, post-HF and DFT methods, and considers the application of such methods to study of the structure, properties and chemical reactivity of individual molecules, and further extended to the study of condensed matter.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 9 am - 1 pm

Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE306PSemester 26No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Pharmaceutical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE306USemester 26No

Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lilia Milanesi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the principles of drug design, drug discovery and the relationship between the molecular structure of drugs and their biological activity. Topics to be covered include: how candidate drug structures are selected for synthesis, structure activity relationships, physico-chemical properties of compounds and how these may be employed to assist in the selection of drug candidates, organic synthetic methods that are of particular relevance to the preparation of drug-like molecules. The module will build upon the knowledge and understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry gained in CHE206, and examines applications of the drug discovery process by focusing on specific disease areas such as cancer, where concepts and methods of current therapies and the structures and mechanisms of action of chemotherapeutic agents are studied.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm

Bioorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE307Semester 26No

Bioorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE302U

This module reviews the chemistry of some important biomolecules, including: peptide chemistry (the synthesis, properties and reactions of aminoacids, and their combination to give peptides); sugar chemistry (sugar nomenclature, sugar protection protocols and synthetic manipulations); nucleosides and nucleotides (representation of DNA and RNA structures, the significance of the purine and pyrimidine ring systems noncovalent interactions, and an introduction to the synthesis and sequencing of oligonucleotides).

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 6, 10, 11: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE308PSemester 26No

Advanced Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Analytical Chemistry & SpectroscopyBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE308USemester 26No

Advanced Analytical Chemistry & Spectroscopy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tippu Sheriff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides advanced coverage of topics in instrumental analysis, with illustrations of the applications of such techniques. Topics to be covered include: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, separation sciences - gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques e.g. GC-MS, LC-MS-MS, ICP-MS, that combine two or more methods to provide improved detection of analytes. There will a strong emphasis on problem-solving in analytical chemistry.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Practical Chemistry 2Biological and Chemical SciencesCHE311Semester 26No

Advanced Practical Chemistry 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE301

This is a level 6 module, but is only available to third year students registered on a four year chemistry-based MSci programme. The module provides experience of advanced methodology in practical chemistry, including experience of using more advanced (research-level) analytical and preparative instrumentation. Students undertake a series of extended experimental procedures and investigations, and are required to produce a detailed report for each.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lab
  • : Friday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7; Semester 2: Weeks 7: Monday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7; Semester 2: Weeks 7: Tuesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7; Semester 2: Weeks 7: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7; Semester 2: Weeks 7: Thursday 9 am - 5 pm

Professional Skills for ChemistsBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE401Full year7No

Professional Skills for Chemists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathalie Lebrasseur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims at developing students¿ awareness of the role of chemistry in contemporary societal and global issues and at equipping final year students with the key skills required to address some of the challenges that they are likely to encounter as professional chemists. Topics such as green chemistry, industrial safety, intellectual property and ethical issues arising during professional practice of chemistry will be discussed. This module will particularly focus on developing communication skills that will allow students to evaluate, interpret, synthesise and discuss chemical information effectively and present scientific material to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Biological ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE402Semester 17No

Advanced Biological Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE302U

This module focuses on the role of organic compounds in the natural world, with particular reference to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The role of synthetic models for biological systems is examined critically. The aim is to rationalise the properties and reactivity of the principal classes of natural products and to demonstrate the fundamental chemistry behind biochemical reactions in biosynthetic pathways. Major biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of secondary metabolites are examined from the mechanistic point of view.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 9 am -11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 8, 9, 11: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Friday 10 am -11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Advanced Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE403PSemester 17No

Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module seeks to provide a coherent introduction into the roles that metals play in biological and medicinal systems. The first six lectures of the module focus on electron transfer and will include an introduction to basic terms (redox potential and its tuning in biological systems, excited-state electron transfer) and elements of the Marcus theory, followed by a discussion of electron transfer processes in biology, including light-energy harvesting and conversion in photosynthetic reaction centre, long-range electron transfer in metalloproteins, DNA and molecular wires. Application in molecular devices will be discussed as well. Molecular redox chemistry and electrochemistry including redox catalysis is surveyed.The next set of lectures detail the role that metal plays in a range of biological systems and in medical applications. Initially the focus will be on electron transport in naturally occurring systems such as in the oxygen evolving centre within PS2 of the photosynthetic apparatus, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer. There will then follow a discussion of the roles metals play as Lewis acids in a range of biological systems covering metalloenzymes such as carbonic anhydrase, liver alcohol dehrdrogenase and nickel urease. The final lectures in this part of the module will focus on the roles metal play in medicine eg anti-ageing drugs, anti-cancer drugs and in imaging agents.The final four lectures of the module will begin with an introduction to the important area of biomaterials, which will then be followed by an overview of selected topics from the areas of metallic biomaterials, ceramic biomaterials and bioglasses. The final lecture will consider implant/host interactions and the factors affecting long-term performance of a biomaterial.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Inorganic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE403USemester 17No

Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Contemporary Inorganic Chemistry (CHE512). This module seeks to provide a coherent introduction into the roles that metals play in biological and medicinal systems. The first six lectures of the module focus on electron transfer and will include an introduction to basic terms (redox potential and its tuning in biological systems, excited-state electron transfer) and elements of the Marcus theory, followed by a discussion of electron transfer processes in biology, including light-energy harvesting and conversion in photosynthetic reaction centre, long-range electron transfer in metalloproteins, DNA and molecular wires. Application in molecular devices will be discussed as well. Molecular redox chemistry and electrochemistry including redox catalysis is surveyed.The next set of lectures detail the role that metal plays in a range of biological systems and in medical applications. Initially the focus will be on electron transport in naturally occurring systems such as in the oxygen evolving centre within PS2 of the photosynthetic apparatus, nitrogenase enzymes and the role of iron-porphyrin complexes in biological electron transfer. There will then follow a discussion of the roles metals play as Lewis acids in a range of biological systems covering metalloenzymes such as carbonic anhydrase, liver alcohol dehrdrogenase and nickel urease. The final lectures in this part of the module will focus on the roles metal play in medicine eg anti-ageing drugs, anti-cancer drugs and in imaging agents.The final four lectures of the module will begin with an introduction to the important area of biomaterials, which will then be followed by an overview of selected topics from the areas of metallic biomaterials, ceramic biomaterials and bioglasses. The final lecture will consider implant/host interactions and the factors affecting long-term performance of a biomaterial.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE404PSemester 27No

Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal system and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Physical ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE404USemester 27No

Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ali Zarbakhsh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: CHE304

Prerequisites: Molecules and Ions at Interfaces (SBC702). For F152 students only. This module will cover various advanced concepts of colloidal systems and their application. An overview of the concepts involved such as surface tension and surfactants, monolayers such as lipids will be given. We shall investigate the application of colloids and their structures and characterisation. Techniques such as light scattering, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering as well as rheology of these systems will be covered. Various examples of in pharmaceuticals and natural products design will be discussed.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 11: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE405PSemester 27No

Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathalie Lebrasseur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is designed to give you a detailed understanding of stereochemistry, an appreciation of the relevance of this topic to the activity and regulatory requirements of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, and a detailed knowledge of the methods available to generate single enantiomers of pharmaceutical relevance. Furthermore the module will provide you with an overview of the principles, practicalities and applications of contemporary catalytic methodology of relevance to drug discovery and manufacture within the pharmaceutical industry. The aim is to furnish you with sufficient knowledge that you will be able to appraise and develop synthetic strategies for the synthesis of complex organic molecules using catalytic methodology.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Topics in Organic ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE405USemester 27No

Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nathalie Lebrasseur
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is designed to give you a detailed understanding of stereochemistry, an appreciation of the relevance of this topic to the activity and regulatory requirements of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, and a detailed knowledge of the methods available to generate single enantiomers of pharmaceutical relevance. Furthermore the module will provide you with an overview of the principles, practicalities and applications of contemporary catalytic methodology of relevance to drug discovery and manufacture within the pharmaceutical industry. The aim is to furnish you with sufficient knowledge that you will be able to appraise and develop synthetic strategies for the synthesis of complex organic molecules using catalytic methodology.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 5, 9, 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Chemistry Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE600Full year6No

Chemistry Research Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Prerequisites: Students with an average of 60% or above (combination of first year and second year results) are eligible to register for this module. Overall the module is expected to involve students for approximately 18h/week, for 12 weeks, spent on laboratory and library work, plus additional time spent on data analysis and on writing the dissertation.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Chemistry Investigative ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE601Full year6No

Chemistry Investigative Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students work independently on topics set by their project supervisors. The work involves extensive searching, reviewing and critical evaluation of a specific area of the scientific literature. A final dissertation is prepared, based upon the investigative work that has been undertaken. Students are also required to present their work in a variety of other forms, including a poster and seminar appropriate for a specialist audience, and in an alternative format in which the topic is made more accessible to the general public.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Literature Project in ChemistryBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE602Full year6No

Literature Project in Chemistry

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Tony Vlcek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students work independently on topics set by their project supervisors. The work involves searching, reviewing and critical evaluation of a well-defined area of the scientific literature. A final dissertation is prepared, based upon the investigative work that has been undertaken. Students are also required to present their work in a seminar, at a level appropriate for a specialist audience.

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Chemical Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE700PFull year7No

Chemical Research Project

Credits: 150.0
Contact: Dr Gregory Chass
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module involves students carrying-out an original piece of experimental or computational research on projects agreed with their academic supervisor. Projects are in the areas of biological, organic, inorganic, physical, materials or theoretical/computational chemistry; or a combination thereof. The work also involves an in-depth and critical evaluation and dissemination of the relevant literature associated with the topic and methodologies employed.

A dissertation is prepared and defended in an oral examination (mid-September); students also present their work in the form of a ~15-20 min research seminar (mid-September).

The diversity of expertise of the chemistry and biochemistry faculty involved with the programme affords a wide range of project choice within the chemical sciences, in addition to facilitating identification of potential project supervisors.

Assessment: 60.0% Practical, 40.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Drug Design and DevelopmentBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE406PSemester 17No

Drug Design and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aim of the module is to focus on drug discovery and development using a number of case studies and the most recent advances in the pharmaceutical chemistry approaches. At the end of this module students should be able to discuss the physical and chemical approaches to the design and development of new drugs and be aware of the physiological/pharmacological issues that need to be considered before a drug can be used clinically.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 10, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Drug Design and DevelopmentBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE406USemester 17No

Drug Design and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Marina Resmini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students in the fourth year of the F152 MSci programme in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and will be offered as an option. Pre-requisite 18 modules passed in F152. The aim of the module is to introduce you to the approaches currently employed in the pharmaceutical industry for drug discovery and development using a number of recent case studies as exemplars. The module will introduce you to the physical and chemical approaches used in the design and development of new drugs and will make them aware of the physiological/pharmacological issues that need to be considered before a drug can be used clinically.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 6, 10, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Chemistry MSci Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE750Full year7No

Chemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The students work independently on research topics set by their project supervisors. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of advanced projects. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared and defended in an oral examination; students also present their work in the form of a poster and as a short oral presentation.

Assessment: 50.0% Dissertation, 30.0% Practical, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5, 6, 8: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Pharmaceutical Chemistry MSci Research ProjectBiological and Chemical SciencesCHE751Full year7No

Pharmaceutical Chemistry MSci Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wyatt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students work independently on a research topic in pharmaceutically-related chemistry, set by their project supervisors. Original experimental or theoretical work is the principal component of this advanced project. The work also involves critical evaluation of previously published results. A dissertation is prepared describing the research work undertaken, and placing it in the context of other research in the field. The dissertation is defended in an oral examination; students also present their work in the form of a poster and as a short oral presentation.

Assessment: 50.0% Dissertation, 27.5% Coursework, 22.5% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 5, 6, 8: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Histology and EmbryologyBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC152Semester 14No

Histology and Embryology

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course will focus on the development, formation, organisation, and interactions of human tissues and their roles in physiology and morphology. It will involve an overview of the embryological development of the major organs and detailed instruction on the appearance, nature and structure of different cell types, the structure of different organs and the structurefunction relationship of tissues within major organs. Topics will include the epithelium and connective tissue, bone, cartilage, blood, and muscle tissue, nerve tissue and nervous system, the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, endochrine, and immune systems, sense organs, skin, digestive tract and glands, male and female reproductive systems, early development of the embryo and the development of the cardiovascular system.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

English 1aBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC154Semester 14No

English 1a

Credits: 22.5
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Biomedical sciences course at Nanchang will be taught in English. This module will develop the English skills of students on the JP, extending them and ensuring that they are fully capable of meeting the demands of studying and being examined in English. The module will cover spoken and written English, and will offer extensive practice in formal and informal communication, using presentations, essays and English clubs. There will be a strong emphasis on scientific English.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

English 1bBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC155Semester 24No

English 1b

Credits: 22.5
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Biomedical sciences course at Nanchang will be taught in English. This module will develop the English skills of students on the JP, extending them and ensuring that they are fully capable of meeting the demands of studying and being examined in English. The module will cover spoken and written English, and will offer extensive practice in formal and informal communication, using presentations, essays and English clubs. There will be a strong emphasis on scientific English.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

PhysiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC156Semester 24No

Physiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will look at the functions, genetic control, and general physiology of the cell and the functional organisation of the human body. Module components include an introduction to major areas of human physiology, covering cell exchange, the properties and nerve and skeletal/smooth muscle, and the alimentary, renal endocrine and nervous systems, membrane physiology of the nerve and muscle, the intracellular and extracellular fluids, physiology of blood and the immune system, gastrointestinal physiology, metabolism and temperature regulation, endocrinology and reproduction, the heart and circulatory system, respiration, and aviation, space, and deep-sea diving physiology.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 4
Timetable:

English for Academic PurposesBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC251Semester 15No

English for Academic Purposes

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Bimoedical sciences course as Nanchang will be taught in English. Building on the level 4 module NNC151 English 1, this module will continue to develop the English skills of students on the JP, extending them and ensuring that they are fully capable of meeting the demands of studying and being examined in English. The module will cover spoken and written English, and will offer extensive practice in formal and informal communication, using presentations, essays and English clubs. There will be a strong emphasis on scientific English.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

PharmacologyBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC252Semester 25No

Pharmacology

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the action of medicinal drugs. The topics covered include receptors, concentration-response relationships, drug disposition and pharmacokinetics and elementary structure-activity relationships. Major classes of drugs, and their mechanism of actions in treating disease, are then reviewed in the second part of the module. Prototypical drugs and those developed to refine the properties of earlier examples are also considered.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 5
Timetable:

Medical MicrobiologyBiological and Chemical SciencesNNC253Semester 15No

Medical Microbiology

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the biological properties and structure of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protists with an emphasis on strains that effect humans. Topics will also focus on the development, transmission, infection, immunity, pathology, diagnosis, and prevention of bacterial and viral diseases as well as microbial heredity and variation leading to complications in drug resistance and control strategies. Good hygiene practices such as disinfection, sterilisation, and biosafety techniques of pathogenic organisms will be emphasised.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

Essential Skills for PsychologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY100Full year4No

Essential Skills for Psychologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tiina Eilola
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800).

This module is structured around three main key areas:

(1) Acquiring Essential Skills for Academic Psychology.
The module will support students in acquiring a variety of key skills such as experimental report and essay writing, data and information handling, oral and written communication skills and appropriate use of referencing and citations in psychology. Students will also be introduced to the use of statistical analysis to support psychology, some basic concepts in experimental design and research ethics.

(2) Considering the role of Psychology in the ¿real world¿.
Through personal investigations and a series of talks from professional Psychologists, students will be encouraged to consider the role of psychology in an applied context and gain a more global perspective of their discipline. To broaden their experience further, students will also be given the opportunity to take part in research conducted in the Psychology Department at QMUL.

(3) Exploring Career Pathways.
Students will be given an opportunity to explore various career choices, to reflect on their own career aspirations and to meet with professional Psychologists from diverse backgrounds.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10; Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10; Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 6; Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 8: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6, 8, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 10: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 6, 8, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 10: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 5, 9: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY109Semester 24No

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Hannon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module introduces fundamental skills in experimental design, statistical analysis and other methodologies necessary for conducting research in psychology. The module will combine lectures and practical sessions including hand calculation and computerised statistical analysis using SPSS.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Biology for PsychologistsBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY111Semester 14No

Biology for Psychologists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caroline Brennan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

To provide psychology students with a scientific overview of biology, especially the central notions of variation in whole organism biology, as relevant to behaviour. This supports the distinctiveness of QMUL psychology as a natural and experimental science and introduces students to the growing notion of psychology as a branch of the biological sciences (e.g., that behaviour is the end product of whole organism biology). It will also introduce students to the integrative scientific thinking skills required to study subsequent psychological topics (e.g., how the study of micro-organisms and plants has contributed to our understanding of gene-environment interactions which are now routinely studied in behaviour genetics). Students will be introduced to empirical findings and will critically evaluate the range of methods in the field. Topics covered include basic genetics, origins and diversity of life, phylogeny, development, eukaryotes, prokaryotes and plants, microbiology, invertebrates and vertebrates, biodiversity, body size and life history strategies.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Brain and BehaviourBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY121Semester 24Yes

Brain and Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Isabelle Mareschal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is intended for students studying BSc Psychology (C800). This module builds on the theme of psychology as a biological science in parallel with the 'Exploring Psychology' module by specifying the proximate biological mechanisms involved in psychological phenomena. The module will focus on basic principles of biological psychology predominantly, and then introduce psychological processes to illustrate these.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4, 8: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Occupational PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY123Semester 24No

Occupational Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Occupational Psychology module aims to build upon the student¿s base of knowledge regarding principles of psychology as they are applied in industrial and organisational settings. In particular, the module will provide students with an introduction to the theory and empirical evidence of occupational psychology using three organising principles: the organisation as a complex system, its processes and the people in the workplace. The module will present the students with various concepts in the study of occupational psychology such as decision making at the workplace, work motivation, stress at work, individual differences (stereotyping and prejudice at work environments) and problem solving.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Exploring Psychology IBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY124Semester 14Yes

Exploring Psychology I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sevasti Foka
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces and develops basic concepts in the philosophy of science and its relevance to psychology as a discipline. A biological framework for psychological science is also provided. It then introduces basic cognitive science/psychology, social psychology, differential psychology and an introduction to brain and behaviour relationships.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 10: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Exploring Psychology IIBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY125Semester 24Yes

Exploring Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Bennetts
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "PSY115,PSY111"

This module builds upon PSY115 Exploring Psychology I by extending the introduction of basic concepts, theories, methods and research findings in psychology. The areas introduced include cognitive development, learning and memory, language and thought, intelligence, motivation and emotion, psychopathology and treatment of mental disorders. .

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology IIBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY209Semester 15No

Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tiina Eilola
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: PSY109

This module builds introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists, and one where the College has research strengths; health psychology or psychology as applied to health and medicine. The module covers the central models and evidence base concerning the relationship of psychological processes to health maintenance, treatment adherence, professional-patient interactions, stress and immune system function. Topics covered by this module include models and theories of health behaviour and their explanatory power; psychology & health promotion; adherence to treatment, health professional and patient interactions; research methods in health psychology; psychological issues in clinical trial design; personality, health and lifestyle; psychoneuroimmunology; cardiovascular disease; sexual health behaviours; and coping with chronic & terminal conditions.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 10: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 10: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, 10: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Cognitive PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY211Semester 15Yes

Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rachel Bennetts
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is only available to students who enter under the C1C8 programme. This module builds upon themes developed in level 4 psychology modules and considers specific cognitive functions and properties of the human mind. The material covered will include traditional cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neuropsychology (the understanding of normal cognitive processes through unique case studies of human brain damage). Cognitive functions examined will include visual, object and spatial perception, psychophysics, memory processes, complex reasoning, language, face processing and the relationship between emotion and these processes. Experiments and studies from classical and modern cognitive psychology will be provided throughout.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm

Health PsychologyBiological and Chemical SciencesPSY213Semester 15Yes

Health Psychology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Hannon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces an area of special interest to applied psychologists - namely, psychology as applied to health and medicine. The module covers the central models and evidence base concerning the relationship of psychological processes to health maintenance, treatment adherence, professionalpatient interactions, stress and immune system function. Topics covered by this module include models of health behaviour and their explanatory power; psychology & health promotion; adherence to treatment, health professional and patient interactions; research methods in health psychology; psychological issues in clinical trial design; personality, health and lifestyle; psychoneuroimmunology; cardiovascular disease; sexual health behaviours; and coping with chronic & terminal conditions.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Geographical Information SystemsGeographyGEG5102Full year5Yes

Geographical Information Systems

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the basic principles of GIS and their application in modelling geographical realities. It is practically based and a requirement of the module is to become proficient in the operation and use of the GIS software - ARCVIEW. The main components of the module include defining the key elements of a GIS, basic cartographic principles, elementary database management, error and data quality issues, statistical analysis of spatial data, and presentation and outputs from GIS. The module will emphasise the applications of GIS both realised, within the module, and potential, within the wider geographical remit.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Geographical Research in PracticeGeographyGEG5103Full year5No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester A, students will attend weekly lectures that introduce key qualitative research techniques. In addition, students will work on an action research project in the local community to develop these skills and produce a final report to summarise their findings. In both Semesters A and B, these research foundations are further developed through tutorials that are designed to prepare students to do their own IGS.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geographical Research in PracticeGeographyGEG5103BSemester 25No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students studying away from Queen Mary in Semester 1 and who would like to prepare for GEG6000 Independent Geographical Study (IGS) in Semester 2 when they return. The module is delivered through tutorials/small group teaching and focuses on equipping students with the knowledge and skills required to design an independent piece of research (the IGS). The programme focuses on how to select a feasible research topic, review academic literature, justify and select appropriate research methodology, make pragmatic decisions about research access, sites and timeline, consider the ethical dimensions of research and make appropriate risk assessments.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Cultural GeographiesGeographyGEG5126Semester 25Yes

Cultural Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the field of cultural geography. It draws on examples both historical and contemporary, in the UK and beyond, to demonstrate how spaces, places and landscapes are laden with meaning. It shows that culture is not something that is fixed, but rather constructed through relations with different people, places, ideas, objects and practices. The module therefore helps student understand and interpret matters of culture critically, with careful attention to plurality, complexity and power. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: an introduction to cultural geography; landscape: meaning, power and identity; interpreting cultural representations; more-than-representational geographies; geographies of embodiment and mobility; cultural geographies of food; emerging cultural landscapes and politics; tensions and new directions in cultural geography.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Society and SpaceGeographyGEG5127Semester 15Yes

Society and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Azeezat Johnson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Drawing mainly, though not wholly, on examples from the UK, this module explores the social geographies of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and sexuality at a variety of scales. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: Changing class relations in the British countryside; rural poverty and homelessness; racial inequality and changing ethnic identities in the UK; London's new migrant division of labour; gentrification; homelessness and the politics of public space; the gendering of urban space; and the geographies of sexuality. The module is assessed by 100% coursework: a field walk and 2000 word report in the form of a Wikipedia entry, and 3000 word course work essay.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGeographyGEG5128Semester 25Yes

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Economic GeographiesGeographyGEG5129Semester 15Yes

Economic Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gale Raj-Reichert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4112

This module aims to explore the diversity and inequalities of economic development experiences globally, as well as within countries and among nations. It will examine some core issues in relation to how economic concerns of capital, production, exchange, valuation and consumption play out in practice with reference to a range of different cases studies. It will also address ongoing debates around economic crisis and complex socioeconomic geographies of post-recessionary growth.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Financial ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUSM054Semester 17Yes

Financial Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sean Mccartney
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the financial reporting of companies, and how such reporting can be analysed to evaluate performance. No prior knowledge of accounting is assumed: students learn how accounts are constructed and analysed, then examine the impact of various issues on the reported numbers. These include the reporting of intangible assets; creative accounting; currency translation; and the use of share options to reward management. The module takes a global perspective and refers largely to the regulatory regime of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 6 pm - 7 pm

Understanding Consumer BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM058Semester 17No

Understanding Consumer Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Danae Manika
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

All marketing action is aimed at consumers. Without an understanding of the consumer the application of marketing tools is unlikely to yield the desired outcomes. This module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of consumer and market behaviour as a main consideration in marketing. The course offers a brief introduction into consumer research and then focuses on an understanding of the consumer from a mainly psychological perspective. Overall, the course provides frameworks that enable students to address the issue of understanding consumers responsibly, systematically, and creatively.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 7 pm

International AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM059Semester 27No

International Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUSM054

The module provides insights into the origins of accounting and its subsequent changes. Adopting this broader perspective, the module will attempt to trace the genealogy of accounting and its principles, standards and conventions. The module will discuss the historical developments in accounting by focusing on accounting issues created in the process of harmonisation. This approach will lead students to critically engage in the current debates on accounting, accountability and the responsibility of cross-border transactions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm

Corporate GovernanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM060Semester 27Yes

Corporate Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr John Butlin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to key theories, concepts and issues in corporate governance. It critically explores corporate governance as an embedded practice and provides insights into how local cultures and developments in local contexts have impacted upon and shaped the development of corporate governance systems and practices and how these local corporate governance systems and practices are challenged by globalisation. Within this broad framework case studies provide detailed insights into specific aspects of corporate governance.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Contemporary Issues in AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM061Semester 27Yes

Contemporary Issues in Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to some of the key developments and issues in accounting currently discussed by policy makers, the profession, the media and academics. The specific issues addressed will change over time but could include: - On-line Reporting - Accounting and Globalisation - Accounting Regulation: The Convergence Project - Accounting and Poverty - Accounting and Indigenous Peoples - Sustainability Reporting - The Relevance of History - Accounting, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion - Accountants and the Financial Crisis - Accounting in the Community - NGOs and Accountability

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Dissertation for Accounting and FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM066Full year7No

Dissertation for Accounting and Finance

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

You will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.
Students undertaking a dissertation based on qualitative methods within the School of Business and Management are required to attend Qualitative Research Methods Workshops in Semester 2.

Students undertaking a dissertation within the School of Economics are required to attend Data Analysis for Research classes will take place throughout Semester 2

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 6: Thursday 10 am -11 am

Modern Political Thought I and IIPolitics and International RelationsPOL206Full year5Yes

Modern Political Thought I and II

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Lasse Thomassen
Overlap: HST5601
Prerequisite: POL100

The module offers an introduction to Modern Political Thought by critically examining the texts and ideas of major political thinkers of the 16th to 19th century. In the first semester, we examine Machiavelli and the social contract theorists: Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau. It concludes with an examination of the ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill. This will enable students to assess the foundations of the history of political thought. The second semester will focus upon the development of political thought in the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on the work of Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. We examine the thinkers through five themes: human nature, progress, freedom, equality, and political authority and legitimacy. Thinkers and themes may vary from year to year. LV21 History & Politics students must take either POL206 or HST5601 History of Western Political Thought

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM208Semester 17No

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: DEN7208, DENM6208
Prerequisite: None

This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDENM209Semester 16Yes

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: DEN6208
Prerequisite: DEN5208

This module covers more advanced topics in heat transfer, developing the ideas introduced in DEN5208 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 1. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; fins; heat exchangers; phase change; turbulent flows; compressible flow.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Advanced Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM305Semester 17No

Advanced Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEN6305, DEN7305
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with the design and performance of a typical aircraft. It covers mission based subsonic aircraft design methodology, areodynamic design, engine design, and noise in propeller and jet driven aircraft, structural design and materials selection.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM311Semester 26No

Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Overlap: DEN7311
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature.
The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage.
It brings this together considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Essential Mathematics Skills for EngineersEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM122Semester 14No

Essential Mathematics Skills for Engineers

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Henri Huijberts
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with knowledge of basic mathematical skills that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basic logic, sequences and series, limits, differentiation and integration, partial derivatives, complex numbers, basic vector calculus, matrix algebra and an introduction to ordinary differential equations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM067Semester 27Yes

Advanced Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing organisations as they operate in a world of increasing competitiveness and change, requiring managers to combine management accounting ideas with those from other areas such as marketing, technology and HR. Accordingly it is interdisciplinary.
The module is arranged around:
1 Accounting for strategic management: introduction: methodological issues in management accounting
2 The essence of management control in private, voluntary and public sectors
3 Strategic Issues in cost allocation and activity-based costing and activity-based management
4 Advanced manufacturing technology, JIT, target costing and product life-cycle costing
5 Quality costing, total quality management and management accounting systems
6 Value-chain analysis and accounting
7 Customer profitability analysis/customer accounting
8 Competitor analysis/competitor accounting
9 Responsibility accounting, financial performance measures, and transfer prices
10 Measuring non-financial performance: the balanced scorecard
11 Benchmarking analysis
The module will draw upon a range of case studies drawn from the `real world¿.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Organisational BehaviourBusiness and ManagementBUSM069Semester 17Yes

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrizia Kokot-Blamey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organizational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, ethics, group dynamics, patterns and negotiation practices which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviour both at individual, group and organisational levels. Students will gain an awareness and knowledge of contemporary issues and approaches to organisational change and development facing organizations. Beyond providing theoretical frameworks, the module will augment skills to prepare students for the work place through communication and team management skills, and through analytical and critical thinking skills .

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Accounting for Business ModelsBusiness and ManagementBUSM070Semester 17Yes

Accounting for Business Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module conceptualizes business models within an accounting framework. There are three significant parts to this module. how we can structure business models, designate business models with a sense of financial purpose (liquidity, solvency and capitalization) and finally evaluate performance and outcomes. These financial objectives are explored and evaluated using accounting data for a range of business model types for example, banking, private equity and bio-pharma and 3rd /public sector organizations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 1 pm

Modern Political Thought IPolitics and International RelationsPOL206ASemester 15Yes

Modern Political Thought I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lasse Thomassen
Overlap: HST5601
Prerequisite: POL100

The module offers an introduction to Modern Political Thought by critically examining the texts and ideas of major political thinkers of the 16th to 19th century. In the first semester, we examine Machiavelli and the social contract theorists: Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau. It concludes with an examination of the ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill. This will enable students to assess the foundations of the history of political thought. The second semester will focus upon the development of political thought in the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on the work of Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. We examine the thinkers through five themes: human nature, progress, freedom, equality, and political authority and legitimacy. Thinkers and themes may vary from year to year. LV21 History & Politics students must take either POL206 or HST5601 History of Western Political Thought.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Modern Political Thought IIPolitics and International RelationsPOL206BSemester 25Yes

Modern Political Thought II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lasse Thomassen
Overlap: HST5601
Prerequisite: POL100

The module offers an introduction to Modern Political Thought by critically examining the texts and ideas of major political thinkers of the 16th to 19th century. In the first semester, we examine Machiavelli and the social contract theorists: Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau. It concludes with an examination of the ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill. This will enable students to assess the foundations of the history of political thought. The second semester will focus upon the development of political thought in the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on the work of Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. We examine the thinkers through five themes: human nature, progress, freedom, equality, and political authority and legitimacy. Thinkers and themes may vary from year to year. LV21 History & Politics students must take either POL206 or HST5601 History of Western Political Thought.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

War and Security in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL241Full year5Yes

War and Security in World Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

The module examines the study of war and security in world politics, examining the modern roots of the study of these phenomenon to the development of the field today. The first part of the module examines war and security in the broad context of international relations. The theoretical roots of studying security and war are introduced, examining key thinkers and perspectives on the politics of organized violence. We then examine a variety of perspectives on the causes of war, from those originating in the character of international relations, to the politics of particular states, to ideas about the changing nature of technology. In Part II, the module offers an advanced understanding of the place of war in world politics and society. We will ask what war is and then investigate its relation to the fields of ethics, law, society and gender. We will look at the question of combat motivation (why solders fight) and specific forms of warfare such as genocide, insurgency and guerrilla warfare, and counter-insurgency. We will conclude by addressing anti-war activism and related forms of civil disobedience and strategic non-violence as alternatives to war. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/241A; Spring Semester POL/241B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

War and Security in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL241ASemester 15Yes

War and Security in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

The module examines the study of war and security in world politics, examining the modern roots of the study of these phenomenon to the development of the field today. The first part of the module examines war and security in the broad context of international relations. The theoretical roots of studying security and war are introduced, examining key thinkers and perspectives on the politics of organized violence. We then examine a variety of perspectives on the causes of war, from those originating in the character of international relations, to the politics of particular states, to ideas about the changing nature of technology. In Part II, the module offers an advanced understanding of the place of war in world politics and society. We will ask what war is and then investigate its relation to the fields of ethics, law, society and gender. We will look at the question of combat motivation (why solders fight) and specific forms of warfare such as genocide, insurgency and guerrilla warfare, and counter-insurgency. We will conclude by addressing anti-war activism and related forms of civil disobedience and strategic non-violence as alternatives to war. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/241A; Spring Semester POL/241B.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN319Semester 16No

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nuria Gavara
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Need to contact academic first for SA students

A 15 credit project specific to BSc(Eng) programmes. The purpose of the project will be to provide knowledge of a particular research area. There will be no set rules concerning format, which will depend on the nature of the subject and personal choice. The project will typically involve experimentation which will be carried out in an associated subject area chosen by a member of academic staff (supervisor).

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN319Semester 26No

Third Year Project (BEng/BSc(Eng))

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nuria Gavara
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Need to contact academic first for SA students

A 15 credit project specific to BSc(Eng) programmes. The purpose of the project will be to provide knowledge of a particular research area. There will be no set rules concerning format, which will depend on the nature of the subject and personal choice. The project will typically involve experimentation which will be carried out in an associated subject area chosen by a member of academic staff (supervisor).

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN320Semester 26No

Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: DEN420, DENM012
Prerequisite: A level Maths

The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the impacts of engineering activity on the environment. It provides them with the basic professional skills to recognise, analyse and minimise adverse impacts. The students will be made aware of the variety of impacts that pollution and engineering works can have upon the environment, e.g. air quality, water quality, waste disposal, noise and vibration, transportation. They will be able to analyse and construct predictive models of the processes which control the level and extent of these impacts. They will apply these, working either individually or in multi-disciplinary groups, to realistic case studies involving engineering problems.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Principles and Applications of Medical ImagingEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN324Semester 26Yes

Principles and Applications of Medical Imaging

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Novak
Overlap: DENM029
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a comprehensive review of the most widely-used methods of imaging in medical and biological science. After an introduction to the parameters that define image quality, modalities, such as MRI and Ultrasound, are considered from the viewpoint of (i) their basic principles (ii) associated instrumentation, (ii) the method of image extraction from the raw data and (iii) the information revealed about the object. A more detailed consideration of image reconstruction is then followed by a discussion of some specialist non-conventional imaging techniques

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 9, 10: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Combustion in Automotive EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN326Semester 26Yes

Combustion in Automotive Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xi Jiang
Overlap: DEN426, DENM021
Prerequisite: None

This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Studio Practice Year 3 GDP Industry Related Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN327Full year6No

Studio Practice Year 3 GDP Industry Related Design Project

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Adam Sutcliffe
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN212

This module offers a live industrial project in industrial design. This design project is a crucial component of the programme emulates the industrial context of design and engineering whilst exposing the student to the realities of the multidisciplinary group design project. This will provide the opportunity for the student to work alongside practising designers and engineers. The design project brief is generated in collaboration with industry and academic staff to deliver a realistic experience of the live project. The intention is to provide knowledge and understanding of the expectations of professional designers and the engineers, while simultaneously supporting the student in an academic context.

Assessment: 60.0% Dissertation, 40.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm

Studio Practice Year 3 Individual Design Project Joie de VivreEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN329Full year6No

Studio Practice Year 3 Individual Design Project Joie de Vivre

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN212

This module offers students the opportunity to work on a complex design project from the initiation of the project to completion of design proposal. The student will experience the critical decision making stages in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also learn project management and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

An Independent Geographical StudyGeographyGEG6000Full year6No

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5103 GEG5211

As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Accounting and Value ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM071Semester 27Yes

Accounting and Value Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is framed with the context of managing for value and how managerial and investor interests are aligned and reflected in accounting information for value creation and market value added and value for money. This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are employed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control and drive value creation for market value added or value for money. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and direct corporate and non-corporate organizations towards generating value on invested funds whether these are public, private or state sponsored agencies.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Financial Markets and InstitutionsBusiness and ManagementBUSM072Semester 17Yes

Financial Markets and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ni Peng
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is about how the increasingly complex relation between financial institutions, markets and firms has evolved over a period of time. A process of financial innovation and deregulation is impacting upon recorded accounting numbers and financial performance of firms much more volatile. In the corporate and non-corporate sectors the relation between financial markets and accounting is complex and inter-related. A large proportion of balance sheet values are now adjusted to reflect financial market values and these adjustments can be significant and volatile. Fair value reporting also requires significant external advisory support to inform accountants: actuaries, credit rating agencies and specialists is specific asset valuations. The development of more sophisticated financial products impacts upon a range of corporate and non-corporate institutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Economics of DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM073Semester 27No

Economics of Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces contemporary theories and the empirical literature of the economics of developing countries with specific reference to public policy delivery. The course will address the problems with public policy delivery in developing countries and what solutions and strategies have been identified in the literature. The course will deal with debates such as centralised and decentralised delivery methods, political economy issues of corruption and state capture, and the role of incentives among politicians and bureaucrats in service delivery.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 7 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 11: Monday 4 pm - 7 pm

Public Financial Management and AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM076Semester 17No

Public Financial Management and Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides understanding of the financial development and trajectory of central government finances in the advanced economies. The first half of this module will introduce students to the challenges facing governments in the advanced economies, and in particular, that of sustaining deficit financing. How have the components of central government revenues changed over time relative to expenditures in GDP and the nature of accumulated sovereign debt (roll-over timings and repayments schedule)? Students will examine the political context of public budgeting. We shall explore how the policy shift towards macro-prudential management of these economies has impacted not only on monetary policy, but also on public spending and cutback management, nationally and at regional and local levels of government. The module examines the link between changing budgetary politics and pressure to develop innovative financial vehicles, as well as exploring some of the medium-term financial risks to which these innovations can unintendedly give rise. The second half of this module will focus on the importance for public management of reforms in accounting systems which require a shift toward resource-based and accrual-based accounting. We examine the impact on managers' accountability for public expenditure of the convergence of public sector with corporate international financial reporting standards (IFRS) and role of resource-based auditing . What are some of the implications of adoption ¿corporate¿ financial accounting and performance key financial and non-financial KPIs? We examine public-private partnerships such as the UK's Private Finance Initiatives (PFIs) for financing public sector capital projects, and issues of risk transfer and cost-effectiveness. We will consider changes financial practices and reporting in sub-national public agencies (local authorities, health care, policing, etc), the possibilities in some countries for bond-financing for sub-national agencies, and their implications on their financial stability and organisational dynamics.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

War and Security in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL241BSemester 25Yes

War and Security in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

The module examines the study of war and security in world politics, examining the modern roots of the study of these phenomenon to the development of the field today. The first part of the module examines war and security in the broad context of international relations. The theoretical roots of studying security and war are introduced, examining key thinkers and perspectives on the politics of organized violence. We then examine a variety of perspectives on the causes of war, from those originating in the character of international relations, to the politics of particular states, to ideas about the changing nature of technology. In Part II, the module offers an advanced understanding of the place of war in world politics and society. We will ask what war is and then investigate its relation to the fields of ethics, law, society and gender. We will look at the question of combat motivation (why solders fight) and specific forms of warfare such as genocide, insurgency and guerrilla warfare, and counter-insurgency. We will conclude by addressing anti-war activism and related forms of civil disobedience and strategic non-violence as alternatives to war. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/241A; Spring Semester POL/241B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Global GovernancePolitics and International RelationsPOL242Full year5Yes

Global Governance

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL103 or POL106"

This new module explores the notion of global governance from the particular perspective of civil society and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs). What we are essentially concerned with here are, first, the extent to which trans-national networks of power can be said to exist; second, to explore which actors dominate and are empowered within such networks, which are excluded and why; third, the extent to which it is viable and appropriate to use the term "global civil society" to describe aspects of social movement and NGO behaviour; and fourthly, whether the concept of global governance helps us to understand better the interactions between state, non-state, market and civil society actors in various locations, regions, policy processes and issue regimes.n Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/242A; Spring Semester POL/242B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Global GovernancePolitics and International RelationsPOL242ASemester 15Yes

Global Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL103 or POL106"

This new module explores the notion of global governance from the particular perspective of civil society and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs). What we are essentially concerned with here are, first, the extent to which trans-national networks of power can be said to exist; second, to explore which actors dominate and are empowered within such networks, which are excluded and why; third, the extent to which it is viable and appropriate to use the term "global civil society" to describe aspects of social movement and NGO behaviour; and fourthly, whether the concept of global governance helps us to understand better the interactions between state, non-state, market and civil society actors in various locations, regions, policy processes and issue regimes.n Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/242A; Spring Semester POL/242B.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Global GovernancePolitics and International RelationsPOL242BSemester 25Yes

Global Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL103 or POL106"

This new module explores the notion of global governance from the particular perspective of civil society and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs). What we are essentially concerned with here are, first, the extent to which trans-national networks of power can be said to exist; second, to explore which actors dominate and are empowered within such networks, which are excluded and why; third, the extent to which it is viable and appropriate to use the term "global civil society" to describe aspects of social movement and NGO behaviour; and fourthly, whether the concept of global governance helps us to understand better the interactions between state, non-state, market and civil society actors in various locations, regions, policy processes and issue regimes.n Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/242A; Spring Semester POL/242B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Energy Conversion SystemsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4006Semester 14Yes

Energy Conversion Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an introduction to the role of the Mechanical Engineer. It sets out the basic concepts of engineering science including statics, dynamics, thermodynamics and fluid mechanics and their application to simple engineering systems. It includes an introduction to energy generation from conventional and renewable / sustainable sources, methods of heating and cooling, and the application of the above ideas to an integrated engineering system (the automobile).

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Computational EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN401Semester 17Yes

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen
Overlap: DENM004
Prerequisite: None

This is an advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aeronautical and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Computational Fluid DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN403Semester 27Yes

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Karabasov
Overlap: DENM010
Prerequisite: DEN331

Following on from an introduction to CFD in DEN331, in this module we deepen our knowledge in various areas. We learn to analyse the properties of discretisations and apply these to simple model equations. We discuss the various aspects of modelling turbulence. In the accompanying laboratory, we learn to generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems on these meshes and perform the relevant analysis of the quality of our simulations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm

Clinical MeasurementsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN406Semester 27Yes

Clinical Measurements

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Novak
Overlap: DENM024
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide an understanding of biopotentials and other biological signals, and identify mechanisms by which they can be measured. It also aims to provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental principals associated with transducers, and comprehensive review of the most widely used techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of disease states

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN408Semester 27Yes

Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DENM011
Prerequisite: DEN5109, DEN5108, DEN5200

The module introduces robotics as an integral part of modern automation, provides an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems. It also provides an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, actuators and sensors, principles and roles in robotics. It introduces various aspects of robot modelling and control and problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and FluidsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN331Semester 16Yes

Computer Aided Engineering for Solids and Fluids

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory module in computational modelling. It covers both computational solids and computational fluids. The most widely used methods such the finite element method are covered. The emphasis is on engineering applications with students being exposed to hands on experience of both solids and fluids commercial packages.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Exploring Aerospace EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4005Semester 14Yes

Exploring Aerospace Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Eldad Avital
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to engage students in various topics closely associated with aerospace engineering with emphasis on the application of materials. These topics include development, flight testing, aerodynamics, structures, failure, reliability, control, propulsion, maintaining operations, environmental impact. Examples will be used from current and future activities within the aerospace sector. A number of group projects will be undertaken by the students to give them a practical understanding of some of the important aspects of aerospace engineering. Lectures delivered by specialists in the School and elsewhere will be given in many of the specialised topic areas listed above.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and SocietyGeographyGEG6006Semester 26No

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Co-requisite GEG6134

The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module will allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society module by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geography, Technology and Society sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Human Resource Management in the Public ServicesBusiness and ManagementBUSM077Semester 27No

Human Resource Management in the Public Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a critical evaluation of the issues, challenges and processes involved in managing employees in the public services. It does so by considering the unique financial, political and legal context within which public personnel practitioners operate as well as the distinct characteristics of public sector jobs and those attracted to work within them, and examines the constraints and opportunities these place on personnel policy and its implementation. Themes covered in this module include resourcing and selection, pay and executive compensation, performance management, employee relations, values and organisational ethics, managing change and the relationship between human resource management and public sector performance. A further element of the course involves exploring the characteristics of public sector labour markets including trends, labour market policy initiatives and their impact. The module draws on case study evidence from multi- country institutional and organisational contexts and encourages students to assess how past legacies and recent reforms impact on HRM strategy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Dissertation - MPABusiness and ManagementBUSM083Full year7No

Dissertation - MPA

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Stella Ladi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation provides students with an opportunity to carry out independent research into a topic of their choice related to the aims of the MPA, subject to guidance from the dissertation supervisor. Each student will be required to have a registered dissertation topic and have been allocated a supervisor by the middle of the spring semester. NB. Students are prepared for the dissertation by taking the compulsory MPA module entitled ""Policy evaluation and research methods"" which includes lectures and classes on research design and methods. Additional methods support may be provided by dissertation supervisors in this module as required.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243Full year5Yes

British Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr James Strong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This module will provide students with an advanced knowledge of the British Political system. It is divided into two principal parts: the study of the institutions of British politics, and the study of political culture, behaviour and participation within those institutions. Topics covered include: constitutional reform, Parliament, Prime Minister and the Cabinet system, civil service devolution, role of the judiciary, representation, political engagement, electoral and party systems, political parties, electoral behaviour and pressure groups. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/243A; Spring Semester POL/243B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243ASemester 15Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Strong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This module will provide students with an advanced knowledge of the British Political system. It is divided into two principal parts: the study of the institutions of British politics, and the study of political culture, behaviour and participation within those institutions. Topics covered include: constitutional reform, Parliament, Prime Minister and the Cabinet system, civil service devolution, role of the judiciary, representation, political engagement, electoral and party systems, political parties, electoral behaviour and pressure groups. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/243A; Spring Semester POL/243B.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

British PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL243BSemester 25Yes

British Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Strong
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

This module will provide students with an advanced knowledge of the British Political system. It is divided into two principal parts: the study of the institutions of British politics, and the study of political culture, behaviour and participation within those institutions. Topics covered include: constitutional reform, Parliament, Prime Minister and the Cabinet system, civil service devolution, role of the judiciary, representation, political engagement, electoral and party systems, political parties, electoral behaviour and pressure groups. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/243A; Spring Semester POL/243B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

The International Politics of the Developing WorldPolitics and International RelationsPOL244Full year5Yes

The International Politics of the Developing World

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Jeff Webber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

The module explores both the international political economy of development and the comparative political sociology of the developing world. This involves analysis of explanations for the North-south divide, and national questions such as state formation, conflict, nationalism and civil war. The module also explores the utility of international political economy and comparative political sociology approaches (and the relationship between them), for understanding controversial contemporary political issues such as the rise of Asia, aid, state-building, and democratisation. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/244A; Spring Semester POL/244B.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

The International Politics of the Developing World IPolitics and International RelationsPOL244ASemester 15Yes

The International Politics of the Developing World I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jeff Webber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

The module explores both the international political economy of development and the comparative political sociology of the developing world. This involves analysis of explanations for the North-south divide, and national questions such as state formation, conflict, nationalism and civil war. The module also explores the utility of international political economy and comparative political sociology approaches (and the relationship between them), for understanding controversial contemporary political issues such as the rise of Asia, aid, state-building, and democratisation. Associate student registration: Autumn Semester POL/244A; Spring Semester POL/244B.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

AeroelasticityEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN410Semester 27Yes

Aeroelasticity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DENM032
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to provide an insight and understanding of, complex structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomenon, by use of the standard bending-torsion vibration paradigm to model the aircraft wing. The module will provide a phenomenological understanding of aeroelastic problems such as control reversal, wing divergence and wing flutter and associated structural dynamic aspects. It will give qualitative understanding of the analytical models of the coupled rigid and flexible body dynamics of future aerospace structures and introduce the dynamics of highly flexible aircraft.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Mechanics of Fluids IEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4101Semester 14Yes

Mechanics of Fluids I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Fluid Dynamics is one of the underpinning sciences in Engineering. Most engineering process involve fluid flow, including flow over aircraft, through combustion engines or cardiovascular flow. In this module we work from first principles to describe the hydrostatic pressure variation, then move on to analyse moving flow using the mass conservation, energy conservation and momentum balance equations.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Monday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Engineering Mechanics: StaticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4102Semester 24Yes

Engineering Mechanics: Statics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emiliano Bilotti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4121

This module provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of stress analysis for linearly elastic materials and their application to simple structures. It focuses on the behaviour of structures in particular beams and shafts, and provides underpinning knowledge for a range of analyses on applications relevant to aerospace, mechanical and medical engineering.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am -11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Engineering Mechanics: DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN4108Semester 24Yes

Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4121

This module provides an introduction to the modelling and analysis of one-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. It includes analysis of the motion (kinematics) of particles. It then goes on to deal with the forces causing these motions (kinetics) by the application of Newton's laws of motion. After this methods for the solution of the differential equation describing the equation of motion and one-degree-of-freedom vibrations will be studied and this will be applied to the description of vibrations of onedegree-of-freedom mechanical systems.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am -11 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Vehicular CrashworthinessEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN411Semester 17No

Vehicular Crashworthiness

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fabian Duddeck
Overlap: DENM033
Prerequisite: DEN331

The module aims to provide an in-depth description of all aspects related to the design of vehicles with respect to their crashworthiness. Here within are included technical aspects, social aspects and economical aspects, which are finally placed in the context of the total product development processes of current industries. Main parts are: history of crashworthiness, crash tests, structural aspects, material selection and modelling, numerical methods for crash, biomechanics, restraint systems and special aspects related to aerospace and automotive.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 11: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Surgical Techniques and SafetyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN412Semester 17Yes

Surgical Techniques and Safety

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su
Overlap: MELM003
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to a wide range of equipment for use in surgery. It looks at the importance of electrical safety within the medical environment, and the rules governing equipment. It also aims to cover the principles of operation of a number of important monitoring devices and some of the major electronic equipment used within a surgical environment.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economyGeographyGEG6129Semester 16Yes

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines significant shifts in South Asian politics, development and society with a particular focus on India. Students will cover nationalism and the "invention" of India, the politics of violence and nonviolence on the sub-continent, processes of economic liberalisation and development in India and its Diaspora. More specifically the module will encourage students to engage with questions concerning: everyday experiences of violence and nonviolence with respect to Hindu nationalism, and Islamist activism in a post 9/11 world; the rise of the middle classes, India¿s cities and citizenship experiences; processes of development including the role of the state and civil society/political society; the nature of political and social transformation in light of caste policies of affirmative action and experiences of education and (un/under)employment and finally the South Asian Diaspora and everyday life in the UK. Throughout the module students will be introduced to different theoretical approaches used by South Asian scholars such as feminist and postcolonial frameworks.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

New Product Development and Business EcosystemsBusiness and ManagementBUSM084Semester 27Yes

New Product Development and Business Ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The introduction and development of new products and processes is an essential drive of a firm's competitiveness. Yet, organizations do not operate in isolation but are a part of complex and increasingly globalized supply chains affecting innovation and new product development. The module Supply Chain and New Product Development enables students to analyze the innovation process within complex supply chains from the definition of a new product concept to the involvement of suppliers and partners in developing new product/process architectures. Students will address the organizational implications and challenges deriving from the involvement of partners and suppliers in new product development, through a blend of theoretical and case study based approaches. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate issues of Governance and Strategic Management, by addressing the dynamics underpinning the emergence of new technological platforms and by investigating issues of outsourcing and knowledge ""hollowing out"", architectural knowledge and path dependent product development, open innovation and architectural innovation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Behavioural Finance and Decision MakingBusiness and ManagementBUSM085Semester 27Yes

Behavioural Finance and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and challenges modern theory of finance and covers the major issues in behavioural finance and decision making. These include biases, which frequently occur in financial decision-making such as optimism, mental framing, over-reaction, trend-chasing, conservatism and anchoring of expectations. Emphasis is on related work in psychology in terms of several theories of human behaviour that have policy implications in Finance. Accordingly the module is arranged around:Traditional Finance and Historical development of behavioural finance, Biases in Financial decision making, their manifestation and reduction, Prospect theory and loss aversion, Use of mental frames in financial decision making, Heuristics and biases in financial forecasting, Group decision making processes, Financial Crisis and human behaviour, Empirical regularities such as overreaction and momentum, Introduction to experimental and empirical methodologies in measuring biases in fiancial domains.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Strategic ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM086Semester 17Yes

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the ""traditional"" competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches and time/timing. Throughout the course we will examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations as well as firms.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

International Business StrategyBusiness and ManagementBUSM089Semester 27Yes

International Business Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lutao Ning
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to introduce students to concepts and practices related to managing in a globally volatile, complex, dynamic environment within which organisations, national and international institutions and individuals interact. The elective is designed to be an advanced global strategic management course presenting material that is highly contemporary. This course provides balanced global strategic insights along with proven practical business frameworks and prepares you to respond quickly to today¿s challenging global environment.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

World Economy and DevelopmentBusiness and ManagementBUSM090Semester 17No

World Economy and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Liam Campling
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module offers a broad overview of the process of economic `globalisation¿ and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm ¿ set in the context of trends in the world economy, with particular emphasis on the period since the 1970s. It provides a critical and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins and development, theories of international trade and its regulation, conceptualisations of international supply chains, and attempts to reform and resist multinationals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

The International Politics of the Developing World IIPolitics and International RelationsPOL244BSemester 25Yes

The International Politics of the Developing World II

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jeff Webber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

The module explores the comparative political sociology of the developing world. This involves analysis of explanations for the North-south divide, and national questions such as state formation, conflict, nationalism and civil war. The course also explores the utility of international political economy and comparative political sociology approaches (and the relationship between them), for understanding controversial contemporary political issues such as the rise of Asia, aid, state-building, and democratisation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247Full year5Yes

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247ASemester 15Yes

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am -12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and SocietyPolitics and International RelationsPOL247BSemester 25Yes

Modernity: Theories of the State, Economy and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module explores the work of key thinkers who focus on the politics of modernity, with a three part division based on society, the state and the economy. It will look at writers such as Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Spencer, Keynes, Polanyi and Hayek, and how these writers have influenced different perspectives on issues that continue to dominate political debate in the current era, including class, the state, social and political movements, and national identity.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Comparative European PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL248Full year5Yes

Comparative European Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100 & POL105

The political map of contemporary Europe is changing rapidly and fundamentally, as the traditional boundaries between East and West and between domestic and international governance break down. This course aims to provide a pan-European introduction to the continent¿s politics - one rooted in a comparative rather than a country-by-country approach. After establishing ontological and epistemological foundations in comparative political science and setting the historical and socio-economic context, it moves on to tackle not just institutions (the nation-state, government and policy-making, legislatures, parties, pressure groups and the media) but also issues - participation, immigration, the supposed blurring of the left-right divide, and Europe in the world.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Comparative European PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL248ASemester 15Yes

Comparative European Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The political map of contemporary Europe is changing rapidly and fundamentally, as the traditional boundaries between East and West and between domestic and international governance break down. This course aims to provide a pan-European introduction to the continent¿s politics - one rooted in a comparative rather than a country-by-country approach. After establishing ontological and epistemological foundations in comparative political science and setting the historical and socio-economic context, it moves on to tackle not just institutions (the nation-state, government and policy-making, legislatures, parties, pressure groups and the media) but also issues - participation, immigration, the supposed blurring of the left-right divide, and Europe in the world.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 1Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN4122Semester 14No

Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 1

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Henri Huijberts
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provide students with knowledge of basic mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basic logic and methods of proofs, sequences and series, limits, differentiation and integration and partial derivatives. Students are introduced to command prompt applications of the numerical and symbolic toolboxes of Matlab.

Assessment: 91.0% Examination, 9.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN4123Semester 24No

Mathematics and Computing for Engineers 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jose Castrejon Pita
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4122

This module builds on DEN4122 Mathematics and Computing 1 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are complex numbers, basic vector algebra, matrix algebra and an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Students are introduced to programming techniques using Matlab.

Assessment: 85.0% Examination, 15.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN419Full year7No

Design and Innovation Year 4 Major Design Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Nobuoki Ohtani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN327 and DEN329

Students will be engaged in a self-initiated project of some weight; evolving their own practice and producing new and meaningful design work. Students will be expected to produce design work, which is appropriately contextualised and also produced to high professional standard. The student will experience the critical decision making in the design development process and learn to synthesize knowledge and understanding gained from previous modules in design and engineering. They will also demonstrate project management skills and how creative design work is produced.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN420Semester 27No

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: DEN320, DENM012
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN426Semester 27No

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xi Jiang
Overlap: DEN326, DENM021
Prerequisite: None

This module introduce fundamentals of combustions in automotive engine. Topics included in the module cover the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, EconomyGeographyGEG6130Semester 26Yes

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Subsequent to the introductory lecture, the module is divided into three sections. The first main section provides an historical and political overview of the 'war on terror' in relation to thinking about other types of wars. It considers how the prosecution of the war on terror has come to shape not only military, but also legal and governmental discourse and practice in the post 9/11 era. The second section invites students to consider ideas and practices of security as a central feature of this. It will consider the rise of private military contracting, immigration, humanitarianism, urban geopolitics, and the overlap between health and security concerns. The third section focuses on the political-economic underpinnings of many of these developments and challenges students to think of conflict as an embedded social phenomenon: as much a part of contemporary discourses on the economy as it is something with merely economic implications. The final, concluding lecture will examine alternatives to the dominant framings of modern conflict that have been put forward and critiqued thus far.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GeographyGEG6132Semester 16No

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5102

This module explores advanced issues in relation to the principles, techniques and applications of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) within the wider geographical remit (e.g. advanced spatial analysis, location-allocation models, interoperability and exchange of data between different systems, etc.). It complements the GIS training offered in levels 4 and 5 of and provides an opportunity to students to consolidate and expand their knowledge about GIS.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geography, Technology and SocietyGeographyGEG6134Semester 26Yes

Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will develop students' critical engagement with the geographies of knowledge, technology and society. The module will discuss the theoretical and conceptual fabric of geographies of science, paying close attention to its development through studies in the history and sociology of science and Science & Technology Studies (STS). It will then apply these theoretical and conceptual tools to understanding a select number of case study examples of hubs of scientific innovation in the life sciences and Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Religion, Belief and SpaceGeographyGEG6135Semester 16Yes

Religion, Belief and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module offers an overview of the ways in which social and cultural geographers are contributing a spatial understanding of the practices and ideas of religion and belief. This important and emerging field of enquiry is responding to questions arising from the growing complexity and variety of religious landscapes ¿ particularly within urban centres and suburbs ¿ as a result of migration and social mobility. The module will consider key theoretical debates and developing themes, including the idea of post-secularisation, the development of alternative forms of spirituality, knowledge and experience, and the ways in which everyday spaces are being `implicated in religious meaning-making¿ to enhance and also challenge `religious life, beliefs, practices and identities¿ (Kong, 2010). The module will also investigate the role of gender, age and the body in reproducing and challenging religious values and identities, and the different sensuous and affective ways in which the sacred is experienced and reproduced within religious buildings, `sacred sites¿, and beyond. Lastly, it will explore how ethical and spiritual ideas and organisations have become influential in community development, urban social welfare, inter-faith work, and in rethinking culture-nature relations.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Global Supply Chain ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM091Semester 27Yes

Global Supply Chain Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Over the last few decades the business world has become more complex, fragmented, and geographically scattered. As firms outsource a growing portion of the activities and functions that were previously carried out in-house, they become one element of a multifaceted and intricate process of value creation and capture that cut across firms' and states' borders: the supply chain. As value-creating activities and functions are shared between ever more players their linkages increase as well as their interdependence. The study of global supply chains and their management looks at this scattered environment: the linkages and relationships among firms, and among firms and other actors; and focuses on how leading firms attempt to drive this complexity in multiple ways, whether by increasing coherence, consistency and unity in the supply chain, or by shifting costs to other chain members and increasing competitive pressures among them.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

MRes DissertationBusiness and ManagementBUSM093Full year7No

MRes Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is available to MRes Business and Management students only. Given that the programme is a Masters by research, it is appropriate to have a longer length dissertation (15,000 words) than the standard SBM PG dissertation (10,000 words). This will enable students to bring together the learning from the taught methods modules and the taught subject modules into an independent piece of work that will act as a springboard for a research career and/or PhD study. The module is core.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Introduction to Marketing Theory and ConceptsBusiness and ManagementBUSM094Semester 17Yes

Introduction to Marketing Theory and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shoutong Thomas Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will provide an overview of marketing across national boundaries and within countries in foreign markets. It will focus on the opportunities to be gained from international marketing, and also its dangers and the challenges that marketers face when they operate in foreign markets. The course will begin by examining the reasons and rationale behind firms deciding to market overseas. It then goes on to analyse the decision making processes behind which markets firms should enter, examining political, economic, social, legal and technological factors. Following this, market entry strategies will be discussed and then the integrated marketing mix of product, price, place and promotion will be taught from an international perspective. Implementation, customer relations and the increasingly important role of e-marketing will also be discussed.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 5 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Social and Political MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM095Semester 27No

Social and Political Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Arianna Bove
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Relationship and Network MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM096Semester 17Yes

Relationship and Network Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephan Henneberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module Relationship and Network Marketing provides students with an overview of important aspects of business-to-business marketing. For this purpose, students will explore crucial underlying concepts of relationships and networks as well as develop a sense of business marketing practices. Thus, the module covers both relationship marketing and network marketing theory and practice and thereby fosters an understanding of how organisations are embedded in a net of business exchanges, which create interdependencies between business actors. Using collaborative and cooperative relational management provides firms within such nets with the possibility to mobilise important external resources via business partners in the supply and customer network. The module will use case studies and practical example throughout.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 6 pm - 8 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Comparative European PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL248BSemester 25Yes

Comparative European Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The political map of contemporary Europe is changing rapidly and fundamentally, as the traditional boundaries between East and West and between domestic and international governance break down. This course aims to provide a pan-European introduction to the continent¿s politics - one rooted in a comparative rather than a country-by-country approach. After establishing ontological and epistemological foundations in comparative political science and setting the historical and socio-economic context, it moves on to tackle not just institutions (the nation-state, government and policy-making, legislatures, parties, pressure groups and the media) but also issues - participation, immigration, the supposed blurring of the left-right divide, and Europe in the world.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

US PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL250Full year5Yes

US Politics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Daniel Kato
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

The United States remains an important actor in the world and understanding its politics is vital both in comparison to other political systems and in terms of how its own political outcomes emerge. The module provides a comprehensive overview of US politics, starting from its foundations in the Constitution, through the core institutions of US government, and the political process itself. The module covers rival perspectives on understanding US politics and government, as well as core thematic areas such as political culture, informal actors in the political system, the influence of ideas, foreign policy, and an understanding of race, class and gender in US politics and society.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251Full year5Yes

International Relations Theory

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr David Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251ASemester 15Yes

International Relations Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

International Relations TheoryPolitics and International RelationsPOL251BSemester 25Yes

International Relations Theory

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL100,POL106"

This is the core second-year module for International Relations students. Through deep, careful and critical engagement with primary texts, it introduces students to key thinkers in and the main currents of International Relations theory: liberalism; realism; the English School; constructivism; Marxism; post-structuralism; post-colonialism; and feminism. The module covers the most fundamental questions in international politics: why do war and suffering persist? Can we hope for a better future? If so, how can we get there? If not, what should we do instead?

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Analysing Public PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOL350Semester 16Yes

Analysing Public Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Diamond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

The aim of this module is to examine the theory and practice of policy-making in modern liberal democratic political systems. The module explores the way in which public issues and problems are triggered, defined and constructed, how policy agendas are set, how decision making takes place, and how policies are implemented. The module is comparative in scope and focuses primarily on case studies from the UK and USA.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Gas TurbinesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN427Semester 27No

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DENM022, DEN306
Prerequisite: None

Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306, but there will be additional directed reading on this module, to enable students to tackle a substantial piece of coursework. This will concern the energy use in power and propulsion systems and the optimisation of land-based power-generating gas turbines in combined cycles with steam plant or similar project.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 8 am - 8 am
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Biomedical Engineering in UrologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN430Semester 17Yes

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight
Overlap: DENM016
Prerequisite: None

The course explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, catheters, pads and implantable devices and materials. Initially the course covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including NHS clinical engineerings.

Assessment: 55.0% Examination, 45.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 9 am - 9 am

Economics and Management of Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN433Semester 27Yes

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: DENM023
Prerequisite: None

This module will equip you with the fundamental tools of economics and management principles. You will learn about their application to conventional and sustainable energy conversion powerplants; systems and their components; and life cycle analyses of energy systems. In addition to understanding the key aspects of international energy supply and demand economics, (and their effect on fuel prices and energy sources), you will also consider the effects of national and international energy policy and emissions regulations on the overall energy scene, analyse developments in the energy markets, and assess the overall impact on environmental issues.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Renewable Energy SourcesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN438Semester 17Yes

Renewable Energy Sources

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hua Wang
Overlap: DENM035
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to equip students with an appreciation of the global energy scene and the impacts of energy production and consumption on the environment. The module provide the students with an understanding of the origin and nature of various renewable/sustainable energy resources, the assessment of their ability to meet our future energy demands, and the design of renewable energy systems.

Assessment: 150.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Engineering Materials for DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5002Semester 25Yes

Engineering Materials for Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MAT4002,DEN5101

This module provides an introduction to engineering materials, providing the student with an understanding of how the structure of materials (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites) influences their properties and performance when used in products and how these properties can be improved. It will cover how to structure business and financial plans and how to produce them, as well as providing an understanding of project management methodologies.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Design For ManufactureEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5101Semester 15Yes

Design For Manufacture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Raza Shah
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4001, MAT4002

This module will develop strategies to identify product requirements, identify design constraints, think creatively, solve problems and identify solutions. It will examine how 3D CAE can be used to create detailed design drawings, create simple assemblies, manufacture prototypes, real parts and also how analytical models such as finite element analysis can be used to evaluate designs. A wide range of different processing techniques will be examined. Various strategies such as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) that can be used to evaluate the design risk, will be described to determine 'safe' design. The role of inspection and statistical process control techniques in ensuring a robust design and manufacturing process will be examined.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm

Cold EnvironmentsGeographyGEG6202Semester 26Yes

Cold Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5206

The module selectively addresses processes active in the glacial and the periglacial environment: glaciogenic (both ice and meltwater) erosion, transport, sedimentation, permafrost and ground ice and their effects on fluvial, aeolian and gravitational processes. For each of these processes the resulting landforms, both in active and in fossil form, will be treated, together with features resulting from converging processes. Examples are drawn from the Arctic, the Antarctic and high mountain ranges, while examples of fossil features are mainly drawn from western Europe.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Environmental HazardsGeographyGEG6203Semester 16Yes

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Project in Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG6212Full year6No

Project in Environmental Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5211

An independent project based upon field, and/or laboratory, and/or numerical modelling work within the field of Environmental Science. NB This module is compulsory for all final-year students registered for an Environmental Science degree (F850) and is not available to students registered for any geography degree. By the end of the second term in your second year you will have to put forward a proposal for your topic, you will be allocated a supervisor based on this proposal. The main research takes place during the summer vacation between your second and third years. Any laboratory analysis should be completed by the end of the first semester in your third year. The work should be preceded by an exploratory study during the Easter vacation of your second year. Data analysis and writing up of the project takes place during the first and second terms of your third year. You are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss the project. The results of your research are presented in a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. Not open to associate students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Science and Politics of Climate ChangeGeographyGEG6214Semester 16No

Science and Politics of Climate Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines one of the most contentious issues facing society in the 21st Century. The module studies the operation of the global climate system, with an emphasis on different aspects of human intervention, and possible implications for changing climates. This module investigates how climate change is (mis-)communicated by primary scientists, politicians, businesses, individuals and communities, and how climate change is used as a geopolitical tool to influence decision-making at individual to supra-national scales.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Research Methods for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM098Semester 27No

Research Methods for Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lily Jampol
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will introduce students to the concepts and practices of scholarly and practitioner marketing research. It will introduce students to research design, address the breadth of research methods used in the field, and the underlying logic (methodology) of those methods. The following will be covered: Key quantitative techniques (e.g., descriptive statistics and methods of hypotheses testing), qualitative methods (e.g., content analysis and contemporary anthropological methods such as netography), key data gathering methods (e.g., surveys, interviews and focus groups), as well as secondary sources.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Dissertation for ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM100Full year7No

Dissertation for Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for International Financial ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM101Full year7No

Dissertation for International Financial Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment RelationsBusiness and ManagementBUSM102Full year7No

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment Relations

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Globalisation: Issues and DebatesPolitics and International RelationsPOL355Semester 16Yes

Globalisation: Issues and Debates

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL240

The module provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes. It examines these influences through detailed analysis of contemporary manifestations of globalisation, including the study of global production and commodity chains, state-market relations, the nature and direction of capital flows, patterns of global inequality, international institutions and global governance, questions of cultural homogenisation/imperialism, the US state and globalisation and East Asia and globalisation, and anti-globalisation. The module aims to provide students with a well-rounded understanding of the globalisation debate, and how this relates to contemporary international and global political issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOL358Semester 16Yes

US Foreign Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephen Pinkerton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The United States plays a powerful role in contemporary international relations. Therefore understanding its place in the international system and how its foreign policy is made are of crucial importance for every student of international relations. The module broadly focuses on the theme of American power in the world, through three areas: the historical development of US foreign policy, the institutional background, and current expressions of American power. Knowledge of these areas will give a solid overview and understanding of US foreign policy in the contemporary world.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

The Politics of the Post-Colonial Middle EastPolitics and International RelationsPOL365Semester 16Yes

The Politics of the Post-Colonial Middle East

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Phillips
Overlap: POL347
Prerequisite: POL240

This module will be designed to provide an introduction to the politics of the contemporary Middle East from the end of the First World War until the present day. The course aims to put the politics of the Middle East in the broader perspective of comparative political science and international relations. It will help students to develop a broad understanding of how the contemporary Middle East has evolved since 1918 and to identify and examine the key issues dominating politics in the region. It will deal with major contemporary themes like the rise of political Islam, the political economy of oil and the prevalence of politically motivated violence.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Latin American PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL369Semester 26Yes

Latin American Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jeff Webber
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL240

Students will survey the major theoretical approaches to understanding Latin American politics and political economy. The course will be designed to provide an introduction to the region from the end of the Second World War until the present day. The course aims to put the politics of Latin America in the broader perspective of comparative politics, international relations, and international political economy. It will help students to develop a broad understanding of how contemporary Latin America has evolved since 1945 and to identify and examine the key issues dominating politics in the region and its relationship to international politics and the global political economy. It will deal with major contemporary themes such as neoliberalism and 'post-neoliberalism', social movements, gender and ethnicity, the rise of the new Latin American Left, regional integration, and the relationship between Latin America and the US, as well as other emerging world powers.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Nationalism and Ethnicity in International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL371Semester 26Yes

Nationalism and Ethnicity in International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "POL106, POL240"

The aim of this module is to study the impact of nationalism and ethnicity in international relations by combining a theoretical approach with the study of a range of case-studies to be developed after reading week. The module considers the concepts of nation and nationalism in classical social theory by examining the work of Marx, Durkheim and Weber. It then moves on to analyze a range of theories of nationalism formulated in the twentieth century with a particular focus on the work of B. Anderson, E. Gellner, and A. Smith. The first part of the module concludes by exploring whether nationalism and cosmopolitanism can ever be compatible.
The module proceeds by examining the relationship between ethnicity and self-determination. It also studies the role of ethnicity in the development of fascist and Nazi regimes across Europe; a topic which is employed as springboard for the analysis of migration and the rise of the radical right across today¿s Europe. It concludes by considering the relationship between ethnicity and violence.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Solid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5102Semester 25Yes

Solid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Vassili Toropov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4102

This module further develops material taught in the first year with respect to stresses and strains in components and how they may be designed to prevent failure. It considers plane stress and strain conditions, using matrix notation to describe these conditions and the failure criteria that may be applied to these systems. It also considers complex bending conditions in asymmetric and composite beams and the stability of struts. Examples will be drawn from applications in aerospace, mechanical and medical engineering.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Energy Conversion AnalysisEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5107Semester 15Yes

Energy Conversion Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Mohamed Adjali
Overlap: DENM510
Prerequisite: DEN4006,DEN107

This module will develop the ideas introduced in DEN4006 Energy Conversion Systems and study how energy conversion systems can be analysed quantitatively. To do this it will use many of the concepts and fundamental laws introduced in DEN107. It will also analyse reacting flows with particular reference to combustion and their application to the analysis of internal combustion engines.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Engineering InstrumentationEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5109Semester 15Yes

Engineering Instrumentation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Hasan Shaheed
Overlap: DENM109
Prerequisite: None

This module is focused on transducers and their uses in engineering control systems. It studies methods of taking measurements, and motor and actuator theory, reviewing important transducer characteristics and the methodology for selecting an appropriate transducer. In relation to this, the module also covers methods of acquiring data from transducers, and effectively processing electronic signals. All aspects of the module content are brought together in a problem based learning exercise, involving the control of a robotic arm.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am -12 pm

Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5122Semester 15No

Grad, div and curl: Vector Calculus for Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Henri Huijberts
Overlap: DENM512
Prerequisite: DEN4122. DEN4123

This module builds on DEN4122/4123 Mathematics and Computing 1/2 to provide students with knowledge of more advanced mathematical and computing techniques that are essential for Engineering students. Topics covered are basics of vector calculus, vector and scalar fields, gradient of scalar fields, optimisation, div and curl of vector fields, vector integration, integral theorems, curvilinear coordinates, application to derivation of the Navier-Stokes Equations.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Integrated Catchment ManagementGeographyGEG6218Semester 26Yes

Integrated Catchment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldene Wharton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Flood risk is increasing at the same time as our rising demand for water. And European legislation, now transposed into UK law, also requires our rivers to achieve good ecological status. There is growing recognition by environmental policy makers and managers that floods, low flows and water quality need to be managed in an integrated way if sustainable solutions are to be found. This module builds on the knowledge of catchment-scale processes gained from GEG5203 Earth System Cycles and applies this knowledge to the practical management of the water environment. Students will gain an understanding of: the issues facing managers of water resources and the water environment; the legislative and policy drivers for management; and the latest approaches being implemented to achieve sustainable and integrated management in the catchment context.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG6221Semester 26No

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will work independently to identify, research and review a wide range of contemporary, primary literature in a chosen area of Environmental Science or Physical Geography. Through a series of small group seminars students will be given the opportunity to discuss and present their findings to both their peers and a member of academic staff. Through these seminars they will also receive feedback on their work.

Broad research themes will be identified at the beginning of the semester (during module registration and advising) to reflect the research interests and expertise of staff available to lead seminars. Students will select a theme within which they can choose their own research topic and will be allocated to a seminar group. The seminars are either staff or student led. In order to benefit from these seminars students must prepare for them in advance and be prepared to critically discuss their peers¿ work.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystemsGeographyGEG6222Semester 26Yes

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Geo-ecology is an interdisciplinary science that studies organisms, air, water and land as interacting components of a single geo-ecosystem. A central tenet is that components of the system must be considered in relation to one another and to the larger whole, rather than in isolation. Geo-ecosystems are 'messy' and cause-and-effect is often cyclical rather than linear. In this module, we will examine selected topics in this field, taking a practical approach through the use of spatial data and models. You will learn how to analyse spatial patterns in the landscape and to investigate the underlying processes and interactions. Developing this approach of `systems thinking¿ is vital to understanding and, where possible, managing environmental issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Dissertation for International BusinessBusiness and ManagementBUSM103Full year7No

Dissertation for International Business

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for Management and Organisational InnovationBusiness and ManagementBUSM104Full year7No

Dissertation for Management and Organisational Innovation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for Accounting and ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM105Full year7No

Dissertation for Accounting and Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation for MarketingBusiness and ManagementBUSM106Full year7No

Dissertation for Marketing

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Paolo Antonetti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBusiness and ManagementBUSM107Semester 17Yes

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are reported and disclosed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control resource allocations and generate performance evaluation, credit ratings and monitor shareholder value. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and manage corporate organizations towards generating income for liquidity and capitalizations for solvency where both are essential and maintain a reporting entity as a going concern.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 8 pm

Africa and International PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL372Semester 16Yes

Africa and International Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Africa has consistently been ignored by many of the major social science disciplines. Many of the major theoretical traditions treat Africa as either irrelevant to great power politics, or as simply an effect of great power or class domination. This module aims to introduce students to Africa's international relations, African-centric perspectives which challenge traditional academic approaches and seeks to locate Africa's fate not merely in processes of imperial domination but also in African social and class configurations themselves. This is a distinct approach which centres the teaching of Africa on the continent itself, rather than exclusively on what external actors are doing to it. This is not to dismiss the influence of external actors and processes, but to reveal the many cases of where this distinction between the external and internal in Africa has limited utility in explaining events and processes on the continent.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Parliamentary StudiesPolitics and International RelationsPOL373Semester 16No

Parliamentary Studies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Philip Cowley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Every democracy has a legislature which performs a number of key functions, most obviously representation and scrutiny and, in the case of parliamentary systems, the formation, maintenance and possibly the dismissal of governments. This module focuses on the way that the UK parliament performs those functions, focusing not just on formal processes but also on cultural norms and ideological conflict. It will (with the help of staff from the House of Commons and a visit to Westminster) look, among other things, at the role of MPs both in the Commons and in their constituency, at the House of Lords, at Select Committees and the scrutiny they carry out, at the organisation and cohesion of parliamentary parties, at legislative-executive relations, and - of course - at how laws are made.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Race and Racism in World PoliticsPolitics and International RelationsPOL377Semester 16Yes

Race and Racism in World Politics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to the theoretical and practical importance of race and racism in the historical construction of modern world order. The module will also enable students to assess the continued ¿ and possibly transformed - significance of race and racism for contemporary world politics. Tackling the various topics in the module, students will re-examine a number of concepts and issue areas all of which hold contemporary importance for the International Relations discipline (IR). Although the focus of the course is on political issues, adequately analysing ¿race¿ nevertheless requires an inter-disciplinary approach that combines work undertaken in anthropology, history, sociology and literature. Students will therefore also benefit from an inter-disciplinary approach to key issue areas in IR.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm

Utopia and Dystopia: Political, Economic and Literary DreamworldsPolitics and International RelationsPOL380Semester 16Yes

Utopia and Dystopia: Political, Economic and Literary Dreamworlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Dunkerley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to a wide range of approaches to Utopian and Dystopian thought and literature. It concentrates on political, economic, and literary dreamworlds since the 16th century. Imagination means `image making¿, and in this sense, we look at utopias as images, snapshots of political desire that reproduce, in the negative, darkness as light, light as darkness, a set geometry of oppression, the contours of a present frustrated.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

The Politics of Southeast AsiaPolitics and International RelationsPOL381Semester 16No

The Politics of Southeast Asia

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lee Jones
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL244

"This module provides a critical introduction to the political economy, domestic politics and international relations of post-colonial Southeast Asia. It begins with a broad survey of the region¿s development and state-making strategies and the domestic power relations generated by rapid capitalist development. A thematic section then explores how these power relations condition political outcomes domestically and internationally. Topics may include: democratisation, human rights, gender, labour and emancipatory politics, development, the environment, and regional economic and security governance."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Monday 9 am - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Control Systems Analysis and DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5200Semester 25Yes

Control Systems Analysis and Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Li Guang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is focused on the basic principles of control systems analysis and design and its application to engineering systems in relation to mechanical, medical, electro-mechanical and aerospace systems. The students will acquire the skill of designing a control system for a particular application. They will also gain practical experience in analysis and design of a typical control system with MATLAB using the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures and problem solving sessions.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am -11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics IEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5208Semester 25Yes

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4101,DEN107

The role of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics in materials science. The module will begin wilth derivation and description of some fundamental kinematics and thermodynamic phenomena such as Gibbs free energy, rate equations, equilibria etc. The effect of variables such as temperature and pressure will be examined. The module will go and to demonstrate with examples how these can be applied to solve problems for gas, solution, and solid phase scenarios with a particular emphasis on polymer synthesis.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Aerothermodynamics of Fluid FlowsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5242Semester 15Yes

Aerothermodynamics of Fluid Flows

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4101,DEN107

This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows, formation of waves, Mach number and Mach Wave, Shock-Waves, effect of area change and back pressure on the flow of gases and its application to jet engines and wind tunnels, flow measurement and flow visualization in compressible flows. Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of compressible aerodynamics and its implication in aerospace engineering. The second part of the module provides students with a basic knowledge of viscous flows and boundary layers and drag.

Assessment: 90.0% Examination, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 7 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Fluid Mechanics of the Cardiovascular SystemEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5300Semester 25Yes

Fluid Mechanics of the Cardiovascular System

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yi Sui
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN4101

This module further develops material taught in the first year about fluid mechanics. It introduces more complex concepts including the role of the boundary layer and the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. It will describe the non-Newtonian nature of blood, haemodynamics and pulsatile flows. It will consider flow in the context of the human cardiovascular system, including the structure of the vascular network and blood vessels, the heart anatomy and cardiac cycle, flow through bifurcations and bypass grafts. It will consider the clinical relevance of the endothelial cell and their function.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 1 pm

Neuromuscular Bioelectricity and BiomechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN5302Semester 15No

Neuromuscular Bioelectricity and Biomechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Lei Su
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module proposal results from a review of the Undergraduate Engineering programmes in Aerospace / Mechanical / Medical Engineering and is a compulsory module for the Medical Engineering programme. It broadens the programme with topics not previously disucssed at level 5, with the capacity available as a result of delivering more materials content in year 1 of the programme

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm

Engineering Industrial ExperienceEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN616Full year6No

Engineering Industrial Experience

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof James Busfield
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will be helped to secure a work placement through a range of new initiatives in a company appropriate to the programme. The work placement will normally be a year in length but not less than 6 months. Successful students with a placement will each be allocated a tutor, a SEMS academic in a relevant field, who will wherever practical visit the student twice in the year. Where a visit is not possible the tutor will ensure that there is email and telephone contact with the student. SEMS will also identify a mentor in the workplace at each employer. This person is likely to be their line manager and will be expected to support as well as line-manage the student. Students completing the module will be required to work on a project that will allow them to follow a pathway toward CEng registration approximately three years after graduation; maintain a training diary to be reviewed by their tutor during and after the placement is completed; attend at least one Industrial Liaison Forum to share their experience with other SEMS students; deliver one seminar at QMUL to promote future opportunities at their sponsor; complete a final report on the placement.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGeographyGEG6223Semester 16No

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5222

The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Advanced Readings in GeographyGeographyGEG7101Semester 17Yes

Advanced Readings in Geography

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Unlike other option modules, Advanced Readings in Geography will be taught on an individual basis and only in exceptional circumstances. The student would be required to complete a proposal explaining why s/he would like to conduct advanced level readings on a clearly defined area of research that is not covered in detail on other MA/MSc courses. If an appropriate colleague agrees to supervise the Readings module, fortnightly meetings will be held to discuss the readings and to develop the 5000 word paper. The course is essentially self-directed, like equivalent courses taught elsewhere at Masters level.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Art, Performance and the CityGeographyGEG7102Semester 27Yes

Art, Performance and the City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module centres on projects by artists and cultural practitioners in London and particularly its East End. It involves critical reading, background research, and engaging with practices and sites through documentation, excursions and discussions with artists. The module begins with sessions on cultural practices of urban exploring and walking. Sessions then introduce and discuss particular cases that form the basis for research and seminar discussion. These may include historical walking tours in East London; artistic walking projects by Francis Alys, Tim Brennan, Janet Cardiff and Iain Sinclair; cinematic representations by Patrick Keiller; controversies about place and politics involved in Rachel Whiteread's House, completed in 1993 at a site on Grove Road next to Queen Mary; and contemporary artistic engagements with the Olympics site. Through these materials, the module explores geographical and political issues concerned the art and the city, and aspects of the changing nature and practice of urban cultures in London and its East End.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Dissertation 15,000 WordsGeographyGEG7107Full year7No

Dissertation 15,000 Words

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 30,000 WordsGeographyGEG7108Full year7No

Dissertation 30,000 Words

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Leading Organisational ChangeBusiness and ManagementBUSM108Semester 17Yes

Leading Organisational Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stefan Krummaker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will investigate and discuss leading change in organisations from a theoretical sound and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on organisational change processes and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. Furthermore, understanding and challenging practices of leading change will contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, the module will focus
- forces and conceptual perspectives of organisational change
- theories and concepts of leading change - in particular Transformational Leadership (visionary, motivational and inspirational leadership)
- creating an environment for creativity and innovation
- leading change in different cultural environments
- responsible leadership in organisational change
- followers' role in and contributions to organisational change
- organisational energy and energising leadership strategies
- avoiding overacceleration and stress in organisational change
- self-leadership in organisational change

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 5 pm - 8 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 8 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Thursday 9 am - 3 pm

Human Resource ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM110Semester 17Yes

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides learners with a critical understanding of the internal and external contexts of contemporary organisations, including the managerial, business, regulatory, labour market and institutional contexts. It further examines the role of the HR function, HR strategy and the link between HR and organisational performance. The module also introduces the major functions of HRM including resourcing, performance management, learning and development and explores the applications in professional practice in different types of organisational scenarios (large, small, global, national, public, private). This is further achieved through additional skills workshops that engage learners in the analysis of case studies, role play and problem solving exercises. Finally, the module seeks to understand the impact of globalisation on employment and its implications for HR strategy and practice.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Management ConsultingBusiness and ManagementBUSM111Semester 27Yes

Management Consulting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adedoyin Atewologun
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what management consultancy is, the variety and types of consulting firms and the markets they serve. We will examine a range of approaches to consultancy as a process of diagnosing management and organisational problems, designing implementing and evaluating organisational interventions. We will examine studies of some of these interventions and case studies we will examine how consultants present their knowledge and expertise, the claims they make for its efficacy and the role of ethics in this. We will examine and explore different kinds of organisational context where management consultancy has been used: firms, public institutions, voluntary organisations and other organisational forms. We will also practise skills critical for consultancy such as diagnosis, intergroup facilitation and evaluation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Applied Empirical MethodsBusiness and ManagementBUSM112Semester 27No

Applied Empirical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides a non-technical overview of quantitative methodologies frequently used in finance and international business research.

The module is data driven and covers the basics of: Hypotheses testing, OLS and Logistic Regression Analysis, Instrumental Variables, Time Series Analysis, Panel Data Models, Differences-in Differences, Sharp and Fuzzy Regression Discontinuity. The module also teaches how to apply these methods using STATA (a leading econometrics software).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Political Violence and Liberal ModernityPolitics and International RelationsPOL383Semester 26Yes

Political Violence and Liberal Modernity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jean-Francois Drolet
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module will introduce students to some of the most important intellectual debates concerning political violence and late modernity as a principle of socio-historical formation. More specifically, the course will draw on literature from various fields such as political theory, philosophy, sociology and international relations to consider the relationship between political violence and the changing nature and consequences of structural phenomena associated with the process of 'liberal modernisation' since the end of the nineteenth century (e.g. secularisation, societal rationalisation, technology, the transnationalisation of production and exchange, decolonisation, the constitutionalisation of the global order, the criminalisation of war etc.). The themes covered include state violence, civil war, revolution, imperialism, genocide, ethnic cleansing, humanitarian warfare and terrorism/counter-terrorism. "

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Global EthicsPolitics and International RelationsPOL385Semester 16Yes

Global Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kimberly Hutchings
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines debates across the field of Global Ethics. It introduces students to frameworks for thinking about global moral questions concerning for example: the global distribution of wealth, the appropriate meaning of human rights in a multi-cultural world, environmental sustainability, migration, development aid, conflict-resolution and transitional justice. Students will be expected to evaluate different approaches to ethical judgment and to apply them to real world dilemmas.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

The European UnionPolitics and International RelationsPOL386Full year6No

The European Union

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL100

European integration is the most far-reaching development of voluntary supranational governance in world history. The objective of this module is to explore in the first semester the origins, development, and institutions of the EU. In the second semester major policies and policy-making processes are examined such as the single market, monetary union, agriculture, regional development, environment, asylum and immigration and foreign policy. Finally, the module focuses on current EU developments such as enlargement and the role of the EU on the international stage. Students will be introduced to existing and evolving theories of integration and will examine the complex operation of the EU as a political system. They will also analyse the political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

The European UnionPolitics and International RelationsPOL386ASemester 16Yes

The European Union

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"European integration is the most far-reaching development of voluntary supranational governance in world history. The objective of this module is to explore in the first semester the origins, development, and institutions of the EU. In the second semester major policies and policy-making processes are examined such as the single market, monetary union, agriculture, regional development, environment, asylum and immigration and foreign policy. Finally, the module focuses on current EU developments such as enlargement and the role of the EU on the international stage. Students will be introduced to existing and evolving theories of integration and will examine the complex operation of the EU as a political system. They will also analyse the political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration"

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6311Semester 26Yes

Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: MAT4003

This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature. The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage. It brings this together considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6335Semester 16Yes

Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Stark
Overlap: DEN7335, DENM335
Prerequisite: DEN4121, DEN4108, DEN5108

The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment: 85.0% Examination, 15.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6405Semester 26Yes

High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEB7405, DENM405
Prerequisite: DEN5242

This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics , design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am -12 pm

Intercalated Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6407Full year6No

Intercalated Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Tina Chowdhury
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Implant DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6437Semester 26Yes

Implant Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Julia Shelton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: DEN5101, DEN4101, DEN4102, DEN5102, DEN331, MAT4002

The module includes a review of the design process concept and its application to implantable medical devices, as well as reviewing materials for use in the body. Issues related to biomaterial evaluation will be covered including biocompatibility, material response to the physiological environment, matching the mechanical environment and preparation of devices for clinical use. It will consider the relevant stakeholders in the design of medical devices. It will use the design methods and evaluation tools appropriately in a hands-on approach for each of the key steps to support the overall design process of medical implants.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2Engineering and Materials ScienceDEN6208Semester 16Yes

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: DEN7208, DENM208
Prerequisite: DEN5208

This module covers more advanced topics in heat transfer, developing the ideas introduced in DEN5208 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics 1. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; fins; heat exchangers; phase change; turbulent flows; compressible flow.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN6305Semester 16Yes

Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEN7305, DENM305
Prerequisite: DEN233, DEN303

This module is concerned the design and performance of a broad range of aerospace vehicles including fixed-wing aeroplanes (subsonic and supersonic), helicopters, hovercraft, airships, and launch vehicles.
Coursework and tutorial materials involve use of spreadsheets, but the module is primarily assessed by a written exam.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Friday 5 pm - 7 pm

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGeographyGEG710USemester 27Yes

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 22,500 WordsGeographyGEG7118Full year7No

Dissertation 22,500 Words

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Geographical Thought and PracticeGeographyGEG7120Full year7Yes

Geographical Thought and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides subject-specific research training in human geography and will cover core understanding of key concepts and approaches to human geography research; subject specific research and transferable skills; and qualitative and quantitative, subject specific methodological and presentation techniques. This module will equip students with the skills necessary to design and implement an extended piece of primary research.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Cultural Geography in PracticeGeographyGEG7122Semester 17Yes

Cultural Geography in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on what could be described as creative and public cultural geographies. It explores the ways in which cultural geography is being undertaken and disseminated through forms of creative practice, participatory approaches and collaborative projects. These include collaborations between cultural geographers and creative practitioners and collaborative relationships with public cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries. Through class discussions and on site explorations of current examples, the module explores the contexts, approaches, practical strategies, possibilities and challenges of creative and public cultural geographies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Cities, Space and PowerGeographyGEG7123Semester 17Yes

Cities, Space and Power

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the relationships between space and power in different cities in the past and the present. Focusing on debates about the emergence and contestation of urban public space, the module uses a range of materials ¿ poetry, novels, art, film, newspaper stories and fieldwork ¿ to explore how the city¿s geographies have been shaped and reshaped by relationships of power. The course uses London, past and present, as a key example, and develops comparative perspectives through other city examples, such as Los Angeles and colonial and post-colonial Calcutta/Kolkata.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Corporate ReportingBusiness and ManagementBUSM113Semester 17Yes

Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Charles Abela
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organizations such as the EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB.

This module considers how changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for integrated corporate reporting (including Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting) and also Integrated and Business Model Reporting

Students will understand and appreciate how financial statements have evolved to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income . The evolution of accounting standards --financial instruments and fair value reporting and debates on the accounting conceptual framework.

How do external consultants impact upon disclosed financial information: role of valuation advisers, actuaries etc in terms of the various forms of accounting standard: financial instruments, tangible assets, pension fund accounting etc

Impact of new institutions on the nature of corporate reporting (IIRC, WRI, UNEP)

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

International Business AnalysisBusiness and ManagementBUSM114Semester 17Yes

International Business Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the nature of international business and key analytical techniques for the operation of a business in a global setting. This module will involve developing a critical understanding of the key techniques that can be employed to support the allocation of corporate resources within an international sphere of operation. It will introduce you to the notion of resource and regulatory arbitrage.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

International FinanceBusiness and ManagementBUSM115Semester 27Yes

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

As the international company becomes the norm rather than the exception, the need to internationalize the tools of financial analysis is apparent. We now live in a highly integrated world economy, and it is crucial that businesses understand both the risks and opportunities that globalization brings. This module is designed to immerse student in the international dimension of financial issues. It specifically focuses on the international aspects of financial management so you are able to appreciate the issues that international investments and money management that international operation involves.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Management ControlBusiness and ManagementBUSM116Semester 17Yes

Management Control

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of management control in relation to: the nature of corporate governance and the importance of resource stewardship. Corporate governance is concerned with the stewardship of resources and risk management techniques. This module will cover the nature of corporate governance and obligations of managers to manage resources, controls costs and returns on investment whilst taking into account risks

Governance as resource stewardship
Types of budgeting process
Business planning/forecasts
Variance analysis and cost control
Allocation of capital and investment analysis
Demands for shareholder value and control metrics
Risk management /analysis

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 1 pm

Risk and Crisis ManagementBusiness and ManagementBUSM117Semester 27Yes

Risk and Crisis Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This qualitative module introduces students to the distinctive features of risk and crisis management. Core concepts of probability, severity, uncertainty, anticipation, resilience, robustness and bias are explored as the module examines, in turn, managerial varieties of bias among managers and regulators in risk perception, assumptions underpinning approaches to assessment and contrasting approaches to the management of risk. It focuses on operational risk, risks of external shock, risks of system failure, risk to customers and clients, and political risk. Throughout the module, regulatory requirements and imperatives for risk management are given full attention. The final weeks will introduce students to decision-making and public relations issues during crises and dealing with regulatory and government bodies when company crises escalate to become matters of wider public concern.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Research ProjectPolitics and International RelationsPOL388Full year6No

Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Lee Jones
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"The project is designed to give students the opportunity of studying an agreed topic under supervision on an individual basis and to a greater depth than is possible within existing modules. Students must fill in the pre-registration form and should undertake a programme of preparatory work during the long vacation. A programme of research workshops will be provided in the first semester and each student will have an opportunity to present their research to a small group in the second semester. Assessment is on the basis of two coursework assignments and a dissertation of 12,000 words. For more details, please read below. This module is compulsory for single honours Politics students and single honours International Relations students, joint honours History/Politics students cannot opt for this module."

Assessment: 80.0% Dissertation, 12.0% Practical, 8.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

The Political Life of Security MethodsPolitics and International RelationsPOL389Semester 26Yes

The Political Life of Security Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jozef Huysmans
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines contemporary security practice through the methods they use. It introduces students to (a) the security life of methods -- how methods shape contemporary security situations -- and (b) the political controversies about their use -- the political life of methods. The module will cover a range of controversial methods, for example: the deployment of anthropological knowledge and methods in counter-insurgency, the role of algorithms in surveillance, the rise of big data in security governance, the use of visual methods in security practice and their political contestation, the rise of forensic methods in criminal investigations of war, and scenario planning and foresight in anticipating catastrophes. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of security methods and their limits, and evaluate their political and social effects.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 1 pm - 6 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Race and Racism in World Politics: Independent ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL390Semester 26Yes

Race and Racism in World Politics: Independent Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL377

This module builds practical research skills in the area of race and racism in world politics through the undertaking of an independent, but supervised and structured, project. Students will undertake literature reviews, observational analysis, and social media analysis of the global racial dynamics that influence life in London.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

The International Politics of Africa: Independent ResearchPolitics and International RelationsPOL391Semester 26No

The International Politics of Africa: Independent Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Brett
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: POL372

The module focuses on changing international perceptions and understandings of African politics. It does this by allowing students to conduct independent research on film and newspaper coverage of the continent since independence, focusing on one country that has particularly interested them in POL372. Assessment will nonetheless be highly structured, the module organiser providing significant assistance with research materials.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 5: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Parliamentary Studies - InternshipsPolitics and International RelationsPOL392Semester 26No

Parliamentary Studies - Internships

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Tim Bale
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to give those who take it a view of British parliamentary politics from the inside out. Students will spend three days per week between January and April working for a parliamentarian, either at Westminster or in constituency offices, or both. The module will be assessed by students completing a reflective journal of their day-to-day experiences. An internship is an intensive and demanding exercise, but should provide a formative experience and useful skills for those interested a career in politics or politics-related fields.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Issues and Debates in International RelationsPolitics and International RelationsPOL400Semester 36No

Issues and Debates in International Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nicholas Hostettler
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students enrolled on the Summer School in International Relations to key debates and issues in contemporary International Relations. In addition to exploring key theories and concepts, students will also learn about particular conflicts, discuss contemporary wars, debate the ethics of intervention and the use of violence, as well as consider the logic and impact of interventions. Students will learn how international institutions function, how they respond to global and international threats, and how they attempt to mediate wars and conflicts.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Theories of Policy Making ProcessPolitics and International RelationsPOLM001Semester 17No

Theories of Policy Making Process

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Marius-Ionut Calu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will equip you with the skills to think critically about the theory and practice of policy making in contemporary states. It introduces the concept of the policy cycle and proceeds to consider a range of frameworks which conceptualise policy-making from alternative paradigms on the nature of rationality and decisions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am

Medical Ethics and Regulatory AffairsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7020Semester 27Yes

Medical Ethics and Regulatory Affairs

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof David Lee
Overlap: DENM702
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to applied medical ethics and law related to the development of new products in the field of bioengineering. It provides knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of approval of products for clinical use in the UK, the EU and the US, risk management and design processes.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Numerical Optimisation in Engineering DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7026Semester 27Yes

Numerical Optimisation in Engineering Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Jens-Dominik Mueller
Overlap: DENM026
Prerequisite: DEN401,DEN403

1. Introduction.
Motivating examples. Sizing, shape and topology opt, Local vs Global opt. Deterministic vs. stochastic opt, linear vs. non-linear, unconstrained vs constrained opt.

2. Deterministic Optimisation
* Unconstrained Optimisation.
Line search vs Trust region methods. Line search methods: Armijo and Strong Wolfe Conditions. Steepest descent algorithm. Search directions: nonlinear conjugate gradient method, Newton's method; Quasi-Newton methods.
* Constrained Optimisation
Penalty methods, interior point methods
* Computation of derivatives Finite-Differences, tangent linear models, adjoints, automatic differentiation

3. Stochastic Optimisation
* Population-based methods
Genetic algorithms, Evolutionary algorithms, Simulated annealing, Particle swarm methods, Multi-criteria evolutionary strategies
* Surrogate modelling
Design of Experiments, Response surface methods, Kriging, Regression models

4. Applications
* Parametrisation
Shape optimisation methods (CAD-based methods, surface and volume morphing, re-meshing techniques), Topology optimisation methods (negative / positive voxel methods)
* Industrial applications
FEM applications in structural opt of shape and topology, CFD applications in shape optimisation
* Overview of commercial software

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7208Semester 17No

Advanced Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: DEN6208, DENM208
Prerequisite: None

This module covers advanced topics in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. It develops and builds on ideas in heat transfer commonly found in undergraduate mechanical and energy degree programmes. The following topics will be covered: transient heat conduction; heat exchanger theory and design; phase change; heat transfer in turbulent flows; heat transfer in compressible flows.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace VehiclesEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7001Semester 17Yes

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DENM001
Prerequisite: None

This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Migration and MobilitiesGeographyGEG7129Semester 27Yes

Migration and Mobilities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Cathy Mcilwaine
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores theoretical, empirical and policy dimensions of patterns and processes of migration and mobilities in a global context and consciously across the global North/global South 'divide' from a scalar, relational and networked perspective. Although the focus will be on the nature and dynamics of contemporary movement of people, the module will also incorporate an analysis of the movement of information, goods and capital as framed within the `new mobilities paradigm¿. Theoretically, the module analyses the key framings of contemporary migration in relation to transnationalism, diaspora and post-national citizenship. In turn, it will interrogate the nature and links between transnationalism, multiculturalism and/or integration; the migration-development nexus; the politics of irregularity and 'illegality'; the relationships between the emergence of global cities and a migrant division of labour; the nature of global gendered mobilities and power and mobility as well as the interrelations between conflict, violence and mobility.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Global working livesGeographyGEG7131Semester 27Yes

Global working lives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alan James
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module explores the economic-development geographies of people's everyday struggles to make a living in the contemporary global economy. Drawing on research within and across the Global North and Global South, this module engages with an exciting 'labour geographies' research agenda, concerned with how workers are capable of fashioning the geography of capitalism to suit their own needs and self-production; and to identify geographical possibilities and labour market strategies through which `workers may challenge, outmaneuver and perhaps even beat capital¿ in different locations. The module seeks to expose the spatial limits of mainstream 'universal' theories in geography which presume that 'the economy' and 'labour' can be theorised solely from the perspective of the formal spaces of advanced capitalist economies in the global North.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 10 am -12 pm

Implementation and EvaluationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM003Semester 27No

Implementation and Evaluation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Diamond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide a critical overview of the theory and practice of two of the 'end' stages of the policy process: implementation and evaluation. The module will explore the development of theoretical and empirical academic literature and provide opportunities for you to apply this material to selected case studies relevant to the group. Practitioners will be encouraged to reflect on their practices and experiences. The module will be delivered by means of lectures, workshops and distance learning.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

DissertationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM017Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Masters' Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics completed over the summer months (May-August) of your degree programme. It is a compulsory element of your degree amounting to sixty credits (providing one-third of the credits for your degree). It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student's specific research interest in an area not covered by other module modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the department who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOLM026Semester 27No

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides students with a detailed examination - and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world. It examines these influences through detailed analysis of contemporary manifestations of globalisation, including neo-liberalism, US hegemony and contemporary imperialism, capital flows, global commodity chains, state-market relations, patterns of global inequality, international institutions, and questions of cultural homogenisation/imperialism. The module also examines the ways in which globalisation is resisted, focusing on the rise of transnational social movements and NGOs, and the politics of anti-globalisation, and how this relates to an ostensibly post-development era. In addressing these issues, the module concludes by asking the most important question: how do we think of development in an era of globalisation, US hegemony, neo-liberalism and imperialism?

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

International Security: War and Peace in a Global ContextPolitics and International RelationsPOLM027Semester 27No

International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bryan Mabee
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, as well as forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states. The module offers an examination of the ways in which violent conflict and the use of force impact on international relations, how force is used by states and other actors, and how force is managed in world politics. The module surveys a variety of perspectives on the causes of war and peace in order to better examine the roots of violent conflicts and security problems in the present day. A major theme is looking at war in a global context, not only in terms of integrating contemporary concerns with globalisation, but also by looking at interconnections between north and south, and war and society. Additionally, the responses of the international community to violent conflict will also be explored, looking broadly at the contested notion of the "Just War", international law, and the role of the United Nations. Overall, the module gives a broad perspective on the place of armed force in contemporary international relations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7335Semester 17No

Advanced Spacecraft Design: Manoeuvring and Orbital Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof John Stark
Overlap: DEN6335, DENM335
Prerequisite: DEN4121, DEN4108, DEN5108

The module introduces students to the factors which influence spacecraft design and highlights the need for a systems engineering approach. The module will provide students with a suitable mathematical description of orbital motion in order to understand spacecraft trajectories about the earth and simplified techniques for planning interplanetary space missions. Underlying principles of all spacecraft propulsion technologies are described, with some detailed focus on electric propulsion.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Modelling and Control of Mechanical SystemsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7336Semester 27Yes

Modelling and Control of Mechanical Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Henri Huijberts
Overlap: DENM336, DENM336
Prerequisite: None

This module builds upon the control and dynamics modules of earlier years to prepare the students for more advanced methods. Modelling of mechanical systems using the Euler-Lagrange and Hamiltonian methods is introduced. Modal methods are used to analyse linear multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Modern nonlinear control methods for mechanical systems are introduced.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 15.0% Practical, 15.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Aircraft DesignEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7305Semester 17No

Advanced Aircraft Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEN6305, DENM305
Prerequisite: DEN233, DEN303, DEN307, DEN306, DEN427, DEN6405, DEN7405

This module is concerned with the design and performance of a typical aircraft. It covers mission based subsonic aircraft design methodology, areodynamic design, engine design, and noise in propeller and jet driven aircraft, structural design and materials selection.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm

Advanced Tissue MechanicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7311Semester 27Yes

Advanced Tissue Mechanics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Himadri Gupta
Overlap: DENM311
Prerequisite: MAT4003

This module is concerned with natural biological materials and how design is optimised for appropriate function. It reviews the structure and composition of natural biological materials and their resulting mechanical properties, before covering how these build to make the wide range of biological structures we see in nature.
The methods by which structures are able to function effectively within their natural load environment are also covered, in addition to how they may change with age, disease or damage.
It brings this together, considering the current methods for characterizing and investigating structure-function in tissues and the latest understanding and thinking which is driving the field.

Assessment: 65.0% Examination, 35.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Retheorizing development futuresGeographyGEG7132Semester 17Yes

Retheorizing development futures

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide the theoretical framework underpinning all the modules for this programme. Teaching will be divided into 4 blocks each examining key substantive themes: (i) Hybrid worlds seminars will introduce students to key debates challenging the academic and disciplinary divides between economic and development geography. In particular these seminars will challenge the representation of the global South as a collection of people and places in need of development intervention and where geographic theory and knowledge travels to, and the economy as only operating in and through advanced economies. These seminars will encourage students to challenge these boundaries and recognise an increasingly interconnected global South and North. (ii) Gendered development futures seminars will focus on the gendered history of development highlighting the critical junctures at which the discipline has been engendered. It will introduce students to key gender and development theories and approaches and the changing nature and politics of gender scholarship. (iii) Citizenship, justice and democracy will focus on questions of contemporary citizenships and their position with regards to democracy and rights. Detailing feminist and postcolonial frameworks, it will highlight the uneven geographies and experiences of democracy, citizenship and rights. (iv) Transnational migration and mobilities will introduce students to contemporary theoretical approaches to migration and mobility focusing particularly on transnational theory. Unpacking the complex mobilities of people, commodities and money, these seminars will particularly focus on migrant remittances illustrating the increasingly contested nature of these flows in relation to the migration-development nexus and the 'financialisation of development'.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Independent Research ProjectGeographyGEG7202Full year7No

Independent Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module allows the student to undertake a piece of independent, supervised research on a topic within the scope of physical geographical and environmental science research. The project may involve working with a partner organisation and it may therefore have an applied focus or contribute to the work of that organisation. The project will normally involve field and/or laboratory work, together with use of appropriate data analysis tools.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Project-Specific Research TrainingGeographyGEG7204Semester 17No

Project-Specific Research Training

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce the student to research issues, methodologies and field and laboratory procedures that are appropriate to the research topic top be investigated in the Independent Research Project, including theoretical background and context, research design and project management. The research area for the project will therefore significantly determine the module content. The module is delivered through formal supervisory sessions, together with appropriate field and/or laboratory training.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Public Policy: Concepts and PracticePolitics and International RelationsPOLM050Semester 17No

International Public Policy: Concepts and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleanor Brooks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine the key concepts, debates, actors and processes within international public policy in the contemporary period. Concepts explored include cooperation, international law, globalisation and governance, and regionalism. The module will explore the role of various agents, including states, international organisations, regiobal organisations, private authorities and NGOs in the processes of international public policy-making. The course also examines these issues through a series of case studies, including climate change negotiations, the global financial crisis, human rights regimes, European policy-making and the International Criminal Court.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Political AnalysisPolitics and International RelationsPOLM058Full year7No

Political Analysis

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores core concepts used in the study of politics from different theoretical perspectives. Students who do not come from a politics background, or who might have studied politics in institutions outside of the UK, will benefit from the introduction that this module provides to the study of politics in the UK academy. A further purpose of the module is to help students develop study skills that will help them succeed in their other modules, particularly, the ability to read, think and write analytically and critically.

Assessment: 100.0% Final Mark
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Approaches to Political EconomyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM059Semester 17No

Approaches to Political Economy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the theoretical foundations of the contemporary analyses of advanced capitalism. How have thinkers within politics and economics theorised and analysed the relationship between the two disciplines? Is it even possible to analytically distinguish between the two? The aim of this module is to answer these two questions by reference to the major theories within the field of political economy. The module analyses both classical and contemporary theories of political economy, and explores their continued relevance to understanding the development of advanced capitalism. Towards the end of the module we will consider some heterodox approaches brought to the fore by the onset of the ongoing financial and economic crisis and consider their relevance.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

Case studies in EU Policy-makingPolitics and International RelationsPOLM066Semester 27No

Case studies in EU Policy-making

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is designed to offer students an in-depth analysis of the EU¿s competence in a number of policy areas including the Single Market, competition policy, the Eurozone, the Common Agricultural Policy, employment and social policy, and environmental policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Themes and Cases in US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM040Semester 17No

Themes and Cases in US Foreign Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Dunkerley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will consider the principal forms in which US foreign policy has been practised and interpreted since the foundation of the Republic. Amongst these are American Exceptionalism and Anti-Americanism, spheres of influence, liberal interventionism and protectionist isolationism, Cold War containment, the War on Terror following 9/11, and the strains on unipolarity in the early 21st century. Amongst the case studies linked to these themes, we shall consider the role of Native Americans and immigration, the war of 1898, gunboat diplomacy in the Caribbean, the ideas of Woodrow Wilson, the Vietnam War, the consequences of the 9/11 attacks, and the challenges posed by China.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Advanced High Speed AerodynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7405Semester 27No

Advanced High Speed Aerodynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEN6405, DENM405
Prerequisite: DEN5242

This module reviews fundamentals of thermodynamics and introduces compressible flows and moves towards more advanced topics in compressible flows. Oblique shock waves, expansion waves, shock-expansion theory, wave interactions and wave drag will be discussed. Design of the supersonic inlets and nozzles in aircraft and rocket propulsion including method of characteristics, design of high speed test facilities including shock tubes will be addressed. Effects of heat and friction on gas flows. Design aspects of high speed aeroplanes and viscous effects will be discussed and analysed including fundamentals of hypersonic flows and high temperature gas dynamics.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am -12 pm

Whole System Design in Sustainable EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7433Semester 27Yes

Whole System Design in Sustainable Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: DENM433
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the nature of sustainability and various sustainability models before examining the role of national and international government agencies on environmental management. The role of technology is examined, primarily through life cycle analysis, and includes design of products, energy supply, and personal consumption. A particular emphasis will be placed on life cycle analysis of wind, solar and nuclear.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Energy Storage EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7600Semester 27Yes

Energy Storage Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ana Jorge Sobrido
Overlap: DENM600
Prerequisite: None

This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Introduction to Solar EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN7601Semester 27Yes

Introduction to Solar Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Joseph Briscoe
Overlap: DENM601
Prerequisite: None

This module will give students a thorough understanding of the importance of energy storage in the field of Sustainable Energy Engineering and provide them with an advanced understanding of key processes in the area of electrochemical storage such as batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells etc. The module will also address fundamental aspects of electrochemistry associated with energy storage devices and introduce the concepts of hydrogen economy, storage and utilisation. It will also cover mechanical and thermal energy storage technologies and discuss aspects related to system integration, with a particular focus on their use for the integration of renewable energy into low-carbon power systems. The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, as well as sessions focused on laboratory practicals and will feature guest lecture from industrial practitioners.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace VehiclesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM001Semester 17No

Advanced Flight Control and Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DEN7001
Prerequisite: None

This is an advanced integrated MSc module consisting of the main topics that are of primary importance to aerospace vehicle flight control and flight simulation. The module aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the principles of flight control and aerospace vehicle simulation. Basic functions of aerospace and launch vehicle flight control systems synthesis and the kinematics and dynamics of flight simulation including pilot physiological modelling and human factors would be covered as part of the course.
A student on the course can expect to gain design experience with the application of the numerical simulation of aerospace vehicle dynamics associated with a variety of such vehicles provided he/she completes all tutorial and the supplementary design exercises. He/she could also expect to gain experience in using the School's integrated flight simulation facility.
On completing the course the student would be able to parametrically design and synthesise a typical aerospace vehicle control subsystem.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Aerospace Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM003Full year7No

Aerospace Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Environmental Science Research and PracticeGeographyGEG7206Semester 17Yes

Environmental Science Research and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to current research issues and approaches in environmental science. Students will develop an understanding of the nature and scope of environmental science research, enabling them to engage with a wide range of research debates. They will conduct an in-depth review of research on a specific topic of interest, and evaluate the utility of different research approaches to investigating that topic. The module is delivered via lectures from guest speakers and seminars with physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Desk StudyGeographyGEG7305Semester 17Yes

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary environmental science issue or specialised area of environmental science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Individual Research ProjectGeographyGEG7308Full year7No

Individual Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students are encouraged to undertake their Individual Research Project in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation The theme for the Individual Research Project is selected by the student in collaboration with the module organiser and in most cases with the practitioner organisation in order to ensure that the project and practitioner link matches the research interests and career aspirations of the student. Students not wishing to link with a practitioner organisation can opt to undertake a free-standing research project of their choice, subject to approval by the module organiser. In either case, the project is undertaken over a twelve week period, and each student is allocated an academic advisor from the MSc academic staff to ensure that they receive appropriate academic guidance during the research. The project report will be marked by two members of the MSc academic staff (usually including the student's advisor) and, where the project is in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation, comments on the project by the link person in that practitioner / user organisation will also be taken into account.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGeographyGEG7310Semester 27Yes

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Theories of the Policy-Making ProcessPolitics and International RelationsPOLM069Semester 17No

Theories of the Policy-Making Process

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Marius-Ionut Calu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to theories and concepts associated with the analysis of the contemporary policy-making process. The module will also provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in applying theoretical concepts to empirical work and vice versa.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Case Studies in EU Policy MakingPolitics and International RelationsPOLM072Semester 27No

Case Studies in EU Policy Making

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a detailed analysis of policymaking in practice to supplement the theoretical training received in the core module.

The object is to enrich understanding of the nature and practicalities of the British and European Union policymaking process, based on empirical case studies. After an introduction to the policymaking environment the module focuses each week on a detailed case study of British policymaking in a first part and of European Union policy-making in a second part, with an accent on topicality.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of DevelopmentPolitics and International RelationsPOLM073Semester 27No

Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Raymond Kiely
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The course provides students with a detailed examination ¿ and critique - of theories of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

The EU as an International Actor (Distance Learning)Politics and International RelationsPOLM067Semester 27No

The EU as an International Actor (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Sarah Wolff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aims of this module are to provide students with a theoretically informed understanding of the European Union¿s international role, the different tools through which the European Union pursues its external relations, and the historical junctures and patterns of development of its international presence.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Implementation and EvaluationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM068Semester 27No

Implementation and Evaluation

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Diamond
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course aims to provide a critical overview of the theory and practice of two of the `end¿ stages of the policy process: implementation and evaluation. The course will explore the development of theoretical and empirical academic literature and provide opportunities for students to apply this material to selected case studies relevant to the group. Practitioners will be encouraged to reflect on their practices and experiences.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Security: War and Peace in a Global ContextPolitics and International RelationsPOLM074Semester 27No

International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Bryan Mabee
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Violent conflict and the use of force remain salient issues in contemporary international relations. While some have theorised that the advent of globalisation and spread of liberal democracy would make the use of force and violent conflict less relevant to the world, war and conflict have remained an integral part of the international system, as well as forming an obstacle to providing stability and security for many states. This module will engage with these issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Themes and Cases in US Foreign PolicyPolitics and International RelationsPOLM075Semester 17No

Themes and Cases in US Foreign Policy

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Dunkerley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course will consider the principal forms in which US foreign policy has been practised and interpreted since the foundation of the Republic. Amongst these are American Exceptionalism and Anti-Americanism, `spheres of influence¿, liberal interventionism and protectionist isolationism, Cold War containment, the `War on Terror¿ following 9/11, and the strains on unipolarity in the early 21st century. Amongst the case studies linked to these themes, we shall consider the role of Native Americans and immigration, the war of 1898, gunboat diplomacy in the Caribbean, the ideas of Woodrow Wilson, the Vietnam War, the consequences of the 9/11 attacks, and the challenges posed by China.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

DissertationPolitics and International RelationsPOLM077Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Robbie Shilliam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Masters¿ Dissertation is an independent programme of study of an approved topic within the field of Politics. It is designed to enable students to undertake independent research and, through this, allow them to develop a specialised knowledge in an area of the Politics discipline which is of particular interest to them. Thus, it may draw upon, and develop an existing topic or issue associated with a module that they have studied in the earlier part of their programme, or emerge out of a student¿s specific research interest in an area not covered by other course modules. Although the dissertation is meant to be an exercise in independent research and writing, each student will be offered guidance and support through the assigning of a supervisor within the School who will oversee the progress of the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Computational EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM004Semester 17No

Computational Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pihua Wen
Overlap: DEN401
Prerequisite: None

This is advanced module in computational modelling focusing on computational solids. Both finite element method and boundary element method are covered together with applications to medical, aero and mechanical engineering. Hands on experience in solving engineering problems using commercial packages is an important part of the module.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Biomedical Research ProjectEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM006Full year7No

Biomedical Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The project consists of an individual piece of work, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. It can take either one, or a combination, of the following forms: (i) an experimental investigation; (ii) a computational exercise; (iii) the development of a piece of experimental apparatus; (iv) a design study; (v) a theoretical analysis; (vi) a review of a topic of current interest. Not open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Computational Fluid DynamicsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM010Semester 27No

Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sergey Karabasov
Overlap: DEN403
Prerequisite: None

Following on from an introduction to CFD in DEN331, in this module we deepen our knowledge in various areas. We learn to analyse the properties of discretisations and apply these to simple model equations. We discuss the various aspects of modelling turbulence. In the accompanying laboratory, we learn to generate meshes, solve viscous flow problems on these meshes and perform the relevant analysis of the quality of our simulations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm

RoboticsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM011Semester 27No

Robotics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ranjan Vepa
Overlap: DEBN408
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces robotics as an integral part of modern automation, provides an introductory insight into the engineering design and application of robot manipulator systems. It also provides an understanding of kinematics, dynamics and trajectory planning of robotic manipulators, actuators and sensors, principles and roles in robotics. It introduces various aspects of robot modelling and control and problems encountered in robot programming and their remedies.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Environmental EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM012Semester 27No

Advanced Environmental Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Peter Wormleaton
Overlap: DEN320, DEN420
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for fourth year MEng and for MSc students. It will be taught alongside DEN320 Environmental Engineering and so will contain all of the materials on that module. Students should refer to the description of DEN320 for details of this part of the course. Additional lectures will be provided on advanced numerical environmental modelling including risk analysis, decision theory, probabilities and Monte-Carlo simulation. Students will complete a group project which will involve some of these more advanced analysis and modelling techniques.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm

Research Methods and Experimental Techniques in EngineeringEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM014Semester 17No

Research Methods and Experimental Techniques in Engineering

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yousef Zawahreh
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces MSc students to design of research projects, use of equipment and analysis of the collected data. After a completion of the module the students will be able to devise and plan research projects, conduct research of their own and achieve optimal results from the equipment in use. The link between mathematical models, experimental design, experimental results and validation tests will be made clear

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Biomedical Engineering in UrologyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM016Semester 17No

Biomedical Engineering in Urology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Knight
Overlap: DEN430
Prerequisite: None

The course explores a broad range of medical engineering associated with the areas of urology. Topics will include surgical instrumentation, imaging and diagnostics, tissue engineering, catheters, pads and implantable devices and materials. Initially the course covers the basic anatomy, physiology of the urinary tract in health and disease, with particular reference to clinical incontinence. The course will utilize tissue and fluid mechanics to examine the biomechanics of the bladder and urodynamic clinical assessment. Specialist information will be provided by outside lecturers including NHS clinical engineerings..

Assessment: 55.0% Examination, 45.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Biogeosciences and Ecosystem ServicesGeographyGEG7313Semester 27Yes

Biogeosciences and Ecosystem Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Flood Risk Management and ModellingGeographyGEG7314Semester 17Yes

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is divided into two linked elements. The first explores the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are examined and novel management options for reducing flood risk (including strategic rural land management and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) are critically reviewed. Flood protection in London is explored through a field trip to the Thames Barrier and potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are reviewed. The second component of the module is focussed on flood risk modelling. A combination of lecture and practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm

River Assessment and RestorationGeographyGEG7317Semester 17Yes

River Assessment and Restoration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide the key knowledge and understanding at an advanced level necessary to support the development of management strategies for rivers along the catchment to coast continuum. Based upon an understanding of the multi-dimensional connectivity of fluvial systems, the module focuses on themes such as sediment and vegetation dynamics, river and floodplain process-form relationships, environmental flows, ecohydraulics and particular issues relating to constrained urban environments. Based on a solid scientific underpinning, the module introduces the legislative context, methods of field survey and assessment, and integrated approaches to the sustainable management of river systems, their flood plains and estuaries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Catchment Science in PracticeGeographyGEG7318Full year7No

Catchment Science in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Miss Giuditta Trinci
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will connect students with the water sector practitioner/ stakeholder community and deepen understanding of science-based catchment management. The module will explore the ways in which advances in scientific understanding of catchment systems and developments in water policy have been translated into management, and the challenges associated with this. Students will engage with a diverse range of practitioners and stakeholder groups including government organisations, environmental consultancies, third sector/ charitable organisations and professional bodies to gain a broader perspective on catchment management and to develop a network of contacts. The module will also provide students with an opportunity to reflect on the knowledge and skills developed during the programme and how these can be communicated effectively to potential employers. The module is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars led by Geography teaching staff, guest lectures and workshops by representatives from the water sector, field visits, student-led reading groups and attendance at external events.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Thermodynamics IEngineering and Materials ScienceDEN107Semester 24Yes

Thermodynamics I

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: A-level Mathematics and Physics, or equivalent

This module formally introduces the fundamental principles of general non-equilibrium thermodynamics; it examines applications of single-constituent fluids, and provides background for all applications in engineering.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am -11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Political AnalysisPolitics and International RelationsPOL105Full year4No

Political Analysis

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Brendan O'Duffy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module serves as an introduction to a politics degree and the ideas, skills, methods and knowledge required to succeed in your studies of politics. You will be trained in a range of study and research skills, from enhancing your ability to write analytically to learning how to interpret a wide variety of political texts. You will also have the opportunity to interact with your personal tutor and conduct a small, independent research project. The module is taught through lectures and seminars, as well as through direct contact with your personal advisor.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8,

Vocational Placement (Distance Learning)Politics and International RelationsPOLM078Semester 27No

Vocational Placement (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Paul Copeland
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to work in and contribute to the political processes that are key to their chosen programme of study. The module will be delivered through a self-organised vocational placement. Students will be required to conduct a placement organization project and a self-reflective portfolio.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

The EU as an International ActorPolitics and International RelationsPOLM079Semester 27No

The EU as an International Actor

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Marius-Ionut Calu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The aims of this module are to provide students with a theoretically informed understanding of the European Union¿s international role, the different tools through which the European Union pursues its external relations, and the historical junctures and patterns of development of its international presence.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

International Public Policy: Concepts and Practice (Distance Learning)Politics and International RelationsPOLM080Semester 17No

International Public Policy: Concepts and Practice (Distance Learning)

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Eleanor Brooks
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

"This module will examine the key concepts, debates, actors and processes within international public policy in the contemporary period. Concepts explored include cooperation, international law, globalisation and governance, and regionalism. The module will explore the role of various agents, including states, international organisations, regiobal organisations, private authorities and NGOs in the processes of international public policy-making. The module also examines these issues through a series of case studies, including climate change negotiations, the global financial crisis, human rights regimes, European policy-making and the International Criminal Court."

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

International Relations of the Middle EastPolitics and International RelationsPOLM081Semester 27No

International Relations of the Middle East

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Christopher Phillips
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will use the analytical tools of International Relations to study the Middle East. It will do this by examining the interaction of the post-colonial states that make up the region with the trans-national forces of Islam and Arab nationalism on one hand and European and American interventions on the other. The result of these interactions is a series of fierce but weak Middle Eastern states, vulnerable to both the international system and their own populations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental ScienceGeographyGEG4002Full year4No

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aids the transition to university by developing basic learning skills including reading and essay-writing as well as field observation and recording, through lectures and small-group tutorial work. In the Green London Project students explore urban environmental management in London, developing their social capital by working in small groups, becoming part of the community of geographers and environmental scientists at QMUL and learning how research, including ¿citizen science¿, can impact on organisations that are managing green spaces in London.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geography in the WorldGeographyGEG4003Semester 14No

Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on academic geography and the application of geographical knowledge and skills by academic geographers and students in their future careers. It provides an understanding of academic geography as engaged with the world and situated within wider society. We address key geographical practices, explore the relevance and application of academic geography, and consider new developments in citizen science and activist, participatory and public geography. The module includes a field trip to the Royal Geographical Society and employability lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental ScientistsGeographyGEG4004Full year4No

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating EnginesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM021Semester 27No

Advanced Combustion in Reciprocating Engines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Xi Jiang
Overlap: DEN326
Prerequisite: None

This module covers fundamentals and applications of combustions in automotive engine. Topics covered in the module include the principles of operation of spark and compression ignition engines, energy and fuels, fuel properties for use in engines, combustion and flame development in CI and Si engines, gaseous and particle emission, and regulations, as well as additional directed advanced reading material in energy use in power plants, combustion modelling and life cycle analysis.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Gas TurbinesEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM022Semester 27No

Advanced Gas Turbines

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Fariborz Motallebi
Overlap: DEN427, DEN306
Prerequisite: None

Much of the content is thermodynamics, applicable to both aerospace propulsion and to power generating gas turbines. The lectures and tutorials will be common with those for DEN 306, but there will be additional directed reading on this module, to enable students to tackle a substantial piece of coursework. This will concern the energy use in power and propulsion systems and the optimisation of land-based power-generating gas turbines in combined cycles with steam plant or similar project.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Economics and Management of Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM023Semester 27No

Economics and Management of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Peters
Overlap: DEN433
Prerequisite: None

This module describes the global energy scene including a historical review of energy supply and demand trends, fossil fuels and climate change, what is renewable energy and a review of sustainable energy sources. It describes Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, accounting and management principles, the free market structure, cartels, barriers to entry, and example applications in the energy field. Applications related to energy vectors and technologies for power plants are included. Policy and climate change issues are discussed, including the emissions regulations. A thermo-economic analysis of various conventional and renewable power plants and their components is included.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Clinical MeasurementsEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM024Semester 27No

Clinical Measurements

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pavel Novak
Overlap: DEN406
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide an understanding of biopotentials and other biological signals, and identify mechanisms by which they can be measured. It also aims to provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental principals associated with transducers, and comprehensive review of the most widely used techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of disease states

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm

Research Project in Sustainable EnergyEngineering and Materials ScienceDENM025Full year7No

Research Project in Sustainable Energy

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Adrian Briggs
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to: define appropriate and achievable goals and relevant structured tasks in order to achieve the desired outcome of the project. Demonstrate knowledge of the current st