Undergraduate

Taster lectures in Law

Friday 21 June

Lecture 1

Time and location: 12.45pm-1.15pm, ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre

Title: How to start a war

Description: The decision to invade Iraq in 2003 was widely considered a disaster. It reduced a sovereign nation to ruins, flared sectarian violence and arguably gave birth to terrorist groups in the region. However, the UK has since launched military action in Libya, Syria and again in Iraq. What are the laws governing when the UK can launch a military attack? Are there ways in which we can hold the UK government or parliament to account under our domestic law? What might the repercussions of resorting to military action be for our country’s security?

Speaker: Dr Tanzil Chowdhury

Lecture 2

Time and location: 3.45-4.15pm, ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre

Title: An unjust law is no law at all

Description: History is full of examples of despots and tyrants doing horrible things, from the British Empire, Apartheid in South Africa and the US, to the Nazis during 1930s Germany. Yet the genocides, famines and racism that all these episodes in history fuelled were in some respects, “legal”. Does a law have to be moral or can laws in fact justify immoral ends? What function do laws and a legal system have? Do they preserve order, do they protect humans and allow them to flourish, or are laws merely the will of a ruling class?

Speaker: Dr Tanzil Chowdhury

Saturday 22 June

Lecture 1

Time and location: 12.45pm-1.15pm, ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre

Title: Can the Law keep up with social change?

Description: In the UK today, there are millions of co-habiting couples whose relationship is not formally recognised in law. This shift has tested the Chancery Court's response to how it addresses the question of shares in a quasi-matrimonial home when a relationship breaks down. Rupert Seal looks at how Equity has adapted to this social change.

Speaker: Mr Rupert Seal

Lecture 2

Time and location: 3.45pm-4.15pm, ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre

Title: In it together?

Description: With ever-rising house prices, many young people are buying properties together with friends. While this has allowed people who can’t otherwise afford it to buy their own property, it also creates interesting issues. What happens if one party wants to sell but the others don’t? Who is on the legal title and does it make any difference who contributed more or less to the purchase? What if one of you dies? Rupert Seal explores some of the issues behind this increasing phenomena.

Speaker: Mr Rupert Seal