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Bespoke

A team of researchers have developed a crowdsource app that will allow cyclists to log cycle accidents, injuries and near misses to create an accurate map of cycling blackspots.

Bespoke
  • School/Institute/Department: Medicine and Dentistry, Barts Health NHS Trust
  • Subjects: Crowdsourcing, Trauma
  • Audience: Cyclists

A team of researchers have developed a crowdsource app that will allow cyclists to log cycle accidents, injuries and near misses to create an accurate map of cycling blackspots.

The number of people commuting by bicycle in London has steadily increased in the last 10 years. Official census analysis has confirmed that the number of people cycling to work in London more than doubled from 77,000 in 2001 to 155,000 in 2011 (TFL, 2014). 

There has been much media attention around cycling deaths in London which has resulted in campaigners working hard to raise awareness of cyclists on the road, however, it is much harder to access data on the number of accidents involving cyclists that do not result in death. At present, the information around injuries sustained by cyclists is not recorded in a meaningful way that allows for researchers to evaluate risk factors or provide data to stakeholders to reduce cycle related injury.

As a result, researchers at the Barts Health have started the Bespoke study. Bespoke is an observational, prospective, cohort study, which will explore the epidemiology of cycling crashes presenting to Barts Health NHS Trust and map crash locations to identify hotspots within London. 

Participants who present with injuries at the Royal London Hospital as a result of a cycling collision will be asked to answer a questionnaire about their cycling routines as well as provide information about the location, conditions and events surrounding their collision. Patients’ recovery will be followed by the study team and morbidity and mortality data will be completed at 28 days. Participants will be followed up at 6 weeks after their initial admission to explore more around their activities of daily living, return to work and cycling habits. 

However, cyclists who are involved in minor collisions or near misses are encouraged to make use of an online crowdsourcing app that allows them to directly take part in the research themselves by contributing information to create a more accurate and representative picture. The app will allow data about those cyclists who do not visit the hospital but are still involved (or nearly involved) in minor collisions to be reflected, so that these incidents can be followed up and mapped to determine ‘hotspots’ for near misses and collisions. 

This can be done visiting www.bespokestudy.co.uk and clicking on ‘report your crash’ or by logging on directly to the website (www.collidosco.pe). Collecting all this information will create a more accurate picture of how cycling collisions affect cyclists and enable researchers to work with stakeholders to reduce the number and burden of cycling related injuries.

The innovative Bespoke data project led by researchers in London’s biggest emergency department is key to unlocking data which is currently lacking from the debate about cycle safety in London. I urge all London cyclists to get involved.
Jon Snow, TV journalist and cyclist

For further information about the study, please visit the Bespoke website, follow them on twitter (@bsp0ke) or email them at bespoke@bartshealth.nhs.uk.

Recent press coverage:
http://www.itv.com/news/london/story/2014-10-06/new-app-will-help-target-cycling-accident-blackspots/
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/hospital-launches-phone-app-in-bid-to-reduce-bike-casualties-9743363.html?origin=internalSearch
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/log-bike-accidents-on-nhs-website-says-gold-medallist-9801242.html?origin=internalSearch

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