Skip to main content
School of Law

SOLM277 Comparative Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals (A21)

Comparative Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals (ICTs) provides a systemic empirical overview of international adjudication and introduces students to the comparative method through the critical appraisal and comparative analysis of the laws, decisions, processes, and policies of ICTs (defined as international institutions capable of resolving disputes through binding decisions and where at least one party to the dispute is a state). The module is organized around a series of 10 cross-cutting legal and/or practical themes common to all or most ICTs (e.g., appointment of international judges and arbitrators, sources of law and applicable law rules, jurisdiction and admissibility requirements, non-disputing party interventions, compliance with judgments/awards, legitimacy challenges, etc.). The module will not dedicate classes to the description of individual ICTs and students will be expected to familiarize themselves with ICTs and their basic features prior to the start of the module.

Applicable Groupings

Mode of Assessment

Independent research essay (5,000-7,000 words)

Credits

30 Credits