4.30 - 9.30pm Friday 23 September 2011

Meet with artists, researchers and academics
Join in with the interactive Science Show
Make a lego universe
Listen to the beat of their own drum
Enjoy transforming lives
Walk in the shoes of an Olympian

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Explore the future being created on your doorstep in an evening full of surprise and wonder

When you meet us on Friday, 23 September...

Mile End

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*Please note: booking is NOT required at the Mile End campus.

On arrival at the Mile End campus visitors can go to an information point at:
1. ArtsOne, Westfield Way, or
2. The Queens' Building - Mile End Road

Hosts will be there to guide you and maps will be available at several points throughout the campus. For further information contact Rose Sharp on 020 7882 2851 or r.sharp@qmul.ac.uk

Refreshments are available from 3pm to 8.30pm at the Ground coffee bar and at the Drapers bar.

Artificial Audience Interaction

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: Engineering building
Researchers:
Professor Pat Healey, Arash Eshghi

Interact with an audience of life-size avatars.

Building on work on street performance carried out by IMC we will create an artificial "audience" of life-size avatars that respond directly to participant behaviour. We will use this to illustrate the effects of mass interaction and 'emotional contagion'; in particular, how people react to being observed by audiences who respond to their movements with patterns of behaviour designed to accentuate and potentially subvert those responses.

Chat Tool

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: Engineering building
Researchers:
Professor Pat Healey, Christine Howes, Arash Eshghi

Test your communication skill.

We will demonstrate an experimental instant-messaging chat tool that (unknown to you) changes and manipulates what you say as you type it. This tool, developed by IMC, makes it possible, for the first time, to carry out systematic, experimental manipulations of live, open-ended dialogue. People will use the tool to chat with each other, while we carry out selective manipulations that aim to enhance or impede people's communication while testing whether they can spot the artificial interventions.

Wheel of Fortune

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: Engineering building
Researchers:
Matthew Purver, Stuart Battersby

Track your emotions in real time on Twitter.

A social media game/experiment allowing people to use Twitter to contribute to a discussion around a given theme. The results will be automatically analysed for the themes and opinions which emerge, the emotional content, agreement/disagreement etc, and visualised on a public screen.

Physiological measurements

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: Human Performance Lab, Bancroft Road
Researchers:
Dr Dylan Morrissey, Stephanie Hemmings & Richard Twycross

Assessments of human performance and health-related fitness tests with the Human Performance Laboratory. Walk in the shoes of an Olympic sports person: experience tests undergone by the Olympians such as pulmonary gas exchange etc.

Sodarace

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: Engineering building
Researchers:
Professor Peter W. McOwan

Explore Artificial Intelligence research as you complete and co-operate with the machine to build the best virtual races to win the game using a BAFTA winning project.

Computer Science Magic Show

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: ArtsTwo foyer
Researchers:
Professor Peter W. McOwan

Explore behind the scenes of some amazing magic tricks and discover the computer science that makes them work. See how the ideas that can fool the audience can also help researchers build safer software for hospitals.

To the beat of their own drum

Time: 4 - 4.30pm
Site: Library Square
Researchers:
Sylvan Baker

Experience the energizing and inspirational power of the arts as you learn drumming skills from a group of young people. 30 mins drumming performance from Peoples Palace Projects.

Transforming Lives

Time: 5 - 5.45pm
Site: Pinter Studio, ArtsOne
Researchers:
Professor Paul Heritage

Come and get involved in a mash up of arts, cutting edge technology and real life experiences of the young video jockeys who perform. 30 mins 'open workshop Lab style' by Lawnmowers Encounters group

Embodied Emotions

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: ArtsTwo studio
Researchers:
Senior Lecturer Ali Campbell

Presentation as part of the Beyond Text programme (Films) led by schoolchildren, bringing together historians, performers, educators, and children to investigate how bodily movements mediate between inward feelings and the outside world.

LEGO Universe

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: ArtsTwo front foyer
Researchers:
Dr Ben Still and other members of the Particle Physics Research Centre

From the initial soup of particles at the beginning of time, we use LEGO blocks to explore the history of the universe. Starting with blocks representing the most basic particles - quarks - build protons and neutrons, then use the fusion techniques within stars to create different types of atoms, as we guide you through the process of building a universe. As the fair goes on, help us create more and more elements. After this, explore planet formation by helping to build a planet, before travelling to the end of the universe, to decide how it all ends...

Facility Tour of the Media Arts Technology Studio

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: Media Arts Technology Studio
Researchers:
Professor Pat Healey

Part of a strategic initiative, funded by Research Councils UK for interaction design and digital media processing, production and recording techniques and optional specialist modules ranging from Digital Audio Effects through Digital Rights Management to Contemporary Performance.

Facility Tour of the Antenna Measurement Labs

Time: from 4pm
Site: Media Arts Technology Studio
Researchers:
Akram Alomainy

The Group's philosophy in antenna design has always been high quality electromagnetic modeling supported by high quality measurements and over its 40 year history it has built an extensive Antenna Measurement laboratory (AML) which now covers the frequency band 500MHz to 345 GHz. Supported by three full-time technical staff: Dr. Dubrovka (CAD/CAM Antenna Engineering Manager, Mr. Dupuy (Lab Manager) and Mr. Tony Stone (workshop Manager), the facility is arguably one of the most comprehensive in a European University.

Cooperative Wireless Sensor Network for Healthcare and Performance Monitoring

Time: from 4pm
Site: Media Arts Technology Studio
Researchers:
Raffaele Di Bari and Max Munoz

The demonstrated system will be aware of the surrounding environment and neighbouring units and thus provide efficient and low power wireless connectivity for personal area network (PAN) and body area network (BAN) applications. The network will couple body parameter data such as ECG with the user's activity detection to provide a better understanding of the changes in health patterns and clear recommendations.

What can studying Animal vocalisations tell us about human Communication?

Time: 4.15 - 5pm
Site: ArtsOne Lecture Theatre
Researchers:
Dr. Alan McElligott, Biological and Experimental Psychology Group

A 30 minute talk about how studying vocal communication in mammals can lead us to a better understanding of vocal communication and language evolution in humans. This presentation will give a deeper insight into what is happening when an animal utters a call, and outline the similarities with what humans do.

Developing Cells

Time: 3.30pm - 8pm
Site: The Fogg Building
Researchers:
Rachel Ashworth and Caroline Brennan

Zebrafish embryos are transparent making it easier to follow the development of cells and organs using a microscope. This workshop will allow you to see (in amazing detail) the various stages of embryonic fish development. You will also have the opportunity to discuss some of the research going on in this area.

SUDOKU

Time: 4 - 4.30pm
Site: Mathematics Lecture Theatre, Mathematical Sciences Building
Researchers:
Professor Peter Cameron, School of Mathematical Sciences

Like them or loathe them, Sudoku puzzles are everywhere. But are they mathematics or are they just "logic and reasoning" as one national British newspaper suggested? All the ingredients of Sudoku had been developed by mathematical scientists long before the puzzle made its official appearance in 1979.This lecture will look at the mathematical origins of Sudoku.

Fairness in Networks

Time: 4.30 - 5pm
Site: Mathematics Lecture theatre, Mathematical Sciences Building
Researchers:
Dr. Rui Carvalho, School of Mathematical Sciences

How do you share resources fairly across a network of people, companies or countries? Transportation or energy networks carry the flow of information, energy or goods using routing rules that aim to be efficient and avoid congestion. What makes a good network, and how can we minimize problems such as congestion?

Listen to your Heart

Time: from 3.30pm
Site: ArtsOne Hitchcock Studio
Researchers:
Fabrizio Smeraldi

Put on the headphones and listen to your own heartbeat. The familiar lub-dub-transmitted as vibrations through your body – is amplified by the sensor, digitized and displayed as waves while you listen. Like all digital sound, your heartbeat can be encoded as an mp3 file.

The Real Matrix: How to Make Self-Replicating Machines that Can Take Over the World

Time: 7 - 8pm
Site: ArtsTwo Lecture Theatre
Researchers:
Dr. Chrisantha Fernando, Lecturer in Computer Science

Humans have been trying to make artificial self-replicating machines now for 60 years. Together we'll look at some of these machines. Some of them are just made of wood or plastic magnetic pucks on an air-hockey table, others are complex robots. We are still a long way from self-replicating machines that can find their own food, and can evolve by Darwinian natural selection, i.e./e/ survival of the fittest machines. The major limitation will be their dependency on us for their raw materials; in this sense they will be like viruses that utilise the metabolism of the cell for their own selfish ends. Do such machines already interact with our brains to encourage us to help them replicate. Do such machines already exist? What is certainly the case is that an important evolutionary step for self-replicating machines will be to break away from their dependency on human will, but this isn't likely to happen for some time. For now, all we have to do is switch them off at the mains.

Tube line and footsteps

Whitechapel

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*Please note: booking for events at the Whitechapel campus is essential due to capacity restrictions.

On arrival visitors will need to come to the Blizard reception for a brief introduction by the Centre of the Cell team. For further information on the event stated please contact Liz on 020 7882 2566 or liz@centreofthecell.org

Refreshments are available in the Nucleus Cafe from 3 - 8.30pm.

'Making Science Beautiful' workshop

Time: 3 - 4pm
Site: Garrod Building
Researchers:
TBC

This is a workshop that will show you the beauty of the microscopic world that is hidden to the naked eye. If you enjoy Science, Art or just getting creative you will love this workshop.

Book now

Pod Show

Time: 4 - 5pm
Site: Blizard Building
Researchers:
TBC

Come and see a show inside our 16-cell embryo-shaped pod, suspended over the laboratories of the Blizard Institute. Once inside, you will gather around a central 'nucleus' for a powerful audiovisual display, projected around the walls of the pod, which introduces cells - the building blocks of life. The nucleus opens to reveal touch-table games: you can try your hand at virtual experiments, heal extensive 'virtual' burns and even have your cells counted. You also get to see real body parts and diagnose cancer cells using high powered microscopes.

Book now

QMUL Café Scientifique

Time: 5 - 6pm
Site: Nucleus Cafe, Blizard Building
Researchers: TBC

Café Scientifique is an informal and fun evening event involving refreshments, short presentations from researchers and other activities such as a quiz or a creative challenge! It will be a chance for researchers and the public to meet each other in a relaxed setting, and to hear about and discuss some of the research going on within the university.

Two short talks:
Joe Parker (Biological & Chemical Sciences) - "Lend me your ears: exploring peculiar similarities in bat and whale hearing genes"
Ruth Saunders (Law) - "Direct-to-consumer Genetic Testing: individual empowerment or a risky investment?"

Book now

'Meet the Researchers'

Time: 5 - 6pm
Site: Blizard Building reception area
Researchers:
TBC

Researchers from the Blizard will be available to chat about their area of work with visitors in the Blizard reception.

No booking necessary.

The Big Question Lecture

Time: 6 - 7pm
Site: Blizard Building – Perrin lecture Theatre
Researchers:
Professor Mike Curtis

This lecture series gives you a chance to hear cell biology experts discuss their work and question them about it. The Autumn question is "'War of the Worlds' will we ever win the fight against bacteria?"

Book now

Pod Show

Time: 7 - 8pm
Site: Blizard Building
Researchers:
TBC

Come and see a show inside our 16-cell embryo-shaped pod, suspended over the laboratories of the Blizard Institute. Once inside, you will gather around a central 'nucleus' for a powerful audiovisual display, projected around the walls of the pod, which introduces cells - the building blocks of life. The nucleus opens to reveal touch-table games: you can try your hand at virtual experiments, heal extensive 'virtual' burns and even have your cells counted. You also get to see real body parts and diagnose cancer cells using high powered microscopes.

Book now

About the project

Blizard Building, Whitechapel campus

Queen Mary, University of London is pleased to be participating in the 2011 EU Researchers Night.

Researchers' Night is a Europe-wide event bringing together the public and researchers once a year on the fourth Friday of September to celebrate research and show how it helps improve people's lives.

This year it takes place on Friday 23 September 2011 and events will take place simultaneously in 500 different venues in over 30 countries.  Queen Mary, University of London is only one of four institutions in the UK who will be hosting a Researchers' Night.

Researchers' Night is an ideal opportunity to explore research facilities that are usually not open to the public, to try out state-of-the-art technology, to participate in experiments and to exchange ideas with researchers.

The other UK venues celebrating Researchers' Night in the UK are the University of Huddersfield, the Natural History Museum, and The University of Reading.

What to expect on the night...

The audience for the event is the public at large, regardless of age and scientific background. It addresses all curious minds from enthusiasts to science-reluctant and offers a variety of fascinating activities for all.

The mix of discovery and leisure activities (art, literature, music, gastronomy, sport) makes the success of the Researchers' Night, which offers an original alternative to more traditional Friday night activities.