School of Politics and International Relations

Anne-Line Rodriguez, PhD (SOAS)

Anne-Line

Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

Email: a-l.rodriguez@qmul.ac.uk

Profile

Anne-Line Rodriguez is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow. She specialises in the ethnographic study of the social experiences in West Africa of the European governance of migration. She was previously an Early Career Fellow in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

Research

Research Interests:

Anne-Line’s work is concerned with the new formations of subjectivity and practice created in regions of departure in the context of the global governance of migration.

Her doctoral thesis, entitled Social Respectability in Dakar at the Time of EU Border Closure: An Ethnography, examined local perceptions and experiences in the Senegalese capital city of the tightening and externalisation of EU migration control. More recently, she undertook an ethnography of repatriations organised from North Africa and Europe to Senegal. As a Leverhulme ECF, she will conduct new research on the relations between the European governmentality of migration and the ethics of Islamic reformism in Senegal.

Her research therefore explores the European governance of migration, including the involvement of humanitarian and development actors; the ethnography of urban West Africa; involuntary (im)mobility and return; the moral economy; gender; youth; the anthropology of hope and aspiration; and religious subjectivities.

Publications

Rodriguez, Anne-Line (2019) ‘European attempts to govern African youths by raising awareness of the risks of migration: ethnography of an encounter’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 45 (5): 735-751. doi: 10.1080/1369183X.2017.1415136

Rodriguez, Anne-Line (2015) ‘Three stories about living without migration in Dakar: coming to terms with the contradictions of the moral economy’, AFRICA: Journal of the International African Institute 85 (2): 333-355. doi: 10.1017/S0001972015000042