School of History

Dr David Veevers

Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

Email: d.veevers@qmul.ac.uk

Profile

I joined the School of History at Queen Mary as a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow in 2018. Having completed my PhD at the University of Kent in 2015, I remained there as a Leverhulme Postdoctoral Researcher on a £1m funded project 'The Global Determinants of the English Constitution', exploring the role trading companies played in England's domestic and global histories in the seventeenth century. My new three year Leverhulme project at Queen Mary explores the response of Asian states to Europeans in the early modern period.

Undergraduate Teaching

HST4604 - Global Encounters: Conquest and Culture in World History

Research

Research Interests:

I'm interested in all aspects of early modern imperial and global history, with a particular focus on the European presence in Asia in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

My first monograph, The Origins of the British Empire in Asia, 1600 - 1750, is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press. It provides a reinterpretation of the emergence of European empire not as a projection of force against Asian states, nor as the carving out of independent sovereign or colonial territory. Rather, it argues that the expansion of the East India Company was achieved through its political and economic enfranchisement at the hands of Asian rulers, elites and communities who sought to utilise the Company's presence for their own benefit. Through marriage, business partnerships, cultural patronage and political alliances, individual Company servants were pulled into the political and economic structures of the Asian state system and subsequently enfranchised their corporate employers with a dazzling array of rights and privileges, from lucrative trading monopolies to the governance of vast port cities.

My new three year Leverhulme project at Queen Mary is titled 'Transnational Constitutions: Asian Governance in a Global World'. This project seeks to explore the constitutional mechanisms developed by Asian states in an effort to accommodate and contain the expansion of European communities within their borders, historicising interdisciplinary research on the concept of transnational constitutionalism to argue that supranational constitutional systems were more widespread than usually accepted, certainly predating the proliferation of the more popular Western tradition of written constitutions from the later eighteenth century.

Publications

Books

The Origins of the British Empire in Asia, 1600 - 1750 (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2020)

With William A. Pettigrew, eds., The Corporation as a Protagonist in Global History, c1550 to 1750 (Brill, 2018)

Peer-reviewed articles

'"Inhabitants of the Universe": Global Families, Kinship Networks and the Formation of the Early Modern Colonial State in Asia', Journal of Global History, vol. 10, no. 1 (March, 2015), pp. 99 - 121

'"The Company as their Lords and the Deputy as a Great Rajah": Imperial Expansion and the English East India Company on the West Coast of Sumatra, 1685 - 1730', Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol. 41, no. 5 (2013), pp. 687 - 709

Edited volume chapter

With William A. Pettigrew, 'Introduction', in William A. Pettigrew and David Veevers, eds., The Corporation as a Protagonist in Global History, c1550 to 1750 (Brill, 2018)

'Gender', in William A. Pettigrew and David Veevers, eds., The Corporation as a Protagonist in Global History, c1550 to 1750 (Brill, 2018)

'The Contested State: Political Authority and the Decentred Foundations of the Early Modern Colonial State in Asia', in Mahesh Gopalan and William A. Pettigrew, eds., The East India Company: Essays on Anglo-Indian Connection (Routledge, 2016), pp. 175 - 192