School of Geography

Undergraduate Modules

Filter by



TitleCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Geospatial ScienceGEG5223Semester 25

Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: GEG5102
Prerequisite: GEG4004

This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems. This knowledge is fundamental not only to research in Physical Geography, Environmental Science and many other disciplines, but provides a critical skill set used widely within a range of industries (including environmental management, local and national government, the utilities and the insurance sector).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Ecosystem ScienceGEG5224Semester 15

Ecosystem Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores the fundamental environmental units: ecosystems. We use biological and physical science perspectives to examine the geographical distribution of ecosystems and to understand the principles and processes governing their structure and function. We study the exchange of materials and energy between biotic and abiotic ecosystem components, focusing on water, carbon and nutrient cycles. We engage with urban land managers in project work, and apply biogeoscience perspectives when interpreting how ecosystems change in response to internal system processes, environmental change, natural disturbance events and human activities.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 11: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

GeomorphologyGEG5225Semester 15

Geomorphology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ALL_456

This module introduces key concepts in geomorphology, exploring fundamental processes driving the development of landforms on Earth and other planetary surfaces. It considers geomorphological systems and processes ranging from the uplift of mountains and gravity-driven mass movement to sediment transport processes in river channels. The module will include discussion of key drivers (e.g. energy, weathering processes) as well as fundamental concepts such as equilibrium, thresholds, complexity, equifinality, feedbacks and magnitude-frequency relationships, through integrated lectures and practical modelling work.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Ice Age BritainGEG5226Semester 25

Ice Age Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4209

This module investigates the nature and causes of the climatic fluctuations of the last 2.5 million years - the Ice Age - focusing on the rich record of Britain. Following an overview of global climate change it focuses on the evidence used to reconstruct and understand past environments, exploring the response of the landscape, biota and humans to climatic changes. In doing so it integrates perspectives from different disciplines such as sedimentology, palaeontology and archaeology.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 4 pm

The Anthropocene: Between the Natural & Social SciencesGEG5227Semester 15

The Anthropocene: Between the Natural & Social Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Anthropocene offers a controversial new framework examining the connections between people and environment. This module evaluates how we define the Anthropocene, its importance to the Earth System and how it will impact humans. This module challenges you to consider your specific role as a citizen of the Anthropocene. To succeed in this module you will need to have a good grounding in both science and social science disciplines.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

An Independent Geographical StudyGEG6000Full year6

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5103, GEG5212, GEG5213, GEG5214

As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Readings in Geography: Contemporary IndiaGEG6007Semester 16

Readings in Geography: Contemporary India

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Readings in Geography: Contemporary India allows students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the concepts and events that they are studying within the co-requisite module GEG6129 Contemporary India: Politics, society and economy. Students will undertake an extended piece of writing (6000 words) based on independent reading and research that is supported through multimedia e-learning resources, two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG6221Semester 26

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will work independently to identify, research and review a wide range of contemporary, primary literature in a chosen area of Environmental Science or Physical Geography. Through a series of small group seminars students will be given the opportunity to discuss and present their findings to both their peers and a member of academic staff. Through these seminars they will also receive feedback on their work.

Broad research themes will be identified at the beginning of the semester (during module registration and advising) to reflect the research interests and expertise of staff available to lead seminars. Students will select a theme within which they can choose their own research topic and will be allocated to a seminar group. The seminars are either staff or student led. In order to benefit from these seminars students must prepare for them in advance and be prepared to critically discuss their peers' work.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystemsGEG6222Semester 26

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Geo-ecology is an interdisciplinary science that studies organisms, air, water and land as interacting components of a single geo-ecosystem. A central tenet is that components of the system must be considered in relation to one another and to the larger whole, rather than in isolation. Geo-ecosystems are 'messy' and cause-and-effect is often cyclical rather than linear. In this module, we will examine selected topics in this field, taking a practical approach through the use of spatial data and models. You will learn how to analyse spatial patterns in the landscape and to investigate the underlying processes and interactions. Developing this approach of 'systems thinking' is vital to understanding and, where possible, managing environmental issues.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGEG6223Semester 16

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5223

The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American CityGEG6125Semester 26

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5126 or GEG5127 or GEG5128 or GEG5129

Boston is a city that has undergone a series of dramatic transformations over the past three centuries. From being a key site of the American Revolution's rejection of British colonial rule, to the mass migration of Irish, Black American and other groups to the city in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, through to more recent processes of economic decline and reinvention as a hub of biotechnology, it is a city that has been at the forefront of American political, economic and social change. This module focuses on the changing historical geographies of Boston from the colonial period to the present day examining key processes which have shaped the city. Teaching and learning begins in the classroom through a series of lectures and workshops examining aspects of the city's historical geography and the sources used to study them, and planning group-based project work. It culminates in a week-long field course in Boston at the end of the semester. Work in Boston involves visiting museums, walking heritage trails, exploring localities and neighborhoods and meeting with researchers, experts and heritage practitioners in order to complete group projects.Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Contemporary India: Politics, Society and the EconomyGEG6129Semester 16

Contemporary India: Politics, Society and the Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

he module examines significant shifts in Indian politics, society and the economy. It does so by connecting the big theories and topics, such as democracy, citizenship, violence, development and neoliberalism, with everyday ideas and practices in India today. Throughout the module students will be introduced to different theoretical approaches used by South Asian scholars such as feminist and postcolonial frameworks, and invited to bring these into dialogue with empirical examples in order to respond to wider questions about development and democracy in India.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, EconomyGEG6130Semester 16

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Subsequent to the introductory lecture, the module is divided into three sections. The first main section provides an historical and political overview of the 'war on terror' in relation to thinking about other types of wars. It considers how the prosecution of the war on terror has come to shape not only military, but also legal and governmental discourse and practice in the post 9/11 era. The second section invites students to consider ideas and practices of security as a central feature of this. It will consider the rise of private military contracting, immigration, humanitarianism, urban geopolitics, and the overlap between health and security concerns. The third section focuses on the political-economic underpinnings of many of these developments and challenges students to think of conflict as an embedded social phenomenon: as much a part of contemporary discourses on the economy as it is something with merely economic implications. The final, concluding lecture will examine alternatives to the dominant framings of modern conflict that have been put forward and critiqued thus far.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GEG6132Semester 16

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5102

This module explores advanced issues in relation to the principles, techniques and applications of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) within the wider geographical remit (e.g. advanced spatial analysis, location-allocation models, interoperability and exchange of data between different systems, etc.). It complements the GIS training offered in levels 4 and 5 of and provides an opportunity to students to consolidate and expand their knowledge about GIS.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Urbanisation and Development in Sub-Saharan AfricaGEG6138Semester 16

Urbanisation and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Africa is urbanising at a faster rate than any other region in the world. However, the continent remains the subject of a number of stereotypes that associate 'authentic' African life with the rural village, rather than the cosmopolitan metropolis. This module will combine approaches from urban and development geography in order to provide students with a historically grounded understanding of urban development in sub-Saharan Africa, covering issues of representation, globalization, gender and informality.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Environmental HazardsGEG6203Semester 26

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 6 pm

Project in Environmental ScienceGEG6212Full year6

Project in Environmental Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5212, GEG5213, GEG5214

An independent project based upon field, and/or laboratory, and/or numerical modelling work within the field of Environmental Science. NB This module is compulsory for all final-year students registered for an Environmental Science degree (F850) and is not available to students registered for any geography degree. By the end of the second term in your second year you will have to put forward a proposal for your topic, you will be allocated a supervisor based on this proposal. The main research takes place during the summer vacation between your second and third years. Any laboratory analysis should be completed by the end of the first semester in your third year. The work should be preceded by an exploratory study during the Easter vacation of your second year. Data analysis and writing up of the project takes place during the first and second terms of your third year. You are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss the project. The results of your research are presented in a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. Not open to associate students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG4002Full year4

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aids the transition to university by developing basic learning skills including reading and essay-writing as well as field observation and recording, through lectures and small-group tutorial work. In the Green London Project students explore urban environmental management in London, developing their social capital by working in small groups, becoming part of the community of geographers and environmental scientists at QMUL and learning how research, including "citizen science", can impact on organisations that are managing green spaces in London.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm

Geography in the WorldGEG4003Semester 14

Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on academic geography and the application of geographical knowledge and skills by academic geographers and students in their future careers. It provides an understanding of academic geography as engaged with the world and situated within wider society. We address key geographical practices, explore the relevance and application of academic geography, and consider new developments in citizen science and activist, participatory and public geography. The module includes a field trip to the Royal Geographical Society and employability lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental ScientistsGEG4004Full year4

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

People and the EnvironmentGEG4005Semester 24

People and the Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to key environmental issues from scientific, economic, social and cultural perspectives. The module encourages an appreciation of the complex and multifactoral nature of environmental problems; students will gain an understanding of the main global environmental systems and how these impact on and are impacted by human activity. They will also gain an appreciation of the range of approaches within geography that can be employed to study the relationship between people and their environment.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Cities and Regions in TransitionGEG4006Semester 24

Cities and Regions in Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cities and Regions in Transition will enable BA Human Geography students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of contemporary change in the UK. Key themes to be addressed in seminar discussion include neo-liberalism, the North-South divide, culture-led urban regeneration, urban heritage and identity, migration and urban health. Students will be assessed via (i) a learning log to demonstrate their critical engagement with reading in preparation for the seminars and (ii) an additional essay to be completed after the fieldtrip on GEG4106.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Reinventing BritainGEG4106Semester 24

Reinventing Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joe Penny
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines geographical implications of changes across the economic, social, cultural and political landscapes of Britain over the last three decades, focused on a field trip North West England. Key themes include: Britain's long-standing North-South divide; uneven geographies of deindustrialisation; culture, heritage and regeneration; geographies of migration and identity; and health inequalities. The module is delivered through lectures and fieldwork, introducing and make connections between theoretical perspectives including economic, social, cultural, political and urban geographies.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Global WorldsGEG4112Semester 24

Global Worlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Samuel Halvorsen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to a range of core issues affecting the world around them from economic, cultural and social perspectives with a particular focus on the importance of global-local relations revolving around inequality and justice. It will explore a range of debates surrounding the interrelationships between globalisation and international development from historical and contemporary viewpoints as well as the nature and politics of identities in relation to nationalism, diaspora, landscape and exclusion . Students will also be introduced to the relationships between health, place and care.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm

Earth Surface ScienceGEG4209Semester 14

Earth Surface Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr James Bradley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 11 am - 1 pm

Transferable Skills for GeographersGEG4444Full year4

Transferable Skills for Geographers

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Dept Of Geography
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is designed to support the transition from the school environment to the university, helping students adapt to the challenges and requirements of reading for a degree. It will utilise fieldwork (week 1 of Year 1), workshops and tutorials in order to teach the key transferable skills students require not just during university but also for any future employment.

By focussing on specific graduate attributes, such as learning how to engage critically with knowledge and acquiring new learning in a range of ways, the module will provide students with the key skills they require to be successful in their degree programmes and futures.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Geographical Information SystemsGEG5102Full year5

Geographical Information Systems

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the basic principles of GIS and their application in modelling geographical realities. It is practically based and a requirement of the module is to become proficient in the operation and use of the GIS software - ARCVIEW. The main components of the module include defining the key elements of a GIS, basic cartographic principles, elementary database management, error and data quality issues, statistical analysis of spatial data, and presentation and outputs from GIS. The module will emphasise the applications of GIS both realised, within the module, and potential, within the wider geographical remit.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Geographical Research in PracticeGEG5103Full year5

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester A, students attend weekly lectures that introduce key qualitative research techniques and approaches used in the discipline. Students work with local community organisations to appraise a local problem, demonstrate key research skills, and disseminate their findings to the wider community. In Semesters A and B, these research skills are further developed through tutorials focused on preparing students to do their IGS.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Geographical Research in PracticeGEG5103BSemester 25

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester B, students attend weekly tutorials that introduce key qualitative research techniques, research design, and common approaches to secondary data used in the discipline. In consultation with their tutor, students conduct a literature review around a research problem of interest and then design a proposal for an independent piece of geographical research intended to evaluate this problem.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American CityGEG5125Semester 25

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5126, GEG5127

Boston is a city that has undergone a series of dramatic transformations over the past three centuries. From being a key site of the American Revolution's rejection of British colonial rule, to the mass migration of Irish, Black American and other groups to the city in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, through to more recent processes of economic decline and reinvention as a hub of biotechnology, it is a city that has been at the forefront of American political, economic and social change. This module focuses on the changing historical geographies of Boston from the colonial period to the present day examining key processes which have shaped the city. Teaching and learning begins in the classroom through a series of lectures and workshops examining aspects of the city's historical geography and the sources used to study them, and planning group-based project work. It culminates in a week-long field course in Boston at the end of the semester. Work in Boston involves visiting museums, walking heritage trails, exploring localities and neighborhoods and meeting with researchers, experts and heritage practitioners in order to complete group projects. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Cultural GeographiesGEG5126Semester 15

Cultural Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the field of cultural geography. It draws on examples both historical and contemporary, in the UK and beyond, to demonstrate how spaces, places and landscapes are laden with meaning. It shows that culture is not something that is fixed, but rather constructed through relations with different people, places, ideas, objects and practices. The module therefore helps student understand and interpret matters of culture critically, with careful attention to plurality, complexity and power. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: an introduction to cultural geography; landscape: meaning, power and identity; interpreting cultural representations; more-than-representational geographies; geographies of embodiment and mobility; cultural geographies of food; emerging cultural landscapes and politics; tensions and new directions in cultural geography.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Society and SpaceGEG5127Semester 25

Society and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to the field of social geography, its theoretical perspectives and substantive concerns, centred upon an understanding of societies as products of uneven and always negotiated relationships of power. Drawing on a social constructionist approach, and using mainly UK examples, we consider intersecting constructions of social class, gender, race and sexuality, and how these constructions both shape, and are shaped by space at a variety of scales. The module includes a field walk assignment designed to develop skills of critical observation and interpretation.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGEG5128Semester 25

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: ALL_456

This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions. These issues will be examined in different regions of the world, enabling students from different disciplinary backgrounds to analyze the impact of diverse cultural and global contexts on development theory and practice.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm

Economic GeographiesGEG5129Semester 15

Economic Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joe Penny
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4112

This module offers a broad introduction to key debates within Economic Geography. It explores: the geographies of production and global production networks; the recentering of Economic Geography through engagement with the Global South and development; the centrality of uneven development in capitalist economic social relations; the connections between globalisation and local socio-spatial relations; and 'alternative' or `diverse' economic practices that challenge neoliberalism. The module will challenge students to understand how economic processes of valuation, production, consumption and exchange play out in practice in time and place.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm

Global London: Society, Economy and CultureGEG5132Semester 35

Global London: Society, Economy and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

London is one of the world's most important global cities. As a centre of world finance and home to many multinational corporations, decisions taken in London affect the livelihoods of millions of people across the globe Befitting of its global status, London is also one of the most diverse cities in the world; well over a third of its population was born overseas and more than 300 languages are spoken in the city. This module takes a critical look at one of the most exciting and dynamic cities on the planet. Focusing on the core themes of inequality and difference, it examines the way that economic, social and cultural processes are reshaping the metropolis and the lives of those who call themselves Londoners. We will examine the gap between rich and poor, explore the contested politics of gentrification and urban renewal, and look at the role of migrant labour in keeping the city working. We will seek to understand the city's diversity of peoples, cultures and religions and investigate the complexity of identity in the context of London's transition from imperial to postcolonial metropolis. For much of the module, the city will be our classroom. We will learn by walking its streets, visiting its museums and cultural institutions, exploring its different neighbourhoods and watching, listening and talking to its people as they go about their everyday lives. We'll engage with community groups, look at current issues and debates exercising Londoners and think about the future of the city. Above all, this module will demonstrate how we can not fully understand London without placing it in a global context; its people, economy and ways of life are profoundly shaped by their connections with the rest of the world. Together with 'Global Paris: History, Politics and Public Space' (ULIP), this module forms half of the new summer school programme 'Global Cities: Paris and London' taught at ULIP and QMUL from late June to early August in two three week blocks. Students are required to take both modules (total equivalent to six US credits).

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical, 10.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

Geographies of BiomedicineGEG5134Semester 25

Geographies of Biomedicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of the relationship between health and biomedicine, and how this varies across different spatial, cultural and technological contexts. It seeks to teach students how geographical perspectives and skills can be used to evaluate the ways in which biomedicine is transforming the increasingly global geographies of medical research, health and healthcare. Key topics that will be considered include: organ trafficking, biological citizenship, neuroscience, genetic screening, and inequitable access to pharmaceutical drugs.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Environmental Research MethodsGEG5212Semester 15

Environmental Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4004

This module provides training in key research methods for physical geography and environmental science, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include practice in laboratory and field techniques, as well as data analysis and interpretation, digital cartography and reporting skills, delivered through lectures, laboratory practicals and a residential field course. With GEG5214 Research Design and GEG5213 Advanced Environmental Research Methods, it provides a foundation for Level 6 independent research projects. In addition, students on the module will evaluate geographical and environmental science perspectives on specific issues, and will develop valuable skills that are transferable beyond these disciplines.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 9: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 8: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Environmental Research SkillsGEG5213Semester 25

Advanced Environmental Research Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldene Wharton
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4004

This module provides further training in selected research techniques, building upon GEG5212 Environmental Research Methods. To develop the skills they need for Level 6 independent research projects, students will select from a portfolio of "short course options" providing opportunities to learn and practice laboratory and field methods, based on research strengths within the School of Geography. Delivery is tailored to the specific needs of each short course and will typically involve small-group laboratory, computing and/or local fieldwork.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Thursday 2 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9: Thursday 12 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm

Research DesignGEG5214Full year5

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuditta Trinci
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4004

This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

New York: Nature and the CityGEG5141Full year5

New York: Nature and the City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5126, GEG5127

As a world city undergoing a series of dramatic social and biophysical transformations, from key site in the development of colonial rule to more recent urban design for climate change resilience, New York is a city where major ideas of nature have been negotiated, narrated and practised. Preparatory lectures and a seven-day field course focus on the changing geographies of nature in New York and their connections to the wider geographies of global environmental change, the Anthropocene and urban sustainability.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

New York: Nature and the CityGEG6141Full year6

New York: Nature and the City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

New York is a world city that has undergone a series of dramatic social and biophysical transformations. As key site in the development of colonial rule, to more recent urban design aimed at climate change resilience, it is a city in which the major ideas of nature have been negotiated, narrated and practiced. From the American Museum of Natural History to the green spaces of community gardens, the city is at the forefront of global environmental change and questions of sustainability, social equality and resilience. This module focuses on the changing geographies of nature in New York and their connections to the wider geographies of climate change, the Anthropocene and urban sustainability.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Ancient Human Occupation of BritainGEG6225Semester 26

Ancient Human Occupation of Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Who are we and where do we come from? These frequently-asked questions are addressed through an examination of the archaeological record and the rich Palaeolithic record in Britain. The British evidence is considered in the context of dispersals of hominin groups from Africa into Europe over the last two million years. Major climatic fluctuations, repeated advance and retreat of ice sheets and major geographical and environmental changes provide the backdrop for this exploration of the ancient human occupation of Britain.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 2 pm

Environmental PollutionGEG6226Semester 16

Environmental Pollution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell
Overlap: GEG7226
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to the sources, pathways and effects of a range of inorganic and organic pollutants in soils, sediments and aquatic environments. It will address current methods of pollution control, focusing on risk-based methods of pollution management and appropriate management strategies for different pollutant types. Developing a process-based understanding of contaminant cycles through the catchment-coast continuum, students will learn how to apply this to environmental management scenarios using case study material. The module includes a one-day site or field visit.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Volcanoes, Climate Change and SocietyGEG6229Semester 26

Volcanoes, Climate Change and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Dept Of Geography
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Volcanic eruptions can influence earth systems on a number of scales, from individual landforms to landscape development and global climatic change. Volcanic hazards can have global-scale social impacts and directly threaten the approximately 800 million people that live within 100 km of an active volcano. This module will provide students with knowledge about volcanic environments, the hazards they pose on many scales and potential benefits to societies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Geospatial ScienceGEG6230Semester 26

Advanced Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Grieve
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5223

The analysis of geospatial data is the cornerstone of much physical geography and environmental science research. Building upon the knowledge acquired in GEG5223 students will be taught through a range of lectures and computer based practicals. Material covered will highlight recent developments from across the discipline, demonstrating the use of cutting edge Geographical Information Systems to solve problems from a range of physical geography and environmental science sub-disciplines. Time will also be devoted to the effective visualisation of geospatial data and analysis outputs, equipping students with key skills required in the workplace or for further study .

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Fragile EnvironmentsGEG6231Semester 26

Fragile Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments are increasingly subjected to changing external stressors, including climate, pollution, land-use and resource consumption. Examining the impact of multiple stressors, this module integrates chemical, biological and physical understanding to explore how fragile environments can be assessed, managed and restored. It will be delivered through a residential overseas field trip to visit exemplary fragile environments such as the Florida Everglades; the specific field location will be announced in advance each year.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Getting Started in Geographical and Environmental ResearchGEG4210Semester 24

Getting Started in Geographical and Environmental Research

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This compulsory module provides training in key research methods for physical geography and environmental science, complementing knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include practice in laboratory and field techniques, as well as data analysis and interpretation, digital cartography and reporting skills, delivered through lectures and practical work (field, lab, computer) and a non-residential field course. It provides a foundation for level 5 methods modules (GEG5214,GEG5213,GEG5212) and for the level 6 independent research project.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 5, 6: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9, 10, 11: Wednesday 9 am - 5 pm

Health, Space and JusticeGEG5135Semester 15

Health, Space and Justice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module critically engages with the geographies of health and place. The module outlines key theoretical concepts shaping the study of health by geographers and sketches a short history of the importance of place to this. Having located the geographies of health and place within their intellectual milieu, the module explores a variety of theoretical and empirical case studies that tease apart the uneven geographies of health and health care at a variety of spatial scales, and in so doing, raises questions of inequity and justice

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Research DesignGEG5214BSemester 25

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4004

This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Fragile EnvironmentsGEG5231Semester 25

Fragile Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments are increasingly subjected to changing external stressors, including climate, pollution, land-use and resource consumption. Examining the impact of multiple stressors, this module integrates chemical, biological and physical understanding to explore how fragile environments can be assessed, managed and restored. It will be delivered through a residential overseas field trip to visit exemplary fragile environments such as the Florida Everglades; the specific field location will be announced in advance each year.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Readings in Geography: Global Historical GeographiesGEG6009Semester 26

Readings in Geography: Global Historical Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Readings in Global Historical Geographies allows students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of perspectives on and approaches to global history and global historical geography, and also their substantive knowledge of particular areas, that they will be introduced to within the co-requisite module GEG6105 Global Historical Geographies. Students will undertake an extended piece of writing (6000 words) based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Readings in Geography: Geographies of HomeGEG6010Semester 26

Readings in Geography: Geographies of Home

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alison Blunt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Readings in Geographies of Home allows students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of geographical approaches to studying home alongside substantive knowledge of particular areas, which they will be introduced to on the co-requisite module GEG6102 Geographies of Home. Through guided and independent reading and research, and supported by two small group seminars and one-to-one tutorials, the students will complete an extended piece of writing (6000 words) on a subject agreed with the module convenor.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Geographies of HomeGEG6102Semester 26

Geographies of Home

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alison Blunt
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module investigates geographies of home on scales ranging from the domestic to the global. Conceptually, the module considers the long-established 'suppression of home' (Reed, 1996), and its more recent revival in research across the humanities and social sciences. The module begins by tracing the celebration of home by humanistic geographers as a site of authentic meaning, value and experience, imbued with nostalgic memories and the love of a particular place. But humanistic geographers failed to analyse the home as a gendered space shaped by different and unequal relations of power and as a space that might be dangerous, violent and alienating rather than loving and secure. More complex and contested spaces of home have come to be studied by cultural geographers, often inspired by feminist and postcolonial theory. One central theme of this work has been an interest in the politics of home and identity, and the ways in which geographies of home are shaped not only by gender, but also by race, class, sexuality and age.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Global Historical Geographies, 1492-1800GEG6105Semester 16

Global Historical Geographies, 1492-1800

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to introduce students to the complexities of the historical geography of globalisation from Christopher Columbus's landing in America to the end of the eighteenth century. During this period there were enormous changes in the relationships between places - particularly between Europe and the rest of the world - which had profound implications for the way in which the world worked then and which have also structured the ways in which the world works now. Based on the key module text Global Lives (Ogborn, 2008) the module distinguishes between various forms, phases and types of global connection: first encounters, settlement, trade both east and west, mariners' and pirates' travelling lives, the slave trade, plantation slavery in the Caribbean and North America, anti-slavery movements, and science and discovery in the Pacific. It uses biographical material to show how those processes shaped people's lives and were shaped by them. The module's substantive material will be taught through lectures, through student discussion sessions which will support the production of coursework and through museum visits which will show how these issues are being presented to contemporary audiences.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Health, Disease and the CityGEG6137Semester 26

Health, Disease and the City

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Starting in the nineteenth-century cities of Britain and North America, this module considers the relationship between health, disease and urban space. Attention is drawn to the ways in which pathologized identities and spaces were constructed through public health and political discourse and consideration given to the productive properties of knowledge/power. Moving beyond the nineteenth-century city, the module moves on to consider how processes of globalisation and urbanisation have reshaped and reinvigorated these discourses in the hyperconnected world of the 21st century.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Urban Geography: The Public Life of CitiesGEG6142Semester 26

Urban Geography: The Public Life of Cities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an engagement with the sub-discipline of urban geography. It explores key challenges, debates, concepts and theories related to how people live and relate to one another in urban environments. It outlines various social, cultural and economic dimensions of contemporary cities, and considers relations between population size, density and diversity. Drawing on case studies and theories from both the Global North and South, the module addresses the problems and potentials of everyday life in an increasingly urbanised world.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Historical Geographies of Childhood and Youth 1800-presentGEG6143Semester 26

Historical Geographies of Childhood and Youth 1800-present

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Claudia Soares
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This is an exciting, interdisciplinary module that explores key themes and issues that enable us to understand childhood and children's everyday lives in the context of social, cultural, political and environmental change over time, in the UK and on a global level. Engaging with the subdisciplines of historical geography and children's geographies, the module makes a case for the use of age as an important category of analysis in understanding individuals' engagement and participation in society and culture.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Latin American Debates: the politics of development and democratisationGEG6144Semester 16

Latin American Debates: the politics of development and democratisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Samuel Halvorsen
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Latin America has provided one of the most dynamic and exciting regions for debating paths of development and democratisation, two processes that have been widely disputed since the region emerged from the shadows of military governments in the early 1980s. This module examines the wealth of knowledges and the key fault lines that have emerged within and about the region since the 1980s, paying particular attention to the period of the so-called left turn (1998-2015).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2: Monday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Film Screening
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Friday 3 pm - 5 pm