School of Geography

Modules

TitleCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Advanced Readings in GeographyGEG7101Semester 17

Advanced Readings in Geography

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Unlike other option modules, Advanced Readings in Geography will be taught on an individual basis and only in exceptional circumstances. The student would be required to complete a proposal explaining why s/he would like to conduct advanced level readings on a clearly defined area of research that is not covered in detail on other MA/MSc courses. If an appropriate colleague agrees to supervise the Readings module, fortnightly meetings will be held to discuss the readings and to develop the 5000 word paper. The course is essentially self-directed, like equivalent courses taught elsewhere at Masters level.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Art, Performance and the CityGEG7102Semester 27

Art, Performance and the City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mr Casper Ebbensgaard
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module centres on projects by artists and cultural practitioners in London and particularly its East End. It involves critical reading, background research, and engaging with practices and sites through documentation, excursions and discussions with artists. The module begins with sessions on cultural practices of urban exploring and walking. Sessions then introduce and discuss particular cases that form the basis for research and seminar discussion. These may include historical walking tours in East London; artistic walking projects by Francis Alys, Tim Brennan, Janet Cardiff and Iain Sinclair; cinematic representations by Patrick Keiller; controversies about place and politics involved in Rachel Whiteread's House, completed in 1993 at a site on Grove Road next to Queen Mary; and contemporary artistic engagements with the Olympics site. Through these materials, the module explores geographical and political issues concerned the art and the city, and aspects of the changing nature and practice of urban cultures in London and its East End.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 15,000 WordsGEG7107Full year7

Dissertation 15,000 Words

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 30,000 WordsGEG7108Full year7

Dissertation 30,000 Words

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced Readings in GeographyGEG7101Semester 27

Advanced Readings in Geography

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Unlike other option modules, Advanced Readings in Geography will be taught on an individual basis and only in exceptional circumstances. The student would be required to complete a proposal explaining why s/he would like to conduct advanced level readings on a clearly defined area of research that is not covered in detail on other MA/MSc courses. If an appropriate colleague agrees to supervise the Readings module, fortnightly meetings will be held to discuss the readings and to develop the 5000 word paper. The course is essentially self-directed, like equivalent courses taught elsewhere at Masters level.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 22,500 WordsGEG7118Full year7

Dissertation 22,500 Words

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Geographical Thought and PracticeGEG7120Full year7

Geographical Thought and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module provides subject-specific research training in human geography and will cover core understanding of key concepts and approaches to human geography research; subject specific research and transferable skills; and qualitative and quantitative, subject specific methodological and presentation techniques. This module will equip students with the skills necessary to design and implement an extended piece of primary research.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Cultural Geography in PracticeGEG7122Semester 17

Cultural Geography in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module focuses on what could be described as creative and public cultural geographies. It explores the ways in which cultural geography is being undertaken and disseminated through forms of creative practice, participatory approaches and collaborative projects. These include collaborations between cultural geographers and creative practitioners and collaborative relationships with public cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries. Through class discussions and on site explorations of current examples, the module explores the contexts, approaches, practical strategies, possibilities and challenges of creative and public cultural geographies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Democracy, rights and citizenshipGEG7130Semester 27

Democracy, rights and citizenship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module examines the critical development geographies of democracy, citizenship and rights focusing on the realisation and articulation of different political agencies across different sites and scales in the global North and global South.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Global working livesGEG7131Semester 17

Global working lives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Monteith
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module explores the economic-development geographies of people's everyday struggles to make a living in the contemporary global economy. Drawing on research within and across the Global North and Global South, this module engages with an exciting 'labour geographies' research agenda, concerned with how workers are capable of fashioning the geography of capitalism to suit their own needs and self-production; and to identify geographical possibilities and labour market strategies through which 'workers may challenge, outmaneuver and perhaps even beat capital' in different locations. The module seeks to expose the spatial limits of mainstream 'universal' theories in geography which presume that 'the economy' and 'labour' can be theorised solely from the perspective of the formal spaces of advanced capitalist economies in the global North.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Retheorizing development futuresGEG7132Semester 17

Retheorizing development futures

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide the theoretical framework underpinning all the modules for this programme. Teaching will be divided into 4 blocks each examining key substantive themes: (i) Hybrid worlds seminars will introduce students to key debates challenging the academic and disciplinary divides between economic and development geography. In particular these seminars will challenge the representation of the global South as a collection of people and places in need of development intervention and where geographic theory and knowledge travels to, and the economy as only operating in and through advanced economies. These seminars will encourage students to challenge these boundaries and recognise an increasingly interconnected global South and North. (ii) Gendered development futures seminars will focus on the gendered history of development highlighting the critical junctures at which the discipline has been engendered. It will introduce students to key gender and development theories and approaches and the changing nature and politics of gender scholarship. (iii) Citizenship, justice and democracy will focus on questions of contemporary citizenships and their position with regards to democracy and rights. Detailing feminist and postcolonial frameworks, it will highlight the uneven geographies and experiences of democracy, citizenship and rights. (iv) Transnational migration and mobilities will introduce students to contemporary theoretical approaches to migration and mobility focusing particularly on transnational theory. Unpacking the complex mobilities of people, commodities and money, these seminars will particularly focus on migrant remittances illustrating the increasingly contested nature of these flows in relation to the migration-development nexus and the 'financialisation of development'.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Critical Global Health GeographiesGEG7133Semester 17

Critical Global Health Geographies

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Critical Global Health Geographies provides the opportunity to engage with the remarkable health challenges that face the world we live in today. Organised around three central themes which outline the shift from international health to global health and identify the importance of geographical analyses to this transformation, the module draws on core geographical concerns with people, place, space, power and justice to promote critical encounters with the interdisciplinary field of global health.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Cities, Space and PowerGEG7123Semester 17

Cities, Space and Power

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module examines the relationships between space and power in different cities in the past and the present. Focusing on debates about the emergence and contestation of urban public space, the module uses a range of materials - poetry, novels, art, film, newspaper stories and fieldwork - to explore how the city's geographies have been shaped and reshaped by relationships of power. The course uses London, past and present, as a key example, and develops comparative perspectives through other city examples, such as Los Angeles and colonial and post-colonial Calcutta/Kolkata.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Migration and MobilitiesGEG7129Semester 27

Migration and Mobilities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module explores theoretical, empirical and policy dimensions of patterns and processes of migration and mobilities in a global context and consciously across the global North/global South 'divide' from a scalar, relational and networked perspective. Although the focus will be on the nature and dynamics of contemporary movement of people, the module will also incorporate an analysis of the movement of information, goods and capital as framed within the 'new mobilities paradigm'. Theoretically, the module analyses the key framings of contemporary migration in relation to transnationalism, diaspora and post-national citizenship. In turn, it will interrogate the nature and links between transnationalism, multiculturalism and/or integration; the migration-development nexus; the politics of irregularity and 'illegality'; the relationships between the emergence of global cities and a migrant division of labour; the nature of global gendered mobilities and power and mobility as well as the interrelations between conflict, violence and mobility.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Researching Global Health and Biomedicine: Geneva FieldclassGEG7134Semester 27

Researching Global Health and Biomedicine: Geneva Fieldclass

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This innovative fieldwork-based module offers a critical introduction to the vast endeavour of global health policy through a particular focus on the position of Geneva as a centre of decision-making. Through lectures, seminars and independent study, students will develop a policy critique of the work of one global health organisation based in Geneva. Students will conduct site visits to this and other organisations on the field class, with this original research feeding into the submission of an assessed policy critique. This 15-credit module is only open to students on selected SMD Masters programmes.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Design and MethodsGEG7135Semester 27

Research Design and Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Marcia Vera Espinoza
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Research Design and Methods provides students with information about a range of research methods including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), creating online surveys, archival research, using film, interviewing and ethnography. In addition, students are provided with information about research design and the importance of ethical considerations. The module builds up to students producing their own research proposal that anticipates their dissertation research over the coming months.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Researching Economic Futures in Practice: Malaysia EmergingGEG7136Semester 27

Researching Economic Futures in Practice: Malaysia Emerging

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gale Raj-Reichert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This innovative fieldwork based module aims to bridge the study of `economic¿, `labour¿, and `development¿ geographies. Core themes are: 1) Malaysia¿s integration into the global and regional production networks of the electronics industry; 2) the state of Malaysia as a `graduated sovereignty¿ and post-developmental state which exhibits discipline over labour and civil society while allowing foreign corporations to assume certain aspects of state power; 3) the role of foreign migrant workers in the stabilisation of the labour market; and 4) the embedding of race politics in the cultural and economic geographies of the country. These themes will be explored through field case studies in Penang and Kuala Lumpur. PGT students will be expected to devise their own projects and site visits in Malaysia in relation to these themes.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Critical Global Health GeographiesGEG7140Semester 17

Critical Global Health Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Critical Global Health Geographies provides the opportunity to engage with the remarkable health challenges that face the world we live in today. Organised around three central themes which outline the shift from international health to global health and identify the importance of geographical analyses to this transformation, the module draws on core geographical concerns with people, place, space, power and justice to promote critical encounters with the interdisciplinary field of global health.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Researching Global Health and Biomedicine: Geneva FieldclassGEG7141Semester 27

Researching Global Health and Biomedicine: Geneva Fieldclass

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This innovative fieldwork-based module offers a critical introduction to the vast endeavour of global health policy through a particular focus on the position of Geneva as a centre of decision-making. Through lectures, seminars and independent study, students will develop a policy critique of the work of one global health organisation based in Geneva. Students will conduct site visits to this and other organisations on the field class, with this original research feeding into the submission of an assessed policy critique. This 15-credit module is only open to students on selected SMD Masters programmes.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Independent Research ProjectGEG7202Full year7

Independent Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module allows the student to undertake a piece of independent, supervised research on a topic within the scope of physical geographical and environmental science research. The project may involve working with a partner organisation and it may therefore have an applied focus or contribute to the work of that organisation. The project will normally involve field and/or laboratory work, together with use of appropriate data analysis tools.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Project-Specific Research TrainingGEG7204Semester 17

Project-Specific Research Training

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module will introduce the student to research issues, methodologies and field and laboratory procedures that are appropriate to the research topic top be investigated in the Independent Research Project, including theoretical background and context, research design and project management. The research area for the project will therefore significantly determine the module content. The module is delivered through formal supervisory sessions, together with appropriate field and/or laboratory training.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Environmental Science Research and PracticeGEG7206Semester 17

Environmental Science Research and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module introduces students to current research issues and approaches in environmental science. Students will develop an understanding of the nature and scope of environmental science research, enabling them to engage with a wide range of research debates. They will conduct an in-depth review of research on a specific topic of interest, and evaluate the utility of different research approaches to investigating that topic. The module is delivered via lectures from guest speakers and seminars with physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Desk StudyGEG7305Semester 27

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary water management issue or specialised area of aquatic science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of MSc staff team

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Individual Research ProjectGEG7308Full year7

Individual Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Students are encouraged to undertake their Individual Research Project in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation The theme for the Individual Research Project is selected by the student in collaboration with the module organiser and in most cases with the practitioner organisation in order to ensure that the project and practitioner link matches the research interests and career aspirations of the student. Students not wishing to link with a practitioner organisation can opt to undertake a free-standing research project of their choice, subject to approval by the module organiser. In either case, the project is undertaken over a twelve week period, and each student is allocated an academic advisor from the MSc academic staff to ensure that they receive appropriate academic guidance during the research. The project report will be marked by two members of the MSc academic staff (usually including the student's advisor) and, where the project is in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation, comments on the project by the link person in that practitioner / user organisation will also be taken into account.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGEG7310Semester 17

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Biogeosciences and Ecosystem ServicesGEG7313Semester 27

Biogeosciences and Ecosystem Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Flood Risk Management and ModellingGEG7314Semester 27

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module is divided into two linked elements. The first explores the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are examined and novel management options for reducing flood risk (including strategic rural land management and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) are critically reviewed. Flood protection in London is explored through a field trip to the Thames Barrier and potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are reviewed. The second component of the module is focussed on flood risk modelling. A combination of lecture and practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

River Assessment and RestorationGEG7317Semester 17

River Assessment and Restoration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module aims to provide the key knowledge and understanding at an advanced level necessary to support the development of management strategies for rivers along the catchment to coast continuum. Based upon an understanding of the multi-dimensional connectivity of fluvial systems, the module focuses on themes such as sediment and vegetation dynamics, river and floodplain process-form relationships, environmental flows, ecohydraulics and particular issues relating to constrained urban environments. Based on a solid scientific underpinning, the module introduces the legislative context, methods of field survey and assessment, and integrated approaches to the sustainable management of river systems, their flood plains and estuaries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Catchment Science in PracticeGEG7318Full year7

Catchment Science in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Giuditta Trinci
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module will connect students with the water sector practitioner/ stakeholder community and deepen understanding of science-based catchment management. The module will explore the ways in which advances in scientific understanding of catchment systems and developments in water policy have been translated into management, and the challenges associated with this. Students will engage with a diverse range of practitioners and stakeholder groups including government organisations, environmental consultancies, third sector/ charitable organisations and professional bodies to gain a broader perspective on catchment management and to develop a network of contacts. The module will also provide students with an opportunity to reflect on the knowledge and skills developed during the programme and how these can be communicated effectively to potential employers. The module is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars led by Geography teaching staff, guest lectures and workshops by representatives from the water sector, field visits, student-led reading groups and attendance at external events.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Environmental Data Acquisition and AnalysisGEG7319Semester 27

Environmental Data Acquisition and Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of skills in data collection plus numerical, statistical and modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in approaches to the collection of field data and data from secondary sources as well as data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Retheorising Global DevelopmentGEG7137Semester 17

Retheorising Global Development

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Hannah Schling
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module will provide the theoretical framework underpinning all the modules for this programme. Teaching will be divided into 4 blocks each examining key substantive themes: (i) Hybrid worlds seminars will introduce students to key debates challenging the academic and disciplinary divides between economic and development geography. In particular these seminars will challenge the representation of the global South as a collection of people and places in need of development intervention and where geographic theory and knowledge travels to, and the economy as only operating in and through advanced economies. These seminars will encourage students to challenge these boundaries and recognise an increasingly interconnected global South and North. (ii) Gendered development futures seminars will focus on the gendered history of development highlighting the critical junctures at which the discipline has been engendered. It will introduce students to key gender and development theories and approaches and the changing nature and politics of gender scholarship. (iii) Citizenship, justice and democracy will focus on questions of contemporary citizenships and their position with regards to democracy and rights. Detailing feminist and postcolonial frameworks, it will highlight the uneven geographies and experiences of democracy, citizenship and rights. (iv) Transnational migration and mobilities will introduce students to contemporary theoretical approaches to migration and mobility focusing particularly on transnational theory. Unpacking the complex mobilities of people, commodities and money, these seminars will particularly focus on migrant remittances illustrating the increasingly contested nature of these flows in relation to the migration-development nexus and the 'financialisation of development'.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Environmental PollutionGEG7226Semester 17

Environmental Pollution

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Heppell
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module introduces students to the sources, pathways and effects of a range of inorganic and organic pollutants in soils, sediments and aquatic environments. It will address current methods of pollution control, focusing on risk-based methods of pollution management and appropriate management strategies for different pollutant types. Developing a process-based understanding of contaminant cycles through the catchment-coast continuum, students will learn how to apply this to environmental management scenarios using case study material. The module includes a one-day site or field visit.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Modelling Environmental SystemsGEG7320Semester 27

Modelling Environmental Systems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module introduces students to the use of models to understand environmental systems. Through lectures, practical training and one-to-one supervision, students will explore different modelling approaches and their applications, learn how models are developed, review their limitations, and plan and execute their own modelling experiment. The nature of training will reflect students' interests and research topics but is likely to include physical and/or numerical simulation of environmental processes.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 15,000 WordsGEG7138Full year7

Dissertation 15,000 Words

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 12,000 WordsGEG7139Full year7

Dissertation 12,000 Words

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced ReadingsGEG7142Semester 17

Advanced Readings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module offers the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of an area of research through self-directed reading. In order to take this module, students must identify an area of interest that can be supervised by a member of the teaching team. The module is assessed by a 4000-5000 word paper that demonstrates advanced engagement with their chosen field of study. If supervision of the topic is agreed, students complete self-directed reading at an advanced level and discuss their readings and develop their paper at fortnightly supervision meetings. The structure of the report may vary according to the nature of the topic, and this is reflected in the word count range provided. Human Geography topics are expected to produce longer papers (up to 5000 words) while topics in Physical Geography and Environmental Science are likely to produce shorter papers (up to 4000 words) that may incorporate figures and data in certain circumstances.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Researching Development in Practice: Mumbai UnboundGEG7128Semester 17

Researching Development in Practice: Mumbai Unbound

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This innovative fieldwork-based module challenges the long-standing academic division of labour between 'economic' and 'development' geographers, and instead builds an alternative hybrid approach, operationalised through an empirical focus on urban change in Mumbai, one of India's Tier I cities. PGT students will be expected to devise their own projects and site visits in Mumbai in relation to these themes. Teaching is focused around a series of core themes: (i) Mumbai's dual economy, in which low-end, low-paid local service providers such as janitors, security guards, cleaners, and laundry underpin the success of high profile, multinational corporations in the financial services, hospitality and IT sectors; (ii) work and employment in India's high profile Business Process Outsourcing - IT-Enabled Services Industry; (iii) the growth of India's new middle classes, new patterns of consumption amongst these classes and their inscriptions in the urban fabric; and (iv) poverty and hope in Mumbai's slums, focusing around informal economies of survival amongst different social and ethnic groups in Dharavi; diverse informal economies related to leather, itinerant waste collectors and pottery and NGO projects to improve well-being and quality of life within Mumbai¿s slums.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Individual Research ProjectGEG7321Full year7

Individual Research Project

Credits: 150.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module allows the student to undertake a piece of independent, supervised research on a topic within the scope of physical geographical and environmental science. Each student will be allocated two supervisors. Progress will be monitored through supervision meetings, presentation/ discussion of research at internal research meetings and a formative viva-style meeting with supervisors and, where, appropriate the programme convenor. The project may involve working with a partner organisation and it may therefore have an applied focus or contribute to the work of that organisation. The project can involve fieldwork, laboratory work and/or advanced data analysis and modelling. The thesis will be submitted in the format of a draft manuscript and supplementary material (e.g., extended literature review, detailed methodologies, additional data analysis) as appropriate to a relevant, peer-reviewed journal by agreement with the supervision team and programme convenor.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Research Skills for Environmental ScientistsGEG7322Full year7

Research Skills for Environmental Scientists

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module provides students with the necessary skills to become professional environmental science researchers. Students will engage with School research theme activities and the current postgraduate training programme. This includes attendance and contribution to research seminars, presentation at the School research conference day, group-based research training and professional development sessions (e.g., CV writing, how to publish, careers, academics and the media, lab safety and risk assessment) and through meetings with the research supervisors on research design and proposal development.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Advanced ReadingsGEG7142Semester 27

Advanced Readings

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module offers the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of an area of research through self-directed reading. In order to take this module, students must identify an area of interest that can be supervised by a member of the teaching team. The module is assessed by a 4000-5000 word paper that demonstrates advanced engagement with their chosen field of study. If supervision of the topic is agreed, students complete self-directed reading at an advanced level and discuss their readings and develop their paper at fortnightly supervision meetings. The structure of the report may vary according to the nature of the topic, and this is reflected in the word count range provided. Human Geography topics are expected to produce longer papers (up to 5000 words) while topics in Physical Geography and Environmental Science are likely to produce shorter papers (up to 4000 words) that may incorporate figures and data in certain circumstances.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Global Health GeographiesGEG7143Semester 17

Global Health Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Global Health Geographies provides the opportunity to engage with the remarkable health challenges that face the world we live in today. Organised around central themes which outline the shift from international health to global health and identify the importance of geographical analyses to this transformation, the module draws on core geographical concerns with people, place, space, power and justice to promote critical encounters with the interdisciplinary field of global health.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Urban Public CulturesGEG7144Semester 17

Urban Public Cultures

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module examines the development of modern, urban public cultures from the eighteenth century to the present day. Focusing on debates over public life in the city, the module uses a range of materials and methods ¿ including fieldwalks in London ¿ to explore the relationships between urban form and public life as they are shaped by cultural and artistic practices, the production of urban space, changing forms of regulation and governance, ideas of creativity and urban development, and new forms of technology and conviviality.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Creative Public EngagementGEG7145Semester 27

Creative Public Engagement

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Engaging with wide and diverse publics is a core concern of both academic institutions such as universities and cultural institutions such as museum and art galleries. This module addresses the ways these imperatives to reach wide audiences have developed in these two domains, the ideas which inform them and the strategies undertaken to meet them. It explores how these shared aims have led to collaborations between academics and cultural professionals, with a particular focus on exhibitions and related activities as a mode of collaborative and creative public engagement. The module examines these themes through a focus on the creative and collaborative work of geographers, but addresses the value and challenges of creative forms of academic public engagement and collaboration more widely.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Researching Global Health: Geneva FieldclassGEG7150Semester 27

Researching Global Health: Geneva Fieldclass

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This innovative fieldwork-based module offers a critical introduction to the vast endeavour of global health policy through a particular focus on the position of Geneva as a centre of decision-making. Through lectures, seminars and independent study, students will develop a policy critique of the work of one global health organisation based in Geneva. Students will conduct site visits to this and other organisations on the field class, with this original research feeding into the submission of an assessed policy critique.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Researching Global Health: Geneva FieldclassGEG7151Semester 27

Researching Global Health: Geneva Fieldclass

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This innovative fieldwork-based module offers a critical introduction to the vast endeavour of global health policy through a particular focus on the position of Geneva as a centre of decision-making. Through lectures, seminars and independent study, students will develop a policy critique of the work of one global health organisation based in Geneva. Students will conduct site visits to this and other organisations on the field class, with this original research feeding into the submission of an assessed policy critique. This 15-credit module is only open to students on selected SMD Masters programmes.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Geospatial ScienceGEG5223PSemester 25

Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems. This knowledge is fundamental not only to research in Physical Geography, Environmental Science and many other disciplines, but provides a critical skill set used widely within a range of industries (including environmental management, local and national government, the utilities and the insurance sector).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGEG6223PSemester 16

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Ancient Human Occupation of BritainGEG6225PSemester 16

Ancient Human Occupation of Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Who are we and where do we come from? These frequently-asked questions are addressed through an examination of the archaeological record and the rich Palaeolithic record in Britain. The British evidence is considered in the context of dispersals of hominin groups from Africa into Europe over the last two million years. Major climatic fluctuations, repeated advance and retreat of ice sheets and major geographical and environmental changes provide the backdrop for this exploration of the ancient human occupation of Britain.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

Volcanoes, Climate Change and SocietyGEG6229PSemester 26

Volcanoes, Climate Change and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Rhys Timms
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Volcanic eruptions can influence earth systems on a number of scales, from individual landforms to landscape development and global climatic change. Volcanic hazards can have global-scale social impacts and directly threaten the approximately 800 million people that live within 100 km of an active volcano. This module will provide students with knowledge about volcanic environments, the hazards they pose on many scales and potential benefits to societies.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Advanced Geospatial ScienceGEG6230PSemester 16

Advanced Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stuart Grieve
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

The analysis of geospatial data is the cornerstone of much physical geography and environmental science research. Building upon the knowledge acquired in GEG5223 students will be taught through a range of lectures and computer based practicals. Material covered will highlight recent developments from across the discipline, demonstrating the use of cutting edge Geographical Information Systems to solve problems from a range of physical geography and environmental science sub-disciplines. Time will also be devoted to the effective visualisation of geospatial data and analysis outputs, equipping students with key skills required in the workplace or for further study .

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Nature-based Climate SolutionsGEG6232PSemester 16

Nature-based Climate Solutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

To what extent can climate change be mitigated by improved stewardship of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? In this module, we examine how conservation, restoration and improved management of ecosystems can increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions. We evaluate a range of ¿natural climate solutions¿ (NCS) for their feasibility, cost-effectiveness, environmental co-benefits and climate mitigation potential. You will take an active approach to learning through participation in lectures, small-group discussions and a non-residential field trip.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Environmental Data Acquisition and AnalysisGEG7316Semester 27

Environmental Data Acquisition and Analysis

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap:
Prerequisite:

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of skills in data collection plus numerical, statistical and modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in approaches to the collection of field data and data from secondary sources as well as data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable: