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School of Geography

Signification and forms of knowledge

A discarded tourniquet – in the shape of an AIDS ribbon - on the ground of a shack squatted by intravenous drug users in Khayelitsha, South Africa (Credit: Stephen Taylor).
A discarded tourniquet – in the shape of an AIDS ribbon - on the ground of a shack squatted by intravenous drug users in Khayelitsha, South Africa (Credit: Stephen Taylor).

Signification and forms of knowledge concerns the politics of representation and the discriminatory practices of making things, people and knowledges visible and invisible. Stephen Taylor’s research, focusing on the political and institutional geographies of mental health knowledges and practices in Kinshasa, has produced recommendations for responding to the pluralising and de-institutionalising landscapes of psychiatric treatment and care in the city. Tim Brown problematizes epidemiological constructions of blackness and risky subjectivity in a collaborative project with Homerton University Hospital and the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine. Aiming to promote breast awareness amongst black women, Brown’s research demonstrated the importance of accounting for political configurations of identity and self in attempts to cohere subject-citizens into biosocial communities. In collaboration with public health specialists at Makerere University in Kampala, Kerry Holden explores the historical geographies of health administration in Uganda with the aim of supporting district health management teams to evaluate health interventions.