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Modules

The following table lists the undergraduate Film Studies modules that have recently run. Please note that not all the modules listed in this table will run each year and that we also often add new modules reflecting our staff's latest research.

The table is divided into level 4, 5, and 6 modules. You will take level 4 modules in your first year and you will typically take level 5 modules in your second year and level 6 modules in your final year.

Module TitleCodeLevelSemesterCreditsDescription
What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]FLM003Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.
What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]FLM003ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.
What Is Cinema? [Critical Approaches]FLM003BLevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module will introduce you to a broad range of theoretical and critical approaches to cinema, and teach you how to apply these approaches to a variety of films. You will gain an understanding of classical film theory, including semiotics, auteur theory and psychoanalysis, as well as of contemporary developments such as audience studies, interest in issues of race and ethnicity, and in issues surrounding the advent of new cinematic technologies. You will also gain an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which given theoretical approaches have emerged. These approaches will be illustrated with reference to a range of Hollywood and European films.
Introduction to British CinemaFLM005Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115The module looks at some of the key films of the British cinema from the 1930s through to the 1950s, providing both a historical and critical overview of this rich period. While most of the films that will be screened during the module have been chosen as examples of the work of distinguished directors, room has also been made for films more squarely in the tradition of popular cinema. The aim is to provide an opportunity for the analysis of some of the characteristics of British national cinema, and to question some of the assumptions relating to that cinema, such as that it is too literary or theatrical. The chosen films will provide a focus for discussion in the seminars of such topics as British auteurs (e.g., Hitchcock), stars (e.g., James Mason), genre (e.g., the Gainsborough melodrama), form (e.g. the tensions between realist and expressionist approaches to film-making), censorship, the influence of the documentary tradition and the industry's links with theatre, broadcasting and the state.
The French New WaveFLM014Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module focuses on one of the most influential movements in the history of cinema, the French New Wave. Foregrounding the ways in which New Wave cinema can be seen to reflect broader changes in French society and culture in the period 1958-1964, the module will also consider how contemporary developments in areas like technology, film financing and film theory impacted upon New Wave aesthetics. Studying canonical New Wave films by the so-called Cahiers group of directors - Chabrol, Truffaut, Godard, Rohmer and Rivette - students will also examine important pre-cursors to the New Wave in films from the 1950s by Agnès Varda, Jean-Pierre Melville, Roger Vadim and Louis Malle.
Scriptwriting: Adaption and Original ScriptFLM205Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This is a level five module offered as an option for single honours and joint honours Film
Studies students only. The module offers the opportunity to study practice and techniques
related to both script adaptation and original scriptwriting and their inter-relationship is
an important step for anyone wishing to establish their creative writing skills above a
foundation level. Both types of scriptwriting will be given equal weight as topics and
assessed accordingly.
German Film 3: Contemporary German CinemaFLM302Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115his module will allow you to analyse the state of contemporary filmmaking in Germany, exploring film cultures in the GDR and FRG immediately prior to unification, as well as the issues surrounding the re-establishment of a single national cinema after the fall of the Wall. The module encourages you to study developments in recent German cinema in the context of the increasing globalisation of media industries and images. You will explore the dynamics of recent German filmmaking, including its relationship to Hollywood and other European cinemas, its approach to questions of transnationalism and transculturalism, particularly concerning the emergence of Turkish-German filmmaking, its approach to the representation of politics, history and the national past, of gender and sexuality, and also its use of genre and popular commercial film styles.
Contemporary Hollywood CinemaFLM308Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Through a detailed examination of a number of contemporary Hollywood movies this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped Hollywood production from the late 1970s to the present day. We will be interrogating contemporary Hollywood movies in order to describe changes in the US film industry since the decline of the studio system and to profile some of the ways in which Hollywood reflects and interacts with American culture and society. This module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which you will select a film of your own choice and across three written assignments situate the film within its industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.
Production SkillsFLM403Level 4 modules (First year)Sem 230A foundation in the technical, teamwork and planning skills required for production. The technical skills covered will include camera, lighting, sound and editing. The production skills will include shooting continuity footage, crewing and scheduling. The module will introduce you to the development of the continuity system from early cinema to the present day. You will be encouraged to reflect and evaluate your practice in relation to your teamwork, planning and production skills. The module will include formative assessments.
Concepts and HistoryFLM4200Level 4 modules (First year)Full year30This module aims to foster a sense of the historical development of the cinema in America from its origins in the late nineteenth century through to the rise of the studio system in the 1930s and 1940s and its eventual disaggregation in the late 1950s. As well as tracking this strand of film history the module will also introduce students to a number of different conceptual frames such as performance, sound, narrative, mise-en-scène, censorship, genre, editing, and technology. By the end of the module you will be able to approach individual films, and film in general, as a complex object of study that can be profitably described via these conceptual frames. This module counts as 15 credits towards the QMUL Model.
Scriptwriting: Creativity and TechniqueFLM4201Level 4 modules (First year)Sem 130Students will produce an essay and an original script. The module will establish the ability to write a short original film script with coherent dialogue, exposition and structure. It will also develop knowledge of scriptwriting: format, structure, character, dialogue, exposition, and how to assess a script using appropriate terminology such as back story, suspense and set-ups and pay-offs.
Approaches and AnalysisFLM4202Level 4 modules (First year)Full year30Approaches and Analysis will examine film from the perspectives of genre, stardom and auteurism. The module begins with a study of historical and contemporary genre filmmaking, then considers stardom from theoretical, industrial and cultural perspectives. We then look at the origins of auteur theory and its operation in the European context. The final quarter of the module draws on all these approaches in close analysis of filmic texts, thereby consolidating the perspectives and contexts examined across the whole course.
Reading German Film 2FLM5025Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module will introduce you to filmmaking in the divided Germany of the post-war period. It will examine the re-establishment of German cinema by the Allies, and look at the role of cinema in the denazification and democratisation of Germany. It aims to allow you to conduct a comparative analysis of cinema in the two German states, and to consider definitions of German national cinema(s). The module aims to introduce the cinematic traditions, styles and genres associated with East and West German cinema, including their respective approaches to the representation of politics, history and the national past, of gender and sexuality, youth and non-conformity, and also their use of genre and popular, art house and experimental styles.
German Narrative Fiction in Text and FilmFLM5027Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215What are the specific qualities of the media film and novel? How is a story changed when it moves from one medium to the other? Is it even still the same story?
Using texts from the German canon, students will explore what happens to the parameters of prose fiction when they are transferred to the medium of film. This includes not only the way the plot is realized, but many other factors which affect the intellectual and emotional responses elicited.
Russian Documentary FilmFLM5030Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215You will examine the ways in which documentary film has been used in Russia both to record life and to shape it. You will trace the use of documentary film to trace and interpret revolution and industrialisation in the 1920s and 1930s, World War Two, the disintegration of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet life, paying particular attention to how filmmakers from Vertov to Sokurov have exploited the genre¿s formal possibilities: framing, editing, various aspects of sound, including music, voice-over commentary, noises, and the interview.
Brazilian Cinema: The Social TraditionFLM5034Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115Why would a Brazilian director depict not the guerrilla Che Guevara but the young doctor developing his social awareness? Walter Salles¿s Motorcycle Diaries will set the tone for the discussion of Brazil¿s emphasis on the social agenda as its major contribution to world cinema. This course will approach the evolution of this genre, beginning with Cinema Novo, the shift towards the commercial film (Pixote, Central Station), the development of a new aesthetics (City of God) and of recent radical experimentations such as prisoners and favela (shantytown) inhabitants making their own film. Discussions will include the tensions between aesthetics and ethics, the achievement of the commercial film and of the documentary as social action, and film as a tool for the empowerment of the marginalized.
From Page to ScreenFLM5035Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215Nobel laureate José Saramago (Portugal) and director of 'City of God' (Fernando Meirelles, Brazil) came together in the film adaptation 'Blindness'. Gael García Bernal was the protagonist of a transposition to contemporary Mexico of a major 19th century novel by renowned Eça de Querirós, set in 2005 in another adaptation. This module analyses text to screen adaptations, offering a panorama of film and literature in the Portuguese-speaking world. We examine authorship and narrative in Camões's epic 'The Lusiads', in the work of modernist Fernando Pessoa and in the cinema of Manoel de Oliveira, also considering the implications of spatial and temporal relocations, as well as the presence of cinematic stars in these films.
Memories of the Holocaust and Colonialism in French CinemaFLM508Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module explores how memories of the Holocaust and colonial crimes ¿ two of the most extreme instances of violence in modern history ¿ have circulated and sometimes overlapped in French-language cinema, including landmark films such as Alain Resnais's Night and Fog, Chris Marker's The Pier, Claude Lanzmann's Shoah and Michael Haneke's Hidden. It investigates the capacity of cinema to act as witness to atrocity, to mediate testimony, to model psychic trauma and repression, to challenge myths about the national past, and to probe the connections between seemingly disparate types of violence. Students will also gain an understanding of critical debates about these issues in French and wider contexts. All films will be available in subtitled versions and all key reading will be in English.
Research Methods (Film)FLM509Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This is a single-semester module (15 credits) focusing on developing the research skills you will need to succeed at Level 6 and in the world of work. In the first part of the module, you will work in small groups to adopt and edit a Wikipedia page on a particular film; in the second part of the module you will work on a proposal for a possible dissertation/research project. The module involves elements of formal teaching, group-led and independent study, weekly reading and preparation, and peer review; and a range of assessments, including the editing of a Wikipedia page, group and individual presentations, and written assignments. It is strongly recommended that students planning to take either FLM601 Script Development and Research or FLM304 Film Studies Research Project at Level 6 take this module.
The Visual EssayFLM511Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115The Visual Essay is a single-semester module (15 credits) which interrogates the links between the essay form and visual media. The module explores how film, still and moving image work can be constructed to produce arguments, debates, and other rhetorical forms. The module allows students to develop a short moving-image or video essay, focusing on its visual elements to create an essay, argument or other poetic form. Students will also acquire a broader historical and theoretical understanding of the essay form, in text, photography, illustration, film, video and digital media. Beginning with the essays of Montaigne, students will be introduced to the visual essay as a hybrid form that navigates the personal and the political, expression and argument, feeling and reason, in cinematic language. The module forms part of the production pathway for Single Honours Film Studies, and as a result requires students to have undertaken production modules at Level 4.
Bardic Film: Storytelling NarrativeFLM5201Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This is a module for single and joint honours Film Studies students. It offers the opportunity to develop creative skills in storytelling and filmmaking within the theoretical framework of the bardic: innovative uses of narrative and form utilizing pre-industrial modes of storytelling: fabula, fabliau, shuchang, pingshu, märchen, sagen, parable and other traditions, and in doing so open up the possibilities for creative, social, personal, political and historical stories outside of the constraints of convention-led commercial production. Assessment will be based on two practice-based productions.
Contemporary World CinemasFLM5202Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module provides a diverse cinematic palette, focussing on films, filmmaking formulations and new aspects of non-Anglophone cinemas from regions outside Europe and America. Module sessions will cover multifaceted aspects of cinema creation, burgeoning film movements and industry dynamics whilst also studying established and emerging filmmakers. The broad geographic stretch will be combined with a specific focus on the current cinematic terrain of countries including Chile, Argentina, Senegal and South Africa. The module also investigates recent and ongoing transformations, such as the magnified visibility of female filmmakers from the Middle East and the rise of new Indian Indie cinema as a competitor to Bollywood.
Film CurationFLM5205Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215Film Curation is a one-semester module which enables students to explore the theory and practice of film curation and film programming. In small groups you will ultimately produce a curated programme of films with accompanying portfolio. Broadly themed around issues to do with collecting, curating, argument and interpretation, you will learn how to develop a thematic, question-based approach to film curation, developing an understanding of audiences and film communities. You will be able to make full use of the ample film culture in London, and will have the opportunity to explore rare and relatively unknown film material as you assemble your film curation project.
Digital Film MakingFLM5206Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This course provides a wide-ranging introduction to technical aspects of digital film making. Through workshops, exercises and assignments, students will develop a foundation in technical filmmaking and a understanding of the equipment used in the production process: camera, audio, lighting and post-production. These skills will be developed in a series of short filmmaking exercises and an assessed short film, which is produced by students working in small groups. There is an individual written report as part of the assessment.
Contemporary Russian FilmFLM6017Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Through the analysis of films produced since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union and creation of Russia, this course aims to equip students to be able to comment on contemporary Russian films as they are released. Teaching and assessment focuses on identifying key industrial, thematic and genre trends and issues in contemporary Russian cinema, with a focus on the intersection of the national and transnational. Those without Russian will be able to participate fully in this course, although a reading knowledge can be useful for working on less well-known films. The secondary reading is in English, and all key films are subtitled.
German Narrative Fiction in Text and FilmFLM6027Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215What are the specific qualities of the media film and novel? How is a story changed when it moves from one medium to the other? Is it even still the same story?
Using texts from the German canon, students will explore what happens to the parameters of prose fiction when they are transferred to the medium of film. This includes not only the way the plot is realized, but many other factors which affect the intellectual and emotional responses elicited.
Russian Documentary FilmFLM6030Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215You will examine the ways in which documentary film has been used in Russia both to record life and to shape it. You will trace the use of documentary film to trace and interpret revolution and industrialisation in the 1920s and 1930s, World War Two, the disintegration of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet life, paying particular attention to how filmmakers from Vertov to Sokurov have exploited the genre¿s formal possibilities: framing, editing, various aspects of sound, including music, voice-over commentary, noises, and the interview.
Slavery, Colonialism and Postcolonialism in African CinemaFLM6036Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Looking at cinema as an increasingly prominent medium for the transmission of historical knowledge (Deleuze, Sorlin, Landy, etc.), this module analyzes the representation of history in African Cinema in three key moments of the continent¿s history. It initially focuses on Mozambique¿s major post-independence audio-visual initiative, headed by Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Rouch and Ruy Guerra ¿ the National Institute of Cinema ¿ and the role of film in nation-building. It then addresses film representations of historical trauma and the reconstruction of shattered lives in the context of Civil Wars in Mozambique and Angola, contrasting them with Sebastião Salgado¿s photographic documentation of the impact of war on African children and civilians. It also analyzes Guinea-Bissau¿s post-independence engagement in dialogue with the West through the musical, for the projection of an African identity and the tensions between tradition and modernization. It finally addresses the dearth of images of slavery in African Cinema and the way resistance to power imbalances and the communities of run-away slaves finds space on the Brazilian screen and, more recently, in tri-continental co-productions. No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. All films have subtitles in English.
Forms of Film PracticeFLM6038Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Mainstream narrative cinema has always benefitted from the formal innovations taking place at the margins of film practice. The formal, aesthetic and technical experiments conducted by the avant-garde were soon appropriated by the commercial film industry. Risks taken in the documentary field have led to new attitudes towards truth and actuality. This module focuses on what forms film practice can take beyond fiction and storytelling. The module aims to broaden the students' skills-base by focusing on documentary filmmaking and artists¿ moving image, encouraging formal experimentation and an active critique of the ways in which mainstream cinema and conventional televisual formats construct meanings and representations.

The module covers a range of practices, production procedures, technologies and techniques for concept development, and is structured to develop creative thinking, collaboration, crew dynamics and practical abilities. It is designed to ground the student in appropriate research and development methods along with practical and aesthetic skills to produce a short documentary or experimental film. Students choose from two short film project options: either a documentary portrait of a person, place or event, or a film that engages with process, concept and aesthetics, rather than with explicitly narrative content. In parallel, students produce an essay consisting of a close reading of a filmmaker or filmmakers working in a mode that relates to their short film production.

Film ArchaeologyFLM604Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215The origins of cinema, key moments of transformation and recent challenges to its form in the wake of digital technologies are the subjects examined in this module. Far from being simply a conflict between the magical tradition of Méliès and the documentary account of the Lumière brothers, cinema archaeology reveals the connections between various nineteenth century inventions concerned with movement, perception and transmission, and the advent of cinema. The course explores the various cultural influences that have contributed to the idea of 'cinema' at a particular time, such as those from painting, literature and theatre. Perhaps more significant are the moments of crisis brought about by the prospect of adding to film, such as the qualities of sound and colour. Most illuminating of all is film's competitive relation to its 'rivals': television, video, digital production and youtube. The course examines the question of whether film is a specific medium with enduring qualities, or whether its component parts are remade with every decade.
Ecocinemas: Nature, Animals, and the Moving ImageFLM609Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Ecocinemas is a single-semester level 6 module focusing on the intersections between cinema and the natural world. The module explores film's embeddedness in the physical world from a number of perspectives: film as an environmental practice in its own right, as a vehicle for exploring the relationship between the human and the nonhuman world, and as a more-than-human projection. The module covers a diverse range of themes: the key role of nonhuman animals and the natural world in the development of the cinematic medium, the representation of animals and nature in film, cinema¿s environmental footprint, and film as an ecological advocacy tool.

The first part of the module looks at the history and theory of the visual representation of nature and animals, from pre-cinematic forms such as cave paintings, to photographic studies of animal locomotion and early scientific cinema. The subsequent blocks introduce students to the principal strands of eco-criticism and ecocinema via a variety of case studies, including the wildlife film, environmental and animal advocacy documentaries, and fictional representations of animals.
Cine-museology: Theorising Cinema and the MuseumFLM610Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module explores the relationships of cinema (as an institution, as a space, and as a concept) to the institutional, spatial and conceptual contexts of the museum. The museum has in recent years become a respository for film as a museum object in its own right; however, film has haunted the corridors of museums since its earliest invention. In this module, we explore the connections and disconnections between cinematic and museal spaces, using theoretical concepts of immersion, spatial dynamics, the archive, exhibition and curatorial theory to make sense of the plurality of film and the moving image in museums, and indeed the 'museum' in the moving image. Making use of London as an ideal base for interrogating some of these encounters between cinema, the moving image, and museums, the module will also explore the interventions of film across other disciplines, including Art History, Museology, Anthropology and the Digital Humanities. We will explore both actual and virtual museums, through a range of film material from Europe, North America, the Middle East, drawing upon concepts such as 'film as a virtual museum', 'cinematic exhibition practices', 'film as museology', and 'the ethics of ethnographic film'.
Creative ProductionFLM6201Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This is an optional module open to Film Studies students with an experience in practice (Production Skills and/or Directing Drama/Directing Fiction). It offers the opportunity to develop and build on knowledge of film making developed during the first two years of the degree, and the opportunity to make one short film in any style the student wishes to explore. The film is made by a group and not an individual. The module has a mixture of group meetings and whole class lectures and workshops.
Film Studies Research ProjectFLM6202Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30Students must consult with the module organiser before finalising registration for this double module. It is designed as an optional module for Final Year students of Film Studies joint and single Honours programme. The aim of the module is to offer students on the Film Studies programmes an introduction to independent study by pursuing a sustained piece of research on a subject agreed with the module organiser and an assigned supervisor. The module will provide training in the research skills and methodologies that this demands via group sessions and individual supervision.
3D Cinema: Digital Space and Stereoscopic AestheticsFLM6203Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Previously condemned as unnecessary spectacle or an industrial gimmick, in the digital era 3D is becoming synonymous with blockbuster cinema. This module examines 3D¿s historical development, technological conditions and unique aesthetics in order to explore this trend. Students will use the tools of film archaeology to explore 3D¿s undervalued but vital place in visual culture, gaining a critical understanding of 3D¿s distinct visual mode and how to `read¿ or interpret the 3D space in a given film. The module provides an overview of stereoscopic media ¿ from the nineteenth-century stereoscope to genre cinema of the 1950s and 1980s ¿ but focuses upon the contemporary digital period of mainstream 3D film production, a period that produces not only epic films like Avatar (Cameron 2009) but also avant garde productions like Goodbye to Language (Godard 2014). In this way the module shows how 3D cinema now joins other digital means of mapping and representing space, but also how 3D is entirely singular in the way it represents space.
Contemporary French CinemaFLM6205Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Through a detailed examination of a number of recent and contemporary French films this module aims to foster an understanding of the network of forces that have shaped French film production since major changes to cultural policy were implemented in France by the socialist Mitterrand administration in 1981. We will profile some of the ways in which French cinema reflects and interacts with French culture and society, and evaluate this in the light of social, political and cultural shifts in late 20th and 21st century French life. The module will be assessed through the production of a 'film note' in which students will select a film of their own choice, and across three written assignments they will progressively develop material about the film that situates it within its historical, industrial and cultural context. The module is research-based and requires a significant commitment to independent study.
Yakuza: Exploring the Japanese Gangster FilmFLM6206Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module examines the Japanese yakuza-eiga (gangster film) in terms of its narrative form and ideological functions, including socio-political commentary on Japanese society from the 1930s to the present day. We will look at the work of such filmmakers as Ozu, Kurosawa, Suzuki, Fukasaku, Kitano and Miike to explore a range of issues, including the post-war occupation and 'democratisation' of Japan, its rapid industrialisation and the 'economic miracle', the mass migration from rural to urban areas and its social consequences, and the disengagement of large sections of society from the political, bureaucratic and business elite which runs the country. Students will also discuss such concepts as 'giri' (duty), 'ninjo' (honour) and 'jingi' (code) as facets of both the yakuza and national myth, and explore the themes of loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice, and the clash of traditional values with modernity. Finally, the module will consider the relationship between the Japanese and Hollywood gangster traditions through an examination of hybrid films which comment on the clash of codes and cultures.

Students will attend a weekly lecture and seminar; in addition there will be a scheduled screening of each week's main film.
Film and EthicsFLM6207Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module provides an introduction to the relationship between ethics and diverse forms of cinema, tracing the emergence of a relatively new but increasingly influential approach to the medium. How can the interactions between documentary filmmakers, their subjects and viewers be understood in ethical terms? What is specific about the way narrative cinema frames the moral dilemmas and decisions around which it so often revolves? To what extent does the filmic institution render viewers ethically complicit in scenarios of suffering and violence? What is distinctive about the contribution of cinema to debates in ethical philosophy? And how do given films relate to the poststructuralist ethical preoccupation with the possibility of unconditional openness towards the other? Students will address these and other questions through analysis of a wide-ranging corpus of films and critical, theoretical and philosophical texts produced in Europe, North America and beyond.
New Independent Indian CinemaFLM6208Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module offers the first in-depth insight into new independent Indian cinema ¿ a contemporary genre distinct from Bollywood. The new 'Indies' are glocal hybrids¿global in aesthetic and local in content. Module sessions will critically appraise the Indies¿ diverse socio-political `state of the nation¿ stories and conduct comprehensive analyses of definitive Indie new wave films. The module explores funding and distribution dynamics, the Indies¿ contestation of `traditional Indian values¿ and their collision with state censorship. Overall, this module examines an Indian film phenomenon that could chart the future of Indian cinema.
Crime Writing: Feature Film DevelopmentFLM6209Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This is an optional module for single honours Film Studies students. It offers the opportunity to develop and build on your knowledge of film genres and creative writing skills developed during the first two years of the degree. The teaching of the module centres on crime writing as the genre in which to develop original work that is suitable for the formal assignment: a complex and demanding feature film treatment. The module is not available to associate students.
Brazilian Cinematic Cities: Regional and Historical DiversityFLM4032Level 4 modules (First year)Sem 215This module explores four Brazilian cinematic cities, namely those which have a significant film industry and whose identities have been projected by film (Mark Shiel and Tony Fitzmaurice). The major focus will be on Rio de Janeiro (the wonders of its topography; the eroticization and exoticization of its beach culture; the spectacle of its Carnival contrasting with over-sensationalized violence on the screen) and São Paulo, an emerging global power (physical and social mobility in a city with 20 million inhabitants; the impact of technology and the car industry on social networks). It will also study Salvador (its vibrant Afro-Brazilian culture; the carnivalesque return of the defunto) and Brasília (Brazil's modernist capital and the aftermath of this utopian project 50 years later). No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. All films are available in English or with English subtitles.
Russian Film: Gender and SocietyFLM5032Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215"Starting from the Russian revolution's proclaimed liberation of women, this course analyses Russian cinema as both a reflection of and means of challenging the dominant constructions of masculine and feminine in Russian society. Informed by Feminist and other perspectives, students examine the shifting representations of gender, the changing role of women in the cinema industry, the specific nature of Russian women's cinema, and the ways in which masculinity has been problematized and questioned in recent film. The films are all available with English subtitles and readings are in English."
Directing FictionFLM5204Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115Directing Fiction involves developing a practical understanding of a range of approaches to film direction stemming from both mainstream and alternative film practices. The module will enable students to develop their creative skills within a context where their practice work is related to film studies theory. A number of approaches to directing will be covered and students will work in a group, preparing a production then making this production based on their specified conception of film direction.
Mapping Contemporary CinemasFLM603Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Running as a pilot in 2010-11, this new module is designed around a student-run editorial process that identifies, edits and develops work from other research- and contemporary cinema-based undergraduate modules in order for the best of that work to be published in a yearly edited collection and on a dedicated website. Students will also write editorials identifying key trends and issues in contemporary cinema, with a focus on the intersection of national and transnational trends. This module will be of interest to students who might be considering a career in academia, publishing, film journalism and so on. Numbers are capped at twelve and students considering taking this module must have confidence in their writing abilities, a strong 2:1 average, and will be askd to attend a short interview. It is also advised that they take either FLM308 Contemporary Hollywood Cinema or FLM302 Reading German Film 3: Contemporary German Cinema.
Russian Film: Gender and SocietyFLM6032Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215"Starting from the Russian revolution's proclaimed liberation of women, this course analyses Russian cinema as both a reflection of and means of challenging the dominant constructions of masculine and feminine in Russian society. Informed by Feminist and other perspectives, students examine the shifting representations of gender, the changing role of women in the cinema industry, the specific nature of Russian women's cinema, and the ways in which masculinity has been problematized and questioned in recent film. The films are all available with English subtitles and readings are in English."
Film Practice and ManifestosFLM6033Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module examines filmmaking practice through the study of statements on practice made by a range of film practitioners across a variety roles, filmmaking styles (including non-fiction examples), institutional contexts and periods, and via the study of a number of film manifestos. The first part of the module examines statements made by film practitioners in which they reflect on their practice and compares and contrasts these to examples of the film practitioner's work. A particular focus will be how practitioners negotiate the restraints of the film industry, thereby encouraging an understanding of filmmaking as a profession. The second part of the module examines three manifestos from different historical periods and considers how these relate to filmmaking practice, especially through the importance of the adoption of measures to restrict creative freedom.
Film PhilosophyFLM6204Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module explores the relationship between film and philosophy by examining how films raise philosophical questions. We will learn what philosophers have to say about cinema, and how filmmakers incorporate philosophical perspectives, but we will also explore how films can inform the ways we think about ourselves and understand the world around us. From how we experience cinema in our minds and bodies, to what scares us and how we assess right and wrong, this module will address the question of how films do philosophy.
Film, Literature and AdaptationFLM502Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module will provide an overview of the role that adaptation has played in cultural history and theory, considering its central importance in the history, economics and art of film. Examining both the Hollywood and European cinemas, it will explore the complex relationship between literature and film over more than a century of the cinema's existence, tracing the varying strategies with which adaptation has been associated, from providing fidelity to an original text to offering a vehicle for revisionist critique and interpretation. It will explore not only the impact of the other arts on the cinema, but also the extent to which the cinema can be said to have influenced these arts in return. The module will include case studies from the cinema's past, but also offer a more contemporary perspective through introducing students to the online archive of British film-maker Sally Potter, which contains materials relating to all stages of her 1992 adaptation of Virginia Woolf's novel Orlando from original concept to completion.
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