School of Geography

Amy Clarke

Amy

ESRC LISS-DTP Postdoctoral Fellow

Email: a.clarke@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)202 7882 2745
Room Number: Bancroft Building, Room 2.11

Profile

Twitter: @Clarkey_123

Website: https://amyclarkeresearch.wordpress.com/

My research interests are broadly centred around social geographies of identity, ‘race’, nation and belonging, with particular focus on the UK. Connected to these broad interests, I am also concerned with legacies of colonialism, intersections of ‘race’ and class, suburban multiculture, and politics of indigeneity, genealogy and relatedness.

I joined Queen Mary in October 2018 as an ESRC LISS-DTP Postdoctoral Fellow. In this role I will be working, supported by Professor Catherine Nash, on the bridging project Urban Roots and National Belonging: hierarchies and scales of belonging in London. This 12-month project involves writing journal articles based on my PhD research, engaging in policy and public engagement activities, and preparing future research on East London’s genealogical communities of belonging.

Before joining Queen Mary, I was an ESRC-funded Doctoral Researcher in Geography at the University of Sussex, where I also taught as a Doctoral Tutor in Geography and Sociology. My PhD focused on the boundaries that surround and hierarchies that structure Britain’s national community of belonging. In contrast to existing work, the research investigated these boundaries and hierarchies of belonging through in-depth qualitative enquiry of their reproduction among white middle-class British adults. The work innovates discussions around migrant integration and national belonging by highlighting a new research agenda focused on the role of the established majority in these processes.

Research

Research Interests:

My recent and ongoing research projects are:

Urban Roots and National Belonging: hierarchies and scales of belonging in London (ESRC LISS-DTP Postdoctoral Fellowship, Oct 2018 – Sept 2019)

During my Postdoctoral Fellowship at Queen Mary, I will be consolidating my doctoral work through academic publication, dissemination and impact, and will begin developing plans for future research on East London’s genealogical communities of belonging.

National Lives, Local Voices: Boundaries, hierarchies and possibilities of belonging (ESRC SENSS-DTP Studentship, Oct 2014 – Jan 2018)

My PhD thesis examined the boundaries that surround and hierarchies that structure Britain’s national community of belonging. In contrast to existing work, the research investigated boundaries and hierarchies of belonging through in-depth qualitative enquiry of their (re)production among Britain’s white middle-classes asking: How do they imagine Britain as a nation and national community? How do they understand and recognise other people as British (or not), and as belonging (or not) in and/or to Britain? And how do they position people in relation to boundaries and hierarchies of belonging? Fieldwork consisted of fifteen months’ ethnography in the suburbs of North East London and West Essex, including successive qualitative interviews with 26 local residents. The thesis included chapters on the extent to which Britain is imagined as a plural nation, on participants’ narratives of local ethnic diversity, everyday interaction and encounter, on markers of belonging and economies of recognition, and on the role of historical imaginaries in reproducing nation.