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QMUL Summer Schools

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What can I study?

Create your own Summer School experience

Our Summer School programme puts you in charge of what you study. You choose from the range of Summer School courses below: there’s no fixed academic path. 

Each of our Summer School courses is three weeks long, giving you a chance to immerse yourself in each subject. Some courses run across both Sessions One and Two (See the course descriptions below for details), so you can combine interests to create your own tailored programme: if you’d like to explore how the Surrealists influence David Bowie – and visit Paris – before finding out whether the Large Hadron Collider will ‘destroy the world’, you can!

We want to give you the broadest possible intellectual experience. You can specialise according to you own interests, knowing that each session will be thought-provoking, challenging and exciting in equal measure. We are proud of the intellectual rigour of our Summer School and you will be taught by our highly respected academic staff, while making use of our world-class facilities.

Course Code
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018 Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
School of Languages, Linguistics and Film
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
N/A
Assessment
Oral presentation (20%), 3,000-word essay (80%)

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This course offers you an introduction to the history of modernist and avant-garde art in Paris, and its impact upon cultural production in London. The course investigates how artists in both places responded to the political, social and technological transformations that took place in European societies between 1870 and 1980. You’ll look at topics ranging from the influence of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting on the Bloomsbury Group’s demands for sexual and social freedoms, to the influence of Dada and Surrealism on David Bowie, and Situationist ‘culture jamming’ on punk rock. We hope you will think about the construction of official ideas of culture and the varying means by which artists have generated their own aesthetics of resistance. Making use of the incredible resources provided by London itself, the course will include field trips to galleries and museums, tours of historic locations, and a day trip to Paris, with some costs covered by QMUL while you will cover other expenses.

Course Code
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018 Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 contact hours)
School
School of Languages, Linguistics and Film
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
N/A
Assessment
Oral presentation (20%), 3,000-word essay (80%)

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Image by Pedro via Flickr (Creative Commons)

This course examines the hybrid and diverse nature of the British cinema from the New Wave of the early 1960s to the advent of Channel 4 in the early 1980s. It will explore two key themes in the British cinema’s long quest for a sustainable model of film-making: the tensions between the indigenous and the international; and the recurring pattern of ‘boom and bust’ in British production. Topics covered include: the emergence of the New Wave and the ‘Swinging London’ films of the 1960s; the relationship between British cinema and Hollywood; the British film renaissance of the early 1980s; TV funding for film; the emergence during the 1970s of British auteur film-makers (such as Peter Greenaway and Derek Jarman); and British genre from horror to heritage. You’ll be taught through a mix of lectures, film screenings, seminars and workshops.

Course Code
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
School of History
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
N/A
Assessment
in-class film analysis test (25%), 3,000-word essay (75%)

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Image by Stefan Rheone via Flickr (Creative Commons)

British cinema is often celebrated for its social realism, yet has made significant and influential contributions to the worlds of horror, fantasy and science fiction. From the Gothic tradition of Dracula to nightmarish visions of London in 28 Days Later and the spectacular popular fantasies of Doctor Who and Harry Potter, this course investigates this alternative history or ‘repressed underside’ of British cinema and the ways in which these films have responded to their social and cultural production contexts. We will make full use of our London setting as you examine, for example, the depiction of London and the East End as both a landscape of fear and wonder; the representation of women, gender and sexuality in horror and fantasy; the psychoanalytic interpretation of horror and the ways through which these films engage with the history of Britain and its capital.

Course Code
ECN215 [TBC]
Teaching dates
Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
School of Economics and Finance
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
Principles of economics (eg demand and supply, competitive equilibrium, market power, externalities and public goods) and elementary mathematical methods (eg functions, simultaneous equations, differentiation, optimisation); or permission of instructor
Assessment
Problem sets (50%), in-class test (50%)

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This course offers you an introduction to game theory, a framework for studying situations of strategic interdependence. You will be shown how to describe and analyse such situations formally, as well as how the theory can be applied in economics, political science, law, and elsewhere. Topics include: games in strategic and extensive form, backward induction, dominance, choice under uncertainty, pure and mixed strategy Nash equilibrium, imperfect information, coordination and outguessing games, the prisoners’ dilemma, subgame perfection, and repeated interaction. The course is taught on historical principles, with attention to the founders and intellectual development of game theory.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
Law
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
You are generally not required to have specific knowledge of immigration law before you enrol on this course. Some very basic knowledge of international law, such as the hierarchy of norms and the role of international law, as well as some basic knowledge of human rights law would be desirable.
Assessment
In-class oral presentation (50%), 2,500-word essay (50%)

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In an era of massive influx of migrants and refugees, this course will examine a series of key topics related to international immigration and refugee law, and the challenges posed from a legal perspective. It will provide you with a broad overview of the main legal instruments in place concerning asylum, migration, human smuggling and trafficking, such as the 1951 Refugee Convention (Geneva Convention) and 1967 Protocol or the 2000 Palermo Protocols attached to the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime. Regional sub-systems, such as the EU legal framework will be explored by focusing on themes such as the legal migration, detention of asylum seekers and irregular migrants, deportation and criminalisation of migration. In order to provide a holistic approach to the examined topics, selected national legislation and case law will be explored as well.

Teaching will be supplemented by field trips to institutions and NGOs (such as the AIRE Centre, Immigration Law Practitioners’ Association, Amnesty International UK, the UNHCR etc) with a view to gaining valuable insights into the practical dimension of migration and refugee law.

Course Code
Teaching dates
Tbc
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
School of Physics and Astronomy
Credit value
15
Credit level
4
Pre-requisites
A good knowledge of A-level mathematics and physics, as required for a QMUL Physics BSc first-year student.
Assessment
In-class presentation (30%), 4,000-word essay (70%)

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This course will explain the basic concepts in particle physics, starting from the basic blocks of matter as we know them before looking at the fundamental forces and experimental methods used in ongoing investigations in the field. You will learn about the elementary particles and fundamental forces acting between them and understand the behaviour of all known matter, from very small-scale particles to the very large scale of the universe and its composition. We will also explain main experimental techniques, from particle accelerators to particle detectors and statistical data analyses. We hope that by the end of the programme you will be able to confidently reassure others that the LHC will not destroy the world!

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018
Course workload
School
School of Business and Management
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
N/A
Assessment
Group presentation (20%), 1,500-word essay (80%)

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This course offers you a broad overview of the process of economic ‘globalisation’ and changes in international business over time. The focus is on the multinational firm set in the context of trends in the world economy. It will give you a critical, strategic and comparative perspective on the nature and scope of international business, its origins, development, and theories. You will examine these issues through case studies. Our Mile End campus is in the heart of London’s East End, close to the financial district and Canary Wharf, and we have strong links with leading multinational firms that have made London their base. As a student in London, you will also be able to explore the city’s unparalleled range of specialist archives and libraries, including the London School of Economics (LSE)’s social science library.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
Law
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
N/A
Assessment
In-class group presentation (20%), 3,000-word essay (80%)

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This course offers a broad as well as profound overview of international law and its various areas, its relations to politics, and current challenges of the international legal system. The focus will be on the theoretical background of international law, as well as its practical implications in our globalised world. It will thus provide a critical, analytical, and stimulating perspective on the nature and scope of international law for every scholar interested in this field. Furthermore, our location in London will offer you not only access to law firms exclusively dedicated to international law (such as Volterra Fietta), but also to international organisations based in London (both better known organisations, such as the International Maritime Organisation and the Commonwealth of Nations, as well as lesser known organisations such as the International Coffee Organisation).

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018 Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
School of Politics and International Relations
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
Each application will be considered on its merits. This programme is designed primarily for students who have studied at university level. Typically, this means you will be in your first year of university, or you can demonstrate recent academic study at this level. We are looking at students who have studied international relations or a similar subject, and if you are studying in the UK, your grades should be in the 2:1 range
Assessment
1,500-word written portfolio (75%), presentation (25%)

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During this Summer school course, you will be exposed to a broad range of seminars, lectures and discussions about the issues facing us in a globalised world. The course will provide you with a sophisticated theoretical and applied understanding of international relations including areas of expertise such as war and security, globalisation and development, and EU foreign policy. Subjects that will be covered include an overview of international relations since 1945, the major international institutions and actors, war and security in a global era, and the European Union as a global actor.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018 Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 contact hours)
School
School of Engish and Drama
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
No prior content knowledge is needed but you should have experience of writing research papers/essays at equivalent to Level 4 in English literature, theatre studies or another relevant arts and humanities discipline.
Assessment
Small group presentation (30%), 2,000-word essay (70%)

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This course draws on London’s rich theatre and performance history, and the wide-ranging opportunities the city offers to engage with historical and contemporary theatre and performance. It explores how historical, social, cultural and architectural contexts produce meaning through play texts and in the theatre. You will be introduced to a range of ways of analysing plays and performances in relation to the conditions in which they are created. You’ll spend the first week on visits related to the work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and in seminars. The second week will normally focus on visits and seminars related to theatre from the 19th century to the present day. Your last week will look at performance beyond the literary play text, for example, Live and Performance Art, Club Performance, Performance in Galleries, Performance Documentation. You will normally have two theatre visits or field trips per week.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 will be contact hours)
School
School of Physics and Astronomy
Credit value
15
Credit level
4
Pre-requisites
Computers and mathematical concepts. We will teach you what you need to know about Python and the TensorFlowTM app during the course, along with an overview of deep learning concepts
Assessment
Continuous in-class practical skills assessment (25%), continuous portfolio assessment (50%), oral assessment (25%)

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Machine learning influences modern life in many different avenues and is silently revolutionising the way we live and work. We can see the influence of machine-learning algorithms in social media, web search engines, mobile device spell checkers and self-driving cars.  This course will give you an introduction to machine learning using the Python programming language and the TensorFlowTM programming toolkit from Google.  No programming background is assumed, however if you want to take this course, you should be familiar with using computers.  

This course is taught by scientists using machine learning for data analysis at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and will allow you to work on practical examples from both general and physics-based problems. Examples will be drawn from a variety of problems in order to allow you to build up an understanding of the tools and how to use them. This will prepare you for a mini-project analysing data from a particle physics experiment to complement the examples encountered earlier in the course.

Course Code
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018 Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 contact hours)
School
School of Languages, Linguistics and Film
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
N/A
Assessment
A 500-word piece of travel writing (25%), 3,000-word personal project (75%)

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London has been the largest European city for more than two-and-a-half centuries and has played a dominant role in the context of European cities. We are going to explore the ways in which this notion is presented in examples of European literature, fine art and film in the 19th, 20th, and early 21st centuries. The course spans three weeks and offers you a mixture of classroom teaching, film screenings, workshops and excursions for three hours per day (excursions might take longer). We will also make a number of suggestions for subject-related activities outside your scheduled contact hours.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018 Summer Session Two: 16 July 2018–3 August 2018
Course workload
150 hours (of which 45 contact hours)
School
School of Languages, Linguistics and Film
Credit value
15
Credit level
5
Pre-requisites
You should have a good standard of general education, making you suitable to study and undertake work at university level. There is no subject-specific requirement for specialist knowledge of film or screen writing for the course, but some aspect formal study of at least one of the following would be expected as part of a general education: film, English, media, drama, creative writing or other literature, drama or media related subjects.
Assessment
2,000-word research portfolio (50%), 2,000-word story outline (50%)

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This three-week Summer School course enables you to develop your creative writing skills in the area of screenwriting to produce a feature film story. The course will begin with a period of research for ideas and topics, using London as a site and location for this exploration. There will be visits to galleries, museums, walking tours and talks that offer material for story development. There will be research and short writing exercises during the first two weeks of the course (which will form a portfolio for assessment) and in your final week, individual writing sessions and group workshops will focus on helping you to develop and define a single-story idea suitable for a feature film screenplay.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July
Course workload
150 hours (including 45 contact hours)
School
Blizard Institute
Credit value
15
Credit level
4
Pre-requisites
Individual oral assessment and presentation (50%), 1,000-word commentary (50%)
Assessment
Individual oral assessment and presentation (50%), 1,000-word commentary (50%)

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This course will provide you with an introduction to political theory, globalisation and the global political economy of health. You will learn about the actors, structures and politics of global health governance and international health policy. You’ll discover more about the WHO, the Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and malaria; as well as the role of civil society organisations and social movements in promoting global health equity.

Course Code
Tbc
Teaching dates
Summer Session One: 25 June 2018–13 July 2018
Course workload
School
School of Physics and Astronomy
Credit value
15
Credit level
4
Pre-requisites
A good understanding of A-level mathematics and physics, as required for a QMUL BSc Physics first-year student
Assessment
4,000-word essay, including a literature survey (90%), in-class tests (10%)

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This course provides a broad overview of astronomy to give you an understanding of the evolution of the universe and its constituents. A particular theme is the role played by the known laws of physics in understanding astronomical observation. You will learn about the constituents of the observed universe; appreciate (and be able to explain) the important part played by the laws of physics in designing experiments and making observations – and interpret and understand them. You will also be able to explain the different types of information obtainable from observations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio waves.

You will discover the home of the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) during your visit to the historic Royal Observatory in Greenwich (founded in the 1670s by King Charles II), and you will be able to stand astride the Prime Meridian, where zero degrees longitude is marked. You will also be able to carry out real astronomical observations using the optical telescopes in-house at the QMUL observatory.

See Also ‘Global Cities: London and Paris’

Find out more about this exciting summer programme offered by our School of Geography, a six-week field course exploring two extraordinary cities. View the course information here.

Cinema sign by Pedro via Flickr - https://www.flickr.com/photos/caixadeluz/2944296162/ (CC BY 2.0)

Eye image by Stefan Rheone via Flickr - https://www.flickr.com/photos/stefanrheone/10710479204/ (CC BY 2.0)

 

Terms and conditions

We have endeavoured to ensure that the information contained here is both helpful and accurate at the time of writing. There are circumstances in which we may still make changes to the programmes and services that we provide. We have endeavoured to ensure that the information contained here is both helpful and accurate at the time of writing. There are circumstances in which we may still make changes to the programmes and services that we provide.

For this reason, it is important that you check this website for the most up-to-date information, or contact us before you apply. For our full terms and conditions, please visit: qmul.ac.uk/prospective/termsandconditions/index.html

Our Summer School courses are also open to QMUL staff. If you are a member of staff, please contact your line or school manager to see whether the course qualifies for CPD funding. 

“QMUL was the only university in London or in England that would enable me to study science but also do drama, so that’s why I came here!”

Miriam Jaffe, Scripps College, spring 2017

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