School of Geography

School of Geography Year 1 Modules

Year 1: Earth Surface Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

 

Year 1: Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on academic geography and the application of geographical knowledge and skills by academic geographers and students in their future careers. It provides an understanding of academic geography as engaged with the world and situated within wider society. We address key geographical practices, explore the relevance and application of academic geography, and consider new developments in citizen science and activist, participatory and public geography. The module includes a field trip to the Royal Geographical Society and employability lectures.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

 

Year 1: Global Worlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Dept Of Geography
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to a range of core issues affecting the world around them from economic, cultural and social perspectives with a particular focus on the importance of global-local relations revolving around inequality and justice. It will explore a range of debates surrounding the interrelationships between globalisation and international development from historical and contemporary viewpoints as well as the nature and politics of identities in relation to nationalism, diaspora, landscape and exclusion . Students will also be introduced to the relationships between health, place and care.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

 

Year 1: Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental Science*

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aids the transition to university by developing basic learning skills including reading and essay-writing as well as field observation and recording, through lectures and small-group tutorial work. In the Green London Project students explore urban environmental management in London, developing their social capital by working in small groups, becoming part of the community of geographers and environmental scientists at QMUL and learning how research, including ¿citizen science¿, can impact on organisations that are managing green spaces in London.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

*Fieldwork module. Fieldwork destinations may vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and depend on the module combinations chosen. Overseas fieldwork modules run in alternate years. Places are limited - if a module is oversubscribed, places will be allocated by ballot. Students on overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.


 

Year 1: People and the Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to key environmental issues from scientific, economic, social and cultural perspectives. The module encourages an appreciation of the complex and multifactoral nature of environmental problems; students will gain an understanding of the main global environmental systems and how these impact on and are impacted by human activity. They will also gain an appreciation of the range of approaches within geography that can be employed to study the relationship between people and their environment.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

 

Year 1: Reinventing Britain*

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines geographical implications of changes across the economic, social, cultural and political landscapes of Britain over the last three decades, focused on a field trip North West England. Key themes include: Britain¿s long-standing North-South divide; uneven geographies of deindustrialisation; culture, heritage and regeneration; geographies of migration and identity; and health inequalities. The module is delivered through lectures and fieldwork, introducing and make connections between theoretical perspectives including economic, social, cultural, political and urban geographies.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

*Fieldwork module. Fieldwork destinations may vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and depend on the module combinations chosen. Overseas fieldwork modules run in alternate years. Places are limited - if a module is oversubscribed, places will be allocated by ballot. Students on overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.


 

Year 1: Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

 


 

Year 1: Fieldwork in Physical Geography and Environmental Science*

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to fieldwork skills for physical geographers and environmental scientists. You will be able to use a range of field techniques to investigate the physical landscape, soils and sediments, river systems and hydrology and also the impact of and management of human activity on the natural environment. The module is delivered through lectures, laboratory/classroom practical exercises and fieldwork exercises, both actual and virtual (e.g. using Google Earth). Actual fieldwork may take place on-campus, off-campus on day trips, during a residential field trip, or any combination of these.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

*Fieldwork module. Fieldwork destinations may vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and depend on the module combinations chosen. Overseas fieldwork modules run in alternate years. Places are limited - if a module is oversubscribed, places will be allocated by ballot. Students on overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.


 

Year 1: Cities and Regions in Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cities and Regions in Transition will enable BA Human Geography students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of contemporary change in the UK. Key themes to be addressed in seminar discussion include neo-liberalism, the North-South divide, culture-led urban regeneration, urban heritage and identity, migration and urban health. Students will be assessed via (i) a learning log to demonstrate their critical engagement with reading in preparation for the seminars and (ii) an additional essay to be completed after the fieldtrip on GEG4106.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

 

Year 1: Economics for Business

This module is run by the School of Business & Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cecilia Lanata Briones
Overlap: BUS137
Prerequisite: None

This module explains how firms, consumers and government interact in markets and how business decision-making is shaped by internal factors such as costs and by external market conditions. The unit examines the main concepts of economic theory and explores the importance of these within a business context, with emphasis on the applicability of economic theory to an understanding of the internal dynamics of business organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm

 

Year 1: Fundamentals of Management

This module is run by the School of Business & Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Matteo Mandarini
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Should not be taken with BUS107

This module introduces students to the purpose, operations and implications of management by exploring the contexts within which management takes place. To put in a somewhat exaggerated way, it is not a "how to do business" module, but a module about the framework for understanding business as well as the environment and contexts in which it operates. We will reflect on management in relation to the social, economic and legal conditions within which it operates, as well as reflect on the political, cultural and environmental consequences of modern management. We will discuss how management practices are informed and, in some cases, defined by issues such as: the privatisation of public services, the environmental impact of technological change, the unequal distribution of the world's resources and the unequal influence of stakeholders on business practices. 

Considering business and management as an object of social scientific study provides students with a broad social scientific approach to the subject. The module's interdisciplinary focus allows students to understand business within its macro-environment, pulled in different directions by competing exigencies within an ever-changing global system of relations. By developing a sense of those diverse pressures, the student can begin to develop an independent perspective and the intellectual tools to confront them.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 10 am

 

Year 1: Ecology

This module is run by the School of Biological & Chemical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers the essentials and fundamental concepts of population and community ecology as well as applied issues such as conservation. There is an one-week residential field course where students will study organisms in their natural environments, rather than in the laboratory.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

 

Year 1: Evolution

This module is run by the School of Biological & Chemical Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr David Hone
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

Description: This module covers essential topics of whole-organism biology, introducing the theory and mechanisms of evolution and speciation, the fossil record and human evolution.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Friday 1 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm