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Social capital: the new frontier in widening participation at universities blog Blog: Social capital: the new frontier in widening participation at universities
2 October 2017

In an article for the Guardian's Higher Education Network, former Principal Professor Simon Gaskell and Vice-Principal for Student Experience, Teaching and Learning, Professor Rebecca Lingwood argue that if universities are to ensure all their graduates fulfil their potential, they will have to start equipping them with the social capital they need to get there. 

New discriminatory NHS policy is bad for your health, whoever you are blog Blog: New discriminatory NHS policy is bad for your health, whoever you are
29 September 2017

Dr Jessica Potter writes for The Conversation about what she calls a discriminatory NHS policy, which she says priorities British lives over others.

No push for a domino effect: Brexit doesn’t loom large in populist radical right parties’ campaigns blog Blog: No push for a domino effect: Brexit doesn’t loom large in populist radical right parties’ campaigns
28 September 2017

Dr Stijn van Kessel writes for UK in a Changing Europe on how Brexit didn’t create a surge of populist radical right parties (PRR) wanting to leave the European Union.

To me, golliwogs are racist – but a tearoom tangle and a new poll shows Britain disagrees blog Blog: To me, golliwogs are racist – but a tearoom tangle and a new poll shows Britain disagrees
20 September 2017

Professor Tim Bale writes for The Conversation on a study that reveals the majority of British people don’t really have a problem with golliwogs.

The Pap smear isn’t used to diagnose cancer – but it could be blog Blog: The Pap smear isn’t used to diagnose cancer – but it could be
19 September 2017

Anita Lim writes for The Conversation about her latest research, published in the British Journal of General Practice, which found evidence that the Pap smear is an excellent test for finding cervical cancer in young women.

What is the Wind in Europe’s Sails? blog Blog: What is the Wind in Europe’s Sails?
15 September 2017

This week European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker claimed that the 'wind is back in Europe's sails'. Andrew Hines from QMUL's School of Languages Linguistics and Film takes a look at his use of metaphor and asks, what force will push Europe forward?

Rohingya crisis: this is what genocide looks like blog Blog: Rohingya crisis: this is what genocide looks like
15 September 2017

Alicia de la Cour Venning writes for The Conversation on the humanitarian catastrophe on the Myanmar-Bangladesh border and the historical isolation of Rohingya Muslims.

I asked artists to create films using real sounds from space – this is what they came up with blog Blog: I asked artists to create films using real sounds from space – this is what they came up with
31 August 2017

Art and science are often seen as complete opposites: art is subjective, while science aims to discover objective facts about nature. Dr Martin Archer writes for The Conversation about how collaborating the two can result in insightful creations.

Robert E Lee, George Washington and the trouble with the American pantheon blog Blog: Robert E Lee, George Washington and the trouble with the American pantheon
25 August 2017

Professor Erik Mathisen writes for The Conversation about the growing debate surrounding the Confederate monuments and how America now has to finally face its troubled history.  

Why aren’t we more outraged about eating chicken? blog Blog: Why aren’t we more outraged about eating chicken?
11 August 2017

Caroline Spence writes for The Conversation about how our attitude towards chickens encourages us to disregard their widespread maltreatment.

Even a ‘minor’ nuclear war would be an ecological disaster felt throughout the world blog Blog: Even a ‘minor’ nuclear war would be an ecological disaster felt throughout the world
11 August 2017

Professor David McCoy writes for The Conversation about how a nuclear attack would cause ecological disruption, devastating many lives.

Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control – new research blog Blog: Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control – new research
9 August 2017

Seeing an abseiling spider descend gracefully using its dragline silk instead of spinning unpredictably and uncontrollably is a magnificent sight. Professor David J Dunstan and Dr Dabiao Liu write for The Conversation, and try to understand the science behind it.

Lions and lambs: can you solve this classic game theory puzzle? blog Blog: Lions and lambs: can you solve this classic game theory puzzle?
20 July 2017

Amirlan Seksenbayev writes for The Conversation about the method of game theory and how it can predict decision-making

Anchoring Labour Rights More Effectively In EU Trade Agreements blog Blog: Anchoring Labour Rights More Effectively In EU Trade Agreements
13 July 2017

Professor Adrian Smith and Dr Liam Campling write for Social Europe about strengthening labour rights in UK and EU trade agreements. 

Trial and error in Northern Irish abortion law blog Blog: Trial and error in Northern Irish abortion law
7 July 2017

Dr Ruth Fletcher from QMUL's School of Law co-authors an article about abortion law reform in Northern Ireland. 

Tory humiliation down to campaign length and cult of May – Norman Tebbit interview blog Blog: Tory humiliation down to campaign length and cult of May – Norman Tebbit interview
29 June 2017

The following interview with Lord Tebbit took place at the House of Lords on 28 June, 2017. He was interviewed by Tim Bale, Professor of Politics, Queen Mary University of London. Norman Tebbit was Conservative MP for Epping (1970-1974) and Chingford (1974-1992) and served as a Junior Minister in both the Department of Trade and the Department of Industry. In the Cabinet, he was the Secretary of State for Employment, Trade and Industry, and Chairman of the Conservative party from 1985 to 1987. He now sits in the House of Lords as Baron Tebbit of Chingford.

Trump’s loyalty fixation recalls one of the US’s most disastrous presidencies blog Blog: Trump’s loyalty fixation recalls one of the US’s most disastrous presidencies
28 June 2017

Erik Mathisen, Teaching Fellow at Queen Mary University of London, writes about the parallels between Donald Trump's presidency and that of Andrew Johnson, who served as the 17th president from 1865-69. 

Corbynism might not actually end – even if Labour loses the election blog Blog: Corbynism might not actually end – even if Labour loses the election
26 April 2017

Professor Tim Bale and David Jeffery from QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations write about Corbyn's leadership post-election, and whether a bad result for the party might not be so bad for 'Corbynism'. 

Now is not the time for the UN to run from the DRC blog Blog: Now is not the time for the UN to run from the DRC
20 April 2017

Dr Reuben Loffman from QMUL's School of History writes about why the UN should stay the course in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 

Snap election a win-win for Theresa May: crush Labour and make Brexit easier blog Blog: Snap election a win-win for Theresa May: crush Labour and make Brexit easier
18 April 2017

A snap election makes perfect sense for Theresa May, says Professor Tim Bale. Writing in The Conversation he said she'll crush Labour and make Brexit a little easier. 

Here’s how Doctor Who’s time machine measures up with real instruments of space and time blog Blog: Here’s how Doctor Who’s time machine measures up with real instruments of space and time
11 April 2017

Physics has seen absolutely staggering accomplishments in the past year or so, particularly in our ability to measure space and time with unprecedented levels of detail. Dr Martin Archer, writes in The Conversation about how these accomplishments stacked up to those of the fictional Time Lords

‘Machine folk’ music shows the creative side of AI blog Blog: ‘Machine folk’ music shows the creative side of AI
31 March 2017

Dr Bob Sturm, from the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, and Kingston University's Dr Oded Ben-Tal explain their research creating artificial intelligence that can write folk music and whether this can open new areas of creativity. 

The Victorians are to blame for assumptions that self-harm is just attention-seeking blog Blog: The Victorians are to blame for assumptions that self-harm is just attention-seeking
6 March 2017

Dr Sarah Chaney, researcher at QMUL's School of History, writes for The Conversation about our attitudes to self-harm and where they come from. 

Viceroy’s House is very watchable – but its account of Indian independence is limited blog Blog: Viceroy’s House is very watchable – but its account of Indian independence is limited
3 March 2017

Dr Ashvin Immanuel Devasundaram, Lecturer in World Cinema, Queen Mary University of London, reviews Gurinder Chadha’s latest film: Viceroy’s House.

Awesome, erotic, everyday: the literary story of electricity blog Blog: Awesome, erotic, everyday: the literary story of electricity
2 March 2017

Sam Halliday, Senior Lecturer in Nineteenth-Century American Literature at QMUL's School of English and Drama writes about a new exhibition at the Wellcome Library: Electricity, The spark of life.

Searching for Corbynism: why no one’s quite sure what Labour stands for blog Blog: Searching for Corbynism: why no one’s quite sure what Labour stands for
24 February 2017

Karl Pike, PhD candidate and Teaching Associate at QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations writes for The Conversation about what Corbyn's Labour stands for. 

The man who invented popular science used a 17th-century version of clickbait blog Blog: The man who invented popular science used a 17th-century version of clickbait
31 January 2017

Harriet Phillips, Research Associate at QMUL's School of English and Drama, writes for The Conversation about the fascinating legacy of 17th century polymath Thomas Browne. 

Hacksaw Ridge promised to champion pacifism – but the film is sadly just jingoistic blog Blog: Hacksaw Ridge promised to champion pacifism – but the film is sadly just jingoistic
30 January 2017

Dr Guy Westwell, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at QMUL reviews Hacksaw Ridge for The Conversation

Death and rebirth: reading between the lines of Trump’s inauguration speech blog Blog: Death and rebirth: reading between the lines of Trump’s inauguration speech
20 January 2017

Andrew Hines, PhD candidate at QMUL's School of Languages, Linguistics and Film writes for The Conversation about President Trump's inauguration speech. 

So you’re looking to run a Research in Schools project? blog Blog: So you’re looking to run a Research in Schools project?
19 January 2017

Dr Martin Archer from the School of Physics and Astronomy writes about his work taking the latest research into schools and how his findings can help science researchers and teachers interested in doing something similar.

Teaching the importance of communication between doctor and patient blog Blog: Teaching the importance of communication between doctor and patient
9 January 2017

In this blog post, Jo Brown, Head of Quality in Teaching and Learning at QMUL’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, talks about her recent experience of teaching Romanian oncologists about successful communication between doctor and patient.

Joseph Kabila will cling to power in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, says expert in African history blog Blog: Joseph Kabila will cling to power in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, says expert in African history
22 December 2016

Dr Reuben Loffman from QMUL's School of History considers the future of Congolese politics and the country's President Joseph Kabila. 

So you want to build a Death Star? Here’s how to get started blog Blog: So you want to build a Death Star? Here’s how to get started
15 December 2016

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, tells the tale of how the rebels stole the plans to the original “Death Star” – a space station the size of a small moon with a weapon powerful enough to destroy a planet. Dr Martin Archer discusses in The Conversation whether our conventional technologies would ever be able to build one.

Brexit and the future of UK trade blog Blog: Brexit and the future of UK trade
25 November 2016

In this article Professor Dr Rafael Leal-Arcas considers what Brexit means for UK trade policy. Professor Leal-Arcas is Jean Monnet Professor in EU International Economic Law at QMUL's Centre for Commercial Law Studies

What does empty space sound like? We need your help to find out blog Blog: What does empty space sound like? We need your help to find out
23 November 2016

There is sound on planets and moons in the solar system – places where there’s a medium through which sound waves can be transmitted, such as an atmosphere or an ocean. But what about empty space? You may have been told definitively that space is silent. Dr Martin Archer explains in The Conversation this isn’t entirely true…

Energy secruity for Europe blog Blog: Energy secruity for Europe
3 November 2016

Energy security is a burning issue in a world where 1.4 billion people still have no access to electricity. A new book from QMUL's Professor Rafael Leal-Arcas focuses on finding solutions for energy security through the international trading system. Focusing mainly on the European Union as a case study, this holistic and comprehensive analysis of the existing legal and geopolitical instruments strives to identify the shortcomings of the international and EU energy trade governance systems, concluding with the notion of a European Energy Union and what the EU is politically prepared to accept as part of its unified energy security.

Thailand mourns its king and heads into the unknown blog Blog: Thailand mourns its king and heads into the unknown
17 October 2016

Dr Lee Jones from QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations writes about the death of Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Dr Jones says that the King was a much more complex figure than is suggested by recent obituaries.

The Conservative party and business have fallen in and out of love for decades blog Blog: The Conservative party and business have fallen in and out of love for decades
11 October 2016

Professor Tim Bale from QMUL's School of Politics and Public Relations writes that its not the first time the Tories and big business have been on less than friendly terms. 

Why Labour Party members still back Jeremy Corbyn as their leader blog Blog: Why Labour Party members still back Jeremy Corbyn as their leader
27 September 2016

Dr Monica Poletti from QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations explores how different views among older and newer Labour party members shaped the outcome of the leadership contest, using survey data from the Party Members Project.

Free State of Jones: Review of Matthew McConaughey’s castaway army in the US civil war blog Blog: Free State of Jones: Review of Matthew McConaughey’s castaway army in the US civil war
27 September 2016

Dr Erik Mathisen from QMUL's School of History reviews Matthew McConaughey’s new movie Free State of Jones.

Many parents won’t read their children scary stories – but perhaps we shouldn’t blame them blog Blog: Many parents won’t read their children scary stories – but perhaps we shouldn’t blame them
1 September 2016

Professor Kiera Vaclavik, from QMUL's School of Languages, Literature and Film, writes about children, stories, and a scare at bedtime.

Possibly habitable planet found around our nearest neighbour star blog Blog: Possibly habitable planet found around our nearest neighbour star
24 August 2016

Thousands of exoplanets have been discovered to date and we regularly come across “Earth-like worlds” around distant stars. It’s also possible that many of these planets may be able to harbour life. Dr Martin Archer argues in The Conversation they are so far away that we will not be able to visit them anytime soon.

Donald Trump’s chaotic use of metaphor is a crucial part of his appeal blog Blog: Donald Trump’s chaotic use of metaphor is a crucial part of his appeal
3 August 2016

Andrew Hines, a PhD candidate at QMUL's School of Languages, Linguistics, and Film, write about Republican nominee Donald Trump's unorthodox and rule-breaking rhetorical style. 

PILI: HIV from the female perspective blog Blog: PILI: HIV from the female perspective
29 July 2016

Dr Sophie Harman from QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations writes about her forthcoming film about HIV, which based on the testimony of 85 local women from the Pwani region of Tanzania.

blog Blog: "With such a small piece of cloth, how do you choose what to cover?"
26 July 2016

In her second blog post from Cambodia with RESULTS UK, QMUL's Dr Jess Potter reports from a multidrug-resistant tuberculosis ward in Phnom Penh and highlights the impossible choices that have to be made with limited funding.

Behind the beauty a TB epidemic is raging blog Blog: Behind the beauty a TB epidemic is raging
21 July 2016

In this blog post, QMUL's Dr Jess Potter reflects on the scale of Cambodia's hidden TB epidemic and what she is experiencing on her trip through rural communities with RESULTS UK.

Here’s what we know about Labour’s £3 supporters blog Blog: Here’s what we know about Labour’s £3 supporters
19 July 2016

In the midst of the election campaign, forces on both sides of the Jeremy Corbyn debate are trying to make the most of the 48-hour window within which anyone can register as a supporter of the Labour Party. Professor Tim Bale writes for The Conversation about how successful the committed ‘Corbynistas’ will be.

What does the Tory grassroots want from Prime Minister Theresa May? blog Blog: What does the Tory grassroots want from Prime Minister Theresa May?
13 July 2016

In this post Professor Tim Bale examines what Tory party members want and expect from Prime Minister Theresa May. The article is based on his research with colleagues in the Party Members Project and is co-authored by Professor Paul Webb, University of Sussex, and Dr Monica Poletti, QMUL.

War guilt, Blair and the Chilcot Inquiry blog Blog: War guilt, Blair and the Chilcot Inquiry
12 July 2016

While the Chilcot Report does not accuse Tony Blair of war guilt for Iraq, his responsibility for the war and its consequences is in question. In this blog post, Dr James Ellison, of QMUL's School of History and the Mile End Institute, reflects on the historical significance of the Iraq Inquiry and whether Blair should be blamed.

What does the Tory grassroots want from Prime Minister May? blog Blog: What does the Tory grassroots want from Prime Minister May?
11 July 2016

Theresa May has secured her place as Prime Minister and leader of the Conservatives without having to win the direct approval of her party’s membership. Professor Tim Bale discusses in The Conversation what this means for Tory support for the stability and direction of the government that May will lead.

Return of the town hall: will Brexit bring British democracy closer to the people? blog Blog: Return of the town hall: will Brexit bring British democracy closer to the people?
8 July 2016

Brexit may reshape the UK's political geography - locally as well as internationally, according to Professor Jane Wills. "When people are encouraged to take back control, they need access to the political institutions that might allow this to happen."

Corbyn's Labour: Survey of post-2015 Labour members and supporters blog Blog: Corbyn's Labour: Survey of post-2015 Labour members and supporters
28 June 2016

Professor Tim Bale examines the results of a YouGov survey of 2026 members and supporters who joined the Labour Party after May 2015.  

Profile: The Cameron Illusion blog Blog: Profile: The Cameron Illusion
27 June 2016

As David Cameron's period at the summit of UK politics draws to a dramatic close, historian Dr Robert Saunders profiles the elusive prime minister. 

Brexit: Where now for Britain? blog Blog: Brexit: Where now for Britain?
24 June 2016

Dr Paul Copeland, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy at QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations, considers the next steps for post-Brexit Britain. 

The idea that English nationalism has powered support for Brexit is unduly simplistic and requires re-examination blog Blog: The idea that English nationalism has powered support for Brexit is unduly simplistic and requires re-examination
23 June 2016

English sentiment has been important to the tenor and character of the Vote Leave campaign, but Michael Kenny writes there are reasons to be sceptical that English nationalism has had a clear, causal role in the EU Referendum. He asks whether the picture of the ‘two Englands’ – one progressive and cosmopolitan, the other populist and nationalist – draws too sharp a distinction between them, and in doing so underplays the extent to which fears about cultural identity, inequality and immigration are shared in very different kinds of places and communities.

Rewriting their fate: how the world’s ‘invisible’ widows are fighting prejudice blog Blog: Rewriting their fate: how the world’s ‘invisible’ widows are fighting prejudice
22 June 2016

Suzy Solley, PhD Candidate at QMUL's School of Geography, writes about the discrimination faced by widows in many parts of the world. 

QMUL 'Cracking Law' Podcast: EU Law and Brexit blog Blog: QMUL 'Cracking Law' Podcast: EU Law and Brexit
22 June 2016

The 'Cracking Law' podcast is produced by expert researchers from QMUL's School of Law. The first episode focuses on European Union law, and episode two looks at Brexit. 

How much radiation damage do astronauts really suffer in space? blog Blog: How much radiation damage do astronauts really suffer in space?
16 June 2016

Space is an inhospitable place to live – there’s no breathable air, microgravity wastes away your bones and muscles and you’re subjected to increased doses of radiation in the form of high-energy charged particles. These can cause damage to the cells in your body by breaking up the atoms and molecules that they’re made of. Dr Martin Archer discusses in The Conversation how much radiation an astronaut on the International Space Station is exposed to and the effects.

What was the chance of Ferris Bueller being caught on his day off? blog Blog: What was the chance of Ferris Bueller being caught on his day off?
10 June 2016

In the classic 1980s movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary, the title character spent his day off gallivanting around Chicago, seeing the sights and even hijacking a parade. Unlike the super-confident Ferris, most of us would probably worry about getting caught if we skived off like that. But is that fear really justified, Dr Martin Archer asks in The Conversation

Labour in meltdown – but what is antisemitism? blog Blog: Labour in meltdown – but what is antisemitism?
4 May 2016

Eric Henize, Professor of Law and Humanities, considers the crisis facing the British Labour Party, and asks - what is antisemitism?

The challenges of working life in an era of individual of legal rights blog Blog: The challenges of working life in an era of individual of legal rights
28 April 2016

Lizzie Barmes is Professor of Labour Law at Queen Mary University of London. She is author of Bullying and Behavioural Conflict at Work, recently published by Oxford University Press.

Demolition: a confused film about confusing emotions blog Blog: Demolition: a confused film about confusing emotions
28 April 2016

Chris Millard, Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Research Fellow, reviews the film Demolition (2015) in the context of his work as a historian of the emotions.  

Government pro-Europe leaflet didn’t swing voters in 1975 – and probably won’t in 2016 blog Blog: Government pro-Europe leaflet didn’t swing voters in 1975 – and probably won’t in 2016
18 April 2016

It might have cost £9.3 million, but will the government's EU leaflet sway many voters? Lindsay Aqui, Phd Candidate, at Queen Mary University of London, looks back to the 1975 referendum and asks whether the experiences of the Wilson government hold lessons for today's campaigners. 

Why lightsabers would be far more lethal than George Lucas envisioned blog Blog: Why lightsabers would be far more lethal than George Lucas envisioned
4 April 2016

Research is an unpredictable process. Sometimes you end up making a really cool discovery that you didn’t see coming. Dr Martin Archer writes for The Conversation about the unexpected discovery he made about lightsabers while doing regular plasma physics research. If it could be created, would it be the most dangerous weapon ever created?

Solving Europe's energy crisis blog Blog: Solving Europe's energy crisis
29 March 2016

Europe imports more than half of the energy that it consumes, and its supply is vulnerable to regional instability and economic shocks. In a major new book, Professor Rafael Leal-Arcas, shows how the creation of a European Energy Union might be an effective and viable solution to the energy security problems that the European Union (EU) is facing.

How astronomers could find the ‘real’ planet Krypton blog Blog: How astronomers could find the ‘real’ planet Krypton
24 March 2016

The search for exoplanets, worlds orbiting stars other than our own, has become a major field of research in the last decade - with nearly 2000 planets discovered to date. Dr Martin Archer discusses in The Conversation, whether the quest for Earth-like planets is futile or fruitful.

Why Iain Duncan Smith resignation registers a six on the political Richter Scale blog Blog: Why Iain Duncan Smith resignation registers a six on the political Richter Scale
20 March 2016

If there were a Richter Scale of Political Resignations, then prime ministers such as Margaret Thatcher, Harold Wilson and Harold Macmillan would register at the very top – on nine, writes Professor Tim Bale in The Conversation. But where would other major Tory cabinet members scale…?

Why Britain is losing its taste for tea – and how hipsters could revive it blog Blog: Why Britain is losing its taste for tea – and how hipsters could revive it
18 February 2016

Britain is known as a nation of tea drinkers, but new statistics suggest that the love affair is fading. Professor Markman Ellis, co-author of Empire of Tea: the Asian Leaf that Conquered the World, considers the future of Britain's favourite brew. 

How British hostility to the EU contrasts with opposition elsewhere in Europe blog Blog: How British hostility to the EU contrasts with opposition elsewhere in Europe
19 January 2016

The UK’s referendum on EU membership may well be one of the main stories of 2016, with the British Prime Minister, David Cameron, recently suggesting that it could be held as early as the summer. Montserrat Guibernau writes on how we can conceive of Euroscepticism in both the UK and other EU countries.

Why frills put female dinosaurs in the mood for love blog Blog: Why frills put female dinosaurs in the mood for love
14 January 2016

Dr Rob Knell from QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences writes how large ornamental structures in dinosaurs, such as horns and head crests are likely to have been used in sexual displays and to assert social dominance, according to a new analysis of Protoceratops.  

This is the first time scientists have linked the function of anatomy to sexual selection in dinosaurs.

blog Blog: How to feed and raise a Wikipedia robo-editor
11 December 2015

Dr Mehrnoosh Sadrzadeh from QMUL's School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science looks at what it takes to teach an AI how to read natural human languages. 

Ada Lovelace and the importance of role models blog Blog: Ada Lovelace and the importance of role models
13 October 2015

To celebrate Ada Lovelace Day 2015, Professor Elaine Chew from QMUL's School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science argues about the importance of role models. After all, if computer pioneer Ada Lovelace had strong women role models even in her day, we must ensure women continue to do so today.  

The white privilege of British poetry is getting worse blog Blog: The white privilege of British poetry is getting worse
8 October 2015

Writing in The Conversation, Andrea Brady - Professor of Poetry at QMUL - criticises what she describes as the "structure of white privilege" in British poetry communities.

Notes from the Tory fringe, where everyone is playing nicely – for now blog Blog: Notes from the Tory fringe, where everyone is playing nicely – for now
6 October 2015

Professor Tim Bale went along to the Tory Party conference in Manchester, he describes it as  a curious mix of the nerdy, the nutty, the nasty, and the nice and normal in The Conversation.

Social media and health: a source of “patient voices” or just business? blog Blog: Social media and health: a source of “patient voices” or just business?
8 September 2015

Why does NHS and government policy neglect and ignore the value of online patient communities? QMUL researchers Dr Nelya Koteyko and Dr Daniel Hunt investigated this question as part of a major study on social media and living with chronic illness.

Bangkok bombing blame game speaks volumes about the state of Thai politics blog Blog: Bangkok bombing blame game speaks volumes about the state of Thai politics
19 August 2015

The Bangkok bomb killed 20 people, injured more than 100, and shook Thai politics, already turbulent, to its core. In this article, Dr Lee Jones, Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, argues: until concrete evidence is produced, we should avoid any rush to judgement, and take both speculation and assignations of blame with a truckload of salt.

Let there be light: understanding our body clocks blog Blog: Let there be light: understanding our body clocks
30 July 2015

Jet-lagged after a long flight? Exhausted after a week of night shifts? The vagaries of the human body clock affect everything from the quality of our sleep to how quickly we adjust to a new time zone. This post is based on a series of interviews with Professor Josephine Arendt, who transformed our understanding of how our body clocks respond to light and melatonin.

Inside Out and the democracy of the modern mind blog Blog: Inside Out and the democracy of the modern mind
29 July 2015

Dr Thomas Dixon, Director of QMUL's Centre for the History of the Emotions, reviews Disney Pixar's Inside Out.

Canny Chancellor co-opts the living wage blog Blog: Canny Chancellor co-opts the living wage
13 July 2015

In this post, Professor Jane Wills considers the implications of the Chanellor's 'co-option' of the living wage.

The ‘quality’ paradox: Quality in healthcare is crucial but it’s time to rethink it blog Blog: The ‘quality’ paradox: Quality in healthcare is crucial but it’s time to rethink it
19 June 2015

We all want a quality health service – but what does this really mean? What does quality in healthcare really look like? Dr Deborah Swinglehurst has been exploring this idea for several years, curious to find out what academics, opinion leaders, healthcare professionals and members of the public really understand by the term ‘quality’ in the healthcare context.  

Showcase of world’s best science teaching arrives at Queen Mary University of London Showcase of world’s best science teaching arrives at Queen Mary University of London
19 June 2015

The Science on Stage Europe festival which brings some of the best science teachers from around the world together to demonstrate their teaching and share ideas is underway at QMUL.

Think you're just a face in the crowd? Not necessarily blog Blog: Think you're just a face in the crowd? Not necessarily
19 June 2015

In this article, Professor Julia Hörnle, of QMUL's School of Law, considers the impact and rapid development of face recognition techniques on privacy. 

Can the European Parliament save us from TTIP? blog Blog: Can the European Parliament save us from TTIP?
15 June 2015

In this article, Sam Fowles, researcher in international law and politics at Queen Mary University of London, asks whether the European Parliament will 'save us' from the controversial Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

Britain’s oldest tea (and first modern commodity) blog Blog: Britain’s oldest tea (and first modern commodity)
3 June 2015

Dr Richard Coulton, based at QMUL's School of English and Drama, reflects on the discovery of Britain's oldest tea. Dr Coulton is one of three authors of a forthcoming book, Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf that Conquered the World.

Mini-megalomaniac AI is already all around us, but it won’t get further without our help blog Blog: Mini-megalomaniac AI is already all around us, but it won’t get further without our help
2 June 2015

Professor Peter McOwan, from the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, discusses  whether artificial intelligences would actually be able to take over the world, whether they’d want to, and how we'd know if they did.

TTIP and CETA: the trade deals threatening British democracy blog Blog: TTIP and CETA: the trade deals threatening British democracy
21 May 2015

In this post, Sam Fowles, postgraduate research student at QMUL's School of Law, argues that the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a threat to British democracy, and should not be ratified. 

How we discovered the three revolutions of American pop blog Blog: How we discovered the three revolutions of American pop
20 May 2015

Dr Matthias Mauch discusses his recent scientific analysis of the “fossil record” of the Billboard charts prompted widespread attention, particularly the findings about the three musical “revolutions” that shaped the musical landscape of the second half of the 20th century.

Dressing down the rabbit hole – how to become Alice in Wonderland blog Blog: Dressing down the rabbit hole – how to become Alice in Wonderland
29 April 2015

From 2 May to 9 November, QMUL's Dr Kiera Vaclavik will curate 'The Alice Look', an exhibition at the V&A Museum of Childhood. In this article, Dr Vaclavik considers the impact of Lewis Carroll's famous heroine on the way that we dress.

More than just a game: Interactive entertainment and intellectual property law blog Blog: More than just a game: Interactive entertainment and intellectual property law
27 April 2015

On 24 April 2015, QMUL's Centre for Commercial Law Studies convened a group of legal experts to consider and examine issues around gaming an intellectual property law. In this article, Dr Gaetano Dimita, Lecturer in International Intellectual Property Law, sets out the many legal challenges that emerge from this growing and dynamic sector. 

Why Not Nudge? blog Blog: Why Not Nudge?
23 April 2015

Dr Magda Osman, Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cognitive Psychology explores the research behind behavioural economics and looks at its relationship with advertising

Racial income inequality reduces levels of trust and social capital in communities blog Blog: Racial income inequality reduces levels of trust and social capital in communities
30 March 2015

In recent decades, commentators and academics have become increasingly concerned over the decline in both trust and social capital in many communities in the United States. While research has shown that race and income diversity tends to be associated with lower levels of social capital, Andrea Tesei takes a closer look, examining the relationship between trust, income inequality and racial diversity.

On the margins of terror: Daesh and the new geography of hate in Sinai blog Blog: On the margins of terror: Daesh and the new geography of hate in Sinai
25 March 2015

Jessica Jacobs, Research Fellow at QMUL's School of Geography, argues that the systematic neglect of border regions by military-backed governments in the Middle East has enabled the success of extreme terrorist groups in these marginalised areas, resulting in "geographies of hate".

Number-crunching Higgs boson: meet the world's largest distributed computer grid blog Blog: Number-crunching Higgs boson: meet the world's largest distributed computer grid
24 March 2015

In an article which originally appeared on The Conversation, Dr Tom Whyntie explains how the world's largest distributed computer grid helped find the Higgs boson and what it'll be doing as the Large Hadron Collider is started up again.

Gender-blind global health institutions ignore misery for women in Ebola-affected regions blog Blog: Gender-blind global health institutions ignore misery for women in Ebola-affected regions
23 March 2015

On the one year anniversary of the Ebola outbreak, Dr Sophie Harman - Reader in International Relations at QMUL - explores the devastating impact on women in affected regions.  

Should Shakespeare be censored for sensitive times? blog Blog: Should Shakespeare be censored for sensitive times?
4 March 2015

Should the works of Shakespeare’s plays be censored where there is a risk of offence? In this article, Dr Preti Taneja, Global Shakespeare Research Fellow, considers the issues.

The economic consequences of the Greek crisis blog Blog: The economic consequences of the Greek crisis
27 February 2015

In this article, co-author Professor Brigitte Granville - School of Business and Management at QMUL - contends that default and exit from the eurozone would allow Greece to begin correcting past mistakes, and put its economy on the path to recovery and sustainable growth.

How music listening programs can be easily fooled blog Blog: How music listening programs can be easily fooled
25 February 2015

In this blog post, QMUL Lecturer in Digital Media Bob L. Sturm discusses how, like 'Clever Hans' the German horse who appeared to be able to do complex mathematics, music listening programs can appear to work until we start to really test them.

Tobacco Industry's spurious claims on plain packaging must be challenged blog Blog: Tobacco Industry's spurious claims on plain packaging must be challenged
23 February 2015

In this letter, published in the Law Society Gazette, QMUL's Jonathan Griffiths challenges "undue pessimism" about the UK’s imminent legislation on plain packaging. 

Passenger tracking in the EU will be as invasive as it is in the US blog Blog: Passenger tracking in the EU will be as invasive as it is in the US
30 January 2015

In this comment article, Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas - head of QMUL's Department of Law - considers the implications of the increasingly heated debate around the collection and retention of information from air passengers. 

Syriza lead the polls in Greece but coalition options remain unclear blog Blog: Syriza lead the polls in Greece but coalition options remain unclear
20 January 2015

Greece will hold parliamentary elections on 25 January. Ahead of the vote, Dr Stella Ladi writes on the state of play in the Greek party system. She notes that while the radical left party Syriza currently enjoys a lead in the polls, there is debate over who its most likely coalition partners would be should it fail to secure a majority.

Torture Allegations, Racial Conflicts…and Leadership on Human Rights? blog Blog: Torture Allegations, Racial Conflicts…and Leadership on Human Rights?
2 January 2015

In this article, Professor Eric Heinze of QMUL's School of Law, argues that the United States, whose government has "has committed grave violations" in the area of human rights, has placed its leadership role in question.

William Hague's plans could be highly contentious, but it's time to address the English question blog Blog: William Hague's plans could be highly contentious, but it's time to address the English question
16 December 2014

Professor Michael Kenny, Director of the Mile End Institute, says there is an increasingly compelling, precautionary case for constitutional reform - but William Hague's "hard" plans aren't positive or carefully calibrated enough.

Syphilis sailed the ocean blue: why a bent femur won’t overturn Columbus theory blog Blog: Syphilis sailed the ocean blue: why a bent femur won’t overturn Columbus theory
11 December 2014

Following recent dispute over its origins in Europe, Dr Rob Knell from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences explains why he is yet to be convinced by any alternative to the theory that Columbus brought syphilis across the Atlantic.

Ukip's sexual harassment row rumbles on, but it's not the only party failing women blog Blog: Ukip's sexual harassment row rumbles on, but it's not the only party failing women
10 December 2014

It's been a bad week for Ukip, but according to QMUL's Dr Rainbow Murrary, it's not the only party failing women.

On immigration, the The Tories should stop following and start leading blog Blog: On immigration, the The Tories should stop following and start leading
10 December 2014

Tim Bale, Professor of Politics at Queen Mary University of London, delivers a warning to the Conservative Party about the likely effects of an increasingly reactive policy on immigration. 

Syria: The view from Moscow blog Blog: Syria: The view from Moscow
10 December 2014

QMUL's Dr Christopher Phillips argues that despite a weaker economy and the domestic threat of ISIS, Moscow is unlikely to change course on Syria.

Professor Iwan Williams on his role in the Rosetta comet mission blog Blog: Professor Iwan Williams on his role in the Rosetta comet mission
4 December 2014

The world was enraptured last month as the Rosetta mission’s Philae lander made its historic landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. QMUL’s Professor Iwan Williams had more reason than most to be interested, as he was one of a team of investigators working the CONSERT instrument that is part of the mission. Here he explains what CONSERT is trying to find out and how it took on a vital new function after the landing.

Our groaning global energy system leaves us all vulnerable blog Blog: Our groaning global energy system leaves us all vulnerable
4 December 2014

In this article, Rafael Leal-Arcas, of QMUL’s Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS), argues that our system of global energy governance is ad hoc and in need of reform.

François Hollande’s Tartuffe Syndrome blog Blog: François Hollande’s Tartuffe Syndrome
3 December 2014

In a joint article with Hans-Olaf Henkel, QMUL’s Professor Brigitte Granville analyses the mounting woes of François Hollande’s beleaguered presidency.

Romanian presidential elections may signal a break from the past blog Blog: Romanian presidential elections may signal a break from the past
20 November 2014 QMUL's Marius Ionut Calu analyses the impact of last week's Romanian elections, and suggests that the surprise result may be indicative of a changing society and maturing democracy.
Why Labour should think culturally as well as economically about immigration blog Blog: Why Labour should think culturally as well as economically about immigration
19 November 2014

According to Professor Tim Bale, Ed Miliband can avoid a damaging split between his party's 'beer drinkers' and 'wine drinkers' on immigration - but he shouldn't rely solely on economic arguments.

Politicisation of the European Arrest Warrant is dangerous and unnecessary blog Blog: Politicisation of the European Arrest Warrant is dangerous and unnecessary
12 November 2014

Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas argues that we need clarity on the European Arrest Warrant so that this logical and useful legal instrument does not fall victim to an emotive political bun fight.

Death of President Michael Sata leaves Zambia with a constitutional conundrum blog Blog: Death of President Michael Sata leaves Zambia with a constitutional conundrum
5 November 2014

Dr Clive Gabay, specialist in African politics and Senior Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London, analyses events in Zambia following the death of President Michael Sata.

Norman Baker's resignation and the future of the coalition blog Blog: Norman Baker's resignation and the future of the coalition
5 November 2014

Emma Sanderson-Nash, Lecturer in Politics at Queen Mary University of London, argues that Norman Baker's resignation tells us more about the man that it does about the health of the coalition. 

European Union must now support Ukraine’s fragile democracy blog Blog: European Union must now support Ukraine’s fragile democracy
28 October 2014

Initial results from Ukraine’s parliamentary elections have thrown down a challenge to the European Union, according to Russia expert and QMUL Research Fellow Dr Eleanor Bindman.

Economic and social future of Ukraine hangs in the balance blog Blog: Economic and social future of Ukraine hangs in the balance
24 October 2014

As the nation prepares to elect a new parliament on 26 October, Dr Eleanor Bindman, specialist in Russian politics and Research Fellow at QMUL’s School of Politics and International Relations, looks at what might lie ahead for the region.

blog Blog: Ebola: West Africa is facing a humanitarian crisis of extraordinary proportions
24 October 2014

Professor Allyson Pollock replies to questions on the Ebola crisis – originally asked prior to the BBC Politics show on 19 October

Belgrade 2014: Pride, prejudice and European politics blog Blog: Belgrade 2014: Pride, prejudice and European politics
2 October 2014

Koen Slootmaeckers, PhD candidate at Queen Mary University of London, writes about Sunday's LGBT Pride parade in Belgrade, and explores the implications for Serbian politics and the county's path to the EU.

London’s high-rise dreams blog Blog: London’s high-rise dreams
1 October 2014

Dr Richard Baxter critiques the ongoing public debate about the UK high-rise and argues that the environment has still not been fully explored

Sarkozy's return is bound to deepen divisions within the UMP blog Blog: Sarkozy's return is bound to deepen divisions within the UMP
1 October 2014

It’s 32 months until the French presidential elections in 2017 and former president Nicolas Sarkozy's return to centre stage promises to make French politics a lively affair in the meantime.

Tunisia’s forthcoming elections: transition to democracy is at risk and arms sales won’t help blog Blog: Tunisia’s forthcoming elections: transition to democracy is at risk and arms sales won’t help
25 September 2014

Dr Sarah Wolff explains how, with presidential and legislative elections on the horizon, and mounting geopolitical chaos and insecurity, Tunisia feels that Europe and America is “leaving it in the lurch” at a critical time.

Power, royalty and the smile revolution blog Blog: Power, royalty and the smile revolution
24 September 2014

What's in a smile? Colin Jones, Professor of History at Queen Mary University of London, writes about royal teeth, power, and the smile revolution.

Britain's constitutional crisis moves from acute to severe blog Blog: Britain's constitutional crisis moves from acute to severe
19 September 2014

Dr Robert Saunders, Lecturer in Modern British History at Queen Mary University of London, argues that promises made in the final weeks of the campaign may result in a political hangover for David Cameron and his government.

We are all sweet enough; it’s time for less sugar now blog Blog: We are all sweet enough; it’s time for less sugar now
18 September 2014

Katharine Jenner, Lecturer in Nutrition and Public Health at QMUL, asks - should we be eating sugar at all?

A Yes vote would see the UK civil service face its biggest test since 1922 blog Blog: A Yes vote would see the UK civil service face its biggest test since 1922
18 September 2014

Professor Perri 6 from QMUL's School of Business and Management explores the implications for civil servants and the national interest in the event of a Yes vote in the Scottish referendum.

False memories could be a side-effect of human ability to learn rules False memories could be a side-effect of human ability to learn rules
18 September 2014

Our tendency to create false memories could be related to our ability to learn rules according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

UN managerialism should not stifle the voices of the poor blog Blog: UN managerialism should not stifle the voices of the poor
11 September 2014

Dr Clive Gabay, Senior Lecturer in politics at Queen Mary University of London, looks ahead to the expiration of the Millennium Development goals and asks if we're destined to repeat the same mistakes.

Ebola and West Africa: where did all the development money go? blog Blog: Ebola and West Africa: where did all the development money go?
11 September 2014

Dr Sophie Harman argues that while the inadequate international response has compounded the Ebola crisis, it is the region’s chronically weak and desperately resourced health infrastructure which is the critical factor.

More women into construction? Olympic Park project shows the way blog Blog: More women into construction? Olympic Park project shows the way
9 September 2014

Dr Tessa Wright, Senior Lecturer from QMUL's School of Business and Management, reflects on the success of the Women into Construction project.

Politics: It’s time to talk about quotas for men blog Blog: Politics: It’s time to talk about quotas for men
18 August 2014

Dr Rainbow Murray of QMUL's School of Politics and International Relations argues that it is time to "reframe gender quotas as quotas for men."

blog Blog: What next for Boris Johnson and the Conservative Party?
7 August 2014

Professor Tim Bale reflects on Boris Johnson’s planned return to the House of Commons, and asks if he has what it takes to make it to the top.

Google Glass in the operating theatre blog Blog: Google Glass in the operating theatre
11 July 2014

By Shafi Ahmed, Associate Dean at Queen Mary University of London and Colorectal Cancer Lead at Barts Health NHS Trust

How does online dispute resolution empower consumers? blog Blog: How does online dispute resolution empower consumers?
16 June 2014

Online dispute resolution (ODR) offers an invaluable means of access to justice for consumers who have a dispute with a business, but are deterred by the costs and barriers involved from going to court.

Rwanda - The Politics of Success, Silence and Genocide Leverage blog Blog: Rwanda - The Politics of Success, Silence and Genocide Leverage
17 April 2014

In the aftermath of the 1994 genocide, Rwanda has wisely used international aid to transform its infrastructure and economy. But how far is progress being marred by its oppressive political regime?

World War II symbolism runs deep in Ukraine-Russia standoff blog Blog: World War II symbolism runs deep in Ukraine-Russia standoff
14 March 2014

Many of the images of pro-Russian demonstrators in Ukraine, from Crimea to Donetsk, have shown them wearing black-and-orange-striped ribbons. The symbolism here is opaque to most Western observers, it is the “George Ribbon”, from a Tsarist-era medal for bravery that was reinstated under a different name following the battle of Stalingrad in 1943.

Are Tory activists weeding out 'moderate' MPs? blog Blog: Are Tory activists weeding out 'moderate' MPs?
11 March 2014

When two Conservative MPs were deselected in rapid succession by their local constituency associations, it marked to some a welcome assertion of grassroots rights and power.  To others, it was no such thing.

Searching for patterns is essential for our survival blog Blog: Searching for patterns is essential for our survival
10 March 2014

Iconic musicians like Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, Janis Joplin and Amy Winehouse all died at the age of 27. Why do we read into these random instances as patterns?

The Tories should stop their silly games about a second coalition blog Blog: The Tories should stop their silly games about a second coalition
6 March 2014

Tactically, strategically and constitutionally, it's utter madness for the Prime Minister to rule out another coalition, says Tim Bale.

What does canine anatomy have to do with clinical trials? blog Blog: What does canine anatomy have to do with clinical trials?
4 March 2014

Queen Mary academics Dr Richard Hooper and Dr Liam Bourke put a new twist on a classic research design.

Who is watching the watchers? blog Blog: Who is watching the watchers?
12 February 2014

We are being watched. Our movements and activity tracked. Our data is being traded behind the scenes, changing hands many times without our knowledge.

Rights against democracy - recalling International Human Rights Day blog Blog: Rights against democracy - recalling International Human Rights Day
10 December 2013

The 10 December is International Human Rights Day, an event first celebrated 65 years ago. In this blog post, Professor of Law, Eric Heinze gives an insightful look into how human 'rights' have progressed over the centuries.

Turner Prize: What can cognitive scientists tell us about art? blog Blog: Turner Prize: What can cognitive scientists tell us about art?
6 December 2013 How do people make sense of Tuner Prize nominee Tino Sehgal's These Associations? And what can cognitive scientists learn from the way they do it?
New findings could tackle over-diagnosis and over-treatment of breast cancer New findings could tackle over-diagnosis and over-treatment of breast cancer
3 December 2013

New research from Queen Mary University of London has revealed, for the first time, the molecule αvβ6 (alpha v beta 6) could tell doctors which cases of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), a condition where non-invasive cancerous cells are contained within the milk ducts of the breast, are most likely to develop into early ‘invasive’ breast cancer.

blog Blog: What was the point of the party conferences?
2 October 2013

Tim Bale, a professor in politics, ponders whether party conferences are still relevant today.

Policy making in and out of power: a dozen lessons blog Blog: Policy making in and out of power: a dozen lessons
2 July 2013 A blog post by Professor Tim Bale: At an event last week co-organised by the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University of London and kindly hosted by Jon Cruddas MP, who is in charge of Labour’s Policy Review, an audience gathered in the House of Commons to hear from three experienced policy people from across the party spectrum: James O’Shaughnessy (Director of the Conservative Research Department, 2007-10 and Director of Policy to the Prime Minister, 2010-2011), Polly Mackenzie (Senior Strategy Adviser to the Deputy Prime Minister since 2010 before which she was in charge of policy for the Lib Dems), and Nick Pearce (currently Director of the IPPR, formerly Head of the Number Ten Policy Unit, 2008-10).
Identity Politics in Your Wallet blog Blog: Identity Politics in Your Wallet
26 June 2013

The Bank of England has come under storm for featuring too few women on its banknotes. Why not abandon the Great Britons approach altogether, argues Dr Helen McCarthy, lecturer in history.

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