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Wild, Wild Women

A collaborative research report sharing learning from an intergenerational arts programme bringing together older women in east London with local school girls.

Wild Wild Women
  • School/Institute/Department: School of English and Drama
  • Subjects: Arts; Collaborative Research;
  • Audience: Artists; Art Organisations; Community Organisations

The collaborative research report ‘Wild, Wild Women’, was written by Dr Caoimhe McAvinchey in collaboration with Magic Me, a leading provider of intergenerational arts projects, and project participants to explore ten years of intergenerational arts programmes led by Magic Me at The Women’s Library.

The project brought together young women aged 14-15 from Mulberry School, with older East-End women to take part in workshops once a week at The Women’s Library in Aldgate. Led each year by Magic Me’s associate artist Sue Mayo and a range of other artists from film-makers, sound artists and puppeteers, the women would draw from the library’s collection and their own life and experiences to explore various themes. Each year there would be a final showing of their work to an audience.

‘Wild, Wild Women’ documents and reflects on these ten years of projects and offers access to the processes involved and critical reflections on these. Its aim is to support artists, researchers and educational arts organisations to develop their own intergenerational work in and with cultural collections.

The report was launched at a full QMUL event, with 65 participants including artists and professionals from arts, education and cultural collections including National Archives, Arts Council and the National Maritime Museum. The event featured a panel of women involved in the project, presentations, film screenings and workshops.

The research was also disseminated through a full colour report available both in print and online, as well as through participant films focussing on the 10 Years of intergenerational arts practice.

I was deeply moved both professionally and personally by the Wild Wild Women conference. Many of the ideas discussed forced me to question my role professionally as a learning facilitator, individually as a women and collectively within the community where I live. I have read your report from front to back and it has definitely help inform my current plans and proposals for future projects.
Stephanie Christodoulou, Royal Albert Hall

You can find more information about Magic Me at the Women’s Library on their webpages, and read the Wild, Wild Women report in full here.

This project received large award funding from the Centre for Public Engagement.

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