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Research degrees in Intelligent Sensing

The Centre for Intelligent Sensing (CIS) is a focal point for research in Intelligent Sensing at Queen Mary University of London.

The Centre focuses on breakthrough innovations in computational intelligence that are expected to have a major impact in transforming human and machine utilisation of multiple sensor inputs for interpretation and decision making.

The expertise in the Centre includes camera and sensor networks, image and signal processing, computer vision, pattern recognition and learning, coding, 3D imaging, reconstruction and rendering, 3D graphics, bio-inspired computing, human-computer interaction, face and gesture recognition, affective computing and social signal processing, and data mining.

PhD students in the Centre will have the possibility to undertake multidisciplinary research in selected areas of sensing applied to a diverse range of fields.

See also the CIS website: Centre for Intelligent Sensing

Research degrees

PhD in Electronic Engineering

PhD students can undertake research in Electronic Engineering with a specific focus on Intelligent Sensing. CIS will provide the engaging framework for PhDs who will be based at the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science.

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PhD in Computer Science

PhD students will be well-integrated in study programmes of world-leading research groups in Computer Science. CIS will provide the engaging framework for Intelligent Sensing PhDs who will be based at the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science.

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PhD in Interactive Cognitive Environments

The field of research in Interactive and Cognitive Environments (ICE) is a combination of computer science, electronic and telecommunication engineering, and machine learning. PhD students will be surrounded by a multidisciplinary environment for designing and implementing new solutions and cutting-edge technologies for ICE.

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Further information

Dr Riccardo Mazzon – Research Manager, Centre for Intelligent Sensing

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