School of Business and Management

Postgraduate modules

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TitleCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Quantitative Research MethodsBUSM014Semester 17No

Quantitative Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georgios Kavetsos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides a relatively non-technical overview of the use of statistical methods in business research. There is an emphasis on practical work and interpretation, and there will be extensive use of Stata, a leading statistics/econometrics package. The course covers the basic elements of: descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, inference, and multivariate regression analysis.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 4 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Comparative Employment RelationsBUSM016Semester 17No

Comparative Employment Relations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Geraldine Healy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will concentrate on the following key features: theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of employment relations; the value and difficulties of a comparative approach; the role of the key actors in employment relations; power, conflict and bargaining; convergence and divergence - a consideration of the debates; the complexity of the trade union role from a comparative perspective; a consideration of international solidarity; impact of globalization and transnational companies on national and cross-national management employment strategies; employee involvement and industrial democracy; social partnership and participation; standards in international employment relations; regulation and voluntarism; examining comparative employment relations through a gender, equality and diversity lens; reappraising comparative employment relations.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Managing DiversityBUSM017Semester 17No

Managing Diversity

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines theories of equality and diversity and of occupational segmentation. It explores diversity and equality across the dimensions of gender, race, disability, age and sexual orientation and considers the organisational processes, which produce and reproduce inequalities of outcome among diverse social groups. The course also considers equality and diversity policy and practice at organisational level. Different national contexts are investigated.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Finance for DevelopmentBUSM020Semester 27No

Finance for Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Rowman Matousek
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the problems that developing countries face in the process of development, in particular, in financing their development programmes, and the measures they take in an attempt to overcome the difficulties. In order to study the problems closely and the respective strategies that are adopted by different developing countries, the primary focus of this course is on India, South Korea and China.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

The Global EconomyBUSM022Semester 17No

The Global Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the Global Economy; World Trade; International Factor Movements and the Multinational Enterprise; The Political Economy of Trade Policy; Controversies in Trade Policy ; The Global Capital Market; International Macroeconomic Policy; Economic Growth; Economic Inequality and Poverty; Role of the International Financial Institutions In the Global Economy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 7 pm

International Marketing CommunicationsBUSM024Semester 27No

International Marketing Communications

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amy Rungpaka Tiwsakul Hackley
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the role of marketing communications in a global environment and the processes through which organisations can effectively communicate with their various publics in order to enhance both customer value and company returns. The course will start with an in-depth discussion of the integrated marketing communications mix (advertising, PR, personal selling, sales promotion, direct marketing). It moves on to a series of considerations such as the development of an effective marketing communications mix, the role of marketing communications in the establishment of long-term customer relationships and equitable brands. Throughout the module, the relationship between marketing communications and brand equity will be discussed with particular reference to problems faced by marketers in the context of a global economy.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Thursday 9 am - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 12: Thursday 11 am - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Brand ManagementBUSM026Semester 27No

Brand Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasmin Ibrahim
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will focus on the strategic role that brands play in the successful marketing of products and services. It aims to introduce current academic thinking and business practice of contemporary branding to students introducing key concepts such as brand equity, brand identity and corporate branding. In addition the course aims to introduce and show the actual process of brand management and the issues and dilemmas that contemporary brand managers and stewards have to face. It aims to comprehensively cover these areas and will deal with topics such as brand identity, brand development, brand strategy, organisational support for branding, brand features and personality, brand portfolios and the internet and branding. The focus of the course will be a final presentation and report that students both in groups and as individuals will have to prepare on analysing a failing brand and proposing ideas to reposition and revitalise it. The brand itself will be taken from the contemporary business world and so will provide the students with opportunities to carry out challenging and relevant research.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Multinationals and Global BusinessBUSM028Semester 27No

Multinationals and Global Business

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Thomas Kemeny
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines multinationals and global business in the era of globalization, offering a broad overview of the process of globalisation and the changing nature of global business over time. The course provides a dynamic and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of global business, its origins and development, the theories of multinational corporations, international trade, market selection and modes of entry. The course will examine the context of global business and the changing context of multinational operation through the changing nature
of the global political economy and through the influence of cultures and institutions. The course explores how the changing global environment affects the decisions of managers and the strategies, structures and activities of firms operating in the global market place.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2: Wednesday 5 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 9: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Corporate Finance for ManagersBUSM030Semester 17No

Corporate Finance for Managers

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sushanta Mallick
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The focus of this module is the financing and investment decisions made by the managers of companies in pursuit of corporate goals. It examines how managers can obtain the greatest possible return on investments for the smallest amount of risk. You will acquire the knowledge and understanding of theories, models, tools and techniques to assist in making financial decisions to achieve corporate goals. These will include identification of the cost of capital/rates of return, dividend distribution, investment appraisal, portfolio theory, foreign exchange and interest rate issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

International Macroeconomics and FinanceBUSM041Semester 17No

International Macroeconomics and Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to basic Concepts in Macroeconomics and Finance; Overview of the financial market, its institutions and instruments. Central banking and the Money supply process; conduct of monetary policy; Exchange rates and Monetary Policy; The International Financial System and Financial Crisis; The Euro and European Monetary policy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 7 pm

International Reward ManagementBUSM049Semester 27No

International Reward Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Maria Koumenta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Reward management is one of the key components of human resource management. It is one of the most sensitive and problematic areas of people management that poses additional issues when cast in an international setting. The module starts by giving students an international empirical and theoretical grounding before applying this knowledge to conceptual issues such as equality, fairness, performance and motivation. These issues are examined at a number of levels: internationally, nationally and organizationally by engaging with topical case studies and practical examples.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Managerial EconomicsBUSM051Semester 17No

Managerial Economics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Ravshonbek Otojanov
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The primary aim of the module is to provide students with a sound understanding of some of the insights from economics with respect to business and management decisions. The module focuses on issues typically addressed in microeconomics, including marginal analysis, supply and demand, production theory, market structures, price discrimination, signalling and screening, and incentives in organisations.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 11 am

Financial ReportingBUSM054Semester 17No

Financial Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sean Mccartney
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the financial reporting of companies, and how such reporting can be analysed to evaluate performance. No prior knowledge of accounting is assumed: students learn how accounts are constructed and analysed, then examine the impact of various issues on the reported numbers. These include the reporting of intangible assets; creative accounting; currency translation; and the use of share options to reward management. The module takes a global perspective and refers largely to the regulatory regime of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Understanding Consumer BehaviourBUSM058Semester 17No

Understanding Consumer Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

All marketing action is aimed at consumers. Without an understanding of the consumer the application of marketing tools is unlikely to yield the desired outcomes. This module develops a useful, conceptual understanding of consumer and market behaviour as a main consideration in marketing. The course offers a brief introduction into consumer research and then focuses on an understanding of the consumer from a mainly psychological perspective. Overall, the course provides frameworks that enable students to address the issue of understanding consumers responsibly, systematically, and creatively.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

International AccountingBUSM059Semester 27No

International Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Ishani Chandrasekara Mudiyanselage
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: BUSM054

The module provides insights into the origins of accounting and its subsequent changes. Adopting this broader perspective, the module will attempt to trace the genealogy of accounting and its principles, standards and conventions. The module will discuss the historical developments in accounting by focusing on accounting issues created in the process of harmonisation. This approach will lead students to critically engage in the current debates on accounting, accountability and the responsibility of cross-border transactions.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 3 pm

Corporate GovernanceBUSM060Semester 27No

Corporate Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Didem Gundogdu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to key theories, concepts and issues in corporate governance. It critically explores corporate governance as an embedded practice and provides insights into how local cultures and developments in local contexts have impacted upon and shaped the development of corporate governance systems and practices and how these local corporate governance systems and practices are challenged by globalisation. Within this broad framework case studies provide detailed insights into specific aspects of corporate governance.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Contemporary Issues in AccountingBUSM061Semester 27No

Contemporary Issues in Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces students to some of the key developments and issues in accounting currently discussed by policy makers, the profession, the media and academics. The specific issues addressed will change over time but could include: - On-line Reporting - Accounting and Globalisation - Accounting Regulation: The Convergence Project - Accounting and Poverty - Accounting and Indigenous Peoples - Sustainability Reporting - The Relevance of History - Accounting, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion - Accountants and the Financial Crisis - Accounting in the Community - NGOs and Accountability

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

New Product Development and Business EcosystemsBUSM084Semester 27No

New Product Development and Business Ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The introduction and development of new products and processes is an essential drive of a firm's competitiveness. Yet, organizations do not operate in isolation but are a part of complex and increasingly globalized supply chains affecting innovation and new product development. The module Supply Chain and New Product Development enables students to analyze the innovation process within complex supply chains from the definition of a new product concept to the involvement of suppliers and partners in developing new product/process architectures. Students will address the organizational implications and challenges deriving from the involvement of partners and suppliers in new product development, through a blend of theoretical and case study based approaches. Students will be encouraged to critically evaluate issues of Governance and Strategic Management, by addressing the dynamics underpinning the emergence of new technological platforms and by investigating issues of outsourcing and knowledge ""hollowing out"", architectural knowledge and path dependent product development, open innovation and architectural innovation.

Assessment: 55.6% Examination, 27.8% Coursework, 16.7% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Behavioural Finance and Decision MakingBUSM085Semester 27No

Behavioural Finance and Decision Making

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Yaz Muradoglu
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and challenges modern theory of finance and covers the major issues in behavioural finance and decision making. These include biases, which frequently occur in financial decision-making such as optimism, mental framing, over-reaction, trend-chasing, conservatism and anchoring of expectations. Emphasis is on related work in psychology in terms of several theories of human behaviour that have policy implications in Finance. Accordingly the module is arranged around:Traditional Finance and Historical development of behavioural finance, Biases in Financial decision making, their manifestation and reduction, Prospect theory and loss aversion, Use of mental frames in financial decision making, Heuristics and biases in financial forecasting, Group decision making processes, Financial Crisis and human behaviour, Empirical regularities such as overreaction and momentum, Introduction to experimental and empirical methodologies in measuring biases in fiancial domains.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm

Strategic ManagementBUSM086Semester 17No

Strategic Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the ""traditional"" competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to consider more contemporary approaches to strategic management, such as the importance of strategy process, business ecosystems, behavioural approaches and time/timing. Throughout the course we will examine a variety of organisational contexts, assessing the extent to which firm strategy models may be applicable to public sector, voluntary, entrepreneurial or other types of organisations as well as firms.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 5 pm - 7 pm

International Business StrategyBUSM089Semester 27No

International Business Strategy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lutao Ning
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to introduce students to concepts and practices related to managing in a globally volatile, complex, dynamic environment within which organisations, national and international institutions and individuals interact. The elective is designed to be an advanced global strategic management course presenting material that is highly contemporary. This course provides balanced global strategic insights along with proven practical business frameworks and prepares you to respond quickly to today's challenging global environment.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

World Economy and DevelopmentBUSM090Semester 17No

World Economy and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Liam Campling
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module offers a broad overview of the process of economic 'globalisation' and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm - set in the context of trends in the world economy, with particular emphasis on the period since the 1970s. It provides a critical and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins and development, theories of international trade and its regulation, conceptualisations of international supply chains, and attempts to reform and resist multinationals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Research Methods for MarketingBUSM098Semester 27No

Research Methods for Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Paolo Antonetti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will introduce students to the concepts and practices of scholarly and practitioner marketing research. It will introduce students to research design, address the breadth of research methods used in the field, and the underlying logic (methodology) of those methods. The following will be covered: Key quantitative techniques (e.g., descriptive statistics and methods of hypotheses testing), qualitative methods (e.g., content analysis and contemporary anthropological methods such as netography), key data gathering methods (e.g., surveys, interviews and focus groups), as well as secondary sources.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Digital MarketingBUSM099Semester 17No

Digital Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nima Heirati
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Welcome to one of the most evolving topics in the marketing literature. The development of the Internet and digital technologies have transformed marketing and has impacted every industry from retail to health. Now more than ever, companies and managers face the challenge of developing and maintaining their business operations and customer engagement in a constantly evolving digital space. The key question is not whether to pursue digital marketing strategies but how to successfully deploy them. What are the techniques that companies need to master to make effective use of digital marketing? This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive guide to the concepts, strategies, and best practice to support all the digital marketing processes. This module empowers students with skills and knowledge needed to work as the digital marketing professional after graduation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 1 pm - 3 pm

Dissertation for ManagementBUSM100Full year7No

Dissertation for Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 6 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation for International Financial ManagementBUSM101Full year7No

Dissertation for International Financial Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 6 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment RelationsBUSM102Full year7No

Dissertation for International HRM & Employment Relations

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 6 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation for International BusinessBUSM103Full year7No

Dissertation for International Business

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 6 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation for Accounting and ManagementBUSM105Full year7No

Dissertation for Accounting and Management

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 6 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation for MarketingBUSM106Full year7No

Dissertation for Marketing

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Paolo Antonetti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Programme of which it forms a component.

Students will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.

To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research Methods module
Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QM+.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Monday 6 pm - 7 pm

Financial Analysis and Management AccountingBUSM107Semester 17No

Financial Analysis and Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Androniki Triantafylle
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are reported and disclosed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control resource allocations and generate performance evaluation, credit ratings and monitor shareholder value. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and manage corporate organizations towards generating income for liquidity and capitalizations for solvency where both are essential and maintain a reporting entity as a going concern.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 7 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm

Leading Organisational ChangeBUSM108Semester 17No

Leading Organisational Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stefan Krummaker
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will investigate and discuss leading change in organisations from a theoretical sound and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on organisational change processes and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases and practices. Furthermore, understanding and challenging practices of leading change will contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, the module will focus
- forces and conceptual perspectives of organisational change
- theories and concepts of leading change - in particular Transformational Leadership (visionary, motivational and inspirational leadership)
- creating an environment for creativity and innovation
- leading change in different cultural environments
- responsible leadership in organisational change
- followers' role in and contributions to organisational change
- organisational energy and energising leadership strategies
- avoiding overacceleration and stress in organisational change
- self-leadership in organisational change

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Organisational Development & TransformationBUSM109Semester 27No

Organisational Development & Transformation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Doldor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to equip students with the skills and resources for thinking critically about human behaviour in organisational change and development. Students will be introduced to - and encouraged to critically interrogate - a range of perspectives dealing with core problems of organizational change and transformation. Drawing on psychological and organizational behaviour research, the module will focus on micro-level topics in particular, aiming to provide an understanding of how individual, interpersonal and group dynamics shape transformation processes in organizations. The module will also explore the role of organizational cultures, the meaning, purposes and interests underlying processes of change, the role of various change agents, as well as sources of power and resistance.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Human Resource ManagementBUSM110Semester 17No

Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides learners with a critical understanding of the internal and external contexts of contemporary organisations, including the managerial, business, regulatory, labour market and institutional contexts. It further examines the role of the HR function, HR strategy and the link between HR and organisational performance. The module also introduces the major functions of HRM including resourcing, performance management, learning and development and explores the applications in professional practice in different types of organisational scenarios (large, small, global, national, public, private). This is further achieved through additional skills workshops that engage learners in the analysis of case studies, role play and problem solving exercises. Finally, the module seeks to understand the impact of globalisation on employment and its implications for HR strategy and practice.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Management ConsultingBUSM111Semester 27No

Management Consulting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explain various theoretical approaches used to explain what management consultancy is, the variety and types of consulting firms and the markets they serve. We will examine a range of approaches to consultancy as a process of diagnosing management and organisational problems, designing implementing and evaluating organisational interventions. We will examine studies of some of these interventions and case studies we will examine how consultants present their knowledge and expertise, the claims they make for its efficacy and the role of ethics in this. We will examine and explore different kinds of organisational context where management consultancy has been used: firms, public institutions, voluntary organisations and other organisational forms. We will also practise skills critical for consultancy such as diagnosis, intergroup facilitation and evaluation.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Applied Empirical MethodsBUSM112Semester 27No

Applied Empirical Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides a non-technical overview of quantitative methodologies frequently used in finance and international business research.

The module is data driven and covers the basics of: Hypotheses testing, OLS and Logistic Regression Analysis, Instrumental Variables, Time Series Analysis, Panel Data Models, Differences-in Differences, Sharp and Fuzzy Regression Discontinuity. The module also teaches how to apply these methods using STATA (a leading econometrics software).

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Thursday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Corporate ReportingBUSM113Semester 17No

Corporate Reporting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr David Onakanmi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of accounting standards and the contribution of pan national organizations such as the EU and International Accounting Standards Board IASB.

This module considers how changes in regulation and corporate governance arrangements have added remuneration reports and the chairman's statements plus new demands for integrated corporate reporting (including Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Reporting) and also Integrated and Business Model Reporting

Students will understand and appreciate how financial statements have evolved to include statements of changes in equity and comprehensive income . The evolution of accounting standards --financial instruments and fair value reporting and debates on the accounting conceptual framework.

How do external consultants impact upon disclosed financial information: role of valuation advisers, actuaries etc in terms of the various forms of accounting standard: financial instruments, tangible assets, pension fund accounting etc

Impact of new institutions on the nature of corporate reporting (IIRC, WRI, UNEP)

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

International Business AnalysisBUSM114Semester 17No

International Business Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the nature of international business and key analytical techniques for the operation of a business in a global setting. This module will involve developing a critical understanding of the key techniques that can be employed to support the allocation of corporate resources within an international sphere of operation. It will introduce you to the notion of resource and regulatory arbitrage.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 6 pm - 7 pm

International FinanceBUSM115Semester 27No

International Finance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

As the international company becomes the norm rather than the exception, the need to internationalize the tools of financial analysis is apparent. We now live in a highly integrated world economy, and it is crucial that businesses understand both the risks and opportunities that globalization brings. This module is designed to immerse student in the international dimension of financial issues. It specifically focuses on the international aspects of financial management so you are able to appreciate the issues that international investments and money management that international operation involves.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 2 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Management ControlBUSM116Semester 17No

Management Control

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

In this module students would be expected to understand the evolution of management control in relation to: the nature of corporate governance and the importance of resource stewardship. Corporate governance is concerned with the stewardship of resources and risk management techniques. This module will cover the nature of corporate governance and obligations of managers to manage resources, controls costs and returns on investment whilst taking into account risks

Governance as resource stewardship
Types of budgeting process
Business planning/forecasts
Variance analysis and cost control
Allocation of capital and investment analysis
Demands for shareholder value and control metrics
Risk management /analysis

Assessment: 100.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Risk and Crisis ManagementBUSM117Semester 27No

Risk and Crisis Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This qualitative module introduces students to the distinctive features of risk and crisis management. Core concepts of probability, severity, uncertainty, anticipation, resilience, robustness and bias are explored as the module examines, in turn, managerial varieties of bias among managers and regulators in risk perception, assumptions underpinning approaches to assessment and contrasting approaches to the management of risk. It focuses on operational risk, risks of external shock, risks of system failure, risk to customers and clients, and political risk. Throughout the module, regulatory requirements and imperatives for risk management are given full attention. The final weeks will introduce students to decision-making and public relations issues during crises and dealing with regulatory and government bodies when company crises escalate to become matters of wider public concern.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm

Global Supply Chain ManagementBUSM091Semester 27No

Global Supply Chain Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Over the last few decades the business world has become more complex, fragmented, and geographically scattered. As firms outsource a growing portion of the activities and functions that were previously carried out in-house, they become one element of a multifaceted and intricate process of value creation and capture that cut across firms' and states' borders: the supply chain. As value-creating activities and functions are shared between ever more players their linkages increase as well as their interdependence. The study of global supply chains and their management looks at this scattered environment: the linkages and relationships among firms, and among firms and other actors; and focuses on how leading firms attempt to drive this complexity in multiple ways, whether by increasing coherence, consistency and unity in the supply chain, or by shifting costs to other chain members and increasing competitive pressures among them.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

MRes DissertationBUSM093Full year7No

MRes Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Ahu Tatli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is available to MRes Business and Management students only. Given that the programme is a Masters by research, it is appropriate to have a longer length dissertation (15,000 words) than the standard SBM PG dissertation (10,000 words). This will enable students to bring together the learning from the taught methods modules and the taught subject modules into an independent piece of work that will act as a springboard for a research career and/or PhD study. The module is core.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Introduction to Marketing Theory and ConceptsBUSM094Semester 17No

Introduction to Marketing Theory and Concepts

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Leischnig
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will provide an overview of marketing across national boundaries and within countries in foreign markets. It will focus on the opportunities to be gained from international marketing, and also its dangers and the challenges that marketers face when they operate in foreign markets. The course will begin by examining the reasons and rationale behind firms deciding to market overseas. It then goes on to analyse the decision making processes behind which markets firms should enter, examining political, economic, social, legal and technological factors. Following this, market entry strategies will be discussed and then the integrated marketing mix of product, price, place and promotion will be taught from an international perspective. Implementation, customer relations and the increasingly important role of e-marketing will also be discussed.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Social and Political MarketingBUSM095Semester 27No

Social and Political Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nicholas O'Shaughnessy
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Our perspective is that marketing is a dynamic tool and a potent agent of change that can civilise or de-civilise society. The design of the module: the course explores five major themes. Collectively they cover the universe of social/civic/ political persuasion via methods of partial commercial derivation. These themes are analysed both via descriptive approaches, case studies and theoretical constructs: Cause marketing (single-issue groups); Civic marketing (health and safety campaigns etc); Party political marketing - Selling Barack Obama Abuse of marketing - selling war A theory of propaganda and persuasion: myth, symbolism, rehetoric The claim is that marketing has shaped, and continues to shape, the culture we live in today. Examination is via oral presentation and project; however the project will be integrative across the whole course so that it discourages over-specialisation.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Friday 5 pm - 7 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 5 pm - 7 pm

Relationship and Network MarketingBUSM096Semester 17No

Relationship and Network Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephan Henneberg
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module Relationship and Network Marketing provides students with an overview of important aspects of business-to-business marketing. For this purpose, students will explore crucial underlying concepts of relationships and networks as well as develop a sense of business marketing practices. Thus, the module covers both relationship marketing and network marketing theory and practice and thereby fosters an understanding of how organisations are embedded in a net of business exchanges, which create interdependencies between business actors. Using collaborative and cooperative relational management provides firms within such nets with the possibility to mobilise important external resources via business partners in the supply and customer network. The module will use case studies and practical example throughout.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Dissertation for Accounting and FinanceBUSM066Full year7No

Dissertation for Accounting and Finance

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the MSc Programmes, carrying a weighting of four modules i.e. one third of the entire Programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication.

You will be guided through the dissertation process by a supervisor.
Students undertaking a dissertation based on qualitative methods within the School of Business and Management are required to attend Qualitative Research Methods Workshops in Semester 2.

Students undertaking a dissertation within the School of Economics are required to attend Data Analysis for Research classes will take place throughout Semester 2

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Thursday 6 pm - 7 pm

Advanced Management AccountingBUSM067Semester 27No

Advanced Management Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module identifies and explores challenges and issues facing organisations as they operate in a world of increasing competitiveness and change, requiring managers to combine management accounting ideas with those from other areas such as marketing, technology and HR. Accordingly it is interdisciplinary.
The module is arranged around:
1 Accounting for strategic management: introduction: methodological issues in management accounting
2 The essence of management control in private, voluntary and public sectors
3 Strategic Issues in cost allocation and activity-based costing and activity-based management
4 Advanced manufacturing technology, JIT, target costing and product life-cycle costing
5 Quality costing, total quality management and management accounting systems
6 Value-chain analysis and accounting
7 Customer profitability analysis/customer accounting
8 Competitor analysis/competitor accounting
9 Responsibility accounting, financial performance measures, and transfer prices
10 Measuring non-financial performance: the balanced scorecard
11 Benchmarking analysis
The module will draw upon a range of case studies drawn from the 'real world'.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 11 am

Organisational BehaviourBUSM069Semester 17No

Organisational Behaviour

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrizia Kokot-Blamey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organizational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, ethics, group dynamics, patterns and negotiation practices which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviour both at individual, group and organisational levels. Students will gain an awareness and knowledge of contemporary issues and approaches to organisational change and development facing organizations. Beyond providing theoretical frameworks, the module will augment skills to prepare students for the work place through communication and team management skills, and through analytical and critical thinking skills .

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 5 pm

Accounting for Business ModelsBUSM070Semester 17No

Accounting for Business Models

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Owolabi Bakre
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module conceptualizes business models within an accounting framework. There are three significant parts to this module. how we can structure business models, designate business models with a sense of financial purpose (liquidity, solvency and capitalization) and finally evaluate performance and outcomes. These financial objectives are explored and evaluated using accounting data for a range of business model types for example, banking, private equity and bio-pharma and 3rd /public sector organizations.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12: Thursday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Wednesday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9: Monday 10 am - 1 pm

Accounting and Value ManagementBUSM071Semester 27No

Accounting and Value Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is framed with the context of managing for value and how managerial and investor interests are aligned and reflected in accounting information for value creation and market value added and value for money. This module is concerned with how accounting numbers are employed at operational, divisional and organizational levels to control and drive value creation for market value added or value for money. It is a module which is concerned with how accounting information is deployed to control and direct corporate and non-corporate organizations towards generating value on invested funds whether these are public, private or state sponsored agencies.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Financial Markets and InstitutionsBUSM072Semester 17No

Financial Markets and Institutions

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mr Alain Wouassom
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is about how the increasingly complex relation between financial institutions, markets and firms has evolved over a period of time. A process of financial innovation and deregulation is impacting upon recorded accounting numbers and financial performance of firms much more volatile. In the corporate and non-corporate sectors the relation between financial markets and accounting is complex and inter-related. A large proportion of balance sheet values are now adjusted to reflect financial market values and these adjustments can be significant and volatile. Fair value reporting also requires significant external advisory support to inform accountants: actuaries, credit rating agencies and specialists is specific asset valuations. The development of more sophisticated financial products impacts upon a range of corporate and non-corporate institutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 3 pm - 6 pm

Economics of DevelopmentBUSM073Semester 27No

Economics of Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Roxana Belinda Gutierrez-Romero
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces contemporary theories and the empirical literature of the economics of developing countries with specific reference to public policy delivery. The course will address the problems with public policy delivery in developing countries and what solutions and strategies have been identified in the literature. The course will deal with debates such as centralised and decentralised delivery methods, political economy issues of corruption and state capture, and the role of incentives among politicians and bureaucrats in service delivery.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 4 pm - 7 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 11: Thursday 9 am -12 pm

Public Financial Management and AccountingBUSM076Semester 27No

Public Financial Management and Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Sukhdev Johal
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides understanding of the financial development and trajectory of central government finances in the advanced economies. The first half of this module will introduce students to the challenges facing governments in the advanced economies, and in particular, that of sustaining deficit financing. How have the components of central government revenues changed over time relative to expenditures in GDP and the nature of accumulated sovereign debt (roll-over timings and repayments schedule)? Students will examine the political context of public budgeting. We shall explore how the policy shift towards macro-prudential management of these economies has impacted not only on monetary policy, but also on public spending and cutback management, nationally and at regional and local levels of government. The module examines the link between changing budgetary politics and pressure to develop innovative financial vehicles, as well as exploring some of the medium-term financial risks to which these innovations can unintendedly give rise. The second half of this module will focus on the importance for public management of reforms in accounting systems which require a shift toward resource-based and accrual-based accounting. We examine the impact on managers' accountability for public expenditure of the convergence of public sector with corporate international financial reporting standards (IFRS) and role of resource-based auditing . What are some of the implications of adoption "corporate" financial accounting and performance key financial and non-financial KPIs? We examine public-private partnerships such as the UK's Private Finance Initiatives (PFIs) for financing public sector capital projects, and issues of risk transfer and cost-effectiveness. We will consider changes financial practices and reporting in sub-national public agencies (local authorities, health care, policing, etc), the possibilities in some countries for bond-financing for sub-national agencies, and their implications on their financial stability and organisational dynamics.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm

Human Resource Management in the Public ServicesBUSM077Semester 27No

Human Resource Management in the Public Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nelarine Cornelius
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides a critical evaluation of the issues, challenges and processes involved in managing employees in the public services. It does so by considering the unique financial, political and legal context within which public personnel practitioners operate as well as the distinct characteristics of public sector jobs and those attracted to work within them, and examines the constraints and opportunities these place on personnel policy and its implementation. Themes covered in this module include resourcing and selection, pay and executive compensation, performance management, employee relations, values and organisational ethics, managing change and the relationship between human resource management and public sector performance. A further element of the course involves exploring the characteristics of public sector labour markets including trends, labour market policy initiatives and their impact. The module draws on case study evidence from multi- country institutional and organisational contexts and encourages students to assess how past legacies and recent reforms impact on HRM strategy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm

Dissertation - MPABUSM083Full year7No

Dissertation - MPA

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Stella Ladi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation provides students with an opportunity to carry out independent research into a topic of their choice related to the aims of the MPA, subject to guidance from the dissertation supervisor. Each student will be required to have a registered dissertation topic and have been allocated a supervisor by the middle of the spring semester. NB. Students are prepared for the dissertation by taking the compulsory MPA module entitled ""Policy evaluation and research methods"" which includes lectures and classes on research design and methods. Additional methods support may be provided by dissertation supervisors in this module as required.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Tuesday 6 pm - 7 pm

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops: Public Management in PracticeBUSM150Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops: Public Management in Practice

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Stella Ladi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Accounting and FinanceBUSM151Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Accounting and Finance

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Sukhvinder Sian
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Accounting And ManagementBUSM152Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Accounting And Management

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Colin Haslam
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International BusinessBUSM153Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Business

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Prof Brigitte Granville
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 9 am -11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Wednesday 9 am -11 am

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Business and PoliticsBUSM154Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Business and Politics

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Liam Campling
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Monday 11 am - 7 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Financial ManagementBUSM155Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Financial Management

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Deven Bathia
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Weeks 6: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Human Resource Management & EmploBUSM156Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc International Human Resource Management & Emplo

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Ms Cathrine Seierstad
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops. These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of HR including: recruitment and selection, performance management, negotiation and bargaining, career development and talent management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc ManagementBUSM157Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Management

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Elena Baglioni
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 6 pm
    Workshop
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Management and Organisational InnovationBUSM158Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Management and Organisational Innovation

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Giuliano Maielli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from marketing, banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 10 am - 6 pm

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc MarketingBUSM159Full year7No

Continued Professional Development and Academic Skills Workshops for MSc Marketing

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Paolo Antonetti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of Professional Development workshops designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes.
The workshops provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries and sectors. and are be delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from banking, media, public relations, government departments as well as third sector and private sector organisations.

These workshops include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and role plays (including a number of case studies based on actual organisations) to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of organisations and management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Experiments for Business and AnalyticsBUSM160Semester 27No

Experiments for Business and Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Georg Von Graevenitz
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is compulsory and will be taught in term B. The module builds on statistical methods covered in the Data Analytics module in term A.

The aim of the module is to introduce students to the problem of causal inference, to theories of how causality is established and to empirical methods used to identify causal effects. The main focus will be on randomized controlled trials and settings that are similar. Students will learn about different econometric techniques used to identify causal effects and will develop an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of these effects. Students will also learn how to collect and organize data that comes from real or natural experiments, to analyze such data and to report on their results in ways that are accessible to non-specialists.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Funding and Financing in the Creative and Cultural IndustriesBUSM161Semester 27No

Funding and Financing in the Creative and Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the theory and practice of financing creative and cultural projects and organisations. The module will give students a grounding in the landscape of funding streams as well as technical aspects of understanding and intelligently interrogating financial accounts and project budgets. It will cover how accounting numbers are generated and reported at project, site, organisational and sectoral levels, and will develop students' critical analysis of how financial information is deployed to control and manage organisational resources.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Heritage: History, Theory and PracticeBUSM162Semester 17No

Heritage: History, Theory and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Edward Legon
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide the theoretical basis for understanding heritage from a range of cross-disciplinary perspectives. It will address the relationships between heritage, history and memory in theory and practice, exploring heritage on personal and collective scales, the politics of heritage, and the materiality of heritage sites and objects alongside intangible heritage in the form of testimony and stories. The module will explore the ways in which different understandings of heritage inform practice in the heritage sector, from community archives and heritage projects to museums, historic houses and palaces.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

History of Cultural IndustriesBUSM163Semester 17No

History of Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Amitabh Rai
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the social and economic history of the formation of cultural production networks in different historical and global contexts. It asks us, what are the overlapping histories of media technologies, organizational form, accumulation strategies, and value generating activities in the creative industries and arts and cultural sector? This module will provide students with key historical knowledge to be able to engage critically with creative industries practice and organisations.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Managing Heritages at Historic Royal PalacesBUSM164Full year7No

Managing Heritages at Historic Royal Palaces

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contact - Dept Of Business Management
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The MA in Heritage Management combines academic rigour with applied professional theory and expertise to introduce students to the actual practice of heritage management at historically renowned sites. This compulsory module, which introduces the practice of heritage management, will be taught and coordinated by Historic Royal Palace's Programme Director with masterclass sessions by other specialists from within HRP and, on occasion, possible visits to other heritage organisations. A combination of classroom-based discussion based on readings, site visits and masterclasses with HRP staff will take a 'critical practice' approach that will connect QMUL compulsory module themes to HRP case studies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 8 am - 8 pm

Organising in the Creative and Cultural IndustriesBUSM165Semester 17No

Organising in the Creative and Cultural Industries

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores the multiple organisational forms in the creative and cultural industries. The purpose is to give students critical and practical tools to organise in the creative economies. Rooted in the ethical mission of the School of Business and Management, the organising methods and organisational forms and behaviours common and emergent in the creative inddustries and cultural sector will be explored through an interdisciplinary understanding of creative ecologies and networks. This module will students with the relevant organising methods, conceptual tools and factual information necessary for critical understanding of the multi-scalar institutional contexts of the creative economies. The module makes use of contemporary examples and case studies to draw out practical and theoretical implications for organising in creative economies.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Professional Practice in Heritage ManagementBUSM166Full year7No

Professional Practice in Heritage Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Professional Work Experience module will be delivered at at least two of HRP's London sites: Tower of London and Hampton Court Palace. This is a key feature of the programme. Students will be given the necessary training to begin to develop the skills and 'real work' experience that will enable them to make informed decisions about their own future career development within the heritage sector and make them competitive in the job market. Students will be assessed on a reflective piece of writing, responding to the challenges in heritage management, conservation and engagement that they have experienced during the placement.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Off-Campus Visit
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 8 am - 8 pm

Leadership SeminarBUSM167Full year7No

Leadership Seminar

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module consists of professional development seminars within the theme of creative industries and cultural sector leadership designed to inspire new thinking and develop immediate, practical behaviour changes through practitioners willing to come share their experiences, and also their contacts. The seminars will provide students with professional skills and networking opportunities within different industries delivered by a diverse group of professionals and practitioners from the creative and cultural sectors. Seminar or workshop sessions can include a mixture of knowledge dissemination, interactive discussion, and the use of worked examples and case studies to provide students with practical insight and initial development of the necessary skills to become effective in addressing issues that arise in various areas of relevant organisations.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 7 pm

Dissertation in Heritage ManagementBUSM168Full year7No

Dissertation in Heritage Management

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the university's MA programmes, carrying a weighting of three 15-credit modules i.e. one quarter of the entire programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Heritage Management programme. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by one or more supervisor/s. Members of academic staff at Historic Royal Palaces may co-supervise dissertation projects. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Research design and methods module, GEG7135. Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QMPlus.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 12 pm - 1 pm

Dissertation in Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBUSM169Full year7No

Dissertation in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 45.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The dissertation forms an important part of the assessment of the university's MA programmes, carrying a weighting of three 15-credit modules i.e. one quarter of the entire programme. The dissertation requires a demonstration of ability to carry out an original investigation into an area of interest. As such, the process should reflect skills of formulating research questions, synthesising and analysing data, drawing insights and conclusions, and written communication. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of an issue relevant to the content of the Creative Industries and Arts Organisation programme. Students will be guided through the dissertation process by one or more supervisor/s. Students may also need to draw on work conducted as part of the Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation module for their dissertation. To prepare you for the dissertation, students are required to take the compulsory Applied Methods Masterclass. Information about the Dissertation will be provided on the dedicated module area on QMPlus.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Applied Methods (Master Class)BUSM170Semester 27No

Applied Methods (Master Class)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the relevant methods of analysis and applied research into the organisation history of the creative industries. What are the interdisciplinary methods that generate innovation and leadership in the creative industries and arts and cultural sector, and which methods are more or less appropriate for engaging these different sectors of society? This module will provide students key methodological knowledge to be able to engage critically with creative industries practice and organization, and prepares students to undertake dissertation and practice-based projects in the third semester.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Introduction to Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBUSM171Semester 17No

Introduction to Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tarek Virani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores the foundational concepts and theories of the creative industries. This module provides students with the relevant theories, conceptual tools and factual information necessary to gain an understanding of, and be able to engage critically with, the realities of managing, working and progressing within the cultural and creative industries. Specifically, this module aims to give you a theoretical and practical understanding of the specific characteristics of the creative sector in terms of how it is organised, intra- and inter-organisational behavior, relationship management in creative industries value chains, different business models and the major challenges creative industries firms face in the current media and competitive environment, as well as an examination into how creative sector work and development (locally and internationally) might inform each other.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts OrganisationBUSM172Full year7No

Professional Practice in Creative Industries and Arts Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The professional practice module runs throughout the year, in collaboration with partner organisations and with degrees of co-supervision as and when possible where students will work individually or in small groups with QMUL academics and sector practitioners. This module will allow students to get practical experience in business and public engagement strategy, organisational behavior, and global value chain ecologies in arts and cultural organisations in London. Students will form groups and co-create a specific research brief for one organisation, this assessment to be submitted in the summer term. This research work will additionally feed into students' dissertations project submissions, which are also conducted over the third semester.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Tutorial
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Group Project in Business AnalyticsBUSM130Full year7No

Group Project in Business Analytics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is the capstone module for the MSc in Business Analytics. Students will work in groups and will be required to provide analysis of a problem or question using complex data from a business context. Each group will be assigned a mentor who will guide the group through the process of structuring the analytical problem, obtaining and organising the data, data analysis and presentation of results. Students will present initial results as a group to an audience consisting of mentors and practitioners. Final assessment of the module will then be based on individual essays which cover specific aspects of the case and in which the students will be required to reflect on their work in the light of the methods and theories which their learning in the MSc has touched upon.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 3: Weeks 10: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 10: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 4: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 4: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 6: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 6: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 8: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 3: Weeks 8: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm

Masterclass in Business AnalyticsBUSM131Full year7No

Masterclass in Business Analytics

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will be split across two terms. There will be six sessions in each term at which outside speakers will present cases on business analytics in companies or cases on the context of business analytics in society or a specific business analytics tool. Each case study will be preceded by student self study on the main topics and will be followed by a seminar in which students summarize insights and the case study. The course will be assessed through students' presentations and through individual coursework in which students elaborate on one of the topics presented by the outside speakers.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12; Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Complex Networks and InnovationBUSM132Semester 27No

Complex Networks and Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Pietro Panzarasa
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module focuses on the structure and dynamics of a variety of complex networks, including the Internet, the World Wide Web, online social networks, inter- and intra-organisational networks, and import-export trade networks among countries. The module aims to develop a unified theoretical framework for the analysis of sociologically relevant phenomena that exhibit complex network structures and dynamics, such as information diffusion, cultural fads, financial crises, and viral marketing. Special emphasis will be placed on innovation, with a view to uncovering the structural foundations of knowledge creation, transfer, sharing, and diffusion in various empirical domains. To this end, the module will develop an interdisciplinary perspective by combining current research on complex networks with contributions from relevant organisational and sociological research.

Assessment: 75.0% Coursework, 25.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 3 pm

EntrepreneurshipBUSM134Semester 27No

Entrepreneurship

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Shoutong Thomas Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will provide a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of entrepreneurship. It combined rigorous theory and concepts with practical applications of entrepreneurship, e.g. business plan writing. The module will begin with establishing a connection between strategy and the realities of innovation in organisations. It will then explore different sources of entrepreneurship and initiation strategies (e.g. open innovation, commercialisation, incubators, business networks). The module will then focus on the core aspects of value conceptualisation and creation with the help of the business model concept. This will lead to translating business models into business plans with emphasis on building a convincing case for different audiences (e.g. lenders, investors, crowd funders, resource partners). Finally, the module will consider the broader dimensions of entrepreneurship and its relationship with social benefits and economic value. Throughout the module, students will engage in a practical entrepreneurial learning exercise that will lead to the creation of a business plan. This activity will be supported by seminar sessions, individual mentoring and the use of business planning software in tutorials. As such, the module will interweave two strands: theory and concepts of entrepreneurship on the one hand, and entrepreneurial practice exercises on the other.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Environmental Change: Economics and PolicyBUSM135Semester 27No

Environmental Change: Economics and Policy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mrs Caterina Gennaioli
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module introduces to the phenomenon of environmental degradation with an emphasis on economic analysis, albeit taught in a non-technical style. The course will provide students with the theoretical and empirical tools to understand the determinants and consequences of global environmental change. The course will analyze the policy tools available to policymakers to tackle environmental degradation and climate change. The course will then discuss the effects of environmental policy on businesses and the barriers to environmental policy implementation with a focus on developing countries and an emphasis on political economy factors such as corruption. Finally the course will analyze the implications of global environmental change in developing countries focusing on prominent phenomena such as migration and conflict. The module will also teach how to empirically assess environmental policy using STATA (an econometrics software).

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Evidence-based Human Resource ManagementBUSM136Semester 27No

Evidence-based Human Resource Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Robert Briner
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The ultimate goal of evidence-based practice is to help practitioners become more effective through providing a framework for making decisions and taking actions which incorporate the best available evidence from multiple sources including scientific evidence. This module will focuses on a practical project in order to provide participants with hands-on experience of how to use different types of evidence and information both to identify real HRM problems and their potential solutions.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Introduction to Marketing ManagementBUSM137Semester 17No

Introduction to Marketing Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Ms Zahra Sharifonnasabi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is meant to provide an outlook on marketing as a sub-discipline of management studies. It is providing students on the MSc in Management and Management and Organizational Innovation with a theoretical foundation of theories and concepts of marketing management which allows them in their subsequent studies to understand and situate more specialised aspects of marketing (e.g. consumer behaviour, social and political marketing, or business relationships and networks). Special emphasis is given to understanding current academic debates in the field. This means students are expected to read articles independently in leading marketing journals.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Knowledge Innovation Learning and OrganisationBUSM138Semester 27No

Knowledge Innovation Learning and Organisation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Stephen Fox
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Information Society is a growing global phenomenon. Related ideas such as Knowledge Economy, Learning Organization, Learning Community, Learning Region and Post-Industrial Knowledge Society are widely known. Knowledge Management, Innovation and Organizational Learning are all management and organizational practices that drive and shape this growing phenomenon and help us understand how it develops and where it might be heading. This module will look at these ideas through practical empirical studies and landmark theories, drawing implications for management and leadership.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Leadership Skills for Business AnalyticsBUSM139Semester 17No

Leadership Skills for Business Analytics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Maxine Robertson
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will familiarise students with the fundamentals of effective leadership in analytical initiatives and projects such as the difference between leading and managing initiatives/projects, dealing with resistance and different stakeholder interests, transactional leadership in teams and projects, building commitment for change, inspiring peers and subordinates, challenging others' assumptions and views, effective communication within teams/project groups and with other teams/projects, executives and stakeholder, building and nurturing relationships and social networks, presenting and pitching concepts and results, managing and mobilising the organisational energy of a team/project and dealing with acceleration and over-acceleration in analytical initiatives and projects.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Managing under RegulationBUSM140Semester 27No

Managing under Regulation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Perri 6
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This qualitative module introduces students to the management skills, frameworks, challenges, imperatives, organisational and inter-organisational processes involved in operating in an industry under regulation. All industries are regulated by generic regulators for health and safety, environment, information privacy, accounting standards, patenting, equality and diversity including physical access, etc; there are sector-specific regulators for financial services, utilities, transport, pharmaceuticals, health care, education, airlines, railways, food standards, print and broadcast media, primary extraction, gambling and many others. This module enables students who will become managers to understand their regulators, what inspectors do and want, how far they can legitimately lobby regulators, and how to operate across many countries each with their own national regulatory systems.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm

Project ManagementBUSM141Semester 27No

Project Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Evangelos Markopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The focus of the module will be on recent project management techniques that encourage the use of incremental delivery of projects. These techniques are appropriate to projects that deliver complex outcomes in a context of high uncertainty about the desired result. The course will also provide a grounding in traditional project management techniques that focus on projects that are concluded to a clear specification within a pre-specified time frame. Students will be encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to earn an accreditation for project management and the course will prepare students for this additional examination.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Research Methods for AccountingBUSM143Semester 27No

Research Methods for Accounting

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to put together a research proposal, how to draw out objectives of research, how to undertake literature reviews, how to assess suitable research methods to use. In terms of research methods, the course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students will know how to put together their own research proposal and will have done some preliminary analysis of literature, assessment of data required and methods to be used.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Monday 9 am -12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Research Methods for Human Resources ManagementBUSM144Semester 27No

Research Methods for Human Resources Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Nelarine Cornelius
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to the nature of research in the field of business and management/ human resource management and to some of the techniques used in business research. The module is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and expertise to undertake a successful dissertation as part of the MSc. The module will introduce you to the fundamentals of research in business and management/ HRM, help you to design a relevant and rigorous dissertation project, and to identify suitable quantitative and/or qualitative research methods techniques. It will walk you through the entire research process from finding a research question to the final results including how to write-up your research. With a strong focus on the dissertation the module will also provide the fundaments for future research projects in academia and different business contexts.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 6 pm

Research Methods for ManagementBUSM145Semester 27No

Research Methods for Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Valeria Cavotta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will provide a foundation in Research Methods for students for their dissertations. It will instruct them in how to put together a research proposal, how to draw out objectives of research, how to undertake literature reviews, how to assess suitable research methods to use. In terms of research methods, the course covers both qualitative methods such as case studies, questionnaires, surveys and interview techniques and an introduction to quantitative methods and data analysis. By the end of the course students will know how to put together their own research proposal and will have done some preliminary analysis of literature, assessment of data required and methods to be used.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Social and Sustainable InnovationBUSM146Semester 27No

Social and Sustainable Innovation

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Yasser Bhatti
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Global challenges such as environmental pollution, inequality or climate change, have driven an increasing need and demand for products or services that contribute value through enhancing environmental performance (e.g. low-carbon or renewable energy) or alleviating social issues (e.g. for the socially excluded, or to enhance social justice). This module has been developed to address these important trends. The module is designed to equip students with the skills and resources for thinking critically about the role of innovation in social justice and sustainable development. It provides a rigorous conceptual understanding of sustainable and social innovation, and of the practical challenges of innovation management.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Strategic AnalysisBUSM147Semester 17No

Strategic Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Panagiotis Panagiotopoulos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore various theoretical approaches used to explain what markets managers choose to compete within, why and how. We will begin by examining the traditional competitive positioning and resource-based views, and critically evaluate these analytical approaches and their appropriateness in an increasingly networked, globalised, digitised and fluid competitive environment. We will then go on to examine the challenges of strategy implementation, including analysing structural, cultural and functional issues.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Thursday 3 pm - 4 pm
    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Leadership in the Social and Public SectorsBUSM149Semester 27No

Leadership in the Social and Public Sectors

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Patrick Mcgurk
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will investigate and discuss leadership in the social and pubic sectors from a theoretical sound and practical perspective. Marrying theory and practice will allow students to critically reflect on leadership processes and to apply their knowledge directly to real world cases from and practices in this sector. Furthermore, understanding and challenging leadership practices in social and public organisations will contribute to students' employability and their personal development. More specifically, this module this module explores principal theories, typologies (e.g. transactional and transformational) and styles of individual and collective leadership at all levels of social and public organisations. Includes research evidence on the effectiveness and otherwise of leadership on performance in social and public sector organisations, often in politically- or resource-constrained environments. Particular attention is given to crisis leadership.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm

Organisational Analysis in the Public SectorBUSM173Semester 17No

Organisational Analysis in the Public Sector

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Martin Laffin
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with a strong understanding of how organisations work in the public sector across policy-making, regulatory, commissioning and service providing bodies, including in the voluntary sector. It examines organisations from a range of different perspectives, analysing them as having distinct cultures, structures, human relations practices and political systems. It will include relations between elected and appointed officials, managers and professionals, and the role of "street level bureaucrats". It also examines the internal organisational processes arising under intensive performance management and league table competition and under conditions of fiscal stress and cutback management. It will take a critical view of recent claims for "public value", "coproduction" and greater "entrepreneurship" in the public sector as well as a review of the recent austerity literature on how public sector cutbacks are designed and implemented.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Principles of Persuasion in MarketingBUSM174Semester 27No

Principles of Persuasion in Marketing

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stephan Dickert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is based on the realization that persuasion is a part of all communication interactions and represents the conceptual bridge between dialogue and influence. Masters students will evaluate with theories regarding the responsible and reflective use and consumption of persuasive marketing communications. The module is constructed to immerse students in theoretical insights and applications of actual persuasion in marketing and prepare them for the possible pursuit of a career in marketing and related professions.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business EthicsBUSM175Semester 27No

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sadhvi Dar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Corporate Social Responsibility will offer students an introductory and in-depth module unpacking the sensitive relationship between corporations and issues of social justice, environmental destruction (animal, climate, pollution, ecologies) and labour rights. At a time when globalisation is perceived as a threat to international business addressing inequalities across the global North and South, this module will provide postgraduate students with indispensable knowledge about key issues facing corporations today. The module will also address both philosophical issues that include ethical theories, moral debates and social scientific perspectives as well as a grounding in real life case studies and access to a local stakeholder engagement project with charities in Tower Hamlets and Poplar. Specific modules will cover a wide-range of subjects including: 'greening' management (reducing emissions, waste management, protecting biodiversity), workers rights (trade unions, ILO, outsourcing, supply-chains), sustainable consumption (ethical marketing, corporate lobbying, consumerism), and promoting democratic processes (governance, accountability, stakeholder engagement).

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Public Management and GovernanceBUSM176Semester 17No

Public Management and Governance

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Stella Ladi
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the political context for public management, the complex accountability pressures which public managers face, the roles they play in policy-making, as well as some of the trends in public management reform. Increasingly public services are delivered by for-profit firms and non-profit organisations. The module examines the trade-offs and implementation challenges of these arrangements. Of great interest are strategies for e-government, and we'll examine the challenges involved. The module will introduce students to key issues in budgeting which affect the work of all public managers during periods of 'austerity'. We'll explore the deepening relationships between local, national and international tiers of governance.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Monday 9 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Innovation and Global CompetitionBUSM177Semester 17No

Innovation and Global Competition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Joanne Zhang
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Technological and organisational innovation is the main source of competitive advantage and, therefore, one of the core elements of entrepreneurship and economic leadership. Thus, education in entrepreneurship would not be complete without an understanding of the industry and firm dynamics of technological innovation. This module addresses innovation issues within the context of globalisation, development and digitalisation. We will approach innovation as a strategic process, beginning with assessing the context, and then moving on to address the formulation and implementation of innovation strategies. We will address several strategic dilemmas within innovation, such as standards battles and design dominance, timing of entry, choosing innovation projects, collaborative innovation strategies and the benefits of protecting or opening up innovation for competitive strategy.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Graduate Professional and Academic SkillsBUSM178Full year7No

Graduate Professional and Academic Skills

Credits: 0.0
Contact: Dr Nikolaos Tsitsianis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The NCM (Non-Credit Module) will assist with the written academic work, practical problems with academic development (structure, plagiarism, collusion, etc). All these initiatives are expected to pave the way to a smoother transition to Post-Graduate setting and the expectation set by the University. The Module aims to boost the skills associated with quantitative analysis and computer lab exposures using both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Moreover classes on skills development, employability, appreciation of labour market trends, exam strategy, personal development, use of University resources are offered.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 3 pm - 5 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Monday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Tuesday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 7: Wednesday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Monday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Tuesday 10 am - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 7: Wednesday 10 am - 5 pm

Selected Issues in Commercial and Company LawBUSM179Semester 27No

Selected Issues in Commercial and Company Law

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Min Yan
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to those aspects of law that are relevant to business operations by examining selected issues and fundamental principles that underlie the law of contract and company law. In particular, this module will deal with creating commercial contracts, contractual terms (including business-to-business contract and business-to-consumer contract), effect of exemption and unfair clauses, remedies for breach of contract, corporate personality & limited liability of shareholders, corporate constitution and corporate management, managerial accountability & directors' duties, shareholder rights & remedies and comparative corporate governance. It has designed to develop students' understanding about the main principles of commercial law within a business context and equip them with the skills for thinking critically about how do those legal principles and rules affect businesses.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 12 pm - 3 pm

Technologies, Work and OrganisationsBUSM148Semester 27No

Technologies, Work and Organisations

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Manuela Perrotta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module presents, explains and illustrates the key concepts that are relevant to mainstream and critical analysis of the role of technology in contemporary organisations. In addition, we will examine several case studies to explore the challenges that the introduction and use of new technologies may pose in organisations. In particular, the module will focus on the literature on practice-based approaches to technologies, i.e. the literature that is interested in exploring what happens when technologies are at work in real organisational settings. The module will also explore how new technologies, and especially digital technologies, affect the relations among organisations, institutions and social contexts.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 5 pm
    Seminar
  • Semester 2: Weeks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm